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City of San Jose


Del Monte
ECOLOGICAL PROFILE
2014

MEASURING AND MAPPING SPATIOTEMPORAL TRENDS IN GEOPHYSICAL,


DEMOGRAPHIC, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, INFRASTRUCTURE, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND
INSTITUTIONAL SECTORS
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History of the City
During the Spanish colonial period, reduccion, which was the method of
relocating settlers towards the center of the Poblacion, was practiced in San Jose, Centro
Da Baloges. The practice was widely spread as part of the movement to spread
Catholicism to the remote areas of Bulacan. Therefore, in March 1750 a decree from the
Archbishop of Manila on the creation of new municipalities was announced in Lagulo
Church in Meycauayan; the decree included the list of families who volunteered to be
relocated. From being a visita of Meycauayan, San Jose Del Monte was thereafter founded
as a municipality on March 2, 1752. This reduccion from Meycauayan brought settlers to
the place where the occupants were previously only the Itas and Dumagats. The name of
the town was taken from San Jose Del Monte, a phrase that is a combination of the patron
saint of the town and “Del Monte”, which means “of the mountains. Further accounts of
the history of the town can be found in the work of Dr. Jaime Veneracion of the
Departamento ng Kasaysayan of the University of the Philippines Diliman.

The new municipality’s population, which was not exceeding 200 people,
belonged to the family of farmers and stonecutters of Libtong and Meycauayan. They
lived a simple lifestyle and raised fish, root crops, vegetables, fruits and other natural
products. These families brought with them rice, wine, nganga, and salt from Lagulo (now
Malhacan) in exchange for the wild pigs, deer, yantok and almasigan of the Itas and
Dumagats. Solares, including intended lots for main roads, were peacefully distributed to
the new occupants after being measured and surveyed.

Under the American regime in 1901, San Jose Del Monte (SJDM) was placed under
the political supervision of Sta. Maria, Bulacan due to the town’s lack of progress, peace,
and order. In 1903 Act 932 of the US-established Philippine Commission bolstered this
supervision. Then, in 1918, the town became an independent municipality with
Honorable Ciriaco Gallardo as the first Municipal Mayor.

The City had its share of violent historical events. The Japanese Imperial Army
took over the local government of San Jose del Monte from 1942-1943. In resistance
against the occupation of the Japanese, the population of the municipality formed its own
guerrilla unit. Also, during the latter parts of the Second World War, SJDM experienced
many casualties when the Americans bombed the Poblacion on January 11, 1945. This
was repeated on January 14, 1945. Years later, dissidents burned the Municipal Building
on October 10, 1950.

Further reorganizations inside the Municipality happened as the population grew


and as the system of national laws matured. The year 1961 marked the opening of the
first Government Resettlement Project, the Sapang Palay Resettlement Area, which
covered 752 hectares. In January 25, 1978, nine barangays were created under P.D. 1921.
With the passage of the new Local Government Code in 1991 came the reformulation of
equal wealth sharing between the national and local units and the realization of the
residents of having their own barangays. This move led to the creation of an additional 41
barangays under Provincial Ordinance promulgated by RA 337 in December 1991. The
reorganization and increasing population also induced changes in the executive and
legislative administration of the City as a whole. On September 10, 2000, SJDM was
proclaimed as a Component City under Republic Act No. 8797. Due to such event, it was
said to be the largest town in the whole province of Bulacan in terms of land area and
population. In addition, the City, also known as the “Balcony of the Metropolis”, was

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recorded as the first City in the province of Bulacan and recorded as the 86th City of the
Philippines. On December 18, 2003, the City of San Jose became the 1st Lone Congressional
District in Bulacan.

As the new millennium marches on, the population of the City registers a booming
population. It continues to grow as settlements mushroomed in strategic areas of the City
to catch the urbanization that is happening in the Greater Metro Manila region. Below is
a summary of key events in the history of the City.

March 2, 1752 Foundation Day of San Jose del Monte, Bulacan

1901 San Jose del Monte was under the political supervision of Sta. Maria

The town became an independent Municipality – Hon. Ciriaco Gallardo was the 1st Municipal
1918
Mayor

The guerilla movement of San Jose del Monte was formally attached to ECLGA under the
September 2, 1942
command of Major Edwin Ramsey

The Japanese Imperial Army had entrusted the Local Government of San Jose del Monte to
1942-1943
Mr. Paulo Capa as Chief of Police

Conference between Captain Joseph Barker and Major Feliciano Avanceña, organizer of the
Local Guerilla Unit, held at Gulong, Sto. Cristo, San Jose del Monte. In this conference, Major
August 1942
Feliciano Avanceña was formally attached to Manila Military District Area and was given the
rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

January 11, 1945 The bombing of the Poblacion by the Americans; casualty was about 500 civilians

January 14, 1945 Second bombing of the Poblacion

October 10, 1950 The burning of the Municipal Building by the dissidents

Opening of the 1st Government Resettlement Project – Sapang Palay Resettlement Area –
1961
covering 752 hectares

January 25, 1978 Creation of nine (9) Barangays under P.D. 1921

Creation of additional forty-one (41) Barangays under Provincial Ordinance promulgated by


December 1991
RA 337

September 10, 2000 San Jose del Monte became a Component City by virtue of R.A. No. 8797

San Jose del Monte became the 1st Lone Congressional District in Bulacan, by virtue of R.A.
December 18, 2003
No. 9230

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Table of Contents

History of the City............................................................................................................ iii


Table of Contents ............................................................................................................... v
LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................................... vii
LIST OF FIGURES ...............................................................................................................xi
1. GEOPHYSICAL SECTOR ............................................................................................1
1.1. GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION, ADMINISTRATIVE BOUNDARIES AND ACCESS
……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….1
1.2. TOPOGRAPHY .............................................................................................................. 1
1.3. GEOLOGY, GEOMORPHOLOGY, AND SOILS .......................................................... 3
1.3.1. Geology............................................................................................................................................. 3
1.3.2. Geomorphology............................................................................................................................ 3
1.3.3. Soils and Mineral Deposits ..................................................................................................... 5
1.4. FRESHWATER RESOURCES ...................................................................................... 6
1.5. CLIMATE ........................................................................................................................ 8
1.6. LAND USE ....................................................................................................................11
1.6.1. General land use ........................................................................................................................11
1.6.2. Urban Land Uses........................................................................................................................15
1.7. LAND CLASSIFICATION ...........................................................................................18
1.8. NATURAL AND GEOPHYSICAL HAZARDS ...........................................................18
2. DEMOGRAPHY......................................................................................................... 23
2.1. TOTAL POPULATION ...............................................................................................23
2.1.1. Barangay Population ...............................................................................................................23
2.1.2. Age-Sex Population ..................................................................................................................27
2.1.3. Level of Urbanization ..............................................................................................................30
2.1.4. Annual Average Population Growth Rates ...................................................................32
2.1.5. Household Population ............................................................................................................34
2.2. TOTAL POPULATION ...............................................................................................42
2.2.1. Population density....................................................................................................................42
2.3. POPULATION CHANGE ............................................................................................43
2.3.1. Historical Population Growth .............................................................................................43
2.3.2. Projected Annual Population...............................................................................................45
2.3.3. Migration .......................................................................................................................................46
3. SOCIAL SECTOR ...................................................................................................... 48
3.1. HEALTH AND SANITATION ....................................................................................48
3.1.1. Vital Statistics .............................................................................................................................48
3.1.2. Nutrition .......................................................................................................................................51
3.1.3. Fertility and Pregnancy .........................................................................................................51
3.2. Morbidity and Mortality .........................................................................................54
3.3. EDUCATION ................................................................................................................58
3.4. HOUSING .....................................................................................................................68
3.4.1. Occupancy ....................................................................................................................................68
3.5. SOCIAL PROTECTION ...............................................................................................81
3.6. PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY .................................................................................87
3.6.1. Crime Incidence.........................................................................................................................87
3.6.2. Fire Incidence .............................................................................................................................90
3.6.3. Disaster Risk Reduction and Management ..................................................................90
3.7. SPORTS AND RECREATION ....................................................................................91

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4. LOCAL ECONOMY ................................................................................................... 94
4.1. LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT ...................................................................................94
4.1.1. Economically Active Population ........................................................................................94
4.1.2. Employment ............................................................................................................................. 102
4.1.3. Unemployment ....................................................................................................................... 110
4.2. ECONOMIC STRUCTURE ....................................................................................... 113
4.2.1. Primary Sector ........................................................................................................................ 113
4.2.2. Local Business Pattern ........................................................................................................ 125
4.2.3. Tourism ...................................................................................................................................... 137
5. INFRASTRUCTURE ...............................................................................................142
5.1. ROADS, BRIDGES, AND LAND TRANSPORT .................................................... 142
5.1.1. Secondary Roads.................................................................................................................... 142
5.1.2. Provincial Roads .................................................................................................................... 147
5.1.3. City Roads.................................................................................................................................. 147
5.1.4. Barangay Roads ...................................................................................................................... 149
5.1.5. Bridges ........................................................................................................................................ 150
5.1.6. Land Transport ....................................................................................................................... 151
5.2. POWER AND ELECTRICITY ................................................................................. 155
5.3. WATER ...................................................................................................................... 157
5.3.1. Production ................................................................................................................................ 159
5.3.2. Processing ................................................................................................................................. 159
5.3.3. Distribution .............................................................................................................................. 159
5.3.4. Processing ................................................................................................................................. 160
5.3.5. Rates ............................................................................................................................................ 162
5.4. TELECOMMUNICATIONS...................................................................................... 163
5.5. CEMETERIES............................................................................................................ 163
6. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ..................................................................164
6.1. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ............................................................................... 164
6.1.1. Air Quality ................................................................................................................................ 164
6.1.2. Water Quality ......................................................................................................................... 166
6.2. WASTE MANAGEMENT ......................................................................................... 168
6.2.1. Solid Waste Management ................................................................................................. 168
6.2.2. Wastewater Management ................................................................................................ 173
7. GOVERNANCE .............................................................................................. 175
7.1. FISCAL MANAGEMENT, ORGANIZATION, AND DEVELOPMENT
ORGANIZATION .................................................................................................................... 175
7.1.1. Local Fiscal Management ................................................................................................. 175
7.1.2. Revenue Performance........................................................................................................ 176
7.1.3. Expenditure Performance................................................................................................ 183
7.1.4. Local Organizational Management .............................................................................. 188
7.1.5. Development Orientation and Public Participation ............................................ 194
References Official Publications..............................................................................202
References Reports, maps, pages, and other information from websites .204
Annex A Elected Officials .......................................................................................205
Annex B City Council Standing Committees ....................................................206
Annex C Barangay Officials ..................................................................................208
Annex D City Department Heads and Contact Details ..................................216

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LIST OF TABLES

Table Page

Table 1-1 The Distribution of Slope Classes and Areas across Barangays ............................. 2
Table 1-2 The Distribution of Slope Classes, Areas, Percent Distribution, and Crops/Vegetation
........................................................................................................................................ 5
Table 1-3 Projection of Temperature, Rainfall Change, and Frequency of Extreme Weather
Events for Bulacan and Other Provinces in Region 3 ............................................................ 9
Table 2-1 Total Population by Barangay (2000-2025) ......................................................... 24
Table 2-2 Highest and Lowest Population by Barangay ...................................................... 26
Table 2-3 Comparative Age-Sex Population of 2010 .......................................................... 27
Table 2-4 Dependency Ratios .......................................................................................... 28
Table 2-5 Voting Age Population ...................................................................................... 29
Table 2-6 City Urban-Rural Population .............................................................................. 30
Table 2-7 Urban Changes Over Time................................................................................ 31
Table 2-8 Number of Households by Barangay (2010) ....................................................... 34
Table 2-9 Number of Households by Sex of Household Head, Size, and Average Size ......... 35
Table 2-10 Educational Attainment by Age Group and Sex (2010) ....................................... 36
Table 2-11 Households by Age Group, Sex and Marital Status ............................................ 37
Table 2-12 Household Population in Bulacan by Religious Affiliation.................................... 38
Table 2-13 Bulacan Provincial Poverty Incidence ............................................................... 39
Table 2-14 2010 Household Poverty Incidence in San Jose Del Monte ................................ 40
Table 2-15 Ten Barangays with Lowest and Highest Population Density .............................. 42
Table 2-16 Historical Growth of Population in San Jose Del Monte ...................................... 43
Table 2-17 Migration Pattern ............................................................................................ 47
Table 3-1 General Health Situation in Region 3 (Rates per Thousand) ................................. 48
Table 3-2 General Health Situation of CSJDM ................................................................... 49
Table 3-3 Crude Birth Rate and Crude Death Rate for the Last Three Years ........................ 49
Table 3-4 Barangays with Lowest and Highest Number of Live Births .................................. 50
Table 3-5 Top Ten Barangays Ranked According to Access to Health Facility: Least Access
(left) Most Access (right) .................................................................................................. 50
Table 3-6 Weight Categories of Preschoolers in 2012 ........................................................ 51
Table 3-7 Top Five Barangays for Teenage Pregnancy ...................................................... 51
Table 3-8 Bottom Five Barangays for Teenage Pregnancy ................................................. 52
Table 3-9 Number of Types of Personnel in the City Health Centers (2013) .......................... 52
Table 3-10 Number of Midwives Assigned to Barangays (2013) .......................................... 53
Table 3-11 Annual Inventory of Key Health Personnel (2010-2013) ..................................... 53
Table 3-12 Service Backlog in Hospitals............................................................................ 54
Table 3-13 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity in Region 3 (2005) ......................................... 54
Table 3-14 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for the Last Three Years................................. 55
Table 3-15 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for 2011 ........................................................ 55
Table 3-16 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for 2012 ........................................................ 56
Table 3-17 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for 2013 ........................................................ 56
Table 3-18 Death Rates Other Death Types by Various Causes .......................................... 57
Table 3-19 Death Rates and Other Death Types by Various Causes (continued) .................. 57
Table 3-20 List of Private Hospitals ................................................................................... 57
Table 3-21 Ratios of Student to Teachers and Students to Classrooms by Level (2013-2014) 58
Table 3-22 Number of Private Schools (2012-2013) ........................................................... 58

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Table 3-23 Summary of the Status of Instructional Rooms for Government Elementary and
Secondary Schools ......................................................................................................... 59
Table 3-24 Teacher-Pupil/Student Ratio/Classroom Ratio ................................................... 59
Table 3-25 Percent Changes in Total Enrollment across Levels from 2013-2014 .................. 60
Table 3-26 Dropout Rate for Elementary School (2013-2014) ............................................. 60
Table 3-27 Dropout Rate for Secondary School (2013-2014) .............................................. 61
Table 3-28 Cohort Survival for Elementary School (2012-2013)........................................... 61
Table 3-29 Cohort Survival for Secondary School (2012-2013) ........................................... 61
Table 3-30 Performance Indicators (Public and Private)...................................................... 62
Table 3-31 Percentage and Number of Individuals per Level of Educational Attainment for
People Five Years and Over (2010) .................................................................................. 62
Table 3-32 Service Backlog for Teacher Requirement ........................................................ 63
Table 3-33 Service Backlog Classroom Requirement ......................................................... 63
Table 3-34 Day Care Centers and Enrollees ...................................................................... 64
Table 3-35 Literacy Rates across Levels of Education ........................................................ 64
Table 3-36 List of Public Elementary Schools .................................................................... 64
Table 3-37 List of Private Elementary Schools ................................................................... 65
Table 3-38 List of Public Secondary Schools ..................................................................... 66
Table 3-39 List of Private Secondary Schools .................................................................... 67
Table 3-40 Occupied Housing Units (1960-2010) ............................................................... 69
Table 3-41 Occupied Housing Units, Number of Households, Household Population, and Ratio
of Household and Household Population to Occupied Housing Units by Type of Building, and
City/Municipality (2010) ................................................................................................... 69
Table 3-42 Occupied Housing Units by Floor Area, Number of Occupants in Each Housing Unit
(2010) ............................................................................................................................ 69
Table 3-43 Occupied Housing Units by Construction Materials of the Outer Walls and Roof
(2010) ............................................................................................................................ 71
Table 3-44 Condition (state of repair) of Building (2010) ..................................................... 72
Table 3-45 Number of Households by Type of Building and the Tenure Status of the Lot (2010)
...................................................................................................................................... 73
Table 3-46 Replacement Rate and Lifespan of Housing Units in Central Luzon (2000-2010).. 74
Table 3-47 Cumulative Number of Subdivisions per Year ................................................... 74
Table 3-48 Percentage of Households Living in Makeshift Housing and Informal Settler
Households across Barangays (2011) ............................................................................... 75
Table 3-49 Informal Settlers Living in Danger Zone Areas ................................................... 76
Table 3-50 Resettlement Projects of NHA (2009-2015)....................................................... 76
Table 3-51 Housing Backlog (2010) .................................................................................. 77
Table 3-52 List of Subdivision .......................................................................................... 78
Table 3-53 Present Social Welfare Organization and Number of Types of Social Services
across Barangays ........................................................................................................... 82
Table 3-54 Number of Victims of Natural Disasters (2010-2012).......................................... 86
Table 3-55 Number of Clients per Type of Social Welfare and Development Program/Service
...................................................................................................................................... 86
Table 3-56 Victim Characteristics ..................................................................................... 88
Table 3-57 Protection Facilities (2008-2013) ...................................................................... 89
Table 3-58 Police Outpost/COMPAC Location ................................................................... 89
Table 3-59 Fire Personnel and Facilities (2008-2014) ......................................................... 90
Table 3-60 List of Sports and Recreational Facilities .......................................................... 91
Table 3-61 List of Covered and Open Courts in Barangays ................................................. 92
Table 4-1 Projected Working Age Population and Household Population (2007-2013)........... 95

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Table 4-2 Projected Working Age Population (2015-2025) ................................................ 102
Table 4-3 Labor Force (2008-2013) ................................................................................ 102
Table 4-4 Estimated Employment Percentage Rates ........................................................ 104
Table 4-5 Employment and Unemployment by Age Group ................................................ 105
Table 4-6 Estimated Number of Employed Persons by Highest Education Level ................. 107
Table 4-7 Employment Status as of 2014 ........................................................................ 109
Table 4-8 Minimum Wage Rates (Effective October 11, 2012)........................................... 109
Table 4-9 Placements and Referrals through PESO-CSJDM (2011-2013) .......................... 111
Table 4-10 Agricultural Land Converted by Barangay (2000-2012) .................................... 115
Table 4-11 Production of Other Major Crops .................................................................... 116
Table 4-12 Comparative Rice Yield by Ecosystem Type and Season (2006-2012) .............. 119
Table 4-13 2013 Drought-Prone Rice Production Areas .................................................... 121
Table 4-14 Irrigation Type by Barangay (2013) ................................................................ 122
Table 4-15 Change in Rice Production Area for Selected Years ........................................ 123
Table 4-16 Distribution of Farmers by Barangay and Ecosystem Type (2013) .................... 123
Table 4-17 2008 Livestock Production ............................................................................ 124
Table 4-18 2013 Aquaculture Areas ................................................................................ 125
Table 4-19 Summary of Local Industries in 2003, 2010-2013 ............................................ 128
Table 4-20 2013 Preliminary Level of Capitalization by Major Industry ............................... 129
Table 4-21 Philippine Standard Industry Classification (PSIC) Industry Codes .................... 133
Table 4-22 Relative Concentration of Industries ............................................................... 134
Table 4-23 Main Tourist Attractions and their Locations in the City .................................... 137
Table 4-24 Inventory of Tourism-Related Establishments ................................................. 138
Table 5-1 Inventory of Roads ......................................................................................... 143
Table 5-2 Summary of Provincial Roads in CSJDM .......................................................... 147
Table 5-3 City Road Inventory ........................................................................................ 148
Table 5-4 Barangay Road Inventory................................................................................ 149
Table 5-5 Summary of Bridges, Categories, Length, and Condition based on DPWH Atlas 2012
.................................................................................................................................... 150
Table 5-6 Summary of Bridges, Category, Capacity, and Length ....................................... 151
Table 5-7 Summary of Registered Jeepney Units and Respective Operators and Routes .... 152
Table 5-8 Summary of Registered Buses and Respective Operators and Routes ................ 153
Table 5-9 Summary of Land Transportations Plying in the City .......................................... 154
Table 5-10 Summary of MERALCO Customers, 2001 and 2012 ........................................ 155
Table 5-11 Summary Table of details with regard to Power and Electricity ......................... 156
Table 5-12 Locations and Extraction Rates of Pump Stations in the City ............................ 157
Table 5-13 Projection of Water Requirements as per NWRB and HLURB Standard (2012-2020)
.................................................................................................................................... 160
Table 5-14 Water Utility (Service Connections) 2013 ........................................................ 161
Table 5-15 Estimated Daily Average Water Consumption (2013-2020) .............................. 162
Table 5-16 Current Market Rates for Water (in Php) ......................................................... 162
Table 5-17 Telecommunication Providers in the City ........................................................ 163
Table 5-18 List of Cemeteries......................................................................................... 163
Table 6-1 Air Quality Monitoring Results for Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Valenzuela (2004-
2012) ........................................................................................................................... 165
Table 6-2 Estimated Electricity Consumption and CO2 Emission (2012-2020) .................... 165
Table 6-3 Monitoring Results for Angat River (2002-2005) ................................................ 166
Table 6-4 Monitoring Results per Station for Marilao River (2002-2004) ............................. 167
Table 6-5 Solid Waste Generated and Collected by Source, Method of Collection, and Disposal
(2012) .......................................................................................................................... 168

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Table 6-6 Estimated Solid Waste Generation and Service Gap Collection (2012-2020) ....... 169
Table 6-7 Solid Waste Management Facilities (2012) ....................................................... 171
Table 6-8 Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (2012) .............................................................. 172
Table 6-9 Estimated Daily Solid Waste Generated Against Daily Acceptance Rate (2012-2020)
.................................................................................................................................... 172
Table 6-10 Wastewater Generation by Source and Method of Disposal (2012) ................... 173
Table 6-11 Estimated Wastewater Generation from NWRB-based Water Requirements...... 174
Table 7-1 Comparative Account of Local Income Sources (2008-2012).............................. 178
Table 7-2 External Sources of Income (2008-2012) .......................................................... 180
Table 7-3 Actual IRA per Barangay (2010-2014) .............................................................. 181
Table 7-4 Local to External Income Source Ratio (2008-2012) .......................................... 182
Table 7-5 Scope of Expenditures by Sector ..................................................................... 185
Table 7-6 Annual Investment Plan 2013 and 2014 ........................................................... 188
Table 7-7 Staff Complement........................................................................................... 189
Table 7-8 Plantilla, Non-Plantilla and Job Order/COS Staff ............................................... 190
Table 7-9 Staff Distribution by Department and Sector ..................................................... 191
Table 7-10 Utilization of LDRRM Fund, September 2013 .................................................. 195
Table 7-11 List of Accredited NGOs ................................................................................ 197
Table 7-12 Number of HOAs by Barangay (2012) ............................................................ 201

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LIST OF FIGURES

Figure Page

Figure 1-1 A Climograph Showing Temperature and Precipitation Patterns throughout the Year
in the City ......................................................................................................................... 8
Figure 1-2 A Satellite Image of Land Uses in the City (Barangay boundaries in white, City
boundary in red) .............................................................................................................. 12
Figure 1-3 Pockets of Agricultural land In the Western half of the City (Mulawin and
surrounding areas) .......................................................................................................... 13
Figure 1-4 Agricultural areas in the Eastern side of the City (near San Isidro) ....................... 13
Figure 1-5 Some types of general land uses in the City: (1) agricultural - rice paddy, (2)
agricultural mango orchard, (3) agricultural - coconut farm, (4) agro industrial, (5) residential
subdivisions .................................................................................................................... 14
Figure 1-6 Some major institutional areas and land uses: (1) Iglesia ng Diyos kay Cristo and
the Christian Ecclesiastical School in Gaya-gaya; (2) the City Hall and St. Joseph the Worker
Parish in Poblacion I; and (3) Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto in Graceville ................................ 15
Figure 1-7 Typical examples of current and future urban nodes in the city: (1) low density
agricultural; (2) gridiron residential; (3) informal residential, (4) institutional district; (5)
commercial and transport node; (6) future high-end residential ............................................ 17
Figure 2-1 City of San Jose Del Monte Population (1990-2050) ........................................... 23
Figure 2-2 Population Pyramid 2010 ................................................................................. 28
Figure 2-3 Urban and Rural Population and Urbanization Level ........................................... 31
Figure 2-4 Annual Average Growth Rates 1990 – 2010 ...................................................... 32
Figure 2-5 Barangays with Higher AAGR Compared to City (2000-2010) ............................. 33
Figure 2-6 San Jose Del Monte Population Growth Rates ................................................... 33
Figure 2-7 Number of Households by Age-Sex of Household Head ..................................... 35
Figure 2-8 Household Poverty Incidence ........................................................................... 41
Figure 2-9 Historical Population Growth (1903-2010) ......................................................... 44
Figure 2-10 1st District Barangay Population Growth (2010-2020) ....................................... 45
Figure 2-11 2nd District Barangay Population Growth (2010-2020) ...................................... 46
Figure 3-1 Number of Persons with Disability by Type of Disability by Sex (2013) ................. 81
Figure 3-2 Crime Incidence per 100,000 Population (2009-2013) ........................................ 87
Figure 3-3 Index Crimes Cleared January - October 2014................................................... 88
Figure 4-1 Working Age Population by Age Group (2007-2013)........................................... 95
Figure 4-2 Share of Working Age Population to Household Population................................. 96
Figure 4-3 Estimated Annual Change in Working Age Population (2008-2013) ..................... 97
Figure 4-4 2013 Male to Female Ratio .............................................................................. 97
Figure 4-5 Working Age Population with Educational Attainment, 2007 and 2010 ................. 98
Figure 4-6 Working Age Population by Education Level 2007 and 2010 ............................... 99
Figure 4-7 Proportion of Graduates by Age Group and Level of Education (2010) ............... 100
Figure 4-8 Male to Female Ratio by Education Level, 2007 and 2010 ................................ 101
Figure 4-9 Estimated Annual Change in Labor (2008-2013) .............................................. 103
Figure 4-10 Labor Force Distribution by Age Group (2008-2013) ....................................... 103
Figure 4-11 Estimated Labor Force, Employment and Unemployment of CSJDM (2008-2013)
.................................................................................................................................... 104
Figure 4-12 Employment by Age Group (2008-2013) ........................................................ 105
Figure 4-13 Estimated Annual Change in Employment by Age Group (2009-2013) ............. 106
Figure 4-14 Employment by Completed Education Level .................................................. 107
Figure 4-15 Estimated Underemployment (2008-2013) ..................................................... 108

xi
Figure 4-16 Estimated Unemployment by Age Group ....................................................... 110
Figure 4-17 Comparative Change in Agricultural Land Area .............................................. 114
Figure 4-18 Area by Changed Use.................................................................................. 114
Figure 4-19 Comparative Production Trend by Ecosystem (2006-2012) ............................. 118
Figure 4-20 Comparative Production Cost by Ecosystem (2006-2012) ............................... 120
Figure 4-21 Trend Sector Growth per Registered Businesses ........................................... 127
Figure 4-22 Proportion of Business Investment by Asset Level .......................................... 130
Figure 4-23 Barangays with over 100 Registered Businesses ........................................... 131
Figure 4-24 Barangays with 50-100 Registered Businesses .............................................. 132
Figure 4-25 Barangays with 10 and Below Registered Businesses .................................... 132
Figure 5-1 Average Annual Daily Traffic by Mode of Transportation ................................... 145
Figure 5-2 Average Annual Daily Traffic by Road 2012 ..................................................... 146
Figure 5-3 Comparative Growth of MERALCO Customers (2001 and 2012) ....................... 156
Figure 5-4 Service Connections (in terms of number households) ..................................... 158
Figure 5-5 Water Distribution Share ................................................................................ 159
Figure 5-6 Summary of Graph Estimated Water Requirement (2012-2020) ........................ 161
Figure 6-1 Breakdown of Total Solid Waste Generated (tons), 2012 .................................. 169
Figure 7-1 Total Income and Expenditure (2003-2012) ..................................................... 175
Figure 7-2 Per Capita Income and Expenditure (2008-2012) ............................................. 176
Figure 7-3 Trend of Local Income (2008-2012) ................................................................ 176
Figure 7-4 Tax and Non-Tax Local Income ...................................................................... 177
Figure 7-5 2012 Local Income Sources of Cities in Bulacan Province ................................ 179
Figure 7-6 IRA to Total Income, 2008-2012 (in Php M) ..................................................... 179
Figure 7-7 Expenditure by Expense Class (2008-2012) .................................................... 183
Figure 7-8 Sector Expenditure (2004-2007) ..................................................................... 184
Figure 7-9 Level of Expenditure by Category (2008-2012) ................................................ 184
Figure 7-10 Comparative Share to Total Current Sector Expenditure (2008-2012) .............. 186
Figure 7-11 Sector Expenditures of Cities in Bulacan (2012) ............................................. 186
Figure 7-12 Allocation of 20% Development per 2012 AIP ................................................ 187
Figure 7-13 Staff Complement by Position Classification, 2008-2009 and 2011-2012 .......... 190
Figure 7-14 Organization Structure of the City Government .............................................. 193
Figure 7-15 Disaster Mitigation Activities, September 2013 ............................................... 196

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1. GEOPHYSICAL SECTOR
1.1. GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION, ADMINISTRATIVE
BOUNDARIES AND ACCESS

The City of San Jose Del Monte is located at the northeast portion of Manila. It is
bounded by the municipalities of Santa Maria and Marilao to the west and Norzagaray to
the north, all of Bulacan, municipality of Rodriguez, Rizal to the southeast, Quezon
province lies to its east, and the cities of Quezon and Caloocan to the south. The City is
approximately 42 kilometers away from Manila.

It is made up of 59 barangays, all of which cover 10,553 hectares, according to the


Land Management Bureau1. However, the Local Government Unit (LGU) claims an actual
territorial area of 31,294 hectares; this includes the disputed areas with adjacent
municipalities. The Angat Watershed Reservation, which has a land area of 18,000
hectares, is partly within the City.

The principal access routes to the City coming from the north is via the Quirino
Highway and the Marilao-San Jose Del Monte Road. These roads connect SJDM to
Norzagaray and Marilao, Bulacan. From Metro Manila, the City may also be accessed
through Quirino Highway after traversing Quezon and Caloocan Cities. Its major links to
the western municipalities of Sta. Maria and Marilao are, in turn, the Sta. Maria-Sapang
Palay Road and Sta. Maria-Tungkong Mangga Road. The latter provides the link with the
North Luzon Expressway.

1.2. TOPOGRAPHY

The elevation of the City ranges from approximately 40 to 900 meters above sea
level; the relief transitions from warm lowland to cool upland as one goes eastward. This
is because the City is part of the Sierra Madre mountain range. Plains and river valley flats
characterize the western and southwestern quadrant of the City. The central portion and
much of its eastern section is made up of undulating hills with low relief. High relief areas
and moderate slopes best describe its extreme eastern and northwestern quadrant. The
main maps are annexed to the main document.

Slopes of three to eight percent (3-8%) are extensively found in the City,
particularly on the western half of the area. Slopes of 30 to 50% comprise the smallest
portion of the total land area. The approximate coverage of lands of each type of slope
percentage is shown in Table 1-1 in the next page.

1 Base in the Volume I of SEP 2005

CITY OF SAN JOSE DEL MONTE


Ecological Profile 2014 Page | 1
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Table 1-1 The Distribution of Slope Classes and Areas across Barangays o
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SHARE TO S
SLOPE RANGE TOTAL a
BARANGAYS PARTIALLY OR LAND AREA n
DESCRIPTION IN PERCENT LAND
COMPLETELY COVERED (ha) J
(%) AREA
(%) o
s
Poblacion to Poblacion I, e
Sapang Palay Proper, Sto. d
Level to nearly
0 to 3 Cristo, Sta. Cruz I to II, San 1,789.367 17.04 el
level
Pedro, Dulong Bayan, Muzon, M
and Gaya-gaya o
n
San Isidro, San Roque, t
Kaybanban, Tungkong e
Mangga, Ciudad Real, San B
Rafael I-IV, Graceville, ul
Muzon, Poblacion, Dulong a
Level to gently c
3 to 8 Bayan, Kaypian, Sapang Palay 4,615.337 43.73
sloping a
Proper, Fatima I to V, Sto.
Niño I and II, Assumption, n
Bagong Buhay I to III, San
Martin de Porres, Lawang
Pare, and Citrus

Minuyan Proper, San Roque,


Sloping to San Isidro, Ciudad Real,
8 to 18 2,231.217 21.14
undulating Sapang Palay Proper, Dulong
Bayan, and Muzon

Minuyan I to V, Kaypian, Sto.


Cristo, Kaybanban,
Undulating to
18 to 30 Maharlika, Tungkong 1,430.691 13.56
rolling
Mangga, San Manuel,
Graceville, and Gaya-gaya

Rolling to hilly 30 to 50 San Roque 194.3203 1.84

Hilly to
50 and over Forest Zone 283.0668 2.68
mountainous
Total 10,553.00 100

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1.3. GEOLOGY, GEOMORPHOLOGY, AND SOILS o
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1.3.1. Geology S
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The general geology underlying the plains, hills, and mountains of the area are a J
combination of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Various types of igneous o
rocks from the Oligocene and Paleocene dominate the eastern part of the City. Towards s
e
the center are sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. Finally, recent alluvium from
d
sedimentation is more common towards the west part of the City; this alluvium is usually
el
variants of silt loam and clay loam. M
o
In particular, the geology is composed of seven different rock formations that n
range from Recent to Cretaceous-Paleogene. These are namely: fuviatile alluvium, marine t
and terrestrial sediments, marine clastics, compacted fine to coarse limestone, reworked e
pyroclastics, submarine basaltic to andesitic flows, and andesite/basalt flows in sequence. B
Reworked pyroclastics comprise the biggest geologic land area of the City or about ul
a
40.87% of its total land area. On the other hand, marine and terrestrial sediments
c
comprise the second largest or about 40.62% of the City’s total land area. Limestone
a
deposits in Barangay Minuyan comprise the smallest land area of rock formations2. n

1.3.2. Geomorphology

Footslopes (volcanic/sedimentary). The geomorphologic unit consists of


pyroclastic material formations and thick sequences of clay, shale, sandstone, and silt.
This unit represents the sloping area around the sedimentary and volcanic mountains. It
is characterized by sloping, undulating, to rolling footslopes. This could be found in
Poblacion, Minuyan Proper, Minuyan I to V, Sapang Palay Proper, Citrus, Dulong Bayan,
Muzon, Gumaoc East, West and Central, and Maharlika.

Basaltic hills. This unit has a deep fine loamy to well-drained clay commonly found
on rainfed paddy rice. Acidity is moderate to slight. Undulating to rolling, sharp, and
smooth crest and low relief hills characterize this unit. It could be found in Paradise III at
the northeastern portion of the City.

Conglomeratic hills. These comprise the largest geomorphologic unit in San Jose
del Monte. This unit is characterized by undulating to rolling and elongated low relief
mountains. The conglomerate found in the area ranges from one foot to three feet in
thickness, loosely consolidated with various sizes of angular to rounded fragments of
older rocks particularly volcanic rocks like andesite, basalt, intercalated with tuffaceous
materials. This unit is mostly found in San Roque, Kaybanban, Tungkong Mangga, San
Manuel, Kaypian, Citrus, Sta. Cruz I to V, Bagong Buhay I to III, Lawang Pare and Sto. Niño
I and II.

2Most of the discussions on geology, geomorphology, soils, and freshwater resources were improved versions of those found in the Volume 1
of SEP 2005.

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Limestone hills. This unit is characterized by undulating, rolling low, to high relief f
S
hills. It consists of limestone formations that vary in color from dirty white to light gray.
a
These are found in Minuyan.
n
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Pyroclastic hills. These are composed of volcanic ashes, sand, cinders and other o
volcanic debris, which originated from the accumulation of volcanic ejecta. These s
materials are quite hard and are more commonly known in local term as "adobe." This e
geomorphologic unit is found in the Poblacion and Barangays Paradise III, San Isidro, d
Sapang Palay Proper, Muzon, Graceville and Gaya-gaya. el
M
Shale/sandstone hills. This unit is composed of thick sequences of clay, shale, o
n
sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerates with few intercalations of limestone lenses and
t
pyroclastic materials in some areas. The sandstone found in the area is brownish yellow
e
to reddish brown, poorly hardened, and has fine to coarse texture. On the other hand, the B
shale is light gray to brownish in color. These are areas of undulating to rolling, low relief, ul
and faulted and folded hills. More gentle terrain and deeper soil characterize these areas a
due to the rocks’ relative susceptibility to weathering and erosion. This could be found c
east of Minuyan and immediately north of Salamin Creek. a
n
Undifferentiated volcanic hills. Undifferentiated volcanics consist of basaltic and
andesitic lava flows, intercalated with pyroclastic materials of the same composition.
Rolling, steep, sharp and smooth crest, high-relief mountains characterize this unit. It is
found in the easternmost part of San Jose del Monte along the Angat Watershed
Reservation.

Minor alluvial plain. Alluvial plains were formed by recent alluvium composed of
clay, silt, sand, gravel, and cobbles, all of which were products of weathering and transport
of older rocks from the adjoining highland. The texture of the alluvium is coarser form the
sources and becomes finer as they go further. These are level to nearly level areas in
Minuyan, Sto. Cristo, Dulong Bayan, Kaypian, and Poblacion.

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1.3.3. Soils and Mineral Deposits o
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Pedologic surveys identified three major soil series/categories for City of San Jose a
Del Monte. These broad categories include the Novaliches Clay Loam, Novaliches Loam, n
and the Sibul Clay. The Novaliches Clay Loam is extensively distributed and covers almost J
75% of the land area. About 20% of the land area is covered by Novaliches Loam, which o
may be found along the relatively flat areas in the western section. Sibul Clay coincides s
with limestone deposits in Minuyan Proper. This can be seen in Table 1-2 below. e
d
Table 1-2 The Distribution of Slope Classes, Areas, Percent Distribution, and Crops/Vegetation el
M
SHARE TO TOTAL o
AREA n
SOIL TYPE LAND AREA CROPS/VEGETATION
(ha) t
(%)
e
Banana, chico, langka, mango, upland B
Novaliches Loam 7,046.63 66.77
rice, vegetables, grassland ul
a
Forest and permanent trees, coconut, c
Sibul Clay 3,169.67 30.04 banana, coffee, chico, rice, corn, a
mango, casoy, duhat, langka n

Pasture, grasses, banana, chico,


Novaliches Clay 336.70 3.19
langka, duhat, casoy

Total 10,553.00 100 -

Source: BSWM, Bulacan Land Resources Evaluation Project, Slope Map

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1.4. FRESHWATER RESOURCES o
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The rivers and creeks that flow within San Jose Del Monte are direct tributaries of a
Angat River, which flows from the Angat Reservoir. Major natural waterways of San Jose n
Del Monte are the Kipungoc, Sto. Cristo, and Sta. Maria river systems. Kipungoc River J
separates San Jose Del Monte from Caloocan City and Quezon City. It is directly connected o
to Marilao River, which flows downwards to Manila Bay. Draining to these rivers are s
various creeks and streams, which act as catchment areas for the surface water runoff of e
d
the City. Among these creeks are the Bigte, Kantulot, Katinga, and Salamin Creeks.
el
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Almost 47% of the City’s total land area is covered by shallow well areas or areas o
suitable for construction of wells with depths of not more than 20 meters3. These areas n
are located at the City’s western peripheries. This area is located at the midwestern t
portion of the City. The rest are deep well areas, which are characterized by aquifers e
generally located at a depth of more than 20 meters. According to the Local Water Utilities B
Administration, there are 384 wells in the City. The map in the next page displays the ul
locations of some wells that tap into the aquifers of the area; the wells are shown as dots. 4 a
c
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Vol. 1 of SEP 2005


3

lwua.gov.ph
4

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Map 1-1 A map showing locations of wells licensed by the LWUA in the City

Source: http://122.54.214.222/WDWells.asp?CCC=1

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1.5. CLIMATE o
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In the Modified Corona Climate Classification System, the City is under the Type I a
climate. This implies that the dry season of San Jose Del Monte, and the Province in n
general, is usually from December to April. On the other hand, the wet season is from May J
to November. The dry season usually coincides with cool weather while the wet season is o
associated with the tropical storms and afternoon thunderstorms. Out of all tropical s
e
cyclones that pass through the country every year, about 16% pass through the area.5
d
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The City experiences a tropical climate, which is Am in the Koppen-Geiger climate M
classification. This means that there is significant rainfall for the most of the year while o
the dry season is relatively shorter than the wet season. With an average annual n
temperature of 27°C, the City has mean monthly figures that range from 25.6°C in January t
and 29.6°C in May. The climatological factors behind such temperature patterns produce e
2,637 mm of annual precipitation.6 The figure below is a climograph that depicts the B
trends of temperature and precipitation in the City. ul
a
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Source: http://en.climate-data.org/location/1991/

Figure 1-1 A Climograph Showing Temperature and Precipitation Patterns throughout the Year in the City

The mean annual relative humidity is 75%. The highest level is normally during
the months of August to September. The monthly mean is 83%; the lowest is in April with
only 66%.

Vol. 1 of SEP 2005


5

http://en.climate-data.org/location/1991/
6

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The two wind systems of the Northeast Monsoon (October to April) and o
Southwest Monsoon (May to October) affect the City every year. The Northeast Monsoon f
S
originates from the Asiatic winter anti-cyclones and attains maximum strength in January.
a
On the other hand, the Southwest Monsoon originates from the Indian Ocean. The annual
n
average wind speed is three meters per second (3m/sec). J
o
Cloud cover is highest in the month of June and the lowest is in January. As the s
City is along the Sierra Madre mountain range, orographic precipitation makes the skies e
over cloudier than towns west of the City. d
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About climate change, there shall be changes in temperature from 2020 to 2050 M
averaging from 0.9 to 2.1°C. The projected percentage change in rainfall for the same o
n
period shall be from -23% to 23.6%; this means that dry months shall become a lot drier
t
while over wet months there shall be longer and heavier rains. Extreme weather events
e
such as typhoons shall be more frequent. B
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Table 1-3 Projection of Temperature, Rainfall Change, and Frequency of Extreme Weather Events for Bulacan and a
Other Provinces in Region 3 c
a
Seasonal temperature increases (in °C) by 2020 and 2050 under medium-range emission scenario in
n
provinces in Region 3

Observed Baseline (1971- Change in 2050 (2036-


Change in 2020 (2006-2035)
2000) 2065)
DJF MAM JJA SON DJF MAM JJA SON DJF MAM JJA SON
Aurora 24.5 27.1 27.9 26.7 0.9 0.9 1 1 1.9 2 2 2
Bataan 26.4 28.7 27.6 27.3 1 1.1 0.8 1 2 2.1 1.7 1.9
Bulacan 25.6 27.9 27.1 26.7 0.9 1.1 0.9 1 1.9 2.1 1.7 1.9
Nueva
25.3 27.7 27.5 26.8 0.9 1.1 0 1 2.1 2.2 1.8 2
Ecija
Pampanga 26.0 28.3 27.5 27.1 1 1.1 0.9 1 2.1 2.2 1.8 2
Tarlac 26.1 28.3 27.8 27.3 1.1 1.1 1 1.1 2.2 2.2 1.9 2.1
Zambales 26.3 28.3 27.4 27.2 1 1.1 0.9 1 2.1 2.1 1.7 1.9

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Seasonal rainfall changes (in %) under medium-range emission scenario in provinces f
in Region 3 S
a
Observed Baseline (1971-2000) Change in 2020 (2006-2035) Change in 2050 (2036-2065)
n
DJF MAM JJA SON DJF MAM JJA SON DJF MAM JJA SON
J
Aurora 615.7 546.4 768.7 1151.1 -0.3 -17.1 6.7 5.8 8.7 -29.2 7.4 -5.7 o
Bataan 71.7 368.7 1326.2 872.6 2.7 -5.2 -0.4 -0.4 -8.2 -8.1 29.1 1.5 s
Bulacan 212.4 288.9 1041.4 842.1 4.2 -23 -12.8 -2.9 -13.2 -36.4 23.6 -3.3 e

-2.4 d
Nueva
155.2 316.5 995 745 7.5 -13.8 1.6 1.6 -7.4 -25.7 22.7
Ecija el
Pampanga 120.8 320.6 1030.4 785.2 16.3 -18.8 -5.1 -5.1 -15.4 -26.4 13.9 -7.2
M
Tarlac 43.4 265.4 1193.5 644.3 26 -13.7 -9.6 -9.6 -6.7 -18.2 8.8 -5.5 o
Zambales 40.9 368 1793.9 872 34.2 -4.5 -1.6 -1.6 -2.2 -21.6 31.4 5.6 n
t
Source: http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph e
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1.6. LAND USE o
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1.6.1. General Land Use S
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Overview n
J
Growing commercial, residential, and light industrial areas, are found all over the o
City at major road intersections and along major thoroughfares. However, the bulk of the s
City's built-up areas are mostly located west of Quirino Highway at the primary level to e
gently sloping 0-8% terrain. Most of the City's schools, government institutions, d
commercial developments, industries, and other urban amenities are located within this el
M
section. The largest contiguous built-up area is located at the Sapang Palay Resettlement
o
Project area, followed by the conurbation in Tungkong Mangga and Muzon.
n
t
A high-density commercial strip that follows the Quirino Highway (yellow line) e
divides the City into a heavily built-up western section, and the largely agricultural B
eastern section (Map 1-2 and Figure 1-2). Such pattern can also be seen in the land cover ul
map included in the map pack. a
c
The developments east of Quirino Highway are mostly scattered residential areas a
and agricultural lands. However, there are also few subdivisions that are located along or n
near the highway. In addition, two religious institutions are currently located some
distance away from Ciudad Real and are taking advantage of its secluded and rural
atmosphere. These are the Blessed Sacrament Seminary and an Augustinian convent.

The clusters of built-up land uses found throughout the City are dominated by
residential uses such as those associated with gated communities, socialized housing, and
row houses. These clusters, together with the built-up areas located along primary and
secondary transport corridors, produce an overall pattern of sprawl (Figure 1-3).

In between the built-up clusters are pockets of agricultural lands, which are
continuously converted into built-up uses. Planted in these agricultural lands are various
crops such as rice and corn. The clustering pattern for both built-up and agricultural uses
is also partly due to the decisions made by the settlers with regard to the hilly conditions
that dominate the City’s topography. Most households in the western half of the City opted
to convert their lands to residential uses while others maintained the farms. This left
upland uses, such as those pertaining to forest use, more common towards the
easternmost zones of the City (Figure 1-4).

Most vegetative outgrowths are located at difficult to build areas. But there are
instances when these vegetative outgrowths are integrated within the built-up areas,
usually found in the west, are a number heavily vegetated areas. Supplementing these is
a number of mini forest projects of the City Government. The City Agriculture Office
maintains a 1.65-hectare Mini Forest Project in Barangay Muzon along the San Jose del
Monte - Marilao Provincial Road and a mahogany planting site.

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Map 1-2 A Map of Land Cover in the City S
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Source: Google Earth (April 2014) and philgis.org

Source: Google Earth (April 2014)

Figure 1-2 A Satellite Image of Land Uses in the City (Barangay boundaries in white, City boundary in red)

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Source: Google Earth (April 2014)
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Figure 1-3 Pockets of Agricultural land In the Western half of the City (Mulawin and surrounding areas) n

Source: Google Earth (April 2014)

Figure 1-4 Agricultural areas in the Eastern side of the City (near San Isidro)

The palettes below display the various samples of some typical classes of land
uses in the City. There are various agricultural land use classes – rice lands, orchards,
coconut farms, and agro industrial compounds. Residential land uses are usually in
subdivisions.

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Source: Google Earth (April 2014) e
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Figure 1-5 Some types of general land uses in the City: (1) agricultural - rice paddy, (2) agricultural mango el
orchard, (3) agricultural - coconut farm, (4) agro industrial, (5) residential subdivisions
M
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Residential Land Uses n
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San Jose del Monte currently has more than a hundred private subdivisions e
located in various barangays. The most prolific developer in the City is Palmera Homes, B
Inc., which has subdivisions located in Barangays Sto. Cristo, Muzon, and Kaypian. ul
a
There are also at least six resettlement projects of the National Housing Authority c
within the City. Some of these resettlement projects consist of the 752 hectares Sapang a
Palay Resettlement Project (SPRP) in Sapang Palay, the Towerville Resettlement Project n
in Barangay Minuyan/Sto. Cristo, the Pabahay 2000 Housing Project in Barangay Muzon
and the Liberty Upgrading Project in Barangay Gumaoc. The SPRP site, was sub-divided
in 1991 and is now comprised of Barangays Sapang Palay Proper, Fatima I to V, San Rafael
I to V, San Pedro, Sta. Cruz I to V, San Martin I to IV, Bagong Buhay I to III, Sto. Niño I and
II, Assumption, San Martin de Porres, and Lawang Pare. The subdivisions and
resettlement projects are elaborated in the social sector subsection on housing.

Institutional

Institutional uses in the City are usually associated with government, educational, and
religious activities. Prominent among these uses are those done in the sites and vicinities
of the City Hall (with St. Joseph the Worker Parish beside it), Iglesia ng Diyos kay Kristo
Hesus (with the Christian Ecclesiastical School in Gaya-gaya), and Our Lady of Lourdes
Grotto in Graceville (Figure 1-6).

Industrial

Industrial activity in San Jose del Monte is still not very extensive. Only a few
industries can be found in various areas within the City. Major industries in the area
include marble production, feed mills, manufacturing, construction, and food processing.
Such industrial situation is elaborated in the chapter on the local economy (Chapter 4).

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Source: Google Earth (April 2014) M
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Figure 1-6 Some major institutional areas and land uses: (1) Iglesia ng Diyos kay Cristo and the Christian n
Ecclesiastical School in Gaya-gaya; (2) the City Hall and St. Joseph the Worker Parish in Poblacion I; and (3) Our t
Lady of Lourdes Grotto in Graceville
e
B
Commercial ul
a
The major economic activities of San Jose del Monte are in agri-business, c
manufacturing, and wholesale and retail trading. Commercial developments are scattered a
all over the various areas in the City. The commercial economy of SJDM is currently n
gravitating towards different nodes. These nodes have a bustling commercial atmosphere
distinct from the other areas of the City. They are characterized by the presence of
numerous and contiguous commercial establishments. Residential areas and subdivisions
of various types are typically found in their vicinity.

The recreational land uses are described and explained in the last section of the
chapter on the local economy.

1.6.2. Urban Land Uses

The urban land use clusters in the City are held together by the attraction of
various nodes with important functions. These nodes usually have tertiary industries
dominating their centers, which are serviced by the City’s best and well-travelled
thoroughfares. The said nodes of activities in San Jose del Monte are the following:

Poblacion Node

The most outstanding features of the Poblacion are the City Hall and the Roman
Catholic Church. Small business establishments including restaurants, sari-sari stores,
bakeries, bookstores and the like that serve the needs of the people that frequent these
two structures are found within this vicinity. Residential areas with its accompanying
institutional and commercial land uses that are served by narrow streets, surround this
node.

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Tungkong Mangga Node o
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The node in Tungkong Mangga is the commercial district located in the S
a
intersection of Quirino Highway and the Sta. Maria- Tungkong Mangga – Muzon National
n
Road. Tungkong Mangga appears to be the most progressive commercial node of San Jose
J
del Monte. Many of the City’s banks - BPI Family Bank, Metropolitan Bank and Trust o
Company, Philippine National Bank, BDO, Chinabank Savings, PSBank, Eastwest Bank, s
Planbank, and Landbank - are located in the Tungkong Mangga Area. Its 86 e
Pawnshop/Lending Investor establishments are also mostly located in Tungkong d
Mangga, Muzon and the northernmost barangays in the former Sapang Palay el
Resettlement area. Of the city’s markets – two public markets and many other private M
markets – four are in Tungkong Mangga. o
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Muzon Node e
B
This node is the commercial district located in the intersection between the Sta. ul
Maria-Tungkong Mangga Provincial Road (Bocaue Provincial Road) and the San Jose del a
Monte-Marilao Road. Located within this area is the South Triangle Wet and Dry Market, c
the Philippine Business Bank, RCBC, Country Bank, Planbank, a number of pawnshops and a
lending investors, other business and light industrial establishments including bakeries n
and pharmacies.

Sapang Palay or “Sampol” Node

The node in the Sapang Palay Resettlement Project (SPRP) is located along EVR
Ave. where the Sampol Market is situated. This node primarily serves the 29 barangays at
the northwestern portion of the city. Within the area are various agribusinesses,
wholesale and retail tradings and manufacturing establishments, including the Emerald
Bank, BDO, Sta. Maria Rural Bank, HBC, Policarpio Market, Victory Mall, and Puregold.

Aside from these nodes, commercial, agri-business and other establishments are
also found in linear fashion along the major thoroughfares of San Jose del Monte.7

What is the typology of such urban land use clusters? What general trends can be
identified across the many nodes and subnodes in the city? As seen in Figure 1-7, there
are some urbanizing clusters organized around households concentrated on farming and
other agricultural uses, such as those in Barangay San Isidro (diagram 1). In Muzon,
another typical urban land use cluster is the medium- to high-density residential land use
combination that usually displays a gridiron pattern (diagram 2); these are usually found
on the western half of the city. Next, informal residential urban clusters are characterized
by housing units that exhibit more sinuous and organic settlement patterns, as seen in
Minuyan Proper (diagram 3). In the fourth diagram, institutional land uses anchor the
urban growth in the cluster; while it may not display the same density as those in previous
two types, this type of urban clustering endures the land use changes throughout the city

7 It is recommended to study additional nodes, such as Kaypian, in terms of local economy.

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due to the prime importance of the City Hall, church, and other institutions. Commercial o
and inter-town transport activities make the fifth cluster type grow in importance f
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through the decades (diagram 5); Tungkong Mangga is the first in the said cluster type.
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The sixth diagram displays a future type of urban cluster: the high-end residential area.
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This cluster, while not seen as a high-density area in the foreseeable future due to its J
pricing, shall be attracting urban land use change in its peripheries in the form of o
commercial strips, institutional land uses, and recreational places. s
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The urban land use map of the Poblacion is included in the map pack. d
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Source: Google Earth (April 2014)

Figure 1-7 Typical examples of current and future urban nodes in the city: (1) low density agricultural; (2) gridiron
residential; (3) informal residential, (4) institutional district; (5) commercial and transport node; (6) future high-end
residential8

8 (1) San Isidro; (2) Muzon; (3) Minuyan Proper; (4) Poblacion I; (5) Tungkong Mangga; (6) Tungkong Mangga and Ciudad Real

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1.7. LAND CLASSIFICATION o
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The identified places included in the Network Protected Areas for Agricultural a
and Agroindustrial Development (NPAAAD) of San Jose del Monte are located in n
Barangays Gaya-gaya, Graceville, Muzon, Dulong Bayan, Sapang Palay Proper, Kaypian, J
Tungkong Mangga and Kaybanban. These are mostly planted with rice. These NPAAAD o
areas are part of the Strategic Agriculture and Fisheries Development Zones (SAFDZ), s
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which total to 831.83 hectares.9 Meanwhile, the total forestland in the city amounts to
d
161.94 hectares10; these forestlands are in the east of the city, as indicated in the land
el
cover map shown before. The rest of the land area is devoted to areas of waterways and M
lands that are alienable and disposable (A&D). o
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1.8. NATURAL AND GEOPHYSICAL HAZARDS e
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In the Philippine Fault Zone (PFZ), the seismic situation of the city is greatly
a
connected to the dynamics of the Valley Fault System (VFS). The VFS runs from the c
Bulacan portion of the Sierra Madre mountain range; through the National Capital Region a
(NCR); and southwards to the provinces of Laguna, Cavite, and Batangas (Map 1-3). n
According to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, the fault system is
due to move anytime with respect to historical records and geological studies; an orange
circle indicates the relative location of San Jose Del Monte.

According to the Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (MMEIRS), in


the event of an earthquake along the fault system there shall be a great amount of
destruction in Metro Manila and surrounding cities and municipalities. The ground
shaking and liquefaction that the earthquake shall induce shall have immediate impacts
such as loss of life and catastrophic destruction of public infrastructure11.

In relation to seismic movements such as earthquakes, the risk of ground ruptures


and ground shaking is particularly present in the city and surrounding areas. The
potential ground rupture areas are highlighted in red lines in the east part of the city (Map
1-4). In Map 1-5, the ground-shaking hazard for the city is registered at approximately 7.5
to 8 in the PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale (Destructive to Very Destructive); this
means that the earthquake can cause many well-built buildings to collapse. In addition,
bridges and other infrastructure will be severely damaged while cracks and large fissures
will appear.12

9 Vol. 1 of SEP 2005


10 ibid.
11 Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (MMEIRS). 2004. phivolcs.dost.gov.ph
12 phivolcs.dost.gov.ph. PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale. May 2008.

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Map 1-3 Map showing the City with regard to the Valley Fault System (VFS) that runs from Bulacan to
Southern Metro Manila

Source: Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology

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Map 1-4 Ground Rupture Hazard Map

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Source: Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
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Map 1-5 Ground Shaking Hazard Map

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Source: Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology
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Meanwhile, according to the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB), the city is o
prone to two types of geohazards: mass movement and flooding. The risk of mass f
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movement in the form of landslides covers a large part of the city; the level of
a
susceptibility associated with the risk was classified by the MGB as “low susceptibility”,
n
which is highlighted in the map as the yellow-colored areas. Medium to high susceptibility J
to landslides (green and red areas) become more common in the northern and eastern o
sections of the city. On the other hand, flooding is more possible in the northwestern s
portions of the city where the local drainage systems connected to the Sta. Maria River e
traverse; these were classified by the MGB as “low to moderate susceptibility” areas, d
which were highlighted in peach color (Map 1-6). el
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Map 1-6 A geohazards map of the City of San Jose Del Monte and surrounding areas o
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Source: dilg.gov.ph

With regard to erosion and siltation, these processes are more observable in the
eastern parts of the city – the hilly and mountainous areas of Barangays San Isidro,
Paradise III, San Roque, Tungkong Mangga, Ciudad Real, Kaybanban, Minuyan Proper, and
Sto. Cristo. In those areas, the combination of the effects of slope angle, lack of vegetative
cover, and gravity intensify the physical/mechanical weathering of the recent alluvium.
The sediments are then transformed into load and carried into the central and
northeastern parts of the city towards the higher order streams and water channels and
intensify siltation. In these eastern parts of the city, land cover change due to
suburbanization is the dominant factor in inducing erosion.

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o
2. DEMOGRAPHY f
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2.1. TOTAL POPULATION n
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o
The City of San Jose del Monte Bulacan experienced a 3.64% population growth, s
or an additional population of 138,746 persons from the year 2000 compared to the latest e
census year in 2010. This rapid growth can be observed in the increasing population from d
a majority of the barangays in the city. Should the city observe the same growth trends, in el
30 years, the city’s population would increase by roughly 1.9 million people as seen in the M
figure below: o
n
t
1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050
e
San Jose del Monte 142,042 315,807 454,553 649,908 929,221 1,328,576 1,899,562
B
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City of San Jose del Monte Population 1990 - 2050
c
2,000,000 1,899,562 a
1,800,000 n
1,600,000
1,400,000 1,328,576

1,200,000
1,000,000 929,221

800,000 649,908
600,000 454,553
400,000 315,807
142,042
200,000
0
1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050

Figure 2-1 City of San Jose Del Monte Population (1990-2050)

2.1.1. Barangay Population

Among the most populated Barangays in the city is Muzon with a total of 81,947
(2010) inhabitants or approximately 18% of the city’s total population during the census
year. Interestingly Muzon, with 5.56% Annual Average Growth Rate13 (AAGR) in 2000-
2010, does not maintain the highest population in the city. Based on the population
projections, this Barangay’s population will be exceeded by Minuyan Proper (19.29%
AAGR), by the year 2018.

13
By National Statistics Office (NSO) definition, Annual Average Growth Rate (AAGR) refers to the measure of actual growth in population stock
caused by births and deaths and international migration using the census years as reference period.

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The SJDM’s total population from census years 2000 and 2010 are presented in f
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Table 2-1 below, together with five-year interval projections calculated by the
a
exponential growth method14, using Barangay AAGR from 2000-2010 census years.
n
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Table 2-1 Total Population by Barangay (2000-2025) o
s
2000 2010 2015 2020 2025 e
City of San Jose Del Monte 315,807 454,553 543,528 649,918 777,133 d
Assumption 2,050 4,291 6,126 8,746 12,487 el
Bagong Buhay I 5,621 6,698 7,305 7,967 8,690 M
Bagong Buhay II 3,521 4,009 4,276 4,562 4,865 o
Bagong Buhay III 3,903 5,388 6,313 7,397 8,668 n
Citrus 13,066 20,882 26,260 33,024 41,521 t
Ciudad Real 1,935 2,338 2,567 2,819 3,096 e
Dulong Bayan 5,440 6,292 6,762 7,266 7,810 B
Fatima I 5,242 5,815 6,124 6,449 6,790 ul
Fatima II 9,263 10,453 11,101 11,789 12,518 a
Fatima III 5,425 6,917 7,799 8,794 9,915 c
Fatima IV 2,875 3,167 3,324 3,488 3,660 a
Fatima V 2,850 3,070 3,185 3,305 3,430 n
Francisco Homes-Guijo 1,785 1,707 1,669 1,632 1,596
Francisco Homes-Mulawin 1,461 1,650 1,753 1,863 1,979
Francisco Homes-Narra 1,837 1,974 2,046 2,121 2,198
Francisco Homes-Yakal 2,029 2,407 2,620 2,852 3,104
Gaya-gaya 7,148 13,727 18,825 25,816 35,406
Graceville 22,671 28,563 32,018 35,891 40,230
Gumaoc Central 2,704 3,392 3,795 4,246 4,749
Gumaoc East 3,854 4,533 4,912 5,323 5,769
Gumaoc West 5,288 6,915 7,893 9,008 10,283
Kaybanban 1,000 2,371 3,587 5,425 8,206
Kaypian 18,530 25,614 30,041 35,234 41,315
Lawang Pare 3,264 3,949 4,339 4,767 5,238
Maharlika 2,793 3,127 3,308 3,499 3,701
Minuyan I 3,079 2,861 2,758 2,659 2,563
Minuyan II 4,532 5,360 5,826 6,332 6,881
Minuyan III 2,327 2,703 2,912 3,137 3,379
Minuyan IV 3,492 3,979 4,244 4,528 4,831
Minuyan Proper 4,928 33,928 81,921 197,804 477,659
Minuyan V 2,535 2,215 2,069 1,934 1,807
Muzon 47,010 81,947 107,355 140,642 184,285
Paradise III 2,186 3,420 4,256 5,296 6,591
Poblacion 1,886 2,118 2,244 2,377 2,518
Poblacion I 2,882 4,254 5,148 6,231 7,541
San Isidro 1,811 2,370 2,706 3,091 3,529

14Technical Note: These projections were computed using the exponential growth method. The projections also used AAGR per barangay from
2000-2010 as an input to the projection years from 2011 onwards. Using the two (2) latest census data of 2000 and 2010, several barangays
showed decreasing growth rates. And this explains why several barangays are noted to have decreasing population values.

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2000 2010 2015 2020 2025 o
San Manuel 8,107 12,241 14,979 18,330 22,428
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San Martin I 3,207 3,757 4,063 4,395 4,753
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San Martin II 2,771 3,336 3,656 4,007 4,393
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San Martin III 2,609 3,041 3,281 3,540 3,819
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San Martin IV 2,939 3,592 3,968 4,383 4,840
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San Pedro 12,096 13,866 14,835 15,871 16,985
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San Rafael I 3,457 3,107 2,944 2,790 2,644
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San Rafael II 3,112 2,908 2,810 2,716 2,625
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San Rafael III 5,308 5,257 5,231 5,205 5,180
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San Rafael IV 6,080 7,782 8,792 9,933 11,219
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San Rafael V 2,544 2,807 2,947 3,095 3,250
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San Roque 1,643 1,617 1,607 1,594 1,581 n
Sapang Palay Proper 3,576 4,894 5,712 6,667 7,780 t
San Martin de Porres 2,363 2,227 2,162 2,099 2,038 e
Sta. Cruz I 2,997 2,711 2,578 2,452 2,331 B
Sta. Cruz II 2,798 3,078 3,227 3,383 3,548 ul
Sta. Cruz III 2,058 2,440 2,655 2,888 3,142 a
Sta. Cruz IV 2,623 3,011 3,225 3,453 3,698 c
Sta. Cruz V 3,128 3,500 3,700 3,912 4,137 a
Sto. Cristo 17,840 29,327 37,376 47,634 60,702 n
Sto. Niño 2,807 2,582 2,475 2,373 2,276
Sto. Niño II 3,424 2,808 2,541 2,299 2,080
Tungkong Mangga 6,097 10,260 13,220 17,034 21,949

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Of particular interest are the Barangays with the highest and lowest population
values in the projected population. Table 2-2 in the next page enumerates the barangay
names and respective population for the years 2015, 2020, and 2025.

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Table 2-2 Highest and Lowest Population by Barangay o
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BARANGAYS WITH HIGHEST POPULATION S
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2025
2015 2020 n
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Population Population Population o
Muzon 107,355 Minuyan Proper 197,804 Minuyan Proper 477,659 s
Minuyan Proper 81,921 Muzon 140,642 Muzon 184,285 e
Sto. Cristo 37,376 Sto. Cristo 47,634 Sto. Cristo 60,702 d
Graceville 32,018 Graceville 35,891 Citrus 41,521 el
Kaypian 30,041 Kaypian 35,234 Kaypian 41,315
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Citrus 26,260 Citrus 33,024 Graceville 40,230
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Gaya-Gaya 18,825 Gaya-Gaya 25,816 Gaya-Gaya 35,406
San Manuel 14,979 San Manuel 18,330 San Manuel 22,428
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San Pedro 14,835 Tungkong Mangga 17,034 Tungkong Mangga 21,949 t
Tungkong Mangga 13,220 San Pedro 15,871 San Pedro 16,985 e
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BARANGAYS WITH LOWEST POPULATION
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2015 2020 2025
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Population Population Population
San Roque 1,607 San Roque 1,594 San Roque 1,581
Fatima II 1,669 Fatima II 1,632 Fatima II 1,596
Fatima III 1,753 Fatima III 1,863 Minuyan V 1,807
Fatima IV 2,046 Minuyan V 1,934 Fatima III 1,979
Minuyan V 2,069 St. Martin de Porres 2,099 St. Martin de Porres 2,038
St. Martin de Porres 2,162 Fatima IV 2,121 Sto. Niño II 2,080
Poblacion 2,244 Sto. Niño II 2,299 Fatima IV 2,198
Sto. Niño I 2,475 Sto. Niño I 2,373 Sto. Niño I 2,276
Sto. Niño II 2,541 Poblacion 2,377 Sta. Cruz I 2,331
Ciudad Real 2,567 Sta. Cruz I 2,452 Poblacion 2,581

By 2015, Muzon will still be the most populated barangay in the city; however
Minuyan Proper would overtake the population of the former by the year 2020. Another
barangay of interest in terms of population growth is Citrus, which is projected to have
41,521 inhabitants in 2025 from 26,260 ten years before. Also noticeable is that the
projected population of the city will be concentrated in a handful of barangays namely
Minuyan Proper, Muzon, Sto. Cristo and Citrus. This may pose negative implications in the
distribution of goods and services in the city, should growth remain unmanaged. On the
other hand, barangays with low population values are more closely ranged.

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2.1.2. Age-Sex Population o
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San Jose del Monte generally has a young population with a median age of 23.5 a
years old. This is higher than the recorded 2007 city median age of 21.7. However, note n
that the city’s median age is lower compared to the provincial median age of 24.8 years J
old in 2010. While the sex ratio for the city in the latest Census year is 99.8; this means o
there are approximately 100 males for every 100 females in the population (Table 2-3). s
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Table 2-3 Comparative Age-Sex Population of 2010 d
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Household 2010
Population o
Total Male Female
454,263 226,886 227,377
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0-4 48,833 25,270 23,563 t
5-9 50,745 26,159 24,586 e
10-14 52,208 26,805 25,403 B
15-19 46,998 23,817 23,181 ul
20-24 38,715 19,272 19,443 a
25-29 34,585 16,895 17,690 c
30-34 35,080 17,172 17,908 a
35-39 32,321 16,087 16,234 n
40-44 31,029 15,500 15,529
45-49 25,538 12,846 12,692
50-54 19,524 9,812 9,712
55-59 14,191 6,959 7,232
60-64 9,869 4,542 5,327
65-69 5,985 2,539 3,446
70-74 4,296 1,697 2,599
75-79 2,446 898 1,548
80 and over 1,900 616 1,284
Median age 23.5
Sex ratio 99.8

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

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The age structure of the City of San Jose del Monte embodies the role as the o
provider of human resources to the adjacent Metropolis. Based of the figure below (Figure f
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2-2) more than half of the population or 63% belongs to the productive age group which
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is 15-64 years. The high proportions of the young and productive population translate to
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high demand for social services such as employment, social welfare, housing, school J
health, etc. o
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Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Figure 2-2 Population Pyramid 2010

The total dependency ratio in the city is 58% with a young dependency ratio of
53% age 15 years old and below (Table 2-4), and 5% dependency ratio for the elderly
population. Further, there are more young dependent males than females in contrast with
the elderly with more females.

Table 2-4 Dependency Ratios

SEX RATIO AND PROPORTION BY BROAD AGE GROUP


Both Sexes Male Female
Children - Age - 0-14 100 52 48
Adult - Age 15-64 99 49 50
Old - Old 65 age and over 100 39 61

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WORKING/DEPENDENTS AGE GROUP o
Both Sexes Male Female
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Total 454,263 226,886 227,377
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Young dependents (0-14 years old) 151,786 78,234 73,552 n
Working Age (15-64 years old) 287,850 142,902 144,948 J
Old dependents (65 years old and over) 14,627 5,750 8,877 o
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DEPENDENCY RATIO d
Both Sexes Male Female el
(in %) (in %) (in %)
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Young dependents (0-14 years old) 53 55 51
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Old dependents (65 years old and over) 5 4 6 n
Overall dependency Ratio 58 59 57 t
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OTHER AGE GROUPS
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Both Sexes Male Female a
Senior Citizen (60 years old and over) 24,496 10,292 14,204 c
School Age Population (5-24 years old) 188,666 96,053 92,613 a
Reproductive Women (15-49 years old) 244,266 121,589 122,677 n

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

The voting age population comprises 56% of the total city population, with 96
males for every 100 females within the voting age. This shows there are more females
within the voting age population than males (Table 2-5).

Table 2-5 Voting Age Population15

Ratio
Total Male Female
(in %)
Voting Age Population 255,479 124,835 130,644 56
Non-Voting Age 198,784 102,051 96,733 44
Total 454,263 226,886 277,377 100

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

15 Voting age population was computed using 2010 NSO Census of Population and Housing with voting age assumed from 20-24 years old up
to 80 and over. While non-voting age population is assumed from 0-4 years old up to 15-19 years old.

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2.1.3. Level of Urbanization o
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Urban population amounted to 70.27% and 76.23% of the total city population in a
2007 and 2010 respectively, according to the National Statistics Office (NSO). Table 2-6 n
below shows the past and projected percentage of urban population. By the year 2020, J
less than 15% of the city will remain rural. While by the year 2050, the city will be entirely o
urban. s
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There are three categories that will consider a barangay urban according to the d
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NSO:
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Category 1 refers to barangays with population size of 5,000 or more t
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Category 2 refers to barangays with at least one establishment with a minimum of B
100 employees ul
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Category 3 refers to barangays with five or more establishments with 10 to 99 c
employees, and five or more facilities within the two-kilometer radius a
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from the barangay hall

Table 2-6 City Urban-Rural Population

2007 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014


Urban 308,541 346,527 368,396 380,163 393,657 399,318
Rural 130,549 108,026 100,374 98,971 97,684 106,287
% Urban 70.27% 76.23% 78.59% 79.34% 80.12% 78.98%
% Rural 29.73% 23.77% 21.41% 20.66% 19.88% 21.02%

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Figure 2-3 on the next page shows the level of urbanization in the city from 2007-
2014. From 2007 to 2013 it can be seen that the urbanization is increasing, however this
may decrease in 2014 since some urban barangays have decreasing growth rates. The
level of urbanization is expected to increase to 85.6% in 2020 with a total urban
population of 557,614 people. This urbanization trend is likely to continue in the
following years, and by the year 2030 the city is expected to be 94.7% urbanized.

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Urban and Rural Population and Level of Urbanization f
450,000 S
400,000 a
350,000
300,000 n
250,000 J
200,000
150,000
o
100,000 s
50,000 e
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2007 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 d
Urban 308,541 346,527 368,396 380,163 393,657 399,318 el
Rural 130,549 108,026 100,374 98,971 97,684 106,287 M
% Urban 70.27% 76.23% 78.59% 79.34% 80.12% 78.98% o
% Rural 29.73% 23.77% 21.41% 20.66% 19.88% 21.02% n
t
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Figure 2-3 Urban and Rural Population and Urbanization Level B
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Table 2-7 below lists urban barangays and population over time. The majority of a
urban barangays are classified under category 1 or having more than 5,000 population. c
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Table 2-7 Urban Changes Over Time
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Category 2007 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Bagong Buhay I 1 6,770 6,698 6,815 6,934 7,056 7,179
Bagong Buhay III 1 4,677 5,388 5,561 5,741 5,925 6,116
Citrus 1 19,044 20,882 21,861 22,887 23,960 25,084
Ciudad Real 2 1,798 2,338 2,382 2,427 2,473 2,520
Dulong Bayan 1 7,299 6,292 6,383 6,476 6,570 6,665
Francisco Homes-Guijo 1 5,384 5,815 5,875 5,937 5,998 6,061
Francisco Homes-Mulawin 1 10,677 10,453 10,579 10,707 10,837 10,968
Francisco Homes-Narra 1 7,379 6,917 7,085 7,257 7,434 7,614
Gaya-gaya 1 9,901 13,727 14,622 15,575 16,591 17,673
Graceville 1 32,670 28,563 29,223 29,898 30,588 31,295
Gumaoc West 1 7,186 6,915 7,100 7,291 7,486 7,687
Kaypian 1 26,308 25,614 26,444 27,301 28,185 29,098
Minuyan II 1 4,746 5,360 5,450 5,542 5,635 5,729
Minuyan III 2 2,751 2,703 2,744 2,785 2,826 2,869
Minuyan Proper 1 21,912 33,928 40,469 48,272 57,579 68,680
Muzon 1 82,851 81,947 86,495 91,296 96,362 101,711
Poblacion I 3 3,978 4,254 4,419 4,591 4,770 4,956
San Manuel 1 10,362 12,241 12,745 13,270 13,871 14,386
San Pedro 1 13,668 13,866 14,055 14,246 14,439 14,636
San Rafael I 1 7,806 7,782 7,974 8,171 8,373 8,580
San Rafael IV 1 5,446 5,257 5,246 5,241 5,236 5,231
Sto. Cristo 1 25,669 29,327 30,785 32,315 33,921 35,606
Sapang Palay Proper 1 4,466 4,894 5,048 5,206 5,370 5,538
Tungkong Mangga 1 8,209 10,260 10,794 11,355 11,945 12,566
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

The tempo of urbanization refers to the growth rate of urban population minus
the growth rate of rural population.16This resulted in the tempo of urbanization of 36%.

16 To compute for this, the 2007-2010 AAGR of rural barangays was subtracted from the urban AAGR.

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2.1.4. Annual Average Population Growth Rates o
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The City of San Jose Del Monte has higher average annual growth rates (AAGR)
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compared to the National, Provincial, and Regional level. From the year 2000 – 2010, the n
city recorded a 3.64% growth rate, which is 0.91% higher than the provincial growth rate J
of Bulacan. This can be seen in Figure 2-4below. o
s
In addition, some barangays have higher growth rates than the city average as e
shown in Figure 2-5 in the next page. d
el
M
0.00% 1.00% 2.00% 3.00% 4.00% 5.00% 6.00% 7.00% 8.00% 9.00% o
n
Philippines t
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Central Luzon ul
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Bulacan a
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San Jose del Monte

San Jose del


Bulacan Central Luzon Philippines
Monte
1990-2000 7.99% 4.02% 2.61% 2.34%
1990-2010 5.86% 3.37% 2.37% 2.12%
2000-2010 3.64% 2.73% 2.14% 1.90%

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Figure 2-4 Annual Average Growth Rates 1990 – 2010

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Barangay Annual Average Growth Rates 2000-2010 f
25.00% S
19.29%
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20.00% n
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15.00%
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10.00% 7.38%
8.63% s
6.52% 5.55% e
4.69% 4.47% 3.89% 4.12% 4.97% 5.20%
5.00% d
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0.00%
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e
B
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010 ul
a
c
Figure 2-5 Barangays with Higher AAGR Compared to City (2000-2010) a
n
From the graph above it can be observed that Minuyan Proper has the highest
population growth rate at 19.29%. This is followed by Kaybanban with 8.63%. The AAGR
ranges from 3.89% - 19.29% for 2000 – 2010 among barangays with higher growth rates
than at the city level.

San Jose del Monte Average Annual Growth Rates


12.00%

10.00%
1995-2000, 9.63%

8.00%

1990-1995, 6.55%
6.00%
2000-2007, 4.55%
4.00%

2.00%

2007-2010, 1.26%
0.00%
0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Figure 2-6 San Jose Del Monte Population Growth Rates

Figure 2-6 shows the historic AAGR of City of San Jose Del Monte. The latest census
years from 2007 to 2010 recorded the lowest AAGR of 1.26%, while the highest rates were
recorded from 1995 – 2000 with 9.63% growth.

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2.1.5. Household Population o
f
S
For the year 2010, a total of 102,131 households with an average of four persons a
per household were recorded among 59 barangays. In Table 2-8 below it can be observed n
that Muzon has the most number of households at 18,747. Minuyan Proper and Sto. Cristo J
follow this with 7,122 and 6,870 respectively. For barangays with the least number of o
households, these are Ciudad Real, Minuyan V, San Martin de Porres, Poblacion, Fatima s
IV, Fatima III, San Roque, and Fatima II, all with less than 500 households. e
d
el
Table 2-8 Number of Households by Barangay (2010)
M
HOUSEHOLDS HOUSEHOLDS HOUSEHOLDS o
Assumption 955 Kaybanban 537 San Rafael 1,673 n
Bagong Buhay I 1,450 Kaypian 6,843 San Rafael I 629 t
Bagong Buhay II 972 Lawang Pare 880 San Rafael III 602 e
Bagong Buhay III 1098 Maharlika 694 San Rafael IV 1,060 B
Citrus 4339 Minuyan I 617 San Rafael V 522 ul
Ciudad Real 496 Minuyan II 1,087 San Roque 353 a
Dulong Bayan 1,605 Minuyan III 642 Sta. Cruz I 776 c
Fatima I 655 Minuyan IV 821 Sta. Cruz II 697 a
Fatima II 336 Minuyan 7,122 Sta. Cruz III 561
n
Proper
Fatima III 379 Minuyan V 493 Sta. Cruz IV 678
Fatima IV 435 Muzon 18,747 Sta. Cruz V 827
Fatima V 500 Paradise III 792 Sto. Cristo 6,870
Francisco Homes-Guijo 1,225 Poblacion 459 Sto. Niño 598
Francisco Homes- 2,337 Poblacion I 918 Sto. Niño II 631
Mulawin
Francisco Homes-Narra 1,476 San Isidro 501 Sapang Palay 1,096
Proper
Francisco Homes-Yakal 742 San Manuel 2,643 San Martin de 493
Porres
Gaya-gaya 3,141 San Martin 810 Tungkong Mangga 2,298
Graceville 6,504 San Martin II 684 Total Households 102, 131
Gumaoc Central 739 San Martin III 640
Gumaoc East 1,049 San Martin IV 777
Gumaoc West 1,562 San Pedro 3,065

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

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The City of San Jose del Monte had a total of 102,131 households in 2010. Among o
these households there are 83,894 male household heads and 18,237 female heads of f
S
households. The average household size for 2010 is 4.4 as can be seen on the table below.
a
n
Table 2-9 Number of Households by Sex of Household Head, Size, and Average Size
J
Average
Total No. of Households Household Size Household
o
Household Size s
Head 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 and e
Both Sexes over d
102,131 5,676 11,379 18,124 21,270 18,204 12,267 7,231 7,980 4.4 el
Below 20 M
486 114 151 131 47 22 11 5 5 2.6
o
20 - 29 11,598 772 1,959 3,782 2,793 1,402 542 231 117 3.5 n
30 - 39 27,364 1,091 2,250 4,778 7,010 5,746 3,454 1,746 1,289 4.4 t
40 - 49 28,981 1,167 2,119 3,870 5,757 6,005 4,374 2,727 2,962 4.9 e
50 - 59 19,435 1,003 2,072 2,992 3,469 3,298 2,548 1,705 2,348 4.8 B
60 - 69
ul
9,497 818 1,717 1,721 1,489 1,237 972 603 940 4.2
a
70 - 79 3,836 542 865 696 578 416 289 179 271 3.7 c
80 years old and over 934 169 246 154 127 78 77 35 48 3.4 a
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010 n
Figure 2-7 summarizes the entries in the table above as follows: the city
household heads are predominantly male, which comprise 82% of the household head
population. Fifty five percent (55%) of the total household heads in the city are male and
18% female aged 30 – 49 years old. However, it is notable that there are more female
household heads aged 80 years old and over than males.

No. of Households by Age-Sex of Head


30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

0
80 and
Below 20 20 - 29 30 - 39 40 - 49 50 - 59 60 - 69 70 - 79
over
Male Household Head 347 10,236 24,509 24,773 15,211 6,238 2,130 450
Female Household Head 139 1,362 2,855 4,208 4,224 3,259 1,706 484

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Figure 2-7 Number of Households by Age-Sex of Household Head

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Household Population by Educational Attainment o
f
From Table 2-10, it can be seen that there are more females with academic degree S
a
and post baccalaureate degree holders than males in the city. This is similar to the overall
n
age-sex educational attainment rates in the province of Bulacan. The implications on the
J
educational attainment for the city population are discussed in more detail in succeeding o
chapters. s
e
Table 2-10 Educational Attainment by Age Group and Sex (2010) d
el
Educational Both sexes Male Female
M
Attainment Household Household Household
5-9 10-16 5-9 10-16 5-9 10-16 o
Population Population Population
years years years years years years n
5 years 5 years 5 years
old old old old old old t
and over and over and over
405,430 81,582 141,381 201,616 41,826 72,378 203,814 39,756 69,003 e
No grade B
9,876 8,101 397 5,176 4,363 232 4,700 3,738 165
completed ul
Preschool 11,998 11,807 130 6,240 6,129 80 5,758 5,678 50 a
Elementary 113,100 30,837 38,058 57,892 15,667 20,382 55,208 15,170 17,676 c
1st - 4th Grade 56,027 30,837 15,285 29,265 15,667 8,520 26,762 15,170 6,765 a
5th - 6th Grade 17,344 - 11,797 8,968 - 6,079 8,376 - 5,718
n
Elementary
39,729 - 10,976 19,659 - 5,783 20,070 - 5,193
Graduate
High School 162,860 - 31,957 80,701 - 15,491 82,159 - 16,466
Undergraduate 61,856 - 26,868 31,339 - 13,226 30,517 - 13,642
Graduate 101,004 - 5,089 49,362 - 2,265 51,642 - 2,824
Post-
16,826 - 27 8,757 - 11 8,069 - 16
Secondary
Undergraduate 1,597 - 27 912 - 11 685 - 16
Graduate 15,229 - - 7,845 - - 7,384 - -
College
46,353 - 724 23,172 - 298 23,181 - 426
Undergraduate
Academic
43,192 - - 19,160 - - 24,032 - -
Degree Holder
Post
938 - - 385 - - 553 - -
baccalaureate
Not Stated 287 - 85 133 - 39 154 - 46

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

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Households by Marital Status o
f
There are more unmarried men in the City of San Jose del Monte than single S
females. It is also notable that the population of married men and women are similar. a
Another observation is that there are over 9,000 females who were widowed and 4,778 n
females who are separated from their spouses – which is twice the number reported for J
males (Table 2-11) seen below. o
s
Table 2-11 Households by Age Group, Sex and Marital Status e
d
HH pop 10 years old Single Married Widowed Separated Live-in Unknown el
MALES and older M
175,457 80,185 77,230 2,663 2,163 12,887 329 o
n
Below 20 50,622 49,655 310 15 27 445 170 t
20 - 24 19,272 14,449 2,389 13 96 2,272 53 e
25 - 29 16,895 7,057 6,706 42 199 2,855 36 B
30 - 34 17,172 3,504 11,040 71 277 2,256 24 ul
35 - 39 16,087 1,881 12,249 89 304 1,547 17 a
40 - 44 15,500 1,491 12,256 149 352 1,244 8 c
45 - 49 12,846 913 10,519 230 306 872 6 a
50 - 54 9,812 550 8,109 303 241 602 7 n
55 - 59 6,959 312 5,732 349 162 401 3
60 - 64 4,542 183 3,679 376 99 204 1
65 - 69 2,539 85 2,033 280 45 96 0
70 - 74 1,697 50 1,239 315 37 54 2
75 -79 898 29 613 217 13 25 1
80 years and older 616 26 356 214 5 14 1
HH population 10 years Single Married Widowed Separated Live-in Unknown
FEMALES old and older
179,228 70,734 78,467 11,695 4,778 13,166 388

Below 20 48,584 46,142 854 17 99 1,307 165


20 - 24 19,443 11,296 4,411 40 382 3,258 56
25 - 29 17,690 5,288 8,993 81 535 2,755 38
30 - 34 17,908 2,596 12,527 196 626 1,927 36
35 - 39 16,234 1,446 12,609 269 633 1,259 18
40 - 44 15,529 1,163 12,034 583 678 1,056 15
45 - 49 12,692 884 9590 914 583 705 16
50 - 54 9,712 591 6,818 1,356 495 441 11
55 - 59 7,232 404 4,749 1,467 350 251 11
60 - 64 5,327 344 2,913 1,738 199 120 13
65 - 69 3,446 215 1,510 1,571 102 42 6
70 - 74 2,599 157 922 1,454 44 21 1
75 -79 1,548 118 366 1,013 33 16 2
80 years and older 1,284 90 171 996 19 8 0
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

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Religious Affiliation o
f
Shown in Table 2-12 below are the religions with the highest and lowest S
a
household affiliation, based on provincial data. The most practices religion in the Province
n
is Catholicism at 89.4%, followed by Iglesia Ni Cristo (INC) at 3.3%.
J
o
Table 2-12 Household Population in Bulacan by Religious Affiliation s
e
BULACAN d
RELIGIONS WITH HIGHEST HOUSEHOLD AFFILIATION Both Sexes Male Female In % el
Roman Catholic, including Catholic Charismatic 2,611,025 1,310,026 1,300,999 89.4 M
Iglesia Ni Cristo 96,148 48,390 47,758 3.3 o
Other religious affiliations 55,171 26,863 28,308 1.9
n
t
Evangelicals (Philippine Council of Evangelical Churches) 44,696 21,824 22,872 1.5
e
Jesus is Lord Church 24,664 11,893 12,771 0.8 B
Non-Roman Catholic and Protestant (National Council of Churches ul
17,389 8,523 8,866 0.6
in the Philippines)
a
Jehovah’s Witness 10,755 5,079 5,676 0.4
c
Bible Baptist Church 8,707 4,269 4,438 0.3 a
Islam 6,173 3,145 3,028 0.2 n
Seventh Day Adventist 6,062 2,870 3,192 0.2
Total 2,9889,790 1,442,882 1,437,908 98.6

Note: Total does not include religions with less than 0.2% share.
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Poverty Indicators

According to the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) report of 2003


City and Municipal Level Poverty Estimates, the City of San Jose del Monte has a poverty
incidence of 8.1 and ranked 1,527 out of 1,622 cities and municipalities in the Philippines.
This means that poverty incidence in the city is comparatively better than 94% of the
population. Also in 2003, the recorded magnitude of poor population is 31,092 or an
estimated 8% of the 361,678 estimated population of the same year.

In addition, the NSCB released the 2006, 2009, and 2012 poverty incidence rates
(Table 2-13) for the province of Bulacan in 2013. Like the city, the province of Bulacan
has relatively low poverty incidence rates than other provinces. Based on latest poverty
statistics it has consistently been in Cluster 5 or considered least poor provinces of the
country.

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Table 2-13 Bulacan Provincial Poverty Incidence o
f
2006 2009 2012 S
Clustera PIb C. Intervalc PI C. Interval PI C. Interval a
LLd ULe LL UL LL UL n
5 4.9 3.6 6.1 4.6 3.5 5.6 5.4 3.4 7.3 J
o
Source: 2012 Full Year Official Poverty Statistics s
Notes: e
a Cluster refers to the grouping of the province depending on poverty incidence, where 1 represents the poorest cluster.

b Refers to Poverty Incidence the proportion of families/individuals with per capita income less than the per capita poverty threshold to the total d
number of families/individuals. el
c Confidence Interval at 90%.
M
d Lower limit

e Upper limit
o
n
t
From the CBMS data compiled by DILG through the years, it was reported that,
e
there are 32 out of 59 barangays with households that have income below poverty
B
threshold, food threshold, have experienced food shortage, and have members who are ul
unemployed (Table 2-14). Barangay Kaypian had the most number of poor households a
despite that all household members are employed. c
a
Following Kaypian is Citrus with almost half the household population with n
income below poverty threshold. It also has the most number of unemployed individuals.
Other than these two, San Pedro is among the poorest with 1,281 households below
poverty threshold. Other barangays in the list mostly have less than 500 households
below the poverty threshold. Using latest provincial estimates, there is a poverty
magnitude of 19,002 poor households

While the poverty line or the minimum income to meet basic food and non-food
needs for the province of Bulacan is around Php 19,910 (in 2012).17

17 NSCB 2012 Full Year Official Poverty Statistics

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Table 2-14 2010 Household Poverty Incidence in San Jose Del Monte o
f
S
Households with Households with Households who
Total Members a
Income Below Income Below Experienced Food
Households Unemployed n
Poverty Threshold Food Threshold Shortage
Assumption 955 43 266 2 272 J
Bagong Buhay 1,450 741 403 177 521 o
s
Bagong Buhay II 972 449 272 69 228
e
Bagong Buhay III 1,098 560 309 124 270
d
Citrus 4,339 2,156 1,315 239 1,228 el
Fatima I 655 217 127 20 170 M
Fatima V 500 214 126 49 108 o
Francisco Homes-Narra 1,476 230 130 37 393 n
Francisco Homes-Yakal 742 158 98 55 237
t
e
Gumaoc West 1,562 550 242 8 358
B
Kaybanban 537 175 83 0 70
ul
Kaypian 6,843 6,843 6,843 0 0 a
Lawang Pare 880 454 313 6 263 c
Maharlika 694 102 46 2 153 a
Minuyan III 642 200 94 26 189 n
Minuyan IV 821 182 0 456 193
Minuyan V 493 170 91 34 127
San Isidro 501 243 166 12 66
San Martin 810 321 151 58 165
San Martin II 684 321 186 134 185
San Martin III 640 259 133 1 156
San Martin IV 777 434 271 41 202
San Pedro 3,065 1,281 616 230 656
San Rafael 1,673 664 360 79 440
San Rafael I 629 242 108 142 167
Sta. Cruz II 697 185 144 0 150
Sta. Cruz III 561 299 112 0 51
Sta. Cruz IV 678 355 184 75 115
Sta. Cruz V 827 257 125 5 208
Sto. Nino 598 187 90 10 63
Sto. Nino II 631 276 164 11 158
San Martin de Porres 493 233 148 51 127
Total 37,923 19,002 13,717 2,151 7,687

Source: CBMS data from DILG (2010)

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o
f
Household Poverty Incidence 2010 S
Income Below Poverty Threshold Income Below Food Threshold a
Experienced Food Shortage Members Unemployed
n
5,000
J
4,500 o
s
4,000
e
3,500 d
3,000 el
M
2,500 o
2,000 n
t
1,500
e
1,000 B
500
ul
a
0 c
a
n

Source: CBMS Data from DILG (2010)


Figure 2-8 Household Poverty Incidence

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o
2.2. TOTAL POPULATION f
S
2.2.1. Population density a
n
J
The population density18 of a city has critical implications for planning since this o
indicates how the population is distributed in the city suggests the intensity or spread of s
services across settlements. e
d
The City of San Jose del Monte has a gross population density of 4,307 persons per el
hectare (persons/hectare) of land.19 M
o
n
Table 2-15 below shows the barangays with the highest and lowest population
t
densities as of 2010. Compared to the regional population density in Central Luzon of
e
460-persons/sq km, only nine barangays had lower densities. B
ul
Table 2-15 Ten Barangays with Lowest and Highest Population Density20 a
c
Barangays with Lowest Population Density Barangays with Highest Population Density a
Barangay Land Area Population Density Barangay Land Area Population Density
n
(in hectares) (persons/sq.m.) (in hectares) (persons/sq.m.)
San Roque 962 168.1 Gumaoc West 270 2,561.1
Kaybanban 975 243.2 Citrus 800 2,610.3
San Isidro 953 248.7 Sta. Cruz V 134 2,611.9
Ciudad Real 928 251.9 San Rafael IV 194 2,709.8
Minuyan V 660 335.6 Muzon 2,300 3,562.9
Paradise III 960 356.3 San Rafael 197 3,950.3
Maharlika 865 361.5 Gaya-gaya 310 4,428.1
Minuyan III 675 400.4 Kaypian 512 5,002.7
Minuyan I 670 427.0 Minuyan Proper 620 5,472.3
Poblacion 413 512.8 Graceville 300 9,521.0

Source: CSJDM Official Website and NSO CPH 2010

Aside from the numbers of the table above, 42 out of the 59 barangays have higher
population densities compared to the Province of Bulacan with 1,046-persons/sq km.

18 Population density refers to the number of persons occupying a unit of space, for this discussion it is calculated by dividing the number of
persons in the barangay by the barangay land area.
19 This was calculated using the latest NSO census data for the City and the total land area of 10,553 hectares (105.53 sq km), which is
according to the Land Management Bureau (LMB).
20 Barangay population densities were computed based on per Barangay land area found on the CSJDM website with a total of 31,294 hectares

(312.94 sq km).

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2.3. POPULATION CHANGE o
f
2.3.1. Historical Population Growth S
a
n
The first recorded population of San Jose del Monte was in 1903 with 1,378 J
inhabitants. The succeeding census had an annual average growth rate (AAGR) of 3.92% o
spread over 21 years and is comparative with the most recent City AAGR (2000-2010) of s
3.64%. The population growth rate doubled in the 1920s and rapidly declined as a result e
of World War II. With the Japanese Imperial Army taking over San Jose del Monte in 1942- d
1943, and the bombing of the Poblacion by Americans in 1945, the population dropped el
M
from 5,826 in 1939 to 5,363, recording 12 years of negative population growth rates for
o
the city.
n
t
Table 2-16 Historical Growth of Population in San Jose Del Monte
e
B
YEAR POPULATION AAGR21 ul
1903 1,378 -
a
c
1918 3,141 3.92% a
1939 5,826 6.86% n

1948 5,363 -0.69%

1960 9,329 5.54%


1970 18,704 13.91%
1975 59,021 22.98%
1980 90,732 4.23%
1990 142,047 9.28%
1995 201,394 6.55%
2000 315,807 9.63%
2007 439,090 4.55%
2010 454,553 1.26%

Source: CSJDM Official Website

Note that the AAGR values were recalculated by the research team.
21

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By the year 1961, the city population hastily recovered with the Sapang Palay o
Resettlement Project. The Project covers a 752-hectare area that influenced the city’s f
S
highest growth rates at 22.98%, with a population of 59,021 by 1975. From 1980 to 2000,
a
the city’s growth rates remained quite high. It is only in the most recent census year
n
(2010) that the city growth rate decreased to 1.26%; however San Jose del Monte was J
already recognized as the most populated city in Bulacan, comprising 15.5% of the o
provincial population according to the NSO22 back in 2007. s
e
d
el
Historical Population Growth San Jose Del Monte City M
454,553 o
439,090 n
445,000
t
395,000 e
B
345,000 315,807 ul
295,000 a
c
245,000
201,394
a
195,000 n
142,047
145,000
90,732
95,000
59,021
45,000
1,378 3,141 5,826 5,363 9,329 18,704
-5,000
1903 1918 1939 1948 1960 1970 1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2007 2010

Population

Source: CSJDM Official Website23

Figure 2-9 Historical Population Growth (1903-2010)

22Bulacan’s Sex Ratio was Recorded at 100 Males per 100 Females (Results from the 2010 Census of Population and Housing)” NSO, Released
10 July 2013. Accessed 14 May 2014 http://www.census.gov.ph/content/bulacan%E2%80%99s-sex-ratio-was-recorded-100-males-100-
females-results-2010-census-population-and

23Values were taken from the City of San Jose Del Monte official website found at http://www.csjdm.gov.ph/levels-growth-pattern.html, note that
the presented AAGR rates does not follow the source as these were recalculated using the exponential method for computing AAGR.

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2.3.2. Projected Annual Population o
f
S
As shown in Figure 2-10 barangay population sizes are distinctively varied. By the a
year 2020, Barangay Sto. Cristo is projected to have 47,634 inhabitants, which indicates n
an increase of 18,307 people in only 10 years. J
o
For District 1, barangays with highest population include the following: Muzon s
(140,642), Sto. Cristo (47,634), Graceville (35,890), Kaypian (35,233), and Gaya-Gaya e
(25,815). Conversely, barangays with the lowest population are San Roque (1,594), d
el
Poblacion (2,377), Ciudad Real (2,819), San Isidro (3,091), and Francisco Homes-Yakal
M
(3,488).
o
n
t
e
B
ul
a
c
a
n

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Figure 2-10 1st District Barangay Population Growth (2010-2020)

Meanwhile District 2 barangays (Figure 2-11) have higher population values than
the first. As previously mentioned, Minuyan Proper will have the highest projected
population in the city by 2020 with a population of 197,804 or 30% of the city’s
population. Citrus, the second most populated barangay lags behind it with 33,024
inhabitants, followed by San Pedro (15,871), San Rafael I (9,933), and Assumption (8,746)
as the barangays with the highest projected population in the district.

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o
f
S
a
n
J
o
s
e
d
el
M
o
n
t
e
B
ul
a
c
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010 a
n
Figure 2-11 2nd District Barangay Population Growth (2010-2020)

On the other hand, barangays with the lowest population at the city level are also
located in this district. By 2020, Fatima II population will drop to 1,632 persons, followed
by Fatima III and Minuyan V at 1,863 and 1,934 people respectively. San Martin de Porres
also shows declining population values from 2,277 in 2010 to 2,099 in 2020. This suggests
possible intra-city movement areas with more developed services.

2.3.3. Migration

Historically, the influx of migrants is illustrated by the high migration rates in the
previous decades. This is reflected by an unusually rapid population growth rate with an
average value of 21.16% from 1990-2000. This can be supported by the observation that
in 1996 there were about 73 migrants for every 1,000 residents.

Considering that the city has received an influx of migrants of about 12, 458 to 21,
607 annually from 1996 to 2001, it can be deduced that San Jose del Monte holds some
influential factors that keep the migrants flowing in. These reasons may be the numerous
residential subdivision developments within the City; the state of social service facilities;
proximity to Metro Manila; and the condition of physical and social infrastructure.

In the latest decade, the pace of migration has relatively slowed down. This trend
started at the turn of the century. The migration turn started when the proportion of
migrants to total residents decreased from 73 in the year 1996 to 39 in the year 2000.

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Such decreasing trends in total inter-town migration with respect to the city o
seemed to continue to the present. The latest NSO census records showed that 81.3% f
S
(369,537 individuals) of the city’s household population aged five years and older are
a
residents of the city in the last three years. In the same period, only 7.4% was reported to
n
have migrated from other provinces. This situation is reflected in the housing J
construction pattern, which boomed in the 1990s but slowed down in the 2000s; the said o
housing pattern is elaborated in the social sector chapter. In terms of foreign migrants, s
there are more males than females who opted to live in the city (Table 2-17). e
d
Table 2-17 Migration Pattern el
M
Household Population 5 years and Over Same City In % o
n
Both sexes 405,430 369,537 81.3
t
Male 201,616 184,063 40.5
e
Female 203,814 185,474 40.8 B
ul
Other City; Same Province % Other Province In % a
Both sexes 1,889 0.4% 33,602 7.4 c
Male 943 0.2% 16,395 3.6
a
n
Female 946 0.2% 17,207 3.8

Foreign Country % Unknown In %


Both sexes 394 0.09% 8 0.002
Male 211 0.05% 4 0.001
Female 183 0.04% 4 0.001

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing 2010

Considering the rapid growth of population among barangays, particularly


Minuyan Proper, Gaya-gaya, and Sto. Cristo, it is possible that these areas will affect
migration patterns inside the city. As of late there are indications of this scenario, such as
the case of Muzon. Some barangay populations in recent census in 2010 posted negative
growth, possibly due to emigration, as new growth centers in other parts of the city will
emerge.

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o
3. SOCIAL SECTOR f
S
a
3.1. HEALTH AND SANITATION n
J
o
The health situation of the city is comprised of the regional health situation, the s
city’s vital statistics, nutrition, sanitation, and human resource for health services and e
governance. The vital statistics portray glimpse of the key parameters such as birth rates d
and death rates. The discussion of nutrition as a key component of health shall provide el
context regarding the early stages of the young population cohort. The availability of M
water and domestic sewage facilities shall describe the situation on sanitation. Finally, the o
figures and distribution of health specialists will give ideas on the possibilities regarding n
the future health-related governance of the city. t
e
3.1.1. Vital Statistics B
ul
a
To understand the health situation in the city, it is proper to catch a glimpse of the c
general health situation in Central Luzon. From 2008 to 2011, the Crude Birth Rate (CBR) a
has generally decreased while the Crude Death Rate (CDR) has fluctuated. Infant Mortality n
Rate (IMR) decreased from 2008 to 2009 at 5.5 to 5.02 but increased from 2009 to 2011
with 5.02 to 5.41. Meanwhile, Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) incurred a net increase
from 2008 to 2011 of 0.4. The IMR is for every 1,000 live births. The MMR is for every
100,000 live births. These figures are summarized in the table below.

Table 3-1 General Health Situation in Region 3 (Rates per Thousand)

INDICATORS 2008 2009 2011


Crude Birth Rate 22.0 20.7 17.7
Crude Death Rate 4.2 3.94 4.13
Infant Mortality Rate 5.5 5.02 5.41
Maternal Mortality Rate 0.37 0.31 0.41

NOTE:
CBR and CDR are computed per 1,000 population
IMR computed per 1,000 live births
MMR computed per 100,000 live births
Source: FHSIS, 2008-2011

The general health situation of the city is characterized by its contrasts with
Region 3. For instance, from 2011 the CBR of the city is higher than that of Region 3 but
lower CDR and IMR of the city in 2011.

The CBR and CDR of the City from 2010 to 2013 demonstrated a net increase. The
IMR also displayed net increase from 2010 to 2012 while MMR decreased in the same
period (Table 3-2).

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Table 3-2 General Health Situation of CSJDM o
f
S
HEALTH INDICATOR 2010 2011 2012 2013 a
n
Crude Birth Rate (CBR) 25 22.6 22.6 27.85 J
o
s
Crude Death Rate (CDR) 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.58 e
d
el
Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) 2.3 2.9 2.9 - M
o
n
Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) 0.6 0.5 0.5 - t
e
B
Source: CHO, 2010-2013 ul
a
Table 3-3 Crude Birth Rate and Crude Death Rate for the Last Three Years c
a
YEAR CBR PERCENT CHANGE CDR PERCENT CHANGE n
2011 22.6 - 2.3 -
2012 22.6 0% 2.3 0%
2013 27.85 23% 2.58 12.17%

Source: FHSIS, 2008-2013 and CHO, 2013

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Regarding live births, the top ten barangays with lowest and highest live births o
above the city average for 2013 are found below. f
S
Table 3-4 Barangays with Lowest and Highest Number of Live Births a
n
BARANGAYS WITH LOWEST NUMBER OF LIVE BIRTHS BARANGAYS WITH HIGHEST NUMBER OF LIVE BIRTHS
J
Barangay No. of Live births Barangay No of Live births o
Ciudad Real 15 Muzon 2,489 s
Fatima III 57 Minuyan Proper 976 e
Minuyan III 68 Graceville 896 d
Poblacion 71 Kaypian 674 el
San Roque 71 San Pedro 537 M
Fatima II 72 Citrus 530 o
San Rafael III 73 Sto. Cristo 402 n
San Martin de Porres 73 Tungkong Mangga 282
t
San Martin III 74 Narra 241
e
Sto. Nino II 75 Dulong Bayan 236
B
Source: CHO, 2013
ul
a
Access of households to health facilities per barangay is shown in Table 3-5. c
a
Notice that majority of the barangays with lowest number of access to health facility are
n
also the one’s with lowest live births as shown in Table 3-4. This shows that these
barangays are either far from health care facilities or they really have low population. The
fluctuating vital statistics in the city could be explained by the influx of people in the
resettlement areas. In 2012, the CBR is 22.6 while in 2013 it reached 27.5. According to
World Bank, the standard CBR is 25.

Table 3-5 Top Ten Barangays Ranked According to Access to Health Facility: Least Access (left) Most Access
(right)

NO. OF HOUSEHOLDS NO. OF HOUSEHOLDS


BARANGAY BARANGAY
WITH ACCESS WITH ACCESS
San Roque 296 Muzon 18572
Ciudad Real 404 Graceville 7333
Fatima II 448 Kaypian 5905
Fatima IV 482 Minuyan Proper 4918
Poblacion 482 Citrus 4278
Fatima IV 482 San Pedro 3068
Sto. Nino I 525 San Manuel 2326
Minuyan V 534 Gaya-Gaya 2222
Kaybanban 543 San Rafael I 2058
San Martin De Porres 577 Tungkong Mangga 1843

Source: CHO, 2013

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3.1.2. Nutrition o
f
S
The nutritional status of children is approximated through weight measurements. a
In 2012, 96% (149,708) of preschoolers were of normal weight. At the same time, 3.4% n
or 5,292 children of preschool age were either underweight or severely underweight. On J
the same year, there was 0.6% (914) of preschoolers who were overweight (Table 3-6). o
s
Table 3-6 Weight Categories of Preschoolers in 2012 e
d
WEIGHT STATUS NUMBER OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN PERCENT OF TOTAL el
Normal 149,708 96% M
o
Underweight 3,370 2.2%
n
Severely Underweight 1,922 1.2%
t
Overweight 914 .6% e
Total 155,914 100% B
ul
Source: CHO, 2012
a
c
3.1.3. Fertility and Pregnancy a
n

According to the latest Young Adult Fertility and Sexuality (YAFS) study, around
14% of girls aged 15 to 19 are either pregnant for the first time or are already mothers.
That is up from about six percent (6%) recorded by an earlier YAFS study in 2002.

In CSJDM, the City Health Office reports that all barangays in the city have cases
of teenage pregnancy. The highest number of cases is in Barangay Muzon (346).

Table 3-7 shows the top barangays where recorded teenage pregnancy happened
in 2013. The figure of Muzon, being on top of the list, is significantly larger than each of
those of the other barangays.

Table 3-7 Top Five Barangays for Teenage Pregnancy

BARANGAY NUMBER
Muzon 346
Graceville 182
Gaya – Gaya 139
Kaypian 123
Minuyan Proper 106

Source: CHO, 2013

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Table 3-8 Bottom Five Barangays for Teenage Pregnancy o
f
BARANGAY NUMBER S
Ciudad Real 5 a
Fatima III 6 n
San Martin III 7 J
Francisco Homes - Narra 7 o
Poblacion 7 s
e
Source: CHO, 2013 d
el
Despite Muzon being the top barangay that has access to health facility, the said M
barangay still ranked first in the barangays with highest cases of teenage pregnancy. o
n
According to the data provided by the City Health Office, there is one (1) public t
hospital with 90-bed capacity, five (5) private hospitals (see Table 3-20) and five (5) City e
B
Health Centers. The following tables display the distribution of medical facilities and
ul
personnel throughout places in the city. There is an average of 7.8 personnel in each City
a
Health Center. c
a
n
Table 3-9 Number of Types of Personnel in the City Health Centers (2013)

NUMBER OF PERSONNEL IN CITY HEALTH CENTERS


PERSONNEL
CATEGORY Health Health Center Health Center Health Center Health Center
Center I II III IV V
CHP 1 1 1 1 -
RSI 1 1 1 1 1
Med tech 1 1 1 1 1
Nurse 1 2 2 2 2
Encoder 1 - - - 1
Utility 1 1 - - -
Midwife 2 1 - - -
Dentist 1 1 1 1 -
Dental aide 1 1 1 - -
Lab aide - 1 - - -
MO - - - - 1
Total 10 10 7 6 6

Source: CHO, 2013

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Table 3-10 Number of Midwives Assigned to Barangays (2013) o
f
NUMBER S
BARANGAY OF a
MIDWIVES n
Muzon 5 J
Graceville 3 o
s
Kaypian, Gaya-Gaya, Sto. Cristo, Minuyan Proper, San Pedro 2 each
e
Dulong Bayan, Francisco Homes - Guijo, Francisco Homes - Mulawin, Poblacion, Poblacion I,
d
Sapang Palay Proper, Francisco Homes -Yakal, Tungkong Mangga, Gumaoc East, Gumaoc
el
Central,
M
Gumaoc West, Kaybanban, San Isidro, Minuyan I, Minuyan IV, Minuyan V,
1 each o
Citrus, Sto. Niño I, Sto. Niño II, Bagong Buhay I, Bagong Buhay II,
n
Bagong Buhay III, Fatima I, Fatima II, San Martin I, San Martin III, Sta. Cruz I,
t
Sta. Cruz II, Sta. Cruz III, Sta. Cruz IV, San Rafael I, San Rafael II,
e
San Rafael IV, San Rafael V
B
Source: CHO, 2013
ul
a
Table 3-11 Annual Inventory of Key Health Personnel (2010-2013) c
a
HEALTH INDICATOR 2010 2011 2012 2013 n
No. of Public Hospital 1 1 1 1
No. of Public Doctors 7 7 7 7
No. of Public Dentists 4 4 5 5
No. of Public Nurses 11 11 10 17
No. of Public Midwives 52 55 52 53
No. of Other Health Personnel 26 32 - -
Medical Technologists - - 4 6
Nutritionists - - 3 3
Barangay Health Workers - - 600 621
Sanitary Inspectors - - 5 5
Non-technical personnel - - 4 2
No. of Public Clinics / Health Stations 60 65 65 65
No. of Private Hospitals 2 2 2 5

Source: SEP, 2010-2012 and CHO, 2013

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Table 3-12 Service Backlog in Hospitals o
f
YEAR POPULATION POPULATION PER 1 HOSPITAL BED RATIO BACKLOG S
a
2010 454,553 455 255
n
2011 471,099 471 271 J
2012 488,245 488 288 o
2013 506,017 506 306 s
524,435 e
2014 524 324
d
2015 543,523 544 344 el
2016 563,307 563 363 M
2017 583,810 584 384 o
605,060 n
2018 605 405
t
2019 627,083 627 427 e
2020 649,908 650 450 B
ul
Source: NSO and National Economic Development Authority a
c
a
3.2. Morbidity and Mortality n

Morbidity is defined as the relative incidence of disease. In Region 3, acute watery


diarrhea leads the list. Majority of the diseases found in Table 3-13 is also present in the
City of San Jose Del Monte.

Table 3-13 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity in Region 3 (2005)

DISEASE NO. OF CASES RATE PER 100,000 POP


Acute Watery Diarrhea 76,927 891.8
Bronchitis/Bronchiolitis 52,834 612.5
ALRI and Pneumonia 38,877 450.7
Hypertension 31,291 362.8
Diseases of the Heart 22,878 265.2
Influenza 22,675 262.9
TB Respiratory 7,969 92.4
Chickenpox 2,349 27.2
Dengue Fever 2,320 26.9
Malaria 1,246 14.4

Source: FHSIS, 2005

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For the last three years, the reported prevalence of diseases in the city was o
marked by a combination of both infectious and chronic diseases: acute respiratory f
S
infection, diarrhea, wound infections, bronchitis, tonsillitis, and hypertension; those
a
diseases are highlighted below. Such situation is summarized in the following tables.
n
Table 3-14 shows the top ten leading causes of diseases for the last three years. J
o
Table 3-15 to 3-17 shows the number leading causes of morbidity per sex for s
2011, 2012, and 2013. Notice that mostly the females rank first in most diseases. This e
shows that the females are more exposed than men, thus more services for female d
population is needed. el
M
Table 3-14 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for the Last Three Years o
n
t
2011 2012 2013
e
Acute Respiratory Infection Acute Respiratory Infection Acute Respiratory Infection B
ul
Arthritis Arthritis Pain (All forms) a
c
Dental problem, All types Animal bite Skin Problems
a
Diarrhea Dental problem (All types) Anemia n

Infected Wound Infected Wound Diarrhea

Eye Problem (All types) Diarrhea Bronchitis

Bronchitis Tonsillitis Infected Wound

Tonsillitis Hypertension Hypertension

Skin Problems Bronchitis Urinary tract Infection

Hypertension Skin allergy Tonsillitis

Source: CHO, 2013

Table 3-15 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for 2011

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS
CAUSES
Male Female Total
1. Acute upper respiratory infection 40,720 43,908 84,628
2. Arthritis 1,694 2,277 3,971
3. Dental problem 1,251 1,370 2,621
4. Diarrhea 1,322 1,199 2,521
5. Infected wound 1,241 1,120 2,361
6. Eye problem 1,013 1,191 2,204
7. Bronchitis 1,058 1,065 2,123

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8. Tonsillitis 944 1,124 2,068 o
f
9. Skin problem 870 1,119 1,989
S
10. Hypertension 781 1,021 1,802 a
n
Source: CHO, 2013 J
o
Table 3-16 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for 2012
s
e
NUMBER d
CAUSES Male Female Total el
1. Acute respiratory infection 41,905 43,192 85,097 M
2. Arthritis 1,617 2,229 3,846 o
n
3. Animal bite 1,787 1,755 3,542
t
4. Dental problem 1,303 1,470 2,773 e
5. Infected Wound 1,348 1,333 2,681 B
6. Diarrhea 1,233 1,261 2,494 ul
7. Tonsillitis 1,160 1,313 2,473
a
c
8. Hypertension 1,042 1,222 2,264
a
9. Bronchitis 905 1,000 1,905 n
10. Skin allergy 882 1.005 1,887
Source: CHO, 2013

Table 3-17 Ten Leading Causes of Morbidity for 2013

NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS
CAUSES
Male Female Total
1. Acute upper respiratory infection 40,720 43,908 84628
2. Arthritis 1,694 2,277 3,971
3. Dental problem 1,251 1,370 2,621
4. Diarrhea 1,322 1,199 2,521
5. Infected wound 1,241 1,120 2,361
6. Eye problem 1,013 1,191 2,204
7. Bronchitis 1,058 1,065 2,123
8. Tonsillitis 944 1,124 2,068
9. Skin problem 870 1,119 1,989
10. Hypertension 781 1,021 1,802
Source: CHO, 2013

The death rate in the city has been fluctuating recently. This rate can be
disaggregated into infant deaths, maternal deaths, deaths due to neonatal tetanus,
perinatal deaths, and due to other causes from pathogenic, chronic, and debilitating
diseases. These rates are shown in the tables below.

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Table 3-18 Death Rates Other Death Types by Various Causes o
f
Year Deaths Infant Deaths Maternal Deaths S
a
Total Rate Total Rate No. Rate
n
2008 1,153 2.9 32 2.4 5 44.7
J
2009 1,340 3.29 37 2.60 9 0.63 o
2011 1,259 2.20 36 3.01 3 0.25 s
e
Source: FHSIS 2008-2011 d
el
Table 3-19 Death Rates and Other Death Types by Various Causes (continued) M
o
n
Year Deaths due to Neonatal Tetanus Perinatal Deaths Under Five Mortality Rate t
e
Total Rate Total Rate No. Rate B
2008 2 0.1 - - - - ul
2009 0 0.0 9 0.63 64 0.45 a
2011 0 0.0 1 0.08 59 0.49 c
a
Source: FHSIS 2008-2011
n

Programs addressed by City Health Officials include campaign drives against


dengue, rabies, malnutrition, and smoking in public.

Table 3-20 List of Private Hospitals

Name Location
1. Kairos General Hospital Brgy. Muzon
2. Brigino General Hospital Brgy. Tungkong Mangga
3. Grace General Hospital Brgy. F. Homes Mulawin
4. E.V Roque Memorial Hospital Brgy. San Pedro
5. Zamora Hospital Brgy. Poblacion I

Source: City Health Office

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3.3. EDUCATION o
f
S
Regarding the situation of public education, student-to-teacher and student-to- a
classroom ratios provide useful to the development of the City. In public elementary n
schools, there was an average of 54 students per 1 teacher (54:1) and 65 students per 1 J
classroom (65:1). In public secondary schools, there was an average of 48 students per 1 o
teacher (48:1) and 79 students per 1 classroom (79:1). Take note that the standard for s
teachers to students to classroom ratio is 1 is to 45 (1:45). e
d
Table 3-21 Ratios of Student to Teachers and Students to Classrooms by Level (2013-2014)
el
M
NUMBER OF ENROLLEES o
NO. OF TOTAL NO. OF
STUDENT- STUDENT- n
TEACHER CLASSROOM
TYPE/LEVEL Male Female Total TEACHERS CLASSROOM
RATIO RATIO
t
e
B
Public Schools ul
a
Elementary 37,442 34,733 72,175 1,345 858 54:1 65:1 c
a
n
Secondary 15,659 15,818 31,477 650 399 48:1 79:1

Private Schools

Elementary 10,109 9,302 19,411 - - - -

Secondary 6,888 6,539 13,427 - - - -

Source: DepEd District Office, 2013

Table 3-22 Number of Private Schools (2012-2013)

PRIVATE NUMBER TOTAL ENROLLEES


Private enrollment 133 15,276
Tertiary 8 -
Vocational 16 -

Source: CSJDM website

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In particular, the conditions of the classrooms and buildable spaces vary per o
educational level. Around 3.38% of the elementary school rooms and 2.26% of the f
S
secondary school rooms are condemned buildings. And 13.52% of classrooms in the
a
elementary schools are condemnable but are still being used; the figure is 3.26% for
n
secondary schools. Meanwhile buildable spaces (7 x 9 meters each) are still available for J
both elementary and secondary schools. o
s
Table 3-23 Summary of the Status of Instructional Rooms for Government Elementary and Secondary Schools e
d
TYPE OF CLASSROOM SPACE ELEMENTARY SECONDARY el
Total instructional rooms 858 399 M
o
Condemned Classrooms 29 (3.38%) 9 (2.26%)
n
Condemnable Classrooms 116 (13.52%) 13 (3.26%)
t
Buildable space (7 x 9 m) 284 194 e
B
Source: DepEd District Office, 2013
ul
a
The figures of the public secondary schools, on the other hand, display positive change c
in the student-to-teacher ratio and negative change in the student-classroom ratio. a
n
Table 3-24 Teacher-Pupil/Student Ratio/Classroom Ratio

PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Indicator 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Teacher-to-student ratio 1:50 1:50 1:47 1:46

Classroom-to-student ratio 1:70 1:73 1:73 1:47

PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS

Teacher-to-student ratio - - 1:47 -

Classroom-to-student ratio - - 1:82 -

Source: DepEd District Office, 2013

The changes in enrollment in elementary and secondary schools across the city
were different from each other from SY 2010-2011 to SY 2012-2013. For instance, in SY
2011-2012 forces behind increase in secondary school enrollments (9.73%) drove the
changes while in SY 2012-2013 it was the increase in elementary school enrollments
(13.27%) that demonstrated significant changes. In SY 2013-2014 the rates of change for
both elementary and secondary school enrollments seem to have more or less balanced.

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Table 3-25 Percent Changes in Total Enrollment across Levels from 2013-2014 o
f
ELEMENTARY AND S
SCHOOL ELEMENTARY SECONDARY
SECONDARY a
YEAR n
Enrollees % Change Enrollees % Change Enrollees % Change
J
2010-2011 77,587 - 38,506 no data 116,093 no data
o
2011-2012 76,449 -1.47% 42,456 9.73% 118,905 2.42% s
2012-2013 86,592 13.27% 42,426 -.07% 129,018 8.5% e
2013-2014 91,586 5.77% 44,904 5.84% 136,490 5.79% d
el
Source: DepEd District Office, 2013 M
o
n
There is a marked difference in the dropout rates of males and females across all
t
educational levels in the city; the dropout rate is higher for males than that of females.
e
B
In the elementary level, when the shares of males and females in the total ul
enrollees are compared, males gain the upper hand with a gender parity index of 0.65 24. a
In the secondary level, there is an improvement of the gender parity index, which DepEd c
Region 3 assigned as one. a
n
Table 3-26 Dropout Rate for Elementary School (2013-2014)

DIVISION AVE. DROPOUT TOTAL TOTAL GENDER PARITY


RATE DROPOUTS ENROLLEES INDEX25

San Jose Del Monte 1. 84% 1,181 64,314


Male 2.48% 831 33,456 0.46
Female 1.13% 350 30, 858

Source: ebeis.dep.gov.ph

24 An index value equal or close to 1 implies more equality.


25 Gender Parity Index (GPI) is a socioeconomic index usually designed to measure the relative access to education of males and females.

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Table 3-27 Dropout Rate for Secondary School (2013-2014) o
f
S
DIVISION AVE. DROPOUT TOTAL TOTAL GENDER PARITY a
RATE DROPOUTS ENROLLEES INDEX n
J
o
San Jose Del Monte 1.36% 612 44,904 1
s
Male 1.67% 376 22,547 e
Female 1.06% 236 22,357 d
el
Source: ebeis.dep.gov.ph M
o
During the conduct of the years in elementary schools, the cohort survival rates n
for females are usually higher than those for males. On the other hand, the overall cohort t
survival rates for both genders are decreasing as one goes from Grade 1 to Grade 6. These e
overall and trends among genders are also true for secondary schools. B
ul
Table 3-28 Cohort Survival for Elementary School (2012-2013) a
c
a
COHORT SURVIVAL YEARS n
DIVISION GENDER
INPUT PER
Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 GRADUATE

Total 100% 90.37% 88.60% 88.60% 88.60% 86.03% 6.61%


San Jose Del
M 100% 89.41% 87.56% 87.56% 86.91% 83.41% 6.84%
Monte
F 100% 91.46% 89.77% 89.77% 89.77% 88.19% 6.41%

Source: DepEd District Office, 2013

Table 3-29 Cohort Survival for Secondary School (2012-2013)

COHORT SURVIVAL (in %)


COEFFICIENT OF
COMPLETION
DIVISION GENDER EFFICIENCY
RATE (in %)
Year I Year II Year III Year IV (In %)

Total 100 96.98 92.09 87.27 84.60 86.19


San Jose Del
M 100 95.07 87.65 82.52 80.28 82.57
Monte
F 100 98.94 96.70 92.22 89.09 89.80

Source: DepEd District Office, 2013

In general, performances of elementary and secondary schools in the city from the
school years covering the period from 2009 to 2013 indicate relatively stable trends. This
is more observable in the cohort survival rates in elementary and secondary schools.
However, there are parameters that do not display such generally stable trends. For
example, the Net Enrollment Ratio (NER) has decreased from 85.09% to 81.54%.

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Table 3-30 Performance Indicators (Public and Private) f
S
a
LEVEL 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013
n
Elementary J
Net Enrollment Ratio (NER) 85.09% 82.26% 81.54% o
s
Cohort survival 86.31% 85.71% 84.68%
e
Complete 80.78% 80.86% 80.61% 83.83% d
School Leaver 3.31% 3.27% 3.36% el
M
Secondary
o
Net Enrollment Ratio (NER) 65.16% 62.61% 64.55% n
Cohort survival 81.21% 81.84% 80.50% t
e
Complete 73.00% 73.52% 73.79% 84.60%
B
School Leaver 6.93% 6.68% 7.27% ul
a
Source: DepEd website c
a
The levels of literacy for the population five years old and over in 2010 can be n
identified through the level of educational attainment. Of the 405,430 individuals in the
said cohort (5 years old and over), 2.96% completed preschool; 9.8% completed
elementary school; 24.91% completed high school; 10.65% obtained an academic degree;
and 0.23% obtained a post-baccalaureate degree (e.g. Master’s degree). On the other
hand, 2.44% of the population was not able to obtain any formal education at all. It is to
be noted that the discrepancy between the figures on completion levels for elementary
school, high school, and post-secondary schools may be attributed to migration.

Table 3-31 Percentage and Number of Individuals per Level of Educational Attainment for People Five Years and
Over (2010)

LEVEL PERCENTAGE NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS


No grade completed 2.44 9,876
Preschool 2.96 11,998
Elementary
At least entered elementary 27.9 113,100
1st-4th Grade 13.82 56,027
5th-6th Grade 4.28 17,344
Graduated elementary 9.8 39,729
High school
At least entered high school 40.17 162,860
High school undergraduate 15.26 61,856
Graduated 24.91 101,004
Post-secondary

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o
Undergraduate of any postsecondary degree 0.39 1,597
f
Graduate of any postsecondary degree 3.76 15,229 S
College undergraduate 11.43 46,353 a
Academic degree holder 10.65 43,192 n
Post baccalaureate 0.23 938
J
o
Not stated 0.07 287 s
e
Source: Census of Population and Housing, NSO, 2010
d
el
Regarding the deployment of teachers in elementary schools, there are 1,234
M
positions assigned for the Division of the City of San Jose Del Monte. Among these are 11 o
vacant positions; ten (10) are working within the division headquarters, and eight (8) n
positions are borrowed from other schools. On the other hand, there are 600 positions t
assigned for the secondary schools in the Division. Among these 46 are vacant; 44 are e
working within the division headquarters; and 41 positions are borrowed from other B
schools. ul
a
Table 3-32 Service Backlog for Teacher Requirement c
a
CURRENT ELEMENTARY ENROLLMENT 72,175 n
Standard teacher student ratio 1:50
Current number of teachers 1,345
Current teacher requirement 2013-2014 99 teachers

Source: NEDA, DEPED Division Office

Table 3-33 Service Backlog Classroom Requirement

USEABLE CLASSROOMS 858


Non usable classrooms 29
School population 72,175
Standard classroom ratio 1:50
Current classroom requirement 2013-2014 615

Source: NEDA Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016, DEPED Division Office

According to SEP 2012, there are 122 enlisted day care centers in CSJDM with total
enrollees of 3,392. In 2010, there are 48,833 children spread through ages 0-4 years old.
This population should make up the enrollees of day care centers. In comparison the
tablin the next page shows the enrollment in day care centers and the facilities and
personnel that attend to them. The locations of these day care centers are included in the
map pack attached to this document.

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Table 3-34 Day Care Centers and Enrollees o
f
S
No. of Day Care Centers Male Enrollees Female Enrollees Total Enrollees a
122 1,674 1,718 3,392 n
J
Source: SEP, 2012
o
s
In general, the aforementioned data on education produces a situation on literacy
e
in the city that emphasizes the completion of elementary and high school levels. In
d
contrast with 2.96% completion of preschool, the completion rate in elementary school is el
27.9%. This is further complemented by a 40.17% in high school. Please take note that M
the higher rate in high school than in elementary does not mean that the individuals in o
percentage difference did not go through elementary school; this may again be attributed n
to migration. t
e
It should be noted that in contrast with the 40.17% high school completion rate, B
ul
the percentage of academic degree holders (college graduates) drops almost four-fold to
a
10.65%
c
a
Table 3-35 Literacy Rates across Levels of Education
n

Percentage of the Household


CSJDM Household Population 5 Years Over Population that Completed the
Education Level
Both sexes 405,430
No Grade completed 9,876 2.44%
Preschool 11,998 2.96%
Elementary 113,100 27.90%
High school 162,860 40.17%
Post-Secondary 16,826 4.15%
College Undergraduate 46,353 11.43%
Academic Degree Holder 43,192 10.65%
Post baccalaureate 938 0.23%
Not stated 287 0.07%

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing, 2010

In general, to serve the educational needs of the City, there are 33 public schools
and 134 private schools offering elementary education; 18 public schools and 67 private
schools offering secondary education. The following tables are the list of public and
private schools offering elementary and secondary education.

Table 3-36 List of Public Elementary Schools

1 Bagong Buhay A ES 18 Minuyan ES


2 Bagong Buhay B ES 19 Muzon (Pabahay 2000) ES
3 Bagong Buhay E ES 20 Paradise Farms Comm. School

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4 Bagong Buhay F ES 21 Partida ES o
5 Bagong Buhay G ES 22 Ricafort ES f
6 Bagong Buhay I ES (Lawang Pari) 23 S. Palay Proper ES S
7 Benito Nieto ES (Muzon ES) 24 San Isidro ES a
8 Dulong Bayan ES 25 San Jose Del Monte Central School n
9 Francisco Homes ES 26 San Manuel ES J
10 Gaya-Gaya ES 27 San Martin ES (BBC) o
11 Golden Ville ES 28 San Rafael ES (BBH) s
12 Graceville ES 29 San Roque ES e
13 Gumaok ES 30 Sta. Cruz ES (BBD) d
14 Heroesville Elementary School 31 Sto. Cristo ES el
15 Kakawate ES 32 Towerville ES M
16 Kaypian ES 33 Tungkong Mangga ES o
17 Marangal Elementary School n
t
Source: DEPED Division Office, SY 2013-2014, ebeis.deped.gov.ph
e
B
Table 3-37 List of Private Elementary Schools ul
a
1 ABC Christian Academy Inc. 68 Kidswork Educational Center, Inc. c
2 Academia de San Lorenzo Dema-ala, Inc. 69 Kisap Brent School, Inc. a
3 Academia de Santa Maria 70 La Concepcion College n
4 Academia Learning Center 71 Liceo de Daniel School Inc.
5 Agape Christian School 72 Little David Preparatory School for Kids, Inc.
6 Alan Holganza Memorial School, Inc. 73 Living Image Academy of SJDM
7 Andreus Kristofer Christian School 74 Lord Jesus' Blessed Academy
8 Angel's of God Learning School 75 Lord's Grace Integrated School of Bulacan
9 Angels Care Christian Academy of Bulacan, Inc. 76 Luz Christian Academy
10 Ateneo Casa Famiglia Servants of the Poor, Inc. 77 Maranatha Christian Academy of Bulacan, Inc.
11 Benedictian School of Learning Foundation 78 Maryknoll Child Development Center
12 Berlyn Academy 79 Mater El Roi School, Inc.
13 Bethuel Christian Academy 80 Melody Plains Academy
14 BF St. Mary's School of San Jose 81 Modern Era Learning Center, Inc.
15 Brighton School of San Jose del Monte 82 Mommy's Little Helper Learning Center
83 Montville Centro Escolar of Bulacan (Gumaok Kiddie Christian
16 Bulacan Higher Ground Christian Academy
School)
17 Bulacan Standard Academy 84 Nazareth Academe of SJDM, Inc.
18 Calvary Christian Academy 85 Nepez Learning School
19 Carissa Homes School of St. Therese 86 Olive Grove School
20 Child's Faith Foundation Academy 87 Our Lady of Lourdes Academy
21 Christ Achievers Montessori 88 Our Lord's Glory Academy (OLGA) Inc.
22 Christian Ecclesiastical School 89 Paulette College, Inc.
23 Clairemont Academy 90 Perpetual Help Academy
24 Colegio de San Gabriel Arcangel 91 Phase M Learning Academy, Inc.
25 Colegio de San Jose del Monte 92 Praise Preparatory, Inc.
26 College of Saint Adela Inc. 93 Precious Brent School, Inc.
27 College of Saint Anthony 94 Pristine Edification Learning Center, Inc.
28 Community of Learners Academy of San Jose 95 Queen Marys Academy of San Jose
29 Corinthills Learning Center, Inc. 96 RVS Achievers Academy, Inc.
30 Daphney Learning Center 97 Saint Francis de Assisi School of Multiple Intelligences
31 Darwin International School 98 Saint Joseph Academy of Bulacan
32 Del Carmen Learning School of Palmera, Inc. 99 San Jose Academy of Bulacan
33 Dela Costa Learning Center 100 Sapang Palay Learning Center, Inc.
34 Divine Majesty School 101 Sarmiento Homes Academy of SJDM
35 Door of Faith Christian School 102 School of Our Lady of La Salette
36 Dovedale Academy 103 SEMB Integrated School, Inc.

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37 Ebenezer Christian Academy, Inc. 104 Send the Word of Life Christian School o
38 Elisha Learning Center, ELC, Inc. 105 Shepherd Christian Academy f
39 Emmanuel Christian School 106 Siena College of San Jose S
40 Enthusiastic Learning Center of SJDM 107 SJDM Cornerstone Academy Inc. a
41 First City Providential College 108 Smart Classican's Academy, Inc.
n
42 First Progressive Academy 109 Smart Starters Montessori
43 Forest Ridge Integrated School, Inc. 110 Sovereign Grace Christian School
J
44 Francess Preparatory School, Inc. 111 Spirit of Joy School o
45 Genesis Christian Academy 112 St. Francis Divine College s
46 Golden Children Academy, Inc. 113 St. Margaret School City of San Jose Del Monte Inc. e
47 Golden Valley College 114 St. Mary's D' Queen College of CSJDM d
48 Graceville Integrated School 115 St. Mary's Goretti School
el
49 Gracious Family Learning School, Inc. 116 Sta. Barbara School (Bulacan) Inc.
50 Great Abrahams Academy 117 Sta. Monica School of Bulacan M
51 Hanniah Learning Home, Inc. 118 Stallion Homes Learning Academy o
52 Happy Child Academy & Resources Center 119 Star Kid Academy of San Jose del Monte, Bulacan, Inc. n
53 Harvardian Learning School of Bulacan, Inc. 120 Sto. Nino Children Educational Center, Inc. t
54 Heading Onward Learning School, Inc. 121 Sto. Nino Educational Academy of San Jose e
55 Headwaters College, Inc. 122 Sto. Nino School of Palmera Homes, Inc.
B
56 Holy Angel School of Sarmiento, Inc. 123 Sto. Rosario Sapang Palay College
57 Holy Family Angels Prepatory School 124 Sunhaven Academy ul
58 Holy Family School of San Jose 125 Tads Learning Center a
59 Holy Infant Jesus Montessori School 126 The Belayer Learning Academy, Inc. c
60 Immaculate Heart of Mary School 127 The Immaculate Mother Academy of Bulacan, Inc. a
61 Jarmmeth Academy Inc. 128 The Living Water Christian Academy n
62 Jarmmeth Academy, Inc. (Villa Muzon Campus) 129 The Messianic Mission Academe, Inc.
63 JC Excellente Christian Academy Inc. 130 Via Mare Marymount Learning Center & Tutorials, Inc.
64 Jesus of Nazareth Learning Center 131 Village Montessori School
65 Jesus the Greatest Name Christian College 132 Vine Immanuel School
66 Johnryn Learning School, Inc. 133 Virgen de la Paz Learning School
67 Joyful Angels Academy 134 Yverdon de Pestallozi School

Source: DEPED Division Office, SY 2013-2014, ebeis.deped.gov.ph

Table 3-38 List of Public Secondary Schools

1 Citrus National HS
2 City of San Jose del Monte National Science High
School
3 Graceville NHS
4 Kakawate National HS
5 Kaypian National High School
6 Marangal National High School
7 Minuyan NHS (Golden Ville HS)
8 Muzon Harmony Hills High School
9 Muzon HS
10 Paradise Farms NHS
11 San Jose del Monte HS
12 San Jose del Monte Nat'l. Trade School
13 San Martin National HS
14 Sapang Palay National NHS
15 Sto. Cristo National HS
16 Towerville HS
17 San Jose del Monte Heights High School
18 San Manuel High School

Source: DEPED Division Office, SY 2013-2014, ebeis.deped.gov.ph

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Table 3-39 List of Private Secondary Schools o
f
1 Academia de San Lorenzo Dema-ala, Inc. 35 Jesus the Greatest Name Christian College S
2 Academia Learning Center 36 Joyful Angels Academy a
3 Agape Christian School 37 La Concepcion College n
4 Alan Holganza Memorial School, Inc. 38 Liceo de Daniel School Inc.
J
5 Angels Care Christian Academy of Bulacan, Inc. 39 Living Image Academy of SJDM
6 Ateneo Casa Famiglia Servant of the Poor, Inc. 40 Lord Jesus' Blessed Academy
o
7 Benedictian School of Learning Foundation 41 Lord's Grace Integrated School of Bulacan s
8 Berlyn Academy 42 Mater El Roi School, Inc. e
9 BF St. Mary's School of San Jose 43 Montville Centro Escolar of Bulacan (Gumaok Kiddie Christian School)
d
10 Brighton School of San Jose del Monte 44 Olive Grove School el
11 Bulacan Standard Academy 45 Our Lady of Lourdes Academy
M
12 Calvary Christian Academy 46 Paulette College, Inc.
13 Christ Achievers Montessori 47 Queen Marys Academy of San Jose o
14 Christian Ecclesiastical School 48 RVS Achievers Academy, Inc. n
15 Clairemont Academy 49 Saint Francis de Assisi School of Multiple Intelligences t
16 Colegio de San Gabriel Arcangel 50 Saint Joseph Academy of Bulacan e
17 Colegio de San Jose del Monte 51 San Jose Academy of Bulacan B
18 College of Saint Adela 52 Sarmiento Homes Academy of SJDM
ul
19 College of Saint Anthony 53 School of Our Lady of La Salette
20 Community of Learners Academy of San Jose 54 Shepherd Christian Academy a
21 Daphney Learning Center Inc. 55 Siena College of San Jose c
22 Darwin International School 56 SJDM Cornerstone Academy Inc. a
23 Divine Majesty School 57 Spirit of Joy School n
24 Ebenezer Christian Academy, Inc. 58 St. Francis Divine College
25 Emmanuel Christian School 59 St. Margaret School City of San Jose Del Monte Inc.
26 First City Providential College 60 St. Mary's D' Queen College of CSJDM
27 First Progressive Academy 61 St. Mary's Goretti School
28 Genesis Christian Academy 62 Stallion Homes Learning Academy
29 Golden Valley College 63 Sto. Nino Educational Academy of San Jose
30 Graceville Integrated School 64 Sto. Rosario Sapang Palay College
31 Great Abrahams Academy 65 The Immaculate Mother Academy of Bulacan, Inc.
32 Holy Infant Jesus Montessori School 66 Village Montessori School
33 Immaculate Heart of Mary School 67 Yverdon de Pestallozi School
34 Jarmmeth Academy Inc.

Source: DEPED Division Office, SY 2013-2014, ebeis.deped.gov.ph

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3.4. HOUSING o
f
S
In comparison with Bulacan and the Country in general, the rate of growth of the a
households has been influx through the decades. The change in population residing in n
such households grew by 6.55% from 1990 to 1995; by 9.63% from 1995 to 2000; 4.55% J
from 2000-2007; and 1.26% from 2007 to 2010. By 2010, there were a total of 102,131 o
households from approximately 35,000 households two decades before. s
e
d
With at least 7.4% of its 2010 population as migrants, the city has definitely
el
experienced such situation due to the influx from other towns in Bulacan and cities in M
Metro Manila. This is primarily due to: (1) the function of the city as a residential town for o
employees who work in NCR; and (2) relocation projects with its waves of new residents n
by hundreds/thousands for each project through the decades. t
e
In particular, the migration from Metro Manila was carried through relocation B
projects by the government; the common causes for the government to initiate the ul
relocation include the focus given to informal settlers and incidents such as a city fire. a
c
Through the decades, the preference of the government for places in CSJDM to be
a
relocation sites contrasts with the minimal housing delivery initiated by the LGU as it
n
copes with the situation to deliver the needs of the waves of relocated individuals. The
said preference of the LGU is connected with the local government’s goals on shelter to
encourage and allow low- to medium-density residential subdivisions mixed with
institutional and recreational uses.

3.4.1. Occupancy

Historically the housing development has been expanding intensively in the


northwest areas of the city. This is clearly seen in the northwestern area’s settlement
pattern, which displays smaller barangay sizes than those of the original barangays; those
smaller barangays were created because higher population densities enabled the
barangay to reach the threshold population requirement for barangay creation according
to law.

First, the occupancy in the city has drastically increased through the decades. The
table below shows that the occupied units have increased by a factor of 56 through 50
years; the fastest growth was during 1990 to 2010.

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Table 3-40 Occupied Housing Units (1960-2010) o
f
1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 S
City of San Jose Del Monte Feb. 15 May 6 May 1 May 1 May 1 May 1
a
n
1,768 3,122 16,008 25,277 65,044 99,666
J
o
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing, 2010 s
e
Of all types of housing units, the single houses are the most occupied. Multi-unit d
residential houses rank second. It can also be observed that the ratio of households to el
occupied units, despite being close to one, implies that there are thousands of households M
sharing a single house with another household (Table 3-40). o
n
Table 3-41 Occupied Housing Units, Number of Households, Household Population, and Ratio of Household and t
Household Population to Occupied Housing Units by Type of Building, and City/Municipality (2010) e
B
RATIO ul
TOTAL
TYPE OF BUILDING/HOUSE AND OCCUPIED NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLD Household a
Households to
CITY/MUNICIPALITY HOUSING HOUSEHOLDS POPULATION Population to c
Occupied
UNITS Occupied a
Housing Units
Housing Units
n
Ciy of San Jose Del Monte
Total 99,666 102,131 454,263 1 4.6
Single House 61,344 62,880 288,223 1 4.7
Duplex 7,193 7,343 31,192 1 4.3
Multi-unit Residential 30,858 31,635 133,778 1 4.3
Commercial/Industrial/Agricultural 189 191 712 1 3.8
Institutional Living Quarters 6 6 31 1 5.2
Other Housing Unit 16 16 82 1 5.1
Not Reported 60 60 245 1 4.1

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing, 2010

The table below shows that a large proportion of occupants are using housing units
with 30 to 49 square meters (sqm) of floor area; 50 to 69 sqm and 20-29 sqm categories trail
behind. It can also be observed that the values for the number of occupants range from 4.2 to
5.1.

Table 3-42 Occupied Housing Units by Floor Area, Number of Occupants in Each Housing Unit (2010)

FLOOR AREA OF THE HOUSING UNIT (sqm) TOTAL OCCUPANTS AVERAGE OCCUPANTS
Total 99,666 4.6
Less than 5 3,654 4.2
5 to 9 5,255 4.3
10 to 19 7,835 4.4
20 to 29 13,939 4.4
30 to 49 33,850 4.5
50 to 69 18,744 4.6
70 to 89 6,660 4.8

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90 to 119 4,512 5 o
120 to 149 2,210 5 f
150 to 199 1,235 5.1 S
200 and over 1,294 5.1 a
Not applicable 16 5.1 n
Not reported 462 4.4
J
Source: 2010 Census of Population and Housing, NSO
o
s
Regarding construction materials, the residents of the city seem to prefer e
galvanized iron/aluminum for roofs; and concrete brick and stone for walls (Table 3-42). d
el
Housing units in this category made up 85.5% (80,940) of housing units. On the other end
M
of the spectrum there are still 348 housing units with makeshift, salvaged, and improvised
o
materials as roofs and walls. n
t
Upon examination of the table below, there are thousands of housing units that e
needs major repair (9,662). Of the total of 99,666 housing units in 2010, there were 2,664 B
unfinished units; 225 of the total units were either dilapidated or condemned. The ul
situation that these figures reflect has serious implications in disaster risk reduction and a
management, particularly with regard to disasters such as typhoons and earthquakes. c
a
n
Another interesting fact is that 41.5% of all housing units were constructed from
1991 to 2000. These housing units comprise 41,387 of the total of 99,666 households in
2010.

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Table 3-43 Occupied Housing Units by Construction Materials of the Outer Walls and Roof (2010) o
f
S
TOTAL HALF a MAKESHIFT/
TILE COGON/
CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS OF THE OCCUPIED GALVANIZED GALVANIZED IRON n SALVAGED/ NOT
CONCRETE/ WOOD NIPA/ ASBESTOS OTHERS
OUTER WALLS HOUSING IRON/ALUMINUM AND HALF J ANAHAW IMPROVISED REPORTED
CLAY TILE
UNITS CONCRETE MATERIALS
o
s
Total 99,666 94,699 973 1,954 279 62 599 67 -
e
Concrete/Brick/Stone 82,641 80,940 904 422 3 13 35 33 -
d
Wood 5,037 4,292 7 89 28 10 29 6 -
el
Half Concrete/Brick/Stone/and Half Wood 8,441 6,757 49 1,394 20 39 66 - -
M
Galvanized Iron/Aluminum 864 796 13 31 2 - 8 - -
o
Bamboo/Sawali/Cogon/Nipa 1,476 1,158 - 8 194 - 73 20 -
n - - - - -
Asbestos 12 12 - -
Glass 3 2 - 1
t - - - - -
Makeshift/Salvaged/Improvised Materials 915 541 - 9
e 9 - 348 1 -
Others 45 35 - -
B 2 - 1 7 -
No walls 6 6 - -
ul - - - - -
Not Reported 226 160 - -
a 21 - 39 - -
c
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing, 2010 a
n

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Table 3-44 Condition (state of repair) of Building (2010) o
f
UNDER S
NEEDS NO NEEDS
DILAPIDATED/ RENOVATION/ a UNDER UNFINISHED NOT
YEAR BUILT TOTAL HH UNITS OCCUPIED REPAIR/NEEDS MAJOR NOT REPORTED
CONDEMNED BEING
MINOR REPAIR REPAIR
REPAIRED
nCONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION APPLICABLE

J
Total 99,666 84,578 9,662 225 390 639 2664 16 1492
o
2010 1,315 1,020 172 5 12 52 38 - 16
s
2009 2,778 2,066 303 13 15 e 57 103 - 221
2008 3,717 3,203 338 8 9 d 26 69 - 64
2007 2,678 2,130 342 8 10 el 46 78 - 64
2006 2,869 2,300 334 9 7 M 24 117 - 78
2001-2005 16,307 12,912 1,824 45 84 o 161 985 - 296
n
1991-2000 41,387 36,548 3,188 53 137 171 775 - 515
t
1981-1990 15,850 13,600 1,689 30 63 e 62 274 - 132
1971-1980 6,361 5,296 828 31 27 B 22 115 - 42
1970 or earlier 2,040 1,628 297 17 15 ul 3 50 - 30
Not Applicable 16 - - - - a - - 16 -
Not Known/Not Reported 4,348 3,875 347 6 11 c 15 60 - 34
a
n
Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing, 2010

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Now, looking at the distribution of the occupant households according to the type o
of housing unit and tenure status of the lot. A majority of housing units (72,781 units) f
S
among households are owned or being amortized. The number of households in rented
a
units follows with the number of households in rent-free units with consent of owner
n
(14,012, and 12,840 units, respectively). Such situation implies a high percentage of J
households living in their own housing units. o
s
Among the type of housing units, the most utilized by households are the single e
houses. The number of households in multi-unit residential units follows this. The d
household use of duplex units is less than the use of single houses and multi-unit el
residential housing by factors of approximately ten and five, respectively. A small number M
o
of households occupy the remaining commercial, industrial, agricultural, and institutional
n
housing units.
t
e
Table 3-45 Number of Households by Type of Building and the Tenure Status of the Lot (2010) B
ul
Tenure Status of Lot a
Rent-free Rent-free c
Type of Housing Owned/
with without Not a
Unit being Rented Not reported
consent of consent of applicable n
amortized
owner owner
Single House 45,797 6,729 8,575 1,162 615 2
Duplex 4,531 1,412 1,198 167 34 1
Multiunit
22,446 5,788 3,005 297 99 -
Residential
Commercial/Indu
72 71 42 4 2 -
strial/Agricultural
Institutional 3 - 3 - - -
Other Housing - - - - 16 -
Not Reported 22 12 17 9 - -
Total 72,871 14,012 12,840 1,639 766 3

Source: 2010 Census of Population and Housing, NSO

To provide context for the usage of the said housing units, the Table 3-46 shows
the replacement rate26 and lifespan27 of housing units in Central Luzon.

26 “Replacement rate” means the percentage of the housing units replaced by new ones in the same site to the total number of housing units
over a specified time period.
27 The “lifespan” of a housing unit is the total time period covered by the use of a housing unit until its replacement or disposal.

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Table 3-46 Replacement Rate and Lifespan of Housing Units in Central Luzon (2000-2010) o
f
S
REGION REPLACEMENT RATE LIFESPAN IN YEARS a
n
Region 3 0.93% 100 J
o
Source: Estimated Housing Needs Based on 2010 Census of Population and Housing. Mary Ann C. Magtulis and Eleanore V. Ramos. 2 s
October 2013. e
d
The yearly change in the number the residential subdivisions have to be el
considered too. From 2008 to 2012, there has been a general increase in the number of M
such subdivisions – the percent increase from 2008 to 2014 was 49.11%. o
n
Table 3-47 Cumulative Number of Subdivisions per Year t
e
YEAR NO. OF SUBDIVISIONS
B
2008 112
ul
a
2009-2010 107
c
2011 130
a
2012 149
n
2013 157
2014 167

Source: SEP, 2008-2012

The housing conditions in the city also include makeshift housing. The number of
households living in such housing units (Table 3-47), indicate that the figure could be as
much as 15.4% of households, as in the case of Kaybanban. The other barangays that
follow the rank of Kaybanban in this matter are Minuyan IV (11.1%), Sta. Cruz II (8.8%),
Sto. Niño II (8.7%), Maharlika and Citrus (both in 5th spot with 7.8%).

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Table 3-48 Percentage of Households Living in Makeshift Housing and Informal Settler Households across o
Barangays (2011) f
S
% OF HH LIVING IN MAKESHIFT % OF HH WHO ARE INFORMAL a
BARANGAY
HOUSING SETTLERS n
Assumption 1.1 0.2 J
Bagong Buhay I 4.4 1.1 o
Bagong Buhay II 4.8 2.1
s
e
Bagong Buhay III 4.4 0
d
Citrus 7.8 0.7 el
Fatima I 1.2 0.7 M
Fatima II 0 0 o
Fatima V 4.1 0.6 n
Francisco Homes - Narra 2.1 0.1 t
e
Francisco Homes - Yakal 5.1 2.2
B
Gumaoc West 2.5 0.2 ul
Kaybanban 15.4 6.2 a
Kaypian 0 0 c
Lawang Pare 6.6 0.7 a
Maharlika 7.8 3.9 n
Minuyan III 3.6 0.7
Minuyan IV 11.1 11.1
Minuyan V 4.9 0.6
San Isidro 2.7 0.9
San Martin I 5.6 0.3
San Martin II 6.2 0.6
San Martin III 1.9 0.6
San Martin IV 3.4 4.1
San Pedro 6.2 0.4
San Rafael 4.5 2.9
San Rafael I 7.4 0.3
Sta. Cruz II 8.8 2.9
Sta. Cruz III 0 0
Sta. Cruz IV 2.7 0.4
Sta. Cruz V 1 1
Sto. Nino 0.8 2.1
Sto. Nino II 8.7 1.7
San Martin de Porres 5.3 0.6

Source: NSO Census of Population and Housing, 2010

From 2008 to 2010, the total number of dwelling units of the mentioned informal
settler households totaled 6,283 units; the said households are usually located in danger
zones such as riverbanks. The table below displays the number of housing units of
informal settlers living in danger zones.

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o
Table 3-49 Informal Settlers Living in Danger Zone Areas f
S
a
BARANGAY NO. OF DWELLING UNITS LOCATION n
Assumption 92 Creek river J
Bagong Buhay II 9 Road o
s
Citrus 30 Creek
e
San Martin I 137 Creek bank d
San Martin II 19 Creek el
San Martin III 145 Creek M
Sto. Niño II 19 Creek/Riverbank o
n
Source: SEP, 2011 t
e
One of the earliest resettlement projects in the City of San Jose Del Monte is the B
Sapang Palay Resettlement Project in the year 1961. It was then followed by Towerville ul
a
Resettlement Project in Minuyan Proper; Pabahay 2000 that followed in Muzon; Gumaoc
c
Liberty Upgrading Project in Gumaoc East, Gumaoc Central and Gumaoc West. The Armed a
Forces of the Philippines (AFP-PNP) Housing project is located in Sitio Tubigan, which is in n
Barangay Gaya-gaya at the turn of the millennium. The table below displays the recent
and forthcoming resettlement projects in the city under the National Housing Authority
(NHA).

Table 3-50 Resettlement Projects of NHA (2009-2015)

RESETTLEMENT PROJECT LOCATION YEAR NO. OF HOUSEHOLDS

Towerville 6 Brgy. Gaya-gaya and Graceville 2009 6,000

San Jose Del Monte Heights Brgy. Muzon 2010 4,000

St. Josephville Brgy. Kaypian 2012 1040


Pleasant Hills (Medium-Rise
Brgy. Graceville and San Manuel 2013-2014 1,700
Building)
SRCC Garden Heights Brgy. Graceville 2013-2014 (on-going)
Towerville 7 Sto. Cristo 2015 forthcoming

Source: Interviews with officials from the National Housing Authority in May 2014.

The private sector is the current active driver of housing development in the city.
Using government-led or primarily business-led projects and program, the real estate and
land development businesses in the city is active in land acquisition and improvement for
residential and mixed-use subdivisions; these new developments are usually done in
high-density areas beside primary and secondary roads.

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In particular, future developments such as the Altaraza site being developed by o
AyalaLand shall greatly impact the area in and around Tungkong Mangga. In particular, f
S
the prime position of the Tungkong Mangga intersection in terms of the intensity of
a
commercial and residential land uses shall be bolstered. However, together with the
n
existing housing, land use, and transport conditions the gated situation of the Altaraza site J
shall produce a more unequal situation. o
s
Through the method proposed by the Housing and Urban Development e
Coordinating Council (HUDCC), the total housing backlog for the city as of 2010 is 46,528 d
units. This figure excludes unavailable data on (1) homeless individuals and (2) allowance el
for inventory losses. M
o
Table 3-51 Housing Backlog (2010) n
t
ACCUMULATED NEEDS NUMBER OF HOUSING UNITS e
Households in unacceptable housing B
Rent-free without consent of owners 1,639 ul
a
Homeless* -
c
Dilapidated/condemned 225 a
Marginal housing, e.g. makeshift housing 599 n
Doubled-up households in acceptable housing units 2,465
Future/Recurrent Needs
Allowance for inventory losses* -
New households** 41,600
TOTAL 46528

*No data available.


**Derived using the 5.86% population growth rate of the City from 2000-2010 and the 2010 number of households (102,131) as base year
figure.

Source: National Statistics Office. 2010 Census of Population and Housing

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Table 3-52 List of Subdivision o
Areaf
Name of Subdivision Owner / Developer Location
(sq.m.)
S
1 Andrew Village Raymundo Gerona Poblacion 30,000
a
2 Avanceña Subdivision Aurelio Avena Poblacion 63,000
3 Marcela Village No. 3 Arcadio Zamora T-Mangga
n
50,000
4 Morning Star Brigida Gallardo Gaya-Gaya J
11,900
5 Del Monte Realty Corp. Jose Villano Sto. Cristo 55,000
o
6 Pecson Ville Subdivision Ma. Casas et Al T-Mangga 55,000
s
7 Ciudad Real T-Mangga
8 Del Valle Heights Marcelino del Valle Gaya-Gaya
e
59,000
9 Noel Village Narsico G. Isidro Muzon d
42,000
10 North Diamond H. Corp. N.D. Housing Corp. T-Mangga el
67,100
11 Francisco Homes Subd. A. Francisco Realty Mulawin M
Yakal
o
Guijo
Narra n
12 Francisco Homes 2 A. Francisco Realty Graceville t
13 Fancisco Homes 3 A. Francisco Realty Muzon e
14 Tower Grotto Ville Dr. Felipe de Jesus Graceville 200,000
B
15 Sunlight Subdivision Muzon
16 Pleasant Hills Subd. Hillman Realty San Manuel ul
297,511
17 Morning Glory Subd. Jose Villano Poblacion a
22,700
18 Graceville Subd. I-II-III Ruben Tiosejo Graceville 104,300
c
19 Graceville IV Ruben Tiosejo Muzon 160,000
a
20 Nayong Lourdes I Eduardo Kaimo Maharlika 400,000
21 Nayong Lourdes II Eduardo Kaimo n
22 Nayong Lourdes III Eduardo Kaimo Kaypian
23 Mt. View Subd. Rosario Bondoc Muzon 400,00
24 Benjamin Executive Vill. Veronica Lim Graceville 59,016
25 Ever Green Heights Gotesco Prop. Inc. Gaya-Gaya 496,239
26 Samantha Heights AC/DC Construction S.P Proper 24,048
27 Cityville Homes T-Mangga 22,311
28 Sarmiento Homes P.S. Sarmiento & Const Muzon 274,500
29 Sarmiento Townville Poblacion 41,800
30 Harmony Hills I Guillermo Choa Muzon 206,400
31 Harmony Hills II Guillermo Choa Muzon 110,450
32 Dela Costa Homes III Graceville 173,760
33 Dela Costa Homes IV William Keyes 103,869
34 Metro Gate San Jose Moldex Realty Inc. S.P. Proper 1,085,000
35 Verde Heights Eng’r. Juan Labiste Gaya-Gaya 148,522
36 Verde Heights II Eng’r. Allan Santiago Kaypian
37 Northgate Park Exec Citihomes Builder Sto. Cristo 45,664
38 Diamond Crest Village Arch. Vincent Ang San Manuel 10,950
39 Melody Plains Filinvest Muzon 289,277
40 Melody Heights Lot Only Filinvest
41 Grotto Ville Homes Muzon
42 Towerville Subd. NHA/Goldenville Minuyan
43 Villa San Jose Gaya-Gaya 50,000
44 San Jose Complex George Chiu Muzon
45 RSG Urban Homes Honeycomb Builders Sto. Cristo 5,877
46 Kabahay Guro Ville Vanhock Product Sto. Cristo 21,090
47 Merco River side Ville Vanhock Product Gaya-Gaya 62,741
48 Grotto View Homes Starshine Realty Graceville
49 Hossana Community Sure Foundation Dev. Muzon 86,857
50 Sea Horse Executive Genaro Baron Kaypian 6,409
51 Capili Compound Atty. Virgilio Capili Graceville 23,282
52 Rosario Ville Leticia Padua Sto. Cristo 68,956
53 Metro Asia Metro Asia Resources Muzon 67,706
54 Metro Asia Metro Asia Resources S.P. Proper 41,126
55 Dream Land Shappel Homes Inc. Muzon 156,840
56 Billion Homes I Primetown Prop. Muzon 100,000

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57 Stallion Homes 600 Stallion Realty Corp. F-Homes o
52,292,200
Yakal f
Mulawin S
Guijo
Narra
a
58 La Mirasol T-Mangga n
426,000
59 Carissa Homes 1A Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 57,235
J
60 Carissa Homes 1B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 56,039
o
61 Carissa Homes 1C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 22,278
s
62 Carissa Homes 2A & 2B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 81,100
63 Carissa Homes 3A Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo e
60,866
64 Carissa Homes 3B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo d
50,000
65 Carissa Homes 3C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 103,082
el
66 Carissa Homes 4B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 40,736
M
67 Carissa Homes 4C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 5,000
68 Carissa Homes 5B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo o
44,666
69 Carissa Homes 5C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo n
31,007
70 Carissa Homes 5D Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 12,400
t
71 Carissa Homes 5E Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 90,314
e
72 Northridge Executive Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 126,609
73 Northridge Exe. 1-B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo B
24,933
74 Nothridge Heights 1C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo ul
20,000
75 Northridge Heights 1D Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 32,261
a
76 Northwind 1 Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 126,203
c
77 Northwind 2B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 81,111
78 Northwind 2C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo a
11,420
79 Northwind 3B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo n
93,321
80 Northwind 4 Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 40,000
81 Northwind 4C Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 18,828
82 Northwind 4D Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 7,555
83 Northwind 4E Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 8,362
84 Northwinds B5 Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 44,666
85 Northwinds 7 Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 52,273
86 Northwinds 8A Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 44,591
87 Northwinds 8B Palmera Homes Inc. Sto. Cristo 52,273
88 La Poblacion 1B Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon 62,272
89 La Poblacion 1C Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon 9,757
90 La Poblacion 1D Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon 120,577
91 La Poblacion 1 and 2 Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon 17,831
92 La Poblacion 3B Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon
93 La Poblacion 3C Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon 14,719
94 La Poblacion 3D Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon
95 La Poblacion 3E Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon 109,894
96 La Poblacion 4 Palmera Homes Inc. Muzon
97 Rossana Heights San Manuel
98 Guzman Ville Sto. Cristo
99 Marigold Subdivision Muzon
100 Mankor Homes I T-Mangga
101 Benjamin Executive III Benjamin Lim Sto. Cristo
102 SJDM Housing Coop SJDM Housing Coop Poblacion I 14,484
103 Golden Ville Realty & Devt Golden Ville Realty & Devt Minuyan Proper
104 Colinas Verdes Ph 1 Araneta Properties T.Mangga
105 Titan Primestate Realty & Titan Primestates Realty & Devt. Corp. Muzon 34,379
Devt. Corporation
106 Borland Devt Corp. Borland Development Muzon 95,947
107 Tierra Benita Subd. Steel Building System and Techniques Muzon 45,077
108 D’ Dreamland Ville Makati Housing Project Kaypian 32,314
109 Lancaster Place Citihomes Builder and Devt. Inc. Kaypian 8,833
110 Residencia de Muzon Citihomes Builder and Devt. Corp. Muzon 72,807
111 Holy Angels Subd. Palmera Homes Northwinds Kaypian
112 Grand Cypress AJ Mark Realty and Devt. Corp. T.Mangga
113 Colinas Verdes Ph 2 Sta. Lucia Realty & Devt. Corporation T. Mangga 236.4082 H

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114 Primavera Heights Prime Asia, Inc. T. Mangga o
3.5172 has.
115 Greenleaf Classic Household Devt. Corp. Kaypian 2.3 has.
f
116 The Marigold Residences Borland Devt. Corp. Muzon 3.9 has.
S
117 Villa Annapolis Hausplus Ventures, Inc. Dulong-Bayan 8.2274 has.
118 Greenleaf Classic II Household Devt. Corp. Kaypian a
3.4619 has
119 Villa Hermano Con-Tech Properties, Inc Sto. Cristo n
3.6800 has
120 Towerville Subdivision Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Gaya-Gaya 33.1424 Jhas.
121 Springtown Villas Ph 1 Borland Devt. Corp. Gaya-Gaya 4.5 has
o
122 Montecillo Townhomes Borland Devt. Corp. Graceville 4.6 has
123 Tierra del Sueño Expansion Household Devt. Corp. Sto. Cristo
s
1. 2856 ha.
124 Villa Zalamea Zalamea Realty & Devt. Corp. Muzon 1.7429 eha
125 EEJ North Villas AB Finez Engineering Services Mulawin 2.2209 has
d
126 MB Reyes Ville Magno B. Reyes Muzon 3.7775 has
el
127 Kelsey Hills Kirkwood Devt. Corp Muzon 21. 0275 has
128 Grand Cypress Phase 2 AJ Mark Realty and Devt. Corp. T.Mangga
M
1.1000 has.
129 San Jose Homes Trass Construction Co., Inc. San Manuel o
.9998 ha
130 Colinas Verdes Ph 3 Sta. Lucia Realty & Devt. Corporation T. Mangga 48.4038
n
131 Heroe's Ville Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Gaya-Gaya 8.5454 has
t
132 Amaresa Subdivision Red Oak Properties Guijo 5.5375 has.
133 Heroe's Ville Ph 2 Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Gaya-Gaya
e
9.5859 has.
134 Lessandra San Jose del Household Devt. Corp. Kaypian B
4.8818 has.
Monte ul
135 Springtown Villas Ph 2 Borland Devt. Corp. Gaya-Gaya 6.3388 has.
a
136 San Jose del Monte Heights LAK-K Builders Company Muzon 30. 4216 has.
137 Villa Baliano Profetiso Baliano Muzon
c
3.8101 has.
138 Towerville Phase 4B Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Minuyan Proper a
.4263 has.
139 Towerville Ph 6 Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Graceville n
1.9952 has.
140 Northridge Lane Subdivision Bria Homes. Inc Sto. Cristo 1.0000 has.
141 Towerville Subdivision Ph 6 Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Gaya-Gaya 6.3718 has.
142 Muzon Settings Rhamtany Properties and Devt. Corp. Muzon .5000 has
143 Camella San Jose del Monte Household Devt. Corp. Sto. Cristo 4. 5560 has.
144 Winterbreeze Homes RCD Land Incorporated Minuyan Proper 4.0002 has.
145 Altaraza Town Center Ayala Land, Inc T. Mangga 22.2112 has.
146 Heroes Ville Ph 3 Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Gaya-Gaya 5.6949 has.
147 Nuvista San Jose P.A. Alvarez Properties and Devt. Corp Sto. Cristo 30.18
148 St. Joseph Heights Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Sto. Cristo/ Kaybanban 85.1488
149 Eminenza Residences Metrostar Property Holdings Inc. Kaypian 2.0425 has.
150 T.P. Development Titan Primestate Realty & Devt. Corp. Muzon 2.1751 has.
151 Avida Settings Avida Land Corp. T. Mangga 12.4512
152 Northridge Grove Bria Homes. Inc T. Mangga 6.0423
153 Savano Park Vultera Land Corp. San Manuel 2.7472
154 Guanzonville Guanzonville HOA Graceville 1.0244
155 St. Josephville JC Tayag Builders Kaypian 6.9466
156 Kelsey Hills II Kirkwood Devt. Corp. Muzon 5.7688
157 SRCC Garden Village Dowal Realty & Mgmt. System Corp. Graceville 6.2741
158 Springtown Villas Ph 2A Borland Devt. Corp. Gaya-Gaya 2.1542
159 Francisco Residences Rhamtany Properties and Devt. Corp. Narra 0.217
160 Towerville phase 6 Expansion Goldenville Realty & Devt. Corp Gaya-Gaya 12.9659
161 Terraza Martha Innova Home Realty Corp. Poblacion 1 3.9699
162 Homeward Home Village Initial Homeland Real Sate & Devt. T. Mangga 2.1866
163 NHA (Medium Rise Bldg) Nha Graceville 3.8
164 Farmgroove Villas Andrew Boado San Manuel 0.0378
165 ALPAS ALPAS Muzon 1.5686
166 San Jose del Monte Heights II LAK-K Builders Company Muzon 9.4974
167 Villa Rebecca Homes IV Sto. Niño 1 0.1082
Source: CPDO

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3.5. SOCIAL PROTECTION o
f
S
Individuals belonging to marginalized and vulnerable groups such as those a
included in poverty, disabled, women, children, indigents, elderly, and others ought to n
receive special attention. First in the list are people in the poverty incidence group, which J
was previously shown in Figure 2-9 Household Poverty Incidence. o
s
In the graph below (Figure 3-1), the male population has the most number of e
d
persons with disability (PWD) in the City.
el
M
o
n
800
t
700 e
B
600 ul
a
500
c
400 a
n
300

200

100

0
Ortho- Psycho- Chronic
Learning Mental Hearing Speech Visual
pedic social Illness
Male 258 189 6 151 106 122 109 389
Female 209 168 5 112 83 89 113 298

Source: CSWDO, 2013

Figure 3-1 Number of Persons with Disability by Type of Disability by Sex (2013)

The major social welfare organizations present in the City are Federation of Senior
Citizens' Association of the Philippines (FSCAP), Kalipunan ng Liping Pilipina (KALIPI),
Solo Parent, PWD, and Pag-asa Youth Association (PYAP). All barangays have a social
welfare organization, except for Ciudad Real. Of the services/projects rendered by such
organizations, the day care services and supplemental feeding have always been present
throughout the years while those services regarding relief and rehabilitation were
introduced only recently.

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Table 3-53 Present Social Welfare Organization and Number of Types of Social Services across Barangays o
f
TYPE OF SOCIAL SERVICES S
SOCIAL WELFARE a
BARANGAY Day Care Service and Relief/Rehabilitation
ORGANIZATION n
Supplemental Feeding Typhoon Victims
1. Assumption FSCAP, KALIPI 30 - J
2. Bagong Buhay I FSCAP, KALIPI 118 - o
3. Bagong Buhay II Solo Parent / FSCAP 47 - s
4. Bagong Buhay III FSCAP 77 - e
5. Citrus FSCAP 136 - d
6.Ciudad Real None None - el
7. Dulong Bayan FSCAP 89 - M
8. Fatima I FSCAP 44 - o
9. Fatima II FSCAP 44 - n
10. Fatima III FSCAP, KALIPI / Solo Parent 34 - t
11. Fatima IV FSCAP 28 -
e
12. Fatima V FSCAP 51 -
B
ul
13. Gaya-gaya FSCAP 108 68
a
14. Gumaoc Central FSCAP 54 -
c
15. Gumaoc East FSCAP 40 72
a
16. Gumaoc West FSCAP 47 60
n
17. Graceville FSCAP / Solo Parent 287 161
18. Francisco Homes - Guijo FSCAP / Solo Parent 57 -
19. Kaybanban FSCAP / Solo Parent 47 21
20. Kaypian FSCAP / Solo Parent / PWD 167 55
21. Lawang Pare FSCAP / Solo Parent 44 -
22. Maharlika FSCAP / Solo Parent 29 91
23. Muzon FSCAP/KALIPI/PYAP / Solo Parent 761 249
24. Francisco Homes - Narra FSCAP 150 6
25. Minuyan Proper FSCAP/ Solo Parent/ KALIPI/ PWD 97 38
26. Minuyan I FSCAP / Solo Parent 56 -
27. Minuyan II FSCAP / Solo Parent 30 -
28. Minuyan III FSCAP / Solo Parent 50 -
29. Minuyan IV FSCAP/ KALIPI/PYAP/Solo Parent 55 -
30. Minuyan V FSCAP / Solo Parent 51 -
31. Narra FSCAP / Solo Parent 43 -
32. Paradise III FSCAP / Solo Parent 40 -
33. Poblacion FSCAP / Solo Parent 39 -
34. Poblacion I FSCAP / Solo Parent 56 -
35. San Martin I FSCAP / Solo Parent 92 34
36. San Martin II FSCAP/ PWD/ Solo Parent 50 -
37. San Martin III FSCAP/ PWD/ Solo Parent 60 -
38. San Martin IV FSCAP/ PWD/ Solo Parent 55 -
39. San Martin de Porres FSCAP/ PWD/ Solo Parent 42 -
40. Sta. Cruz I FSCAP/ PWD/ Solo Parent 34 -
41. Sta. Cruz II FSCAP/ PWD/ Solo Parent 60 -
42. Sta. Cruz III FSCAP/KALIPI/PYAP/ PWD 42 -
43. Sta. Cruz IV FSCAP 42 -
44. Sta. Cruz V FSCAP 31 -

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45. San Pedro FSCAP 124 120 o
46. Sto. Cristo FSCAP/ Solo Parent/ PWD 50 - f
47. Sto. Niño I FSCAP 36 - S
48. Sto. Niño II FSCAP 42 - a
49. San Isidro FSCAP 75 15 n
50. San Manuel FSCAP 68 3
J
51. San Roque FSCAP / Solo Parent 27 -
o
s
52. San Rafael I FSCAP / Solo Parent 39 -
e
53. San Rafael II FSCAP / Solo Parent 31 -
d
54. San Rafael III FSCAP / Solo Parent/ PWD 41 -
el
55. San Rafael IV FSCAP / Solo Parent 36 -
M
56. San Rafael V FSCAP / Solo Parent 50 -
o
57. Sapang Palay Proper FSCAP / Solo Parent 84 -
n
58. Tungkong Mangga FSCAP / Solo Parent 53 30
t
59. Francisco Homes - Yakal FSCAP / Solo Parent 23 -
e
B
Source: SEP 2012
ul
a
The maps in the next page display the locations of vulnerable groups across
c
barangays in the city. The sub-population included in the maps are the elderly and PWDs. a
There is a greater concentration of these cohorts in the western side of the city. n

Specifically, barangays Muzon and Graceville lead the other barangays in terms of
the number of senior citizens. They are followed by Dulong Bayan, Kaypian, Sto. Cristo,
San Manuel, San Isidro, and other barangays in the northern part of the city. Regarding
PWDs, barangays Dulong Bayan and Francisco Homes-Yakal lead the list and are followed
by Muzon, Kaypian, and San Rafael. The large versions of the maps are included as A3
attachments to the EP in the map pack.

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Map 7 Map of Vulnerable Groups - Senior Citizens

Page | 84
Source: CSWDO
f

t
t

c
S
y

a
a
a

e
e

n
n
d
n

o
o
o

B
el
Ci

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Map 8 Map of Vulnerable Groups - Persons with Disabilities

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Source: CSWDO
f

t
t

c
S
y

a
a
a

e
e

n
n
d
n

o
o
o

B
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In the recent years, the number of victims of natural disasters has been variable. o
This can be due to the recent trends in extreme weather events. f
S
a
Table 3-54 Number of Victims of Natural Disasters (2010-2012)
n
J
o
2010 2011 % OF INCREASE/ 2012 % OF INCREASE/
s
DECREASE DECREASE
e
Victim of Natural d
1,714 556 -68% 1,017 82.91%
Disasters el
M
Source: City Social Welfare and Development Office, 2013. o
n
With respect to the social welfare and development programs of the city t
Government, the elderly appears to be the group with the most beneficiaries. They are e
followed by people at risk of disability and solo parents. B
ul
a
Table 3-55 Number of Clients per Type of Social Welfare and Development Program/Service
c
a
% OF % OF
TOTAL MALE FEMALE n
TOTAL TOTAL
1. Solo parent provided
79 8 10% 71 90%
Solo Parent ID’s.
2. Individuals at risk
assisted in early detection
80
of an intervention for their
disability situation. - - - -
3. Elderly who acquired
vocational skills and 10
placed for employment
4. Elderly who actively
participate in family and 1,200 489 41% 711 59%
community activities
5. Elderly enabled to form
interest group and/or self- 63
help organizations
6. Improved mental
patients discharged from
institutional care provided 2 1 1
care and follow up
services.

Source: CSWDO

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3.6. PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY o
f
3.6.1. Crime Incidence S
a
n
The years 2009-2010 recorded the lowest crime rates in the city ranging from 20- J
51/100,000 persons for non-index crimes or violation of special laws.28 While index o
crimes, or crimes against other persons recorded a stable 76/100,000. 29 These crime s
rates saw an alarming increased in 2011 with five times the number of crimes in 2011, e
which steadily increased in succeeding years in terms of index crimes. As for violations d
against ordinances, a record high of 571 cases was recorded in 2011, which gradually el
M
decreased, however still remained high in 2012-13 (Figure 3-2).30 According to the PNP,
o
the sudden increase in crime rates may be attributed to the increasing number of
n
relocated individuals in the city. t
e
B
ul
Recorded Crime Incidence a
600 c
a
500 n
Number of Crimes

400

300

200

100

0
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Index Crime 76 76 385 404 528


Non Index Crime 20 51 571 440 547

Source: SEP, 2009-2012 and PNP

Figure 3-2 Crime Incidence per 100,000 Population (2009-2013)

In terms of the victim characteristics (Table 3-56), there are more married victims
than those who are single. Males are also seen to be more vulnerable to crimes as seen
that there are 134 more male victims than female. While for victims’ ages, it is alarming
to note that 31% of them aged less than 20 years old and older than 60 years old.

28 Index crimes as defined by the Philippine National Police (PNP) refers to crimes against persons such as; murder, homicide, physical injury,
rape, crimes against property such as; robbery, theft, car napping, and cattle rustling, among others.
29 Non-index crimes as defined by PNP refer to violations of special laws such as; illegal logging or local ordinances.
30 Source for crime definitions http://www.senate.gov.ph/publications/AAG%202013-05%20-%20Crime%20Statistics.pdf

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Table 3-56 Victim Characteristics o
f
JANUARY - DECEMBER 2012 S
a
CIVIL STATUS NUMBER OF VICTIMS SEX NO OF VICTIMS
n
Single 354 Male 487 J
Married 481 Female 353 o
Widow 8 Total 840 s
Total 843 e
d
Age No of Victims el
1-10 39 M
o
11-20 192
n
21-30 177
t
31-40 211 e
41-50 134 B
51-60 56 ul
61 and above 29 a
Total 838
c
a
Source: SEP (2009) and PNP (2014)
n

For present data, from January to October of 2014, 380 crime cases had been
cleared by CSJDM-PNP; out of the 1,135 cases, 274 were solved. The index crimes solved
in this period can be seen in Figure 3-3.

Source: PNP (2014)


Figure 3-3 Index Crimes Cleared January - October 2014

The table in the next page lists the protection facilities available in the last five years.
It can be noticed that police forces have steadily increased. As for equipment the numbers are
stable, except for 2013 wherein data is not available.

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o
Table 3-57 Protection Facilities (2008-2013) f
S
a
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
n
Personnel J
No. of Police Forces o
70 82 95 100 121 126
s
Equipment
e
Motor Vehicles 8 8 13 11 11 - d
Motorcycle 9 9 12 9 8 - el
Firearms (Short and Long) 57 57 77 8 (short) 83 - M
Base Radio o
7 7 20 20 16 -
n
Hand Held Radio 1 1 20 20 20 -
t
e
Source: PNP (2014)
B
ul
a
Table 3-58 Police Outpost/COMPAC Location c
a
COMPAC Location n
COMPAC 1 Brgy. Tungkong Mangga
COMPAC 2 Brgy. Muzon (Pabahay 2000)
COMPAC 3 Brgy. Muzon (Harmony Hills)
COMPAC 4 Brgy. Muzon (Sitio Carriedo)
COMPAC 5 Brgy. Bagong Buhay I
COMPAC 6 Brgy. Fatima
COMPAC 7 Brgy. Minuyan Proper (Towerville)

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3.6.2. Fire Incidence o
f
S
A total of 57 incidents of fire had been recorded in 2012. This is the most number a
of fire cases in the City, in the last three years. 31 The barangay with the most cases of fire n
is Muzon with 14 reported cases. This is followed by Graceville (6 cases), Kaypian (4 J
cases) and San Manuel (4 cases), and so on. It is noticeable that these are among the most o
populated barangays in the city. The identified causes of fire are mostly by accidental s
causes with few electrical malfunctions and grass fires.32 e
d
Table 3-59 Fire Personnel and Facilities (2008-2014) el
M
PERSONNEL/FACILITY 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 o
Firemen 25 23 23 20 19 16 19 n
Fire aides 12 15 8 8 9 11 11 t
Equipment - - - - - - - e
Fire trucks 3 3 2 3 3 4 2 B
Fire stations - 1 1 1 1 2 3 ul
a
Source: SEPs from 2008 to 2012, City Fire Station c
a
n
3.6.3. Disaster Risk Reduction and Management

Regarding disaster preparedness, there are three main types of infrastructure


projects for reducing disaster risk namely: drainage works, pedestrian transport, and
slope protection. Drainage works include the construction, rehabilitation, and
improvement of canals and similar infrastructure. Pedestrian transport projects usually
involve the installation of railings and construction of footbridges. And slope protection
is mainly concentrated on riprapping. In 2013, the type of project that had the most shares
of appropriation was on slope protection; followed by drainage works, and pedestrian
transport last.

In addition, from 2011-2012, the personnel of the City Disaster Risk Reduction
and Management Unit (CDRRMU) underwent various trainings for disaster and accident
response, such as follows:33
 Basic Intermediate Course on Incident Command
 Fire Suppression Training
 Provincial Fast Craft Training
 Basic Life Saving (BLS) and Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)
 Water Safety and Fire Suppression
 Water Safety and River Crossing
 Swift Water and Boat Handling
 Crashed Vehicle Training
 Vehicle Extrication

31In 2010 there were 12 cases of fires, while in 2011 this increased to 30 cases of fires. Source: City Fire Station.
32City Fire Station.
33CSJDM City Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Unit (CDDRMU).“2013 Capability” Report.

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3.7. SPORTS AND RECREATION o
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S
The median age of population in the city is 23 years old and the population aged a
10-29 years old made up of 30% of the city’s inhabitants. This implies that there is a large n
market base for sports and recreational facilities in the city. Listed below are the existing J
facilities available within San Jose del Monte. o
s
e
As of 2003, there were a total of 281 sports and recreational facilities in the city;
d
these are composed of both educational centers and libraries as well as play areas.34 The
el
updated list is elaborated in the local economy chapter. M
o
Table 3-60 List of Sports and Recreational Facilities n
t
SPORTS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES NUMBER e
Barangay library/ reading center 30 B
Bowling center 3 ul
Tennis court 6 a
Billiard hall 49 c
Basketball court 106 a
Cockpit arena 2 n
Night club/bar 6
Playground 50
Resort 5
Golf course 1
Video games shops 23
Total 281

Source: SEP 2005

34 Some of the facilities listed below are patronized by the adult population such as cockpit arenas, nightclubs and bars, and the golf course.

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Table 3-61 List of Covered and Open Courts in Barangays o
f
LIST OF BARANGAY NO. OF COVERED COURT NO. OF OPEN COURT S
Poblacion 1 a
n
Poblacion 1 1 1
J
Francisco Homes -Narra 1
o
Francisco Homes -Mulawin 1 s
Francisco Homes -Yakal 1 e
Francisco Homes -Guijo 2 1 d
Gumaoc East 1 el
Gumaoc West 1
M
o
Gumaoc Central 1
n
Graceville 2 2
t
Gaya-Gaya 2 e
Sto. Cristo 1 3 B
Tungkong Mangga 1 3 ul
Dulong Bayan 1 a
c
Ciudad Real 1
a
Maharlika 1 1
n
San Manuel 2
Kaypian 1
San Isidro 1
San Roque 1
Kaybanban 1
Paradise III 1
Muzon 1 2
Minuyan Proper 1
Minuyan I 1
Minuyan II 1
Minuyan III
Minuyan IV 1 2
Minuyan V 1
Bagong Buhay I
Bagong Buhay II
Bagong Buhay III 1
San Martin I 1
San Martin II 1
San Martin III
San Martin IV 1
Sta. Cruz I 1
Sta. Cruz II 1 1
Sta. Cruz III 1
Sta. Cruz IV

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Sta. Cruz V o
f
Fatima I
S
Fatima II 1
a
Fatima III n
Fatima IV J
Fatima V 2 o
Citrus 1 1 s
e
San Pedro 1
d
Sapang Palay Proper 1
el
San Martin de Porres 1 M
Assumption 1 o
Sto. Nino I n
Sto. Nino II 1 t
Lawang Pare
e
B
San Rafael I 1
ul
San Rafael II
a
San Rafael III c
San Rafael IV a
San Rafael V 1 n
Total 37 30

Source: City Engineering Office, 2013

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4. LOCAL ECONOMY f
S
a
4.1. LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT n
J
o
According to figures from the NSO, the population of the City of San Jose del Monte s
at the time of its cityhood declaration in 2000 was more than double its population in e
1990. It was among the key factors that rationalized the change of its status from d
municipality and secure a larger share from the national wealth. One reason for the big el
increase in the number of residential population is that the national government M
relocated thousands of informal settler families from Quezon City and other parts of o
Metro Manila to the city. This continued after it became a city, up until today despite a n
moratorium declared by the city in August 2013. The continuing rise in population t
e
density is the trigger to cityhood as a coping mechanism for the increased demand for
B
local public services.
ul
a
This unprecedented demographic shift in the city catapulted its economy to a c
position that is now inducing rapid changes in living standards, labor activity, economic a
base and land resources. Investment opportunities and employment options are n
diversifying but with the increasing cost of public services, and a demand to harness its
economic assets.

4.1.1. Economically Active Population

Working Age Population

The growth potential of a local economy is in part driven by the quality of available
workers to supply the industry requirements in the area. In many urban settlements, the
size of the working age population can be an economic strength if coupled with adequate
skills that can match the dynamic and competitive labor market.

In 2013, the city’s estimated working age population35 is higher by 53,883 than
the 2007 census (Table 4-1). The age group with the biggest share is age 15-39, which
consistently shares over 15,000 from 2007 until 2013 (Figure 4-1). This is likely to persist
until 2016 when the total working age population is estimated at 369,226 (Figure 4-2).

35 Defined as 15 years old and over(www.bles.gov.ph),

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Table 4-1 Projected Working Age Population and Household Population (2007-2013) o
f
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 S
a
Working Age Population36 277,688 286,320 295,221 302,477 311,880 321,575 331,571
n
Annual Change - 8,632 8,900 7,256 9,403 9,695 9,996 J
Total HH Population 439,090 444,615 450,209 454,553 460,272 466,064 471,928 o
s
e
Source: The projections for 2011-2013 were calculated from NSO data for 2007 and 2010.
d
el
M
60,000 o
n
50,000 t
e
40,000 B
ul
a
30,000
c
a
20,000 n

10,000

-
65 and
15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64
over
2007 45,173 36,286 35,014 31,288 32,368 27,229 21,818 16,483 11,480 7,538 13,011
2008 45,823 37,141 34,857 32,589 32,351 28,522 23,067 17,498 12,365 8,276 13,565
2009 46,483 38,016 34,701 33,945 32,334 29,877 24,387 18,575 13,318 9,087 14,142
2010 46,998 38,715 34,585 35,080 32,321 31,029 25,538 19,524 14,191 9,869 14,627
2011 47,675 39,627 34,430 36,539 32,304 32,503 27,000 20,726 15,285 10,836 15,250
2012 48,361 40,560 34,276 38,059 32,287 34,046 28,545 22,002 16,463 11,897 15,899
2013 49,057 41,516 34,122 39,641 32,270 35,663 30,179 23,356 17,732 13,062 16,575

Source: NSO 2007 and 2010

Figure 4-1 Working Age Population by Age Group (2007-2013)

36 Based on projections in the Population and Demography Section of this Report.

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o
f
2016 S
a
n
2013 J
o
s
2010
e
d
2007 el
M
o
0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000
n
2007 2010 2013 2016 t
Working Age Population 277,688 302,477 331,571 363,464 e
Total Population 439,090 454,553 471,928 489,967 B
ul
a
Figure 4-2 Share of Working Age Population to Household Population
c
a
The annual change in working age population from 2008 to 2013 (Figure 4-3)
n
shows a steady increment for all age-groups of over 8,000 except in age-groups between
25-29 and 35-39 years old. This may be attributed to the temporary displacement
following a slump in the economy in 2009 that affected many sectors, and typhoons
Ondoy and Pepeng that wrought extensive damages in Metro Manila, Central Luzon and
South Luzon. Therefore, the projected working age population affects age-groups
between 25-29 and 35-39 years old which shows a continuous decrease.

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1,800
f
1,600
S
1,400
1,200
a
1,000
n
800 J
600 o
400 s
200 e
- d
(200) el
(400) M
65 and
15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 o
over
n
2008 650 855 (157) 1,301 (17) 1,293 1,249 1,015 885 738 554
t
2009 660 875 (156) 1,355 (17) 1,355 1,320 1,077 953 811 577
e
2010 515 699 (116) 1,135 (13) 1,152 1,151 949 873 782 485
B
2011 677 912 (155) 1,459 (17) 1,474 1,462 1,202 1,094 967 623
ul
2012 686 933 (154) 1,520 (17) 1,544 1,545 1,276 1,178 1,061 649
a
2013 696 955 (154) 1,583 (17) 1,617 1,634 1,354 1,269 1,165 677
c
a
Source: 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics n

Figure 4-3 Estimated Annual Change in Working Age Population (2008-2013)

Based on 2013 data, there are slightly more males of working age than females
except for the age groups 25-34 with a rate of .96, 60-64 with .85, and 65 years and older
with .65 (Figure 4-4).

1.50

1.25

1.00

0.75

0.50
65 and
15-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64
over
M:F Ratio 1.03 0.99 0.96 0.96 0.99 1.00 1.01 1.01 0.96 0.85 0.65

Figure 4-4 2013 Male to Female Ratio

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Educational Background of Potential Work Force o
f
In the last two census years, 98.9% of the working age population in 2007 was S
a
estimated to have attended some formal schooling. This increased to 99.9% or about 350
n
persons shy of the total working age population that year (Figure 4-5).
J
o
s
e
d
302,123 el
2010 M
302,477 o
n
t
e
B
274,433 ul
2007
a
277,688
c
a
n
W/ educational attainment 15 y/o above

Source BLES and NSO 2007 and 2010

Figure 4-5 Working Age Population with Educational Attainment, 2007 and 2010

However, the highest level of education attained by majority of this sector is high
school. The NSO reports this at 50.41% in 2007 and 48.59% in 2010 (Figure 4-6).
Meanwhile, around 26.48% were reported to have enrolled in a 4-year college course in
2007, and 29.74% in 2010. It is worth noting that proportion of those who completed
college education was less than 15% with 12.79% in 2007 and 14.3% in 2010. These are
slightly lower than those who did not get an academic degree with 13.69% in 2007 and
15.34 in 2010. Those with post-secondary education, such as two-year technical courses,
remain to be at 5.75% of the total working age population.

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55% f
S
a
45% n
J
o
35%
s
e
25% d
el
M
15% o
n
5%
t
e
B
-5% ul
No Grade Post College College Post
Completed
Elementary High School
Secondary Undergrad Degree Graduate
a
2007
c
0.49% 16.79% 50.41% 5.75% 13.69% 12.79% 0.08%
a
2010 0.49% 15.41% 48.59% 5.75%
5.57% 15.34% 14.30% 0.31%
n
Figure 4-6 Working Age Population by Education Level 2007 and 2010

Within age groups in 2010 (Figure 4-7), only 33% of those between 15-19 years
old (38,715) completed high school, and 17% were conferred an academic degree. For
those between 25-34 years old (69,665), about 36.5% completed high school while 18.5%
finished college. For those 35 years old and above, 33% or about 48,543 finished high
school and only 16% hold an academic degree.

This implies that while the bulk of the working age population is young, only a few
are qualified by education requirement for competitive employment opportunities. Often,
those who have high school education or less are at a higher risk of displacement by new
entrants to the labor force with higher educational background.

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f
40%
37% S
36%
35% a
33%
33% n
30%
30% J
o
25% s
e
20% 19% 18% d
17% 16% el
15% M
14% o
10%
7% n
6% 6% 6%
5%
t
5% 6% 7% e
2% 5%
0% 1% B
15-19 20 - 24 25 - 29 30 - 34 35 and over ul
a
E Graduate HS Graduate PS Graduate Academic Degree Holder c
a
Figure 4-7 Proportion of Graduates by Age Group and Level of Education (2010) n

Between men and women of working age in 2007 and 2010, there are more
women who attended some formal education – except in 2007 where men with high
school education slightly outnumbered the females (Figure 4-8). Worth emphasizing is
that in terms of academic degree holders, there were more women reported under this
category than men with a ratio of .8. This means that there is one male who did not finish
college for every five women who obtained a degree.

In terms of post-secondary education, there are more men who enlisted in


technical education than women in 2007 and 2010. This may be attributed to the long
tradition of technical education courses that used to be male-dominated and offered
mechanical courses like electronics repair, automotive maintenance, equipment
operations and the like. The DOLE37 reports a growing number of women opting for
technical education as policies and courses have diversified encouraging women to enroll
in short-term technical education. Among the popular courses added to traditional
courses are related to computer operations or software applications, health care and
hospitality services courses allied with tourism.

37 2013 Gender and Statistics on Labor and Employment, www.bles.dole.gov.ph

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75,000
S
a
50,000 n
J
o
25,000 s
e
d
0 el
M F M F
2007 2010 M
High School 69,399 68,944 73,001 73,790
o
n
Academic Degree Holder 15,429 19,672 19,160 24,032
t
College Undergraduate 18,858 18,719 23,172 23,181
e
Elementary 23,284 22,789 23,369 23,177
B
Post Secondary 8,252 7,536 8,757 8,069
ul
No Grade Completed 611 726 641 836 a
Post baccalaureate 83 131 385 553 c
a
Source: NSO 2007 and 2010 n

Figure 4-8 Male to Female Ratio by Education Level, 2007 and 2010

By population estimate, the City of San Jose del Monte can fairly expect its
potential labor force to grow exponentially with the younger age groups still sustaining
the largest share. By 2015, the city’s working age population is estimated at 356,551, and
by 2025 this is expected to reach 521,732 38 (Table 4-2). If this were to happen, the city
government may need to step up its initial plans and investments in developing its local
labor supply to be equipped with market-relevant skills starting with the access to post
secondary and tertiary education, at the minimum.

38 Ibid

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Table 4-2 Projected Working Age Population (2015-2025) o
f
Working S
2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025
Age Group a
15-19 50,480 51,207 51,944 52,692 53,451 54,221 55,001 55,793 56,597 57,412
n
58,238
J
20-24 43,495 44,519 45,568 46,641 47,740 48,865 50,016 51,194 52,400 53,634 54,898
o
25-29 33,817 33,665 33,514 33,364 33,215 33,066 32,918 32,770 32,623 32,477 32,332
s
30-34 43,007 44,796 46,659 48,599 50,620 52,726 54,918 57,202 59,581 62,059 e
64,640
d
35-39 32,236 32,219 32,202 32,185 32,168 32,151 32,134 32,117 32,100 32,083 32,066
el
40-44 39,131 40,990 42,937 44,976 47,112 49,349 51,693 54,148 56,720 59,414 62,235
M
45-49 33,732 35,663 37,704 39,862 42,143 44,555 47,105 49,801 52,651 55,665 58,851
o
50-54 26,320 27,940 29,659 31,485 33,423 35,480 37,664 39,983 42,444 45,056 n
47,830
t
55-59 20,570 22,156 23,863 25,702 27,683 29,817 32,115 34,590 37,256 40,127 43,220
e
60-64 15,747 17,289 18,983 20,842 22,884 25,126 27,587 30,289 33,256 36,513 40,090
B
65 & Over 18,016 18,783 19,582 20,416 21,285 22,191 23,135 24,120 25,147 26,217 ul
27,333
Total 356,551 369,226 382,616 396,765 411,724 427,545 444,286 462,007 480,774 500,657 a
521,732
c
Source: The projections were calculated from NSO data for 2007 and 2010. a
n
4.1.2. Employment

According to regional employment estimates39 from 2008 to 2013, labor force


participation in Central Luzon is estimated at an average of 61.1%. Applying the regional
rates to the City of San Jose del Monte, its labor force 40 in 2008 is 171,632 and 206,568 in
2013 (Table 4-3) with an average annual change of 6,520(Figure 4-9).

Table 4-3 Labor Force (2008-2013)

Working Age Group 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013


LFR 0.60 0.61 0.61 0.61 0.62 0.62
15-24 49,779 51,544 52,285 53,254 55,131 56,155
25-34 40,468 41,874 42,496 43,291 44,847 45,733
35-44 36,524 37,948 38,644 39,532 41,127 42,119
45-54 24,339 26,207 27,488 29,113 31,339 33,191
55-64 12,385 13,667 14,677 15,933 17,583 19,092
65 and over 8,139 8,627 8,922 9,302 9,857 10,277
TOTAL 171,632 179,867 184,511 190,425 199,884 206,568

39No small area estimates for the city is available. This census methodology applied by the NSO to estimate city/ municipal level development
indicators. Thus far, this is applied in estimating sub-national poverty in selected provinces of the country.
40All persons 15 years old and over as of their last birthday who are neither employed nor unemployed. (e.g. housewives, students, disabled,

retired persons, and seasonal workers); Ibid.3

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10,000
9,000 f
8,000 S
7,000 a
6,000 n
5,000 J
4,000
3,000
o
2,000 s
1,000 e
- d
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Labor Force Annual Change 4,186 8,234 4,644 5,914 9,459 6,683
el
M
o
Source: 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics
n
t
Figure 4-9 Estimated Annual Change in Labor (2008-2013)
e
Among age groups, the biggest labor force of the city comes from those between B
25-54 years old (Figure 4-10), with those from 25-34 and 35-44 years old comprising ul
a
23% and 21%, respectively.
c
a
50,000 n
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
-
65 and
15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64
over
2008 27,494 22,284 40,468 36,524 24,339 12,385 8,139
2009 28,355 23,190 41,874 37,948 26,207 13,667 8,627
2010 28,669 23,616 42,496 38,644 27,488 14,677 8,922
2011 29,082 24,172 43,291 39,532 29,113 15,933 9,302
2012 29,984 25,147 44,847 41,127 31,339 17,583 9,857
2013 30,416 25,740 45,733 42,119 33,191 19,092 10,277

Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics

Figure 4-10 Labor Force Distribution by Age Group (2008-2013)

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Table 4-4 Estimated Employment Percentage Rates o
f
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 S
Unemployment 9.2 9.2 8.8 8.5 9.0 8.7 a
Employment 90.8 90.8 91.2 91.5 91.0 91.3 n
Underemployment 8.7 7. 8 9.1 11.1 13.0 14.5 J
o
Source: 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics (www.bles.dole.govv.ph) s
e
Employment estimates41 based on regional rates42 shows high labor absorption d
for the city with an average of 91.1% from 2008 to 2013. el
M
o
250,000
n
t
200,000 e
B
150,000 ul
a
c
100,000 a
n
50,000

-
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Est. Unemployment 15,790 16,548 16,237 16,186 17,990 17,971
Est. Employment 155,842 163,319 168,274 174,239 181,895 188,596
Labor Force 171,632 179,867 184,511 190,425 199,884 206,568

Source: 2014Yearbook of Labor Statistics

Figure 4-11 Estimated Labor Force, Employment and Unemployment of CSJDM (2008-2013)

To approximate the employment distribution across age groups from 2008-2013,


the following regional rates43 were applied (Table 4-3). Based on these, those between
ages 20-54 years old comprise the most number of employed during the period (Figure
4-12). The average annual increase of employed persons between 45-54 years old is
estimated at 1,641, followed by those between 55-64 and 35-44 years old with 1,237 and
1,058, respectively (Figure 4-13). The lowest increase by age group is between 65 and
over with 399 average annual increase followed by 15-19 and 20-24 with 561 and 653
(Figure 4-13).

41 Data may not add up to total due to rounding off.


42 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics and 2013 Gender and Statistics on Labor and Employment; www.bles.dole.gov.ph
43 Gender and Statistics on Labor and Employment 2013. www.bles.gov.ph

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Table 4-5 Employment and Unemployment by Age Group o
f
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 S
Employment a
15 - 19 24,965 25,746 26,146 26,610 27,285 27,769 n
J
20 - 24 20,234 21,056 21,538 22,118 22,884 23,500 o
25 - 34 36,745 38,021 38,756 39,611 40,811 41,755 s
35 - 44 33,164 34,457 35,243 36,172 37,425 38,454 e
45 - 54 22,099 23,796 25,069 26,638 28,518 30,304 d
55 - 64 11,245 12,410 13,385 14,579 16,001 17,431 el
65 & over M
7,390 7,833 8,137 8,512 8,970 9,383
o
Employed 155,842 163,319 168,274 174,239 181,895 188,596 n
Unemployment t
15 - 19 2,529 2,609 2,523 2,472 2,699 2,646 e
20 - 24 2,050 2,133 2,078 2,055 2,263 2,239 B
25 - 34 3,723 3,852 3,740 3,680 4,036 3,979 ul
a
35 - 44 3,360 3,491 3,401 3,360 3,701 3,664
c
45 - 54 2,239 2,411 2,419 2,475 2,820 2,888 a
55 - 64 1,139 1,257 1,292 1,354 1,582 1,661 n
65 and Over 749 794 785 791 887 894
Unemployed 15,790 16,548 16,237 16,186 17,990 17,971

Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Labor Force Statistics

45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
-
65 and
15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64
over
2008 24,965 20,234 36,745 33,164 22,099 11,245 7,390
2009 25,746 21,056 38,021 34,457 23,796 12,410 7,833
2010 26,146 21,538 38,756 35,243 25,069 13,385 8,137
2011 26,610 22,118 39,611 36,172 26,638 14,579 8,512
2012 27,285 22,884 40,811 37,425 28,518 16,001 8,970
2013 27,769 23,500 41,755 38,454 30,304 17,431 9,383

Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics

Figure 4-12 Employment by Age Group (2008-2013)

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2,000 o
1,800 f
S
1,600
a
1,400 n
1,200 J
1,000 o
s
800
e
600 d
400 el
200 M
o
-
15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 and over n
2009 782 822 1,277 1,294 1,696 1,164 443 t
2010 400 482 735 786 1,273 975 304 e
2011 464 580 855 929 1,569 1,194 374 B
2012 676 766 1,200 1,253 1,880 1,422 458 ul
2013 484 616 944 1,029 1,785 1,431 413 a
c
Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics a
n
Figure 4-13 Estimated Annual Change in Employment by Age Group (2009-2013)

With a large and relatively young to middle age labor force, employment
expectations are usually higher with the assumption that people of such ages would have
adequate skills and education background higher than secondary level. However, based
on estimates from official labor surveys44, around 45% of employed persons for each year
reported to have attended high school only. This includes undergraduates and graduates.
The rest of the labor force is fairly distributed between those with elementary and college
education, at around 27% for each category (Table 4-6). Of these, roughly 32.25%
graduated high school, 14.64 % graduated college and pursued higher education; and
18.46% completed elementary education (Figure 4-14).

44
Ibid. 6.

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Table 4-6 Estimated Number of Employed Persons by Highest Education Level o
f
Education Level 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 S
No Grade Completed 468 490 505 697 728 662 a
n
Elementary 43,480 45,239 44,424 46,696 49,112 50,198 J
Undergraduate 13,558 13,882 13,967 15,507 16,552 16,922 o
Graduate 30,078 31,357 30,458 31,189 32,377 33,323 s
High School 70,596 73,657 75,723 78,233 80,761 84,372 e
d
Undergraduate 18,545 19,108 19,352 20,386 21,282 22,263 el
Graduate 52,051 54,549 56,372 57,847 59,480 62,109 M
Post-Secondary - - - - 8,731 9,170 o
Undergraduate - - - - n
2,910 2,505
t
Graduate - - - - 5,821 6,665 e
College 41,298 43,933 47,790 48,787 42,563 44,148 B
Undergraduate 19,324 20,578 22,717 22,825 15,279 16,165 ul
Graduate and Higher a
21,974 23,518 25,073 25,962 27,284 28,029
c
TOTAL 155,842 163,319 168,274 174,239 181,895 188,596 a
n
Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics

2012
2011
32.67% 2010
2009
2008
33.22%

17.84% 33.50%

17.90% 14.98%

18.08% 33.36% 14.90%


14.85%
19.20%
14.39%
33.40%
19.28% 14.09%
Elementary Graduate High School Graduate College Graduate & higher

Figure 4-14 Employment by Completed Education Level

In terms of underemployment, which is measured against estimated employment,


the lowest number is in 2009 with 12,739 and the highest is estimated in 2013 with
27,346 (Figure 4-15). While there are more people getting employed each year, there is
also an increasing number who would like to have additional hours of work in their
present job or an additional job, or to have a new job with longer working hours.

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o
This implies some degree of dissatisfaction with the income derived from the f
S
current employment levels in the city, either because it is lower than what they perceive
a
they should be receiving based on the skills of the workers, or the income is insufficient
n
to meet the basic household expenditures. The annual change of underemployment J
posted a decrease in 2009 while the highest annual change increase is posted between o
2011 and 2012 with 4,306 and 4,028 annual change. s
e
d
el
M
250,000 o
n
t
e
200,000
B
ul
a
150,000 c
a
n

100,000

50,000

-
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
Est. Underemployed 13,558 12,739 15,313 19,341 23,646 27,346
Est. Employed 155,842 163,319 168,274 174,239 181,895 188,596

Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics

Figure 4-15 Estimated Underemployment (2008-2013)

Furthermore, based on the demographic surveillance report of the City


Population Office (CPO) the total population of the city as of December 2014 is 602,508.
The total actual working age (15-64 years old) is 354,025 (see Table 4-7) or about 58.8%
of the total population. An increase of the unemployment rate is perhaps due to the
massive increase of resettlers in the city.

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Table 4-7 Employment Status as of 2014 o
f
STATUS POPULATION PERCENTAGE RATE S
Employed 265,280 74.9 % a
Unemployed 88,746 25.1 % n
Underemployed 34,458 12.9 % J
o
Source: City Population Office
s
e
d
As of October 2012, the minimum wage rates45 for various sector workers in el
Central Luzon are as follows: M
o
Table 4-8 Minimum Wage Rates (Effective October 11, 2012) n
t
Bataan, Bulacan, Nueva Aurora e
INDICATOR/SECTOR Ecija, Pampanga, Tarlac, B
Zambales ul
Non-Agriculture 285.00 a
Establishments With Total Assets of P30M or More 336.00 - c
Establishments With Total Assets of Less Than P30 M 329.00 - a
Agriculture n
Plantation 306.00 270.00
Non-Plantation 290.00 258.00
Retail/Service
Establishments With 16 Workers or More 325.00 -
Establishments With Less Than 16 Workers 311.00 215.00

Source: www.nwpc.dole.gov.ph

The DOLE claims the latest minimum wage rates are just enough to meet basic
food and non-food requirements or stay out of the poverty line - which is estimated at Php
19,910 per capita46 for Bulacan. Comparing this with the average minimum daily wage
(Php 316.67) of a household head with a family of five, the per capita allocation would be
Php 18,240.19 or Php 1,699.81 lower than the poverty threshold for the province.

www.nwpc.dole.gov.ph and www.bles.dole.gov.ph


45

NSCB, 2013. 2012 Full Year Official Poverty Statistics.


46

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4.1.3. Unemployment o
f
S
Adopting the regional distribution of unemployment by age group for 2008 to a
2013, Figure 4-16 shows that most of the unemployed persons in the city belong to ages n
25-34, followed by those between 35-44 years old. The highest number of unemployed J
was in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to the period of the economic crisis pervading in o
the urban regions, rice price hike and aftermath of extreme weather events. s
e
d
el
4,500
M
4,000 o
3,500 n
3,000 t
2,500
e
B
2,000
ul
1,500 a
1,000 c
500 a
n
-
15-19 20-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65 and over
2008 2,529 2,050 3,723 3,360 2,239 1,139 749
2009 2,609 2,133 3,852 3,491 2,411 1,257 794
2010 2,523 2,078 3,740 3,401 2,419 1,292 785
2011 2,472 2,055 3,680 3,360 2,475 1,354 791
2012 2,699 2,263 4,036 3,701 2,820 1,582 887
2013 2,646 2,239 3,979 3,664 2,888 1,661 894

Note: Computed based on Central Luzon data, 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics

Figure 4-16 Estimated Unemployment by Age Group

Conversely, a recent study made by the UPLB-IS47 (2013) on unemployment in


localities within the Luzon Urban Beltway Region48 (Map 9), shows that majority of these
areas have estimates of unemployed persons less than 6,881. However, there are
municipalities and cities with estimates from 6,881-10,000 and they are found in the
following provinces: Tarlac (Tarlac City), Pampanga (Angeles City, Mabalacat City and San
Fernando City), Bulacan (City of San Jose Del Monte), Rizal (Antipolo City, Taytay, San
Mateo), NCR (Tondo, Quezon City, Pasig City, Marikina City, Caloocan City, Valenzuela
City, Malabon City, Taguig City, Las Piñas City, Muntinlupa City and Parañaque City),
Cavite (Bacoor City and Gen. Mariano Alvarez) and Laguna (Calamba City, San Pablo City
and Sta. Rosa City). Such findings, although not conclusive, somehow support the City’s
report about 5% unemployment rate for past two years.

47Alarcon, S. 2013, UPLB Institute of Statistics. NSCB Technical Paper on Estimation of The Municipal and City Count of Unemployed Persons
in The Luzon Urban Beltway Region Using Model-Based Approach. 14th National Convention On Statistics, October 1-2, 2013;
http://www.nscb.gov.ph/ncs/12thncs/papers/INVITED/IPS-18%20Small%20Area%20Estimation/IPS
48 One of the five super regions created 2006 by EO 561 as part of the government economic reforms to create jobs and improve living

standards by investing in better infrastructure and services and create opportunity across the country. Ibid. 14

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In response, the City of San Jose del Monte, continues to improve access to o
employment and labor productivity through employment facilitation services (Table 4-9) f
S
subsidies for cooperatives and micro-enterprises, devolved livelihood programs of the
a
city social welfare and development office, agricultural extension support services and
n
agricultural infrastructure, scholarship programs, technical skills education assistance J
and alternative learning systems for adults. o
s
Table 4-9 Placements and Referrals through PESO-CSJDM (2011-2013) e
d
EMPLOYMENT SECTOR 2011 2012 2013 el
Private Sector 2,258 2,072 2,299 M
o
Regular Employment with Referral 1,355 518 1,333
n
Job Fairs – Local 21 14 31 t
Local Recruitment Activity (LRA) 882 1,540 935 e
Government Sector 10 20 200
B
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Map 9 Geographical Distribution of Estimated Unemployment in Luzon Urban Beltway Region 49 o
f
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Ibid12. Said study used the Poisson regression-based model.


49

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4.2. ECONOMIC STRUCTURE o
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The Luzon Urban Beltway is envisioned to be a globally competitive industrial and a
service center. This comprises the National Capital Region (NCR), Region IV-A, Bulacan, n
Bataan, Pampanga, Mindoro, Marinduque, and the southern parts of the provinces of J
Tarlac, Zambales, Aurora and Nueva Ecija50. The Regional Development Plan for Central o
s
Luzon carries the same vision through its Enhanced W-Corridor development strategy.
e
Based on this, Bulacan lies in the agro-industry corridor where major infrastructure
d
networks are programmed to tighten the linkage between production and market areas. el
This is alongside the multi-tiered strategies of local governments to improve labor M
productivity, which is measured, among others, by the creation of jobs to close the o
unemployment gap and development of small and medium-scale enterprises, which is the n
major employment source for the province. t
e
With the expansion of inter-regional networks and planned extension of Metro B
ul
Rail Transit system (MRT-7) to the city of San Jose del Monte within the next two years,
a
real estate developments and other large business locators are already moving
c
substantial investments along the intermodal routes to the city. Moving in parallel with a
regional economic reforms to boost employment, the City of San Jose del Monte sits on a n
trajectory towards becoming a competitive urban residential and service hub. It
continues to show potential to be the gateway for urban service diffusion to the
northeastern part of the province, bolstering economic integration.

4.2.1. Primary Sector

Agricultural Area

Back in 2000, the Bureau of Soils and Water Management (BSWM) reported that
7,000 hectares or about 80% of the total land area51 of the city is suitable for crop
production based on soil fertility and topography52. According to the 2003 Socio-
Economic Profile of the City, only 2,460 hectares or 35% were utilized then for
agricultural activities. About 898 hectares (36.5 %) were devoted to permanent
commercial crop cultivation, and roughly 26% or 640 hectares to rice production.
Interspersed with these activities are livestock-raising and aquaculture. As of 2012, the
city reports 2,331.47 hectares 53 devoted to agriculture. When compared with the
reported land conversion54 from agriculture to urban uses from 2000-2012, the crop
production area is at least55 2,287 hectares or 173 hectares smaller than the baseline in
2000 (Figure 4-17). Fifty seven percent (57%) of this are now used for private residential
development, 33% for socialized housing and the rest for institutional, industrial and
general development use (Figure 4-18). Seventy percent (70%) of the land converted for

50Philippine Gazette, 2006


51The LGU of CSJDM claims an actual territorial area of 31,294 hectares which include disputed land areas with adjacent municipalities.
52 City Planning and Development Office, 2005. Socio-Economic Profile of City of San Jose Del Monte (Volume 1)
53 City Agriculture Office cited by the City Planning and Development Office in 2012 Socio-Economic Profile, City of San Jose del Monte. No

date of publication.
54 Includes areas declared as SAFDZs. City Agriculture Office. Ibid.21
55 No data on the area converted from agricultural to residential use in 2008 in Tungkong Mangga. Ibid. 21.

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urban uses is located in barangays Gaya-Gaya and Muzon, mostly for residential and social o
housing uses (Table 4-10). f
S
a
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J
o
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M
o
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a
CSJDM Socio Economic profile 2003, 2008-2012 and City Agriculture Office (2013)
n
Figure 4-17 Comparative Change in Agricultural Land Area

10%

Residential (Private)

Socialized Housing
33%
57% General Development,
Institutional Use and Industrial

Source: CSJDM Socio-Economic Profile 2012

Figure 4-18 Area by Changed Use

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o
Table 4-10 Agricultural Land Converted by Barangay (2000-2012) f
S
a
BARANGAY AREA CONVERTED (HA) SHARE TO TOTAL LAND CONVERTED
n
Gaya-Gaya 68.4 40%
J
Muzon 50.94 30%
o
Minuyan Proper 14.53 8%
s
Kaypian 10.1 6%
e
Tungkong Mangga 7.5 4%
d
Paradise III 5.69 3%
el
Gumaoc West 4.62 3% M
Poblacion 4.37 3% o
Sto. Cristo 3.56 2% n
Dulong Bayan 2.95 2% t
e
CSJDM Socio Economic profile 2003, 2008-2012 and City Agriculture Office (2013)
B
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Permanent and High-Value Crop Production o
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Since 2000, the city has been a recognized producer of permanent, other high-
a
value crops; and livestock—specifically poultry and swine. Despite a declining area for n
crop production in the past decade, the city managed to increase its production of some J
permanent crops by 98% from the 2003 yield (Table 4-10). In 2012, watermelon o
production posted over a 200% increase from 2008. These compensated for the decrease s
in the production of legumes and fruit vegetables which registered a -10% and -72% e
change from 2003 production level, respectively. The other crops produced for 2008 and d
2012 were spices, root crops and corn, although, no sufficient data were available for el
other crops like corn and root crops to allow for ascertain the pattern of change. M
o
n
Table 4-11 Production of Other Major Crops
t
2003 2008 2012 e
B
Major Crop Area Yield/ Total Area Yield/ Total Area Yield/ Total %
ul
(ha) ha Yield (ha) ha Yield (ha) ha Yield Change
(MT) (MT) (MT) (MT) (MT) (MT) in Total a
Yield c
Legumes a
Sitao 130 10 1,300 50 25 1,250 - - - n
Mongo 15 2 30 - - - - - -
Peanut 20 3 60 - - - - - -
Sub-Total 165 1,390 50 1,250 -10%
Fruit
Vegetables
Ampalaya 40 5 200 16 30 480 - - -
Eggplant 50 5 250 5 20 100 - - -
Okra 50 5 250 - - - - - -
Squash 100 15 1,500 7.5 20 150 - - -
Tomato 30 10 300 1.5 20 30 - - -
Upo/Patola 75 10 750 5 30 150 - - -
Sub-Total 345 3250 35 910 -72%
Watermelon 753.8
- - - 18 12.5 225 40.3 18.71 2
Sub-Total 753.8
18 225 40.3 2 235%
Permanent
Crops
Atis 58 10 580 - - - - - -
Avocado 30 8 240 - - - - - -
Banana 12,98
260 10 2600 865 15 0 - - -
Citrus 65 10 650 35 30 1,050 - - -
Coconut 45 10 450 134 - - - - -
Coffee - - - 50 4 200 - - -
Guyabano 30 20 600 - - - - - -
Jackfruit 30 8 240 37 - - - - -

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2003 2008 2012 o
Major Crop Area Yield/ Total Area Yield/ Total Area Yield/ Total % f
(ha) ha Yield (ha) ha Yield (ha) ha Yield Change S
(MT) (MT) (MT) (MT) (MT) (MT) in Total a
Yield n
Mango 380 15 5700 211 2.55 539 - - - J
Rambutan - - - 6 25 155 - - - o
Santol - - - 100 14 1396 - - - s
Star apple - - - 561 10 5610 - - - e
898.0 11,06 21,93 d
Sub-Total 0 0 1,999 0 98% el
M
Source: City Agriculture Office 2014: 2013 Accomplishment Report (undated) and CSJDM Socio-Economic Profile from 2003, 2008-2012,
o
City Planning and Development Office
NOTES: n
 no data available t
 Est. yield of cassava for 2012 was reported at 100-120 sacks /ha. Based on BAS (2007) estimated yield of 8,926kg/ha, each e
sack is roughly equal to 81.15kg. This was used to derive the metric ton/ha yield.
B
 The estimated yield of corn in 2008 was expressed in 20,000 ears. Based on BAS monthly report in June in 2011, the value
was converted to kg to derive the MT equivalent. ul
 No values (in PHP) per yield were reported in 2008 a
 Ave. Yield of Yellow Corn/ha in Central Luzon is 5.59 MT c
a
n
Rice Production

The city is not a major rice producer but substantially contributes to the local
supply of rice in the province. As of 2013, the City Agriculture Office reports rice
production still exist in two ecosystems, namely: irrigated and rainfed. Accordingly, the
production trend in irrigated areas fluctuated from 2006 to 2008 in contrast with the
yield from non-irrigated areas, which posted sharp increases for the same period (Figure
4-19). By 2009, the trend reversed with the production level in irrigated areas incurring
steady increases up until 2012. Meanwhile, for the same period, rice yield from rainfed
areas started to decline registering moderate increases in 2011 and 2012. This trend
coincides with the start of the El Niño phenomenon in 200956 that severely struck the
agricultural sector in many parts of the country.

In terms of value of production, the city posted a total of Php 57.5 million for
irrigated rice and Php 55.39 million for rainfed rice production for the six-year period
(Table 4-11). This difference is elaborated further by the unit cost of production where
farms relying on open sources tend to have higher costs.

The cost per kilogram (kg) production of rice for both systems shows steady
increases, however, the cost for irrigated rice was slightly lower than non-irrigated rice
from 2006-2008 with an average annual difference of Php.0.57/kg (Figure 4-20). In 2009,
the production cost of rain-fed palay was lower by Php 0.23/kg than irrigated rice. In the
following years, the cost of irrigated rice appears to be more stable than non-irrigated

56 NSCB 2011. Report on Family and Income Expenditure Survey Results of 2009.

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rice. The gap between the costs averaged at Php 2.63/kg, which means it costs more to o
produce rise from rainfed farms than in irrigated fields. f
S
a
1,200.00 n
1,000.00
J
o
800.00 s
Metric Tons

e
600.00 d
400.00
el
M
200.00 o
n
- t
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Irrigated 440.94 783.30 457.08 763.20 887.56 1,135.15 1,184.27 e
Rainfed 75.62 754.06 1,034.23 905.73 574.70 715.26 797.16
B
ul
a
Source: City Agriculture Office, 2013 Accomplishment Report. (Undated)
c
Figure 4-19 Comparative Production Trend by Ecosystem (2006-2012)
a
n

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Table 4-12 Comparative Rice Yield by Ecosystem Type and Season (2006-2012) o
f
IRRIGATED S RAINFED
AREA (ha) YIELD (MT) VALUE (PHP)
a YIELD (MT) VALUE (PHP)
CROP YEAR n
Total AREA (ha) Ave./ Total
1C 2C TOTAL 1C 2C Ave./ ha TOTAL Cost/ kg J TOTAL Cost/ kg
(in M) ha (in M)
o
2006-2007 37.85 68.4 106.25 4.2 4.1 4.15 440.94 7.42 3.27 s 19.9 3.8 75.62 8.01 0.61
2007-2008 98.85 87.65 186.5 4.1 4.3 4.2 783.30 7.7 6.03 e 193.35 3.9 754.07 8.18 6.17
2008-2009 121.25 69.2 190.45 1 3.8 2.4 457.08 9.42 4.31 d 252.25 4.1 1,034.23 10.04 10.38
2009-2010 91.55 78.05 169.6 4.7 4.3 4.5 763.20 10.82 8.26
el 238.35 3.8 905.73 10.59 9.59
M
2010-2011 111.05 113.65 224.7 4 3.9 3.95 887.57 10.49 9.31 164.2 3.5 574.70 13.91 7.99
o
2011-2012 177.1 110.28 287.38 3.9 4 3.95 1,135.15 11.65 13.22 n 183.4 3.9 715.26 14.31 10.24
2012-2013 180.55 101.42 281.97 4.1 4.3 4.2 1,184.27 11.08 13.12 t 189.8 4.2 797.16 13.06 10.41
TOTAL 1,446.85 3.91 5,651.51 57.52 e 3.89 4,856.77 55.39
B
Source: City Agriculture Office, 2013 accomplishment Report (undated) and Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (www.bsa.gov.ph) ul
Notes:
Area – refers to harvested area reported by the City.
a
1C - 1st cropping season, 2C- 2nd cropping season. Rainfed areas only have 1 cropping period. c
Total yield: reported harvested area multiplied by the average yield per hectare a
Cost/kg from 2006-2012: refers to the computed average production cost for Central Luzon which includes cash-non-cash and imputed costs. This was converted to cost/MT to derive the total value.
n

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Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

Figure 4-20 Comparative Production Cost by Ecosystem (2006-2012)

The City Agriculture Office further reports that during the last three years, rain-fed
farms have become increasingly vulnerable to prolonged increases in temperature and
identified to be at risk from drought. These are spread across active crop production areas
in 13 out of 18 barangays (Table 4-13) with Barangay Gaya-gaya having the biggest area at
risk with 40 hectares.

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Table 4-13 2013 Drought-Prone Rice Production Areas f
S
ECOSYSTEM TYPE a
BARANGAY TOTAL AREA n
Irrigated Rainfed J
Dulong Bayan 5.50 5.50 o
s
Gaya-Gaya 40.00 40.00
e
Graceville 2.00 2.00 d
Gumaoc West 1.50 1.50 el
M
Kaybanban 3.00 3.00
o
Kaypian 8.10 8.10 n
Minuyan Proper 4.00 4.00 t
e
Muzon 19.10 19.10 B
Paradise III 4.50 4.50 ul
a
Poblacion I 6.50 6.50
c
San Isidro 3.00 3.00 a
Sapang Palay Proper 3.00 21.65 24.65 n
Sto. Cristo 4.00 4.00
Total 3.00 122.85 125.85

Source: City Agriculture Office-CSJDM (2013)

This assessment is expounded by the distribution of irrigation facilities across the


agricultural barangays where 156 out of 172 hectares (Table 4-14) rely on open sources
with makeshift water conveyors.

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Table 4-14 Irrigation Type by Barangay (2013) o
f
CIS (NOT NIA-ASSISTED) SWIP/DIVERSION DAM OPEN SOURCE S
a
BARANGAY No. of Coverage No. of Coverage No. of Coverage
n
Units Area (ha) Units Area (ha) Units Area (ha)
J
Dulong Bayan 2 42.70 24 21.10
o
Gaya-gaya 15 11.50 s
Kaybanban 8 4.00 e
Kaypian 1 17.75 16 7.80 d
el
Minuyan Proper 1 8.75 M
Francisco Homes - Mulawin 3 4.00 o
Muzon 26 5.50 n
t
Paradise III 25 14.00
e
Poblacion 3 4.30 B
San Isidro 7 16.25 ul
San Roque 15 10.00 a
c
Sapang Palay Proper 1 13.95 12 8.80
a
Sto. Cristo 1 7.00 n
Tungkong Mangga 3.00
Francisco Homes - Yakal 2 5.50
TOTAL 4 74.40 2 15.75 156 115.75

Source: City Agriculture Office, 2013 Accomplishment Report (undated)


Note: Only those barangays with reported data are included.

On top of the cost discrepancies and irrigation facilities that influence rice yield in
the city, a critical input to production is land. In 2008, active rice production areas declined
to 581 hectares from 648 in 2000. In 2013, the city reports there are only 411.05 hectares
(Table 4-15) used for rice cultivation. To increase the productivity of these areas, the city
continues to scale up its agricultural extension services, linkage with the Agricultural School
in Tungkong Manga57, credit facilities, and development programs for farmers’
cooperatives. The city targets an optimum production level in all rice-producing barangays
from which at least 362 farmer families (Table 4-16) draw their income.

57 City Planning and Development Office 2012. 2012 Socio-Economic Profile of the City of San Jose del Monte

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Table 4-15 Change in Rice Production Area for Selected Years o
f
S
TYPE OF FARM 2000 2008 % CHANGE 2013 % CHANGE
a
Total Area 648 581 -10.34% 411.05 -29.25%
n
Irrigated 200 196 -2% 205.9 5% J
Rainfed 448 385 -14.06% 205.15 -46.71% o
s
e
Table 4-16 Distribution of Farmers by Barangay and Ecosystem Type (2013) d
el
M
TYPE
BARANGAY TOTAL AREA NO. OF FARMERS o
Irrigated Rainfed n
Dulong Bayan 63.80 17.20 81.00 66 t
Gaya-Gaya 11.50 46.00 57.50 33 e
B
Graceville -- 2.00 2.00 1
ul
Gumaoc West -- 1.50 1.50 2 a
Kaybanban 4.00 4.50 8.50 11 c
Kaypian 25.55 10.50 36.05 32 a
n
Minuyan Proper 8.75 5.00 13.75 10
Francisco Homes - Mulawin 4.00 4.00 4
Muzon 5.50 44.85 50.35 46
Paradise III 14.00 7.00 21.00 20
Poblacion 4.30 2.60 6.90 6
Poblacion I 10.70 10.70 8
San Isidro 16.25 8.50 24.75 22
San Roque 10.00 6.75 16.75 15
Sapang Palay Proper 22.75 31.55 54.30 63
Sto. Cristo 7.00 5.00 12.00 14
Tungkong Mangga 3.00 1.50 4.50 5
F. Homes, Yakal 5.50 5.50 4
Total 205.90 205.15 411.05 362

Source: Socio-Economic Profile of City of San Jose del Monte: 2003, 2008 & 2012; and City Agriculture Office 2013

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Livestock, Poultry, and Aquaculture o
f
S
Consistent with the province’s more prominent agricultural activities, the city’s
a
livestock production is associated with poultry and swine raising produced at commercial n
level, and supplying provincial markets including Metro Manila. In 2008, broiler and layer J
chicken topped its production line with a combined population of 321,992 heads (Table 4- o
17). Still, when compared with the provincial output, the city’s share is only 6% of the total s
production for that year. e
d
Table 4-17 2008 Livestock Production el
M
o
LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY HEADS n
Broiler Chicken 184,734 t
Layer Chicken 137,258
e
B
Ducks 20,354
ul
Native Chicken 18,992
a
Quail 18,922
c
Swine 12,472 a
Game Fowl 12,356 n
Goat 885
Cattle 640
Carabao 347
Sheep 120
Horse 52

Source: City Agriculture’s Office, 2008 cited by the City Planning and Development Office; Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

As for aquaculture, there is insufficient information to gauge the trend of


production. Thus far, the city reports there are 12.21 hectares of active fishing pond and
fishing grounds in 2013 that are managed by 116 operators (Table 4-18). The estimated
volume of production is 69.71 metric tons valued at around Php 4,182,600.00. Total area
for production reportedly increased from 7.9 hectares in 2008.

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Table 4-18 2013 Aquaculture Areas o
f
BARANGAY AREA/SIZE NO. OF OPERATORS S
Muzon 1.18 17 a
Mulawin 0.17 4 n
J
Sto. Cristo 1.19 9
o
Kaybanban 0.21 4
s
San Roque 0.19 5
e
Paradise 3 0.225 7 d
San Isidro 1.098 22 el
Sapang Palay Proper 0.3 5 M
Kaypian 2.5769 3 o
Gaya-Gaya 2.66 22 n
Graceville 0.32 3 t
Dulong Bayan 1.32 10 e
Minuyan Proper 0.74 3 B
ul
Poblacion 0.03 2
a
Total 12.2099 116
c
a
The City Veterinary Office through the slaughterhouse services the livestock n
providers. Every month, on average the facility receives two cows and 3,500 hogs per
month for processing.

4.2.2. Local Business Pattern

Businesses in the country are typically categorized into industries based on the
Philippines Standard Industry Classification 58 (PSIC). These industries are aligned to the
fundamental economic sectors, namely: primary, secondary and tertiary. The primary
sector of the economy is the sector of an economy making direct use of natural resources.
This includes agriculture, forestry, fishing and mining. In contrast, the secondary sector
produces manufactured goods, and the tertiary sector produces services. Each sector
structure changes with the investment environment, business patterns and how well a local
government manages to maximize opportunities from emerging developments within and
around its jurisdiction.

Based on the registered businesses in the city 59, the tertiary sector consistently
prevails over the other sectors since 2003 (Figure 4-21) – similar to the regional and
national trends. Industries under this are wholesale, retail and repair services, financial
activities, transportation and storage, industrial supply, and predominantly small-scale
trading and commercial activities. The secondary sector, on the other hand, is led by
manufacturing industry consisting of agro-processing, food processing and several

58
2009 PSIC was patterened after the United Nations International Standard Industrial Classification (UN-ISIC) Revision 4.
59There were no reported registered businesses under the categories of Public administration and defense; compulsory social security; activities
of households as employers; undifferentiated goods and services-producing activities of households for own use; and activities of extraterritorial
organization and bodies.

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industrial-processing activities including machine fabrication, electrical services, and o
construction while the primary sector shows no record of registered businesses. In 2010, f
S
these sector activities gradually declined as more tertiary industries made their way into
a
the supply chain.
n
J
In the recent decade, the changing structure of the economy of City of San Jose Del o
Monte has been forthcoming, and likened to many peripheral settlements of traditional s
growth centers like Metro Manila. The 2009-2016 National Urban Development and e
Housing Framework (NUDHF) elaborates the key drivers of this structural change, and d
identifies the challenges that need to be met to realize the catalytic role of Bulacan and other el
neighboring provinces comprising the inner zone of Mega Manila Region 60 in the wider M
diffusion or urban services in central Luzon. o
n
t
Among these drivers include a strong private led-housing market and national
e
initiatives to expand urban settlements and create growth centers in the immediate vicinity B
of Metro Manila, the changing consumption patterns, benchmarking of technologies for ul
service delivery, and other similar developments. The effects of macro-economic changes a
the indication of the shifting business patterns by number, nature, size and location. c
a
n

60 Corpuz, 2006 and NUDHF 2009

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o
4000 f
S
a
3500
n
J
3000 o
s
2500 e
d
Primary
2000
el
Secondary M
Tertiary o
1500
n
t
1000 e
B
500 ul
a
c
0
2003 2010 2011 2012 2013 a
n

Source: BPLO 2013 Accomplishment Report and Socio Economic profile of the City of San Jose del Monte, 2003, 2008, 2010-2012.

Figure 4-21 Trend Sector Growth per Registered Businesses

Comparing 2003 with 2013, a significant number of the secondary industries seem
to have shifted to other lines of business. The manufacturing of ceramics, pottery and
goldsmith are no longer in the latest roster of businesses of the city. While replaced by more
businesses that complement construction, real estate development and utilities
management, the number of secondary economic activities is still lower than in 2003.
Meanwhile, agricultural businesses, led by livestock production and permanent crop
cultivation, hardly grew since 2003. In 2013, the city reports only 44 agricultural
production farms registered (Table 4-19) as compared to ten years ago.

Consistent with the growing economic position of the city with reference to Mega
Manila, the major industries that significantly increased in 2013 are:

 water supply industries such as water refilling stations following densification of


settlements;
 junkshops and other waste remediation facilities that complement the recent
operation of the sanitary landfill in Minuyan Proper;
 construction and real estate services given the massive investments in real property
development;
 accommodation and food services that run alongside the increased tourism
promotion and consumer-driven activities;

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 financial services such as pawnshops and money courier services that support micro- o
enterprises; f
S
 education facilities that grew with settlements and relocation efforts; and
a
 human health activities such as local clinics and diagnostic facilities. n
J
Table 4-19 Summary of Local Industries in 2003, 2010-2013 o
s
MAJOR INDUSTRY 2003 2010 2011 2012 2013 e
Accommodation and food service activities 358 130 113 139 160 d
Administrative and support service activities 3 39 45 63 71 el
Agriculture, forestry, and fishing 65 46 63 58 44 M
Arts, entertainment, and recreation 21 274 143 161 181 o
Construction 0 37 83 93 120
n
t
Education 210 21 107 105 114
e
Electricity, gas, stream, and air conditioning supply 0 17 10 7 12
B
Financial and insurance activities 37 113 110 140 164 ul
Human health and social work activities 52 57 68 75 105 a
Information and communication 0 6 85 72 68 c
Manufacturing 498 166 84 131 116 a
Mining and quarrying 0 0 1 0 0 n
Other service activities 6 69 77 82 106
Professional, scientific, and technical activities 24 42 30 36 58
Real estate activities 0 83 87 104 129
Transportation and storage 14 63 60 71 67
Water supply, sewerage, waste management, and remediation 0 97 100 129 120
Wholesale, retail, and repair 2,135 1,765 1,708 1,967 2,141
Total 3,423 3,025 2,974 3,433 3,776

Source: Business Permits and Licensing Office-CSJDM, 2014 Accomplishment Report.

Asset Size of Local Businesses

In terms of capitalization, majority of the registered businesses operating in the city


in 2013 are micro to small enterprises, and mostly in the tertiary sector. These provide the
biggest employment source for the city, consistent with the regional trend contained in the
Regional Development Plan (RDP) of Central Luzon61.

61
NEDA/RDC, Central Luzon Regional Development Plan 2011-2014

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Table 4-20 2013 Preliminary Level of Capitalization by Major Industry o
f
PSIC INDUSTRY TYPE MICRO SMALL MEDIUM LARGE S
Accommodation Php23,924,501.00 Php13,020,000.00 Php15,411,000.00 a
Administration services Php12,780,000.00 Php3,645,000.00 n
Agriculture Php8,220,001.00 Php10,000,000.00 J
Arts, recreation Php27,497,803.00 Php5,000,000.00
o
Construction Php14,865,001.00 Php51,634,598.56 Php46,000,000.00
s
Php256,763,420.00
e
Education Php7,455,001.00 Php10,000,000.00
d
Electricity, gas, air
el
conditioning Php2,020,000.00
M
Financial services Php422,918,374.93 Php94,605,542.85 Php105,000,000.00
o
Human health Php9,676,751.00 Php3,150,000.00
n
Information and
t
Communication Php3,757,000.00
e
Manufacturing Php10,813,000.00
B
Other Services Php5,560,001.00
ul
Professional services Php4,672,000.00
a
Real estate services Php45,576,104.40 Php22,000,000.00 Php30,000,000.00 Php300,000,000.00
c
Transportation and storage Php34,401,000.00 Php5,000,000.00 Php30,000,000.00
a
Water supply Php11,793,001.00 Php3,125,375.00
n
Wholesale, retail and motor
vehicle repair Php234,883,839.33 Php75,958,592.41 Php200,000,000.00
TOTAL Php880,813,378.66 Php297,139,108.82 Php226,411,000.00 Php756,763,420.00
GRAND TOTAL: Php2,161,126,907.48

NOTES:
Over 1,400 registered businesses do not have capitalization data. For those financial services or facilities without capitalization data, the following
conservative values were assumed under existing regulatory policies of the SEC, DTI and BSP to improve the plausibility of local business pattern
consistent with regional trends:

“Commercial bank”: regional branch at Php 25M


“Bank” : cooperative bank at Php10M
“Lending”: minimum paid up capital of Php 0.3M
“Money remittance center/ money transfer”: Php 1M
“Pawnshop”: Php 0.1M
“Money changer”: Php 0.6M
“Microfinance”: NGO microfinance at Php 0.15M

Majority of the businesses under the micro scale (below Php3M) with reported capitalization appear to be under-declared such as education facilities,
construction firms, manufacturing, commercial agricultural farms, financial services and real estate rental services. Further validation is recommended.

Sources: Business Permit and Licensing Office-CSJDM, 2013; Securities and Exchange Commission, Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas and Department of
Trade and Industry

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The paid-up capital of those businesses with declared assets of Php 3M and below o
or micro industries comprise 41%. This is followed by 35% from large-scale businesses like f
S
real estate development and construction: and small industries with 14%. The least
a
contributors are medium-scale industries with an aggregate asset of Php 226.4 million or
n
10% of the total reported investments. J
o
s
e
d
PAID CAPITAL DATA el
M
o
n
t
Micro e
35%
41% Small B
Medium ul
a
Large
c
a
n
10%
14%

NOTE: Results are preliminary only. Capitalization Data from BPLO are not complete.

Figure 4-22 Proportion of Business Investment by Asset Level

Areas of Business Concentration

Consistent with the above trend of investment, micro industries spread throughout
the city, but tend to concentrate in a few barangays having at least 100 registered
establishments (Figure 4-23). Barangay Muzon asserts functional primacy hosting 750 of
all registered businesses62 divided across different industry types. Economic activities here
are characterized by wholesale, retail, and repair services, micro to medium scale financial
facilities and higher levels of trading activities. Tungkong Mangga comes second with 450
businesses, and Kaypian with 312. Such situation is facilitated by the operation of public
markets in Minuyan Proper (Towerville Market) and Muzon (Pabahay).

Marginal differences from the total reported businesses operating in the same
barangays can be observed, and these refer to more established businesses that service
catchment markets like banks, schools, construction, real estate services and rentals,
medical and health facilities, hardware supply and supermarkets and the like.

62 Data for this analysis excludes those registered business without information on location.

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o
f
S
Muzon Muzon a
Tungkong Mangga
n
J
Kaypian Kaypian
o
Santo Santo
Cristo Cristo s
Bagong Buhay
Bagong II II
Buhay e
Graceville
d
Graceville
el
Gaya-gaya
Gaya Gaya M
Bagong Buhay
Bagong I I
Buhay o
Minuyan
MinuyanProper
Proper
n
Santa Cruz
t
SantaI Cruz I
e
Poblacion I
Poblacion I B
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 ul
a
Micro All Business Scale
c
a
Source: Business Permits and Licensing Office-CSJDM, 2014. n

Figure 4-23 Barangays with over 100 Registered Businesses

Areas with medium-density economic activities or with 50-100 registered


businesses are led by Narra, San Manuel, and Mulawin (Figure 4-24). Here, secondary level
services are combined with the agro-industrial establishments and agriculture. At the end
of the spectrum are 19 barangays with at most, ten registered businesses (Figure 4-25)
each.

Many of the barangays that have a very low concentration of businesses are
primarily residential areas, which are expansion settlements of core barangays. Such
results imply two things: a severely unchecked informal economy or inadequate support
towards of economic integration that hold back the effective distribution of consumer-
based services and income opportunities.

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o
100
f
80 S
a
60 n
J
40 o
s
20 e
d
0
Sapang San el
San San San Dulong M
Narra Mulawin Palay Martin
Manuel Pedro Rafael I Bayan o
Proper III
Total Businesses 94 88 72 71 58 57 55 52 n
t
e
Figure 4-24 Barangays with 50-100 Registered Businesses B
ul
a
12 c
a
10
n
8
6
4
2
0
Santa Cruz II
Fatima IV

Fatima II

San Roque
Bagong Buhay III

San Isidro

San Rafael IV

Santa Cruz III


Santo Niño I
Fatima III

Minuyan V
Santo Niño II

Gumaoc Central

San Rafael III

Paradise III
San Rafael V

San Martin De Porres


San Martin II

Kaybanban

Figure 4-25 Barangays with 10 and Below Registered Businesses

Table 4-22 shows the relative areas of concentration of industries by barangay


based on businesses with declared location. The PSIC code definitions are in Table 4-21.

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Table 4-21 Philippine Standard Industry Classification (PSIC) Industry Codes o
f
SECTOR PSIC CODE MAJOR INDUSTRY CLASSIFICATION S
PRIMARY A Agriculture, forestry and fishing a
B Mining and quarrying n
C Manufacturing J
SECONDARY D Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply
o
E Water supply; sewerage, waste management and remediation activities
s
e
F Construction
d
G Wholesale and retail trade; repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles
el
H Transportation and storage
M
I Accommodation and food service activities
o
J Information and communication
n
K Financial and insurance activities
t
L Real estate activities
e
M Professional, scientific and technical activities
B
N Administrative and support service activities
TERTIARY ul
O Public administration and defense; compulsory social security
a
P Education c
Q Human health and social work activities a
R Arts, entertainment and recreation n
S Other service activities
Activities of households as employers; undifferentiated goods and services-
T
producing activities of households for own use
U Activities of extraterritorial organization and bodies

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Table 4-22 Relative Concentration of Industries o
f
Indicative Concentration of Industry by Area S
Below 10% a
10-20% n
above 20% J
o
s
No. of MAJOR INDUSTRY CODE e Total
Barangay
Businesses E C F G I S L M K D R d A P J H Q N
Muzon 750 0.292 0.276 0.217 0.209 0.206 0.198 0.178 0.172 0.171 0.167 0.166 el 0.159 0.149 0.147 0.119 0.114 0.113 3.053
Tungkong Mangga 450 0.058 0.078 0.142 0.104 0.100 0.160 0.225 0.138 0.299 0.000 0.083 M 0.227 0.079 0.044 0.090 0.248 0.099 2.174
Kaypian 312 0.058 0.121 0.083 0.094 0.106 0.038 0.016 0.121 0.043 0.000 0.083 o 0.000 0.061 0.029 0.075 0.029 0.141 1.098
Sto. Cristo 215 0.083 0.043 0.083 0.054 0.075 0.057 0.031 0.017 0.030 0.083 0.077 0.114 0.096 0.044 0.060 0.048 0.056 1.051
n
Bagong Buhay II 145 0.000 0.017 0.008 0.053 0.031 0.038 0.047 0.000 0.049 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.045 0.010 0.028 0.326
Gaya-gaya 143 0.058 0.043 0.067 0.037 0.013 0.028 0.031 0.052 0.000 0.000 0.028
t 0.182 0.061 0.029 0.075 0.010 0.042 0.756
Graceville 143 0.092 0.026 0.050 0.031 0.050 0.009 0.031 0.069 0.018 0.167 0.050 e 0.000 0.096 0.088 0.075 0.010 0.028 0.890
Bagong Buhay 128 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.047 0.019 0.019 0.047 0.017 0.030 0.000 0.033 B 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.000 0.029 0.000 0.264
Minuyan Proper 122 0.033 0.026 0.042 0.032 0.019 0.038 0.039 0.000 0.037 0.000 0.017 ul 0.000 0.035 0.029 0.104 0.029 0.028 0.508
Sta. Cruz 120 0.000 0.026 0.000 0.032 0.013 0.057 0.070 0.000 0.122 0.000 0.006 a 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.000 0.057 0.028 0.440
Poblacion I 109 0.008 0.017 0.017 0.024 0.088 0.047 0.023 0.017 0.018 0.083 0.044 c 0.023 0.044 0.029 0.000 0.048 0.070 0.600
Francisco Homes-
Narra 94 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.023 0.025 0.047 0.054 0.086 0.012 0.083 0.028
a 0.000 0.053 0.044 0.030 0.019 0.028 0.540
San Manuel 88 0.042 0.000 0.050 0.021 0.044 0.019 0.016 0.034 0.000 0.000 0.017 n 0.000 0.070 0.029 0.030 0.010 0.056 0.438
Mulawin 72 0.017 0.026 0.025 0.019 0.006 0.038 0.008 0.052 0.000 0.000 0.011 0.000 0.035 0.059 0.015 0.029 0.000 0.340
San Pedro 71 0.008 0.017 0.008 0.015 0.044 0.009 0.008 0.000 0.024 0.000 0.039 0.000 0.009 0.015 0.015 0.095 0.014 0.320
San Rafael I 58 0.025 0.009 0.000 0.013 0.025 0.000 0.016 0.017 0.024 0.000 0.022 0.023 0.035 0.044 0.000 0.038 0.000 0.291
Sapang Palay Proper 57 0.033 0.043 0.033 0.014 0.013 0.009 0.008 0.017 0.000 0.083 0.006 0.045 0.018 0.000 0.015 0.010 0.014 0.361
San Martin III 55 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.013 0.028 0.016 0.017 0.049 0.000 0.028 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.174
Dulong Bayan 52 0.000 0.052 0.017 0.009 0.038 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.227 0.009 0.015 0.015 0.000 0.042 0.439
Fatima I 39 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.009 0.006 0.019 0.023 0.034 0.000 0.000 0.033 0.000 0.009 0.015 0.000 0.000 0.028 0.185
Maharlika 39 0.017 0.034 0.000 0.012 0.006 0.000 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.030 0.010 0.000 0.132
Assumption 35 0.025 0.009 0.008 0.006 0.006 0.028 0.016 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.018 0.015 0.000 0.029 0.014 0.197

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No. of MAJOR INDUSTRY CODE o Total
Barangay
Businesses E C F G I S L M K D R f A P J H Q N
Francisco Homes- S
Guijo 35 0.017 0.000 0.025 0.007 0.000 0.009 0.008 0.017 0.006 0.083 0.028 a 0.000 0.018 0.000 0.015 0.010 0.000 0.243
Sta. Cruz IV 31 0.008 0.000 0.008 0.007 0.013 0.009 0.008 0.000 0.012 0.000 0.017
n 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.000 0.010 0.014 0.135
Gumaoc West 30 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.009 0.006 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.022 0.000 0.009 0.015 0.000 0.000 0.028 0.097
J
Minuyan II 25 0.000 0.009 0.017 0.007 0.000 0.000 0.016 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.011 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.015 0.000 0.000 0.084
Poblacion 25 0.000 0.017 0.008 0.006 0.006 0.000 0.016 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006
o 0.000 0.009 0.044 0.000 0.019 0.000 0.131
Minuyan III 24 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.004 0.006 0.000 0.008 0.052 0.000 0.000 0.028 s 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.075 0.000 0.000 0.181
Gumaoc East 22 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.007 0.006 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.167 0.006 e 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.233
San Martin I 21 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.007 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.006 d 0.000 0.009 0.029 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.065
Sta. Cruz V 19 0.000 0.000 0.008 0.007 0.006 0.019 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 el 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.015 0.010 0.000 0.080
Minuyan I 18 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.006 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.006 M 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.058
Citrus 18 0.008 0.009 0.033 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.083 0.000
o 0.000 0.009 0.015 0.000 0.000 0.042 0.218
Ciudad Real 17 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.018 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.049
Minuyan IV 17 0.008 0.034 0.000 0.003 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006
n 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.030 0.000 0.014 0.104
Francisco Homes- t
Yakal 17 0.008 0.009 0.000 0.004 0.000 0.000 0.023 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.006 e 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.014 0.070
Lawang Pare 14 0.000 0.000 0.017 0.004 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.000 B 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.019 0.000 0.046
San Martin IV 12 0.008 0.017 0.000 0.004 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 ul 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.035
San Rafael II 12 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.003 0.000 0.019 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006
a 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.057
Fatima II 11 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.018 0.015 0.030 0.000 0.000 0.087
Fatima IV 10 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.000 0.011
c 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.048
Fatima V 10 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.004 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 a 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.000 0.000 0.025
Sto. Niño II 10 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.003 0.006 0.000 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.000 0.006 n 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.014 0.046
Gumaoc Central 9 0.000 0.000 0.008 0.003 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.021
Bagong Buhay III 8 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.028 0.045
Fatima III 7 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.029 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.039
San Isidro 7 0.008 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.015 0.000 0.000 0.025
San Rafael IV 7 0.000 0.000 0.008 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.025
Kaybanban 6 0.008 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.006 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.018 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.049
Paradise III 5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.018
San Martin II 5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.002
San Rafael III 5 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.002 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.011

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No. of MAJOR INDUSTRY CODE o Total
Barangay
Businesses E C F G I S L M K D R f A P J H Q N
San Rafael V 5 0.008 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 S 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.036
San Roque 5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 a 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.019
Minuyan V 4 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 n 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.014 0.015
Sta Cruz II 4 0.000 0.009 0.000 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 J 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.010
Sto Niño 2 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.017 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.017
o
San Martin de Porres 1 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.010 0.000 0.010
Sta Cruz III 1 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
s 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000
TOTAL 3,776 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1e 1 1 1 1 1 1 17.00
d
Source: BPLO 2013, RSV-GEMS calculation. el
NOTE: Please refer to Industry Code annexed to this report. M
o
n
t
e
B
ul
a
c
a
n

Page | 136
4.2.3. Tourism

Tourism potentials are often validated by the study of both the place of interest and
tourism circuit that incorporates the necessary services to sustain the influx of tourist
arrivals, and the policy environment within which this circuit is managed. In a place where
there are limited nature-based tourism places, local governments often innovate and
develop possible areas of interest fitting specific markets.

In the past, the city has been identified with the Shrine of the Our Lady of Lourdes
Grotto catering local pilgrimage heritage tourism activities. However, this identity is
expanding with the growth of the tertiary sector, continuous development local road
networks, and future inter-modal transport facilities. The increase in the number of
services including sites for conventions and special event, recreation and more established
commercial crop farms open several opportunities for urban and agri-based tourism.

Tertiary sector services directly support tourism as a strategy for economic growth.
These are businesses dealing with accommodation, food, retail of essential and non-
essential goods, banks and remittance centers, transport and courier services, recreation,
health clinics, travel and tour services, and communication services. According to the City
Tourism Office (2012), there are several establishments that offer integrated tourism
services and are themselves places of interest such as the resorts and recreation facilities.

The city reports places of interest for tourists below.

Table 4-23 Main Tourist Attractions and their Locations in the City

TOURIST ATTRACTION LOCATION


1. Angat Watershed San Isidro
2. Mount Balagbag San Isidro
3. Kaytitinga Falls San Isidro
4. St. Joseph the Worker Parish Church Poblacion I
5. Shrine of the Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto Graceville
6. Dalisay Farms and Garden Resort Tungkong Mangga
7. RAR Resort Kaybanban
8. Grotto Vista Resort Graceville
9. Tierra Fontana Resort Tungkong Manga
10. Metrogate San Jose Sapang Palay Proper
11. Cattle Creek Golf and Country Club Sapang Palay Proper
12. Los Arcos Tungkong Mangga
13. Marina Resort Newtown, Sapang Palay Proper
14. Paradise Adventure Camp Tungkong Mangga
15. Pacific Waves Resort Sto. Cristo
16. Civic Center Sapang Palay Proper

Source: City Tourism Office- CSJDM 2012

CITY OF SAN JOSE DEL MONTE


Ecological Profile 2014 Page | 137
While the basic support services to tourism are present in the city, the challenge is
to ensure that there are enough incentive packages for tourism establishment operators to
improve their services, and a well-managed infrastructure network backing the tourism
circuit to conveniently link visitors, people and services. This would help define the quality
for the City’s tourism sites that will put them at par with the other localities or set them
apart from similar destinations in the province. The table below lists the establishments
supporting and related to tourism activities.

Table 4-24 Inventory of Tourism-Related Establishments

A. CATEGORY: Resorts

Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person

(044)691-0223 to 24
/ (044)815-0943 /
EFREN BARTOLOME /
GROTTO VISTA HOTEL & RESORT GRACEVILLE (02)371-8928 /
Owner
(0917)839-0327 /
(0922)414-4447

0917 - 903 0965 / GRACE B. FERNANDEZ


LOS ARCOS DE HERMANO RESORT TUNGKONG MANGGA
0922 - 572 13 56 Resort manager

775-3269 / 0933-
PACIFIC WAVES HOTEL & RESORT, JONATHAN JOVERO
STO. CRISTO 1233383 /
INC. Resort Manager
0917-833-3144

(02)986-6677 /
TIERRA FONTANA WAVE RESORT JULIE UY /
TUNGKONG MANGGA 985-573 / 440-0508
INC. Marketing Personnel
/ 0932-862-7393

VILLA ANTONIO DE DAVE RESORT & 0932-1029391 / LAARNI JAENA /


STO. CRISTO
LEISURE FARM 0915-727-66-54 Administrative staff

(02)546 9504 /
PARADISE ADVENTURE CAMP AND (02)666 5106 / 0917 JUNA C. QUEVEDO /
TUNGKONG MANGGA
RESORTS 630 3883 / Owner
0922 830 2303

B. CATEGORY: HOTEL / MOTEL


Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person

(044)691-0223 to 24
/ (044)815-0943 /
EFREN BARTOLOME /
GROTTO VISTA HOTEL & RESORT GRACEVILLE (02)371-8928 /
Owner
(0917)839-0327 /
(0922)414-4447

0917 - 903 0965 / GRACE B. FERNANDEZ


LOS ARCOS DE HERMANO RESORT TUNGKONG MANGGA
0922 - 572 13 56 Resort Manager

775-3269 / 0933-
PACIFIC WAVES HOTEL & RESORT, JONATHAN JOVERO
STO. CRISTO 123-33-83 /
INC. Resort Manager
0917-833-3144

(02)986-6677 /
TIERRA FONTANA WAVE RESORT JULIE UY /
TUNGKONG MANGGA 985-573 / 440-0508
INC. Marketing Personnel
/ 0932-862-7393

Page | 138
TRF HOTEL & VIDEOKE (044)815-68-22/ VICTORINO FLAVIANO
MUZON
RESTAURANT (0922)2940104 Owner
SLEEPWELL APARTELLE BAGONG BUHAY 2 0915-983-11-37 JOSE CRISOSTOMO

C. CATEGORY: RESTAURANTS AND BAR (DISTRICT 1)


Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person
ESPAÑOLA, GEORGE
DA' BEST RESTAURANT GRACEVILLE 0917-372-42-56
OSDAÑA

DORY'S & CRISTETA CHINESE 0910-444-62-24 / MARIA VICTORIA WONG


MAHARLIKA
RESTAURANT 0917-564-40-49 RAMOS / Owner

TRF HOTEL & VIDEOKE (044)815-68-22/ VICTORINO FLAVIANO


MUZON
RESTAURANT (0922)2940104 Owner
ZONE 1, BRGY.
BISTRO DEL MONT 0926-745-85-60 ANTONIO, NICOLAS
POBLACION I,
KING ALEN'S LUGAWAN DULONG BAYAN 0923-928-81-82 ELMER D. OSDANA
PROVINCIAL ROAD,
BULALOHAN AT KAMBINGAN NI BOZ BRGY. TUNGKONG HUERTO, AMELITA AYUSO
MANGGA
MT. VIEW SUBD.,
MT. VIEW RESTO 0915-932-98-84 BAUTISTA, CECILIA
BRGY. MUZON
BLOCK 7 LOT 32
ESCAPE.COM HOT SIZZLERS FRANCISCO HOMES SUSANO, MA. LOISA
III BRGY MUZON
BHOYET KAMBINGAN DULONG BAYAN 0926-404-00-12 MARCELO Z. AGUIRRE
SITIO IBABAW BRGY.
GRINGNETH KITCHENETTE DULONG BAYAN, 0922-225-53-48 OSDAÑA, NENETH
CSJDM, BULACAN
SAN PEDRO ST.
GRINGNETH KITCHENETTE 0922-225-53-48 OSDAÑA, NENETH
BRGY POBLACION I
HAYDEE'S RESTAURANT GAYA-GAYA 0947-928-10-54 EFREN ESPANOLA
ZONE 2, PROVINCIAL
HIROKA`S ANGEL VIDEOKE & FLORES, LOLITA
ROAD, GROTTO,
RESTAURANT MAGALLANES
BRGY. GRACEVILLE
MARYLANE DULONG DE MESA, RIZZAH GRACE
IZZAH GRILL & RESTO 0932-429-09-07
BAYAN A.
TRF DINE & CATERING SERVICES POBLACION 1 044-815-68-22 VICTORIANO FLAVIANO
SITIO CENTRAL,
OBSEQUIO, GENERA
R.H. VICTORIA`S RESTAURANT BRGY. DULONG 0916-798-64-94
HERRERA
BAYAN, CSJDM, BUL.
CHLOE'S RESTAURANT MUZON 0916-821-40-34 RENATO GERONA
CHIC-BOY RESTAURANT MUZON 044-658-47-32 FELY GRAVADOR
TITO RENZ CATERING &
POBLACION 1 0942-456-19-31 LORENZO POLICARPIO
RESTAURANT
KAINAN SA KUBO MUZON 0939-281-15-22 LORINA VALDEZ

LAMBINGAN SA KAMBINGAN MUZON 0947-610-43-50 ALFREDO SUREMA

KUBO SA BAYAN POBLACION 1 0905-288-80-75 ELENNISA DE VERA

D. CATEGORY: RESTAURANTS AND BAR (DISTRICT 2)


Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person

Page | 139
#291 BRGY. SAPANG
SIOTO CAFE AND RESTAURANT 0922-848-98-75 DELA TORRE JR, MANUEL
PALAY PROPER

PUROK 7 AREA F AGAPITO, FELICIDAD


TITA BEB`S NIPA HUT RESTAURANT 0922-844-83-34
BRGY. SAN PEDRO IGNACIO
B87 L5 PUROK 7,
VILMA`S RESTAURANT BGY. SAN PEDRO, 0907-208-22-87 FELICIANO, LEONORA
CSJDM, BULACAN
IPO ROAD, BRGY.
MINUYAN RESTO MINUYAN PROPER, 0942-456-19-31 POLICARPIO, LORENZO
CSJDM, BULACAN
B46 L23 P-3 SAN
PAULINE RESTAURANT MARTIN I CSJDM TIMTIM, JOSE
BULACAN
BRGY. SAPANG
GELO`S J-H GRILL AND POLICARPIO, HENRY
PALAY PROPER CITY 0923-658-11-76
RESTAURANT INQUIANGCO
OF SJDM BULACAN
IPO ROAD BRGY.
GRINGNETH RESTAURANT MINUYAN PROPER, 0942-456-19-31 POLICARPIO, LORENZO
CSJDM, BULACAN
BLOCK 20 LOT 1
BULALO & B-B-Q. FIESTA BAR &
TEACHER`S VILLAGE 0916-840-25-98 CRUZ, MARITES MENDOZA
RESTAURANT
SAN RAFAEL I
SABS PIZZA FATIMA 5 0922-877-00-10 LAMBERTO E. CALEON

LENG'S KITCHENETTE SAN RAFAEL 1 0925-530-78-78 LORNA BARTOLATA

KUBO ROYALE SAN RAFAEL 1 0923-998-20-29 MILATONA O. LORENZO

NASH IAN SIZZLERS FATIMA 1 0932-880-34-36 ANTHONY ADVINCULA


KUYA AGA RESTO SAN RAFAEL 1 0927-704-22-15 RONNIE AGAPITO

AQUARIUS VIDEOKE & RESTO BAGONG BUHAY 2 0907-970-01-79 TERESITA VILLALON

E. CATEGORY: Department Store / Specialty Shop / Pasalubong Center/Convenient Store


Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person

QUIRINO HIGHWAY
STAR MALL SAN JOSE DEL MONTE 797-0075 to 77 NHET TECSON
BRGY. KAYPIAN

PUREGOLD JUNIOR BAGONG BUHAY I 044-815-71-70 ARNIE E. CARAMOL

Sta.Maria-Tungkong
SIMPLICITY CENTER (02) 6941236 FELY GRAVADOR
Mangga Road, Muzon

7-11 CONVENIENT STORE MUZON 044-913-11-23 ARLENE B. ARCIAGA


MINI - STOP CONVENIENT POBLACION 1 044-815-53-86 JUDITH CUNANAN

F. CATEGORY: Travel Agencies


Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person
272 SUMILANG SUBD,
AUTHENTIC TRAVEL SERVICES BRGY. GAYA-GAYA, TOLENTINO, RUBETH
CSJDM, BUL.
SUSANA MART PHILS.
TUNGKONG MANGGA
FLIGHT & TRIP TRAVEL SERVICES SALIENTE, MARY ANN
CITY OF SJDM
BULACAN

Page | 140
BLOCK 67 LOT 10 P-5
JAMEL EDUCATIONAL TOUR BRGY. SAN MARTIN DICDICAN, EUNICE
III, CSJDM, BUL.
BLK 19 LOT 1
SECTION 16 PHASE II
0932-392-95-41/ SITAO, CHERYLOU
MOOR TRAVEL AND TOURS PABAHAY 2000
0939-380-87-58 ROARING
MUZON CITY OF
SJDM BULACAN
2ND FLOOR SOUTH
MUZON ROYALE
MUZON ROYALE BOOKSTORE AND TRIANGLE WET &
BOOKSTORE AND TRAVEL
TRAVEL CO. DRY MARKET, BRGY.
CO.
MUZON, CSJDM, BUL.
0242 SITIO TUBIGAN,
NGT TOURS SERVICES BRGY. GAYA-GAYA, TOMAS, NOMERIANO
CSJDM BULACAN
BLK. 13 LOT 37 MAIN
ROAD ST. PHASE
VPLEASANT HILL
ONE CLICK TRAVEL & TOURS SUBD. BRGY. SAN ABROGAR, MARIBEL
MANUEL CITY OF
SAN JOSE DEL
MONTE BULACAN
BLOCK 34 LOT 25 RD.
MAÑALAC, RIZALINA
RBM TRAVEL AND TOURS 11, BRGY. MINUYAN
BACNAT
IV, CSJDM, BUL.
BLOCK 2-D LOT 4
PHASE 1 BRGY.
SERRANO, MINERVA
SERR-J TRAVEL SERVICES CIUDAD REAL CITY
MALICDEM
OF SAN JOSE DEL
MONTE BULACAN
BRGY. PARADISE III,
SHEKINAH TRAVEL & TOURS FRIA, PERLITA ESTRELLA
CSJDM, BUL.
BLOCK 12, BRGY.
SKYMASTER TOURS & TRAVEL GUMAOC WEST, OLASO, SUSANA IMAN
CSJDM, BUL.
202 QUIRINO
HIGHWAY, BRGY.
TRAVEL EASE INC. TUNGKONG TRAVEL EASE INC.
MANGGA, CSJDM,
BUL.
BLOCK 20, BRGY. VISIONARIES TOURS AND
VISIONARIES TOURS AND TRAVEL
ASSUMPTION, TRAVEL PROVIDER
PROVIDER COMPANY
CSJDM, BUL. COMPANY

G. CATEGORY: Spa and Wellness Center


Name of Establishment Address Contact # / email Contact Person
MBC BUILDING, SITIO
HULO, BRGY.
VILLANUEVA, BERNADETTE
QUASA THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE SAPANG PALAY
ACULANA
PROPER,
CSJDM,BUL.

Source: SEP 2012 and City Tourism Office (2012)

Page | 141
5. INFRASTRUCTURE
The Infrastructure Sector of SJDM includes roads, bridges, drainage, sewerage,
power, and telecommunications. The Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)
is the national government agency mandated to undertake the planning of said
infrastructures. As such, DPWH Regional Office in Bulacan (Region III) has two (2) regional
offices to manage their respective Engineering Districts; 1st and 2nd District Engineering
Offices (DEO). The City of San Jose del Monte belongs to the 2nd DEO, which also comprise
Sta. Maria, Norzagaray, and other cities located on the eastern portion of Bulacan province.
The City Engineering Office of SJDM is the office mandated to undertake infrastructure
projects from the barangay to city level.

5.1. ROADS, BRIDGES, AND LAND TRANSPORT

Roads and bridges are the vital elements in providing mobility, facilitating
circulation and movement in the city. Roads are classified from national roads where it has
two subsections – Primary and Secondary Roads, to barangay roads. National roads serve
as linkages of the city to the other major cities and other major institutions. Provincial
Roads or Local Roads connect cities and municipalities without traversing National Roads.
Municipal and City Roads are roads within Poblacion and provide inter-barangay
connections to major municipal and city infrastructure without traversing Provincial
Roads. National Roads are therefore tasked to DPWH.

CSJDM has no National Road – Primary Road traversing CSJDM. The highest road
classification is National Road – Secondary Road down to the Barangay Road 63.

5.1.1. Secondary Roads

There are three secondary roads linking CSJDM to its adjacent cities within the province.
These roads are mostly concrete, asphalt, and macadam. There have been several rehabilitation
activities to respond to the growing needs of daily traffic in the city. The secondary roads have a
total stretch of 35.9 kilometers in the City with 63% already in concrete while the remaining 37%
is in asphalt. The table below summarizes three secondary roads vital to external linkages to
CSJDM.64

63 Republic Act No. 917 otherwise known as the Philippine Highway Act, enacted in 1953 and E.O. 113 series of 1955 classified roads into National
Primary and National Secondary. However, under the current setting, National roads are classified as primary arterial and secondary arterial. To
maintain consistency and standard technical definition, the former definition is maintained and therefore utilized in this section.
64 Sources used for this undertaking are the Vol. 1 of SEP 2005 and the Department of Public Works and Highways 2012 Atlas. It should be noted

that the data presented in SEP 2012 are in 2001 while the DPWH Atlas 2012 is 2010. To minimize error and double-entry of data from both sources,
comparative data has been executed to extract new data and eliminate duplicate or overlapping data. Maps and lengths of the roads were used to
verify the information.

Page | 142
Table 5-1 Inventory of Roads

CONCRETE ASPHALT TOTAL LENGTH


NATIONAL ROAD – SECONDARY
(m) (m) (m)
NCR/ Bulacan Bdry- Bigte- Ipo Dam Road
Good 2,990.0 2,930.0 5,920.0
Fair 6,090.0 - 6,090.0
Poor 800.0 1,100.0 1,900.0
Bad 280.0 2,400.0 2,680.0
No Assessment 330.0 1,510.0 1,840.0
TOTAL 10,490.0 7,940.0 18,430.0
Bocaue San Jose Road
Good 1,430.0 4,130.0 5,560.0
Fair 3,500.0 - 3,500.0
Poor 2,180.0 930.0 3,110.0
Bad 450.0 80.0 530.0
No Assessment - - -
TOTAL 7,560.0 5,140.0 12,700.0
Muzon-Tungkong Mangga
Good 1,040.0 180.0 1,220.0
Fair 3,600.0 - 3,600.0
Poor - - -
Bad - - -
No Assessment - - -
TOTAL 4,640.0 180.0 4,820.0

GRAND TOTAL 22,690.0 13,260.0 35,950.0

Source: DPWH Atlas 2012

NCR/Bulacan Boundary-Bigte-Ipo Dam Road

The road commonly referred to as Quirino Highway is a vital access route going to
the city. The road stretches from southern portion of the City up to the north virtually
bisecting the city. This is also the access route going to CSDJM from Metro Manila via Quezon
and Caloocan Cities. The road covers 18.4 kilometers in the city primarily made of concrete
and asphalt and in good and fair condition. This is the gateway from Metro Manila to
Northern Luzon, hence its high average annual daily traffic (AADT) record. In 2012, it
recorded 13,888 AADT, relatively the highest in the city.65

65 Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) report is released in 2013 but conducted in 2012 as per DPWH Atlas 2012

Page | 143
Bocaue-San Jose Road

Bocaue-San Jose Road is located at the western portion of the city serving access
entrance to CSJDM from Bocaue, Marilao and Meycauayan. It stretches from Poblacion to
Muzon exiting the city covering 12.7 kilometers in length in the city. The road is made of
concrete and in good condition. The road has a relatively low AADT counting only to 639 in
2012, mostly composed of passenger cars followed by public utility vehicle.

Muzon-Tungkong Mangga Road

This road is the link from the central CSJDM to the westernmost portion of the city.
It is perpendicular to Quirino Highway traversing west with a stretch of 4.8 kilometers. It
connects Tungkong Mangga to Muzon. It is primarily made of concrete and asphalt both in
good and fair condition. Most of the traffic is composed of motorcycles and passenger cars.
It is second to Quirino Highway with the highest AADT in the city counting 9,944 in 2012,
mostly composed of motorcycle and passenger cars.

Map 10 Map showing National Highways in CSJDM with Road Type and Condition

Source: DPWH District Office

Page | 144
Average Annual Daily Traffic by Mode of Transportation
source: Department of Public Works and Highways, 2012
9,000
8,000
7,000
6,000
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
0

NCR/Bulacan Bdry-Bigte-Ipo Dam Rd Bocaue-San Jose Road Muzon-Tungkong Mangga Rd

Figure 5-1 Average Annual Daily Traffic by Mode of Transportation

Page | 145
Average Annual Daily Traffic by Road
source: Department of Public Works and Highways, 2012
14,000

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

4,000

2,000

0
NCR/Bulacan Bdry-Bigte-Ipo Dam Bocaue-Sn Jose Rd Muzon-Tungkong Mangga Rd
Rd

Motor - Tricycle Passenger Car Goods Utility


Small Bus Large Bus Rigid Truck 2 Axles
Rigid Truck 3+ Axles Truck Semi-Trailer 3&4 Axles Truck Semi-Trailer 5+ Axles
Truck Trailers 4 Axles Truck Trailers 5+ Axles

Figure 5-2 Average Annual Daily Traffic by Road 2012

Page | 146
5.1.2. Provincial Roads

Provincial roads connect National Roads to barangays through rural areas. There
are four highways classified as Provincial Road. These are the following:

Table 5-2 Summary of Provincial Roads in CSJDM

PROVINCIAL ROAD LENGTH (m)


Marilao-San Jose Road 2,613.5
San Jose Sapang Palay Road 4,520.2
Sta. Maria - Sapang Palay Road 1,915.6
EVR Road 5,989.8
Igay Road 11,314.8
Total 26,353.9

Marilao - San Jose Road

Marilao-San Jose traverses Sta. Maria-Tungko Road and the Municipality of Marilao.
The road is 2.6 kilometers in length.

San Jose - Sapang Palay Road

San Jose-Sapang Palay Road connects to Sapang Palay Resettlement Project. The
road is 4.5 kilometers length.

Sta. Maria - Sapang Palay Road

Sta. Maria-Sapang Palay Road connects Sta. Maria Road to Sapang Palay
Resettlement Project. The road is 1.9 kilometers in length.

Igay Road

Igay Road is the access road to the barangays in the eastern portion of the City such
as; Barangay San Isidro, Kaybanban, San Roque, and Paradise III. The road is 11.3
kilometers in length.

5.1.3. City Roads

City roads, also named as Municipal Roads or Local Roads, are the roads within the
Poblacion, which connect the city to Secondary roads, and provide inter-barangay
connections to major municipal and city infrastructure without traversing the provincial
roads. The city recorded 49 roads, which is classified as City Roads with 7.78 kilometers in
total length.

Page | 147
Table 5-3 City Road Inventory

ROAD NAME CONCRETED DILAPIDATED ASPHALT MACADAM TOTAL


San Jose Street Poblacion 440.0 - - - 440.0
San Francisco Street to Poblacion 440.0 - - - 440.0
Daang Barrio to Tubigan Evergreen Gaya-gaya 1,575.0 675.0 - - 2,250.0
Mt. View Gate to Harmony Hills Bridge Muzon 1,300.0 - - - 1,300.0
Partida to Linawan Muzon 2,451.0 - - - 2,451.0
Kamandalaan Road to La Poblacion Partida
1,800.00 - - 0 1,800.0
Muzon
Sapang Palay Proper to EVR Avenue 6,100.0 - - - 6,100.0
Road 1 to Citrus 1,800.0 - - - 1,800.0
Sapang Palay Proper to Area H Tigbe 360.0 240.0 - - 600.0
School Road Loop Area H - - - 650.0 650.0
Area H Eraño Road going to Sampol 2,000.0 - - - 2,100.0
Sta.Cruz 1 going to Barangay Hall 900.0 - - - 900.0
Sta. Cruz II Going to School 1,160.0 - 290.0 - 1,450.0
Iglesia ni Cristo to Emergency Hospital 1,400.0 - - - 1,400.0
Area B going to Rancho 850.0 - - - 850.0
Area B Going to Citrus 850.0 - - - 850.0
Area C 145th Going to Rancho EVR Ave 332.8 - 947.2 - 1,280.0
San Martin I, II, IV 1,250.0 - - - 1,250.0
First Avenue to National High School Fatima 325.0 - 175.0 - 500.0
Second Avenue to National High School Fatima 75.0 - 425.0 - 500.0
Third Avenue to National High School Fatima 700.0 - - - 700.0
Sto. Domingo St. to Sapang Palay Proper 121.7 - - 228.3 350.0
Sapang Palay Proper to Lote (From National) 1,750.0 - - - 1,750.0
Old Lumber Road Loop San Pedro 2,900.0 - - - 2,900.0
Kadiwa Road Loop San Pedro 1,300.0 - - - 1,300.0
Between Fatima V to San Pedro 950.0 - - - 950.0
From Junction to National High School Fatima 200.0 - 200.0 - 400.0
Lawang Pare to Citrus Boundary 1,120.0 - 280.0 - 1,400.0
Citrus main road to Dumpsite 1,040.0 - - 260.0 1,300.0
Citrus Loop 900.0 - - 600.0 1,500.0
Barangay 64A to Sto. Niño II 1,500.0 - - - 1,500.0
Barangay 64B to Sto. Niño II 600.0 - - - 600.0
Area B (Silungan) to Rancho 600.0 - - - 600.0
San Pedro St. Slaughter House Poblacion 320.0 - - - 320.0
Tungkong Mangga to Tanawin Road 2,300.0 - - - 2,300.0
Tungkong Mangga to Lagunita Road 900.0 - - - 900.0
Kakawate to Licao San Isidro 1,100.0 - - - 1,100.0
Quarry Road to the Minuyan Landfill 900.0 - - - 900.0
Industrial Road Minuyan 900.0 - - - 900.0
Kaypian BSU to NAPOCOR Dulong Bayan 3,480.0 - - - 3,480.0
Quirino Highway to Block313 Gumaoc 1,050.0 - - - 1,050.0

Page | 148
Farmview to Pecsonville Tungkong Mangga 800.0 - - - 800.0
San Manuel to Sienna 800.0 - - - 800.0
Abella Road to Kaypian NAPOCOR 3,700.0 - - - 3,700.0
Tanghali Road to Kaybanban 600.0 - - - 600.0
Umaga Road to Kaybanban Road 600.0 - - - 600.0
Saging Road to San Roque 600.0 - - - 600.0
From Road 5 to Road 2 Minuyan 900.0 - - - 900.0
14,770.
Igay Road ( From Igay to Licao-Licao) 14,770.0 - - -
0
77,881.
TOTAL 72,810.50 915.00 2,317.20 1,738.30
0

Source: CSJDM Socio-Economic and Physical Profile 2012

5.1.4. Barangay Roads

Table 5-4 shows the location of Barangay road and by type of pavement.

Table 5-4 Barangay Road Inventory

LOCATION BARANGAY CATEGORY


San Jose Street Poblacion Concrete
San Francisco Street Poblacion Concrete
Kamandalaan Road to La Poblacion Partida Muzon Concrete
Sta. Cruz I going to Brgy. Hall Sta. Cruz I Macadam/ Concrete
Sta. Cruz II going to school Sta. Cruz II Asphalt/ Concrete
Old Lumber Road LOOP San Pedro San Pedro Macadam/ Concrete
Lawang Pare to Citrus Boundary Lawang Pare Asphalt/ Concrete
San Pedro St. Slaughter House Poblacion I Macadam/ Concrete
Tanawin Road Tungkong Mangga Concrete
Lagunita Road Tungkong Mangga Concrete
Road 10 Minuyan IV Concrete
Road 3 Minuyan II Concrete
64A Road Sto. Niño II Concrete
64B Sto. Niño II Concrete
Road 5 Minuyan IV Concrete/ Macadam
Industrial Road Minuyan Proper Asphalt/ Macadam
Tanghali Road Kaybanban Concrete
Umaga Road Kaybanban Macadam
Saging Road San Roque Macadam
Quarry Road to landfill Minuyan Proper Concrete/ Macadam

Page | 149
5.1.5. Bridges

Bridges are major part of infrastructure development of the City. This contributes
to increased mobility in the city. DPWH listed ten (10) bridges that are located in the city.
The bridges measure 533.2 meters in total length. Most, if not all, bridges specified are made
of concrete however in fair to poor condition. The LGU (CSJDM) recorded 22 all made of
concrete. The bridges measure 357 meters in length when combined. The table below
describes the location of bridges.

Table 5-5 Summary of Bridges, Categories, Length, and Condition based on DPWH Atlas 2012

LENGTH
BRIDGE NAME CATEGORY CONDITION
(m)
Kay Tialo Steel 95.5 Further Assessment
Bigte Concrete 15.5 Fair
New Norzagaray (formerly Lawang) Concrete 12.6 Poor
Pulong Buhangin Concrete 27.6 Bad
Kay Uwak Concrete 28.5 Good
Ilog-Bayan Concrete 37.5 Fair
Sta. Maria 1 Concrete 168 Fair
Sta. Maria 2 Concrete 14 Good
Sta. Maria 3 Concrete 24 Poor
Sta. Maria Concrete 110 Good
Total 533.2

Page | 150
Table 5-6 Summary of Bridges, Category, Capacity, and Length

CAPACITY LENGTH
BRIDGE NAME CATEGORY
(tons) (m)
Bakood Bridge Concrete 5 5
Dulong Bayan Bridge (Between Poblacion and Dulong Bayan) Concrete 20 20
Estangkero Bridge Concrete 20 29
Gumaoc Bridge Concrete 20 8
Kantulot Bridge Concrete 10 6
Kay Salop Bridge (Dulong Bayan) Concrete 20 8
Kay Tialo Bridge (Between Sto. Cristo and Minuyan) Concrete 25 30
Kay Tutong Bridge (Between Dulong Bayan and Sapang Palay
Proper ) Concrete 20 25
Lambakin Bridge (Sitio Lambakin, Sto. Cristo) Concrete 5 7
Linawan Bridge Concrete 20 12
Makaing Bridge (Between Barangay Muzon and Poblacion I) Concrete 20 8
Makisap Bridge Concrete 20 9
Overflow Bridge Concrete 10 5
Overflow Bridge (Pangitlugan, Muzon) Concrete 20 8
Purok 3 Kaybanban Overflow Bridge Concrete 10 32
Skyline Bridge Concrete 20 12
Towerville Bridge (Towerville Subdivision, Minuyan) Concrete 10 12
Tubigan Bridge (Between Evergreen Subdivision & Tubigan
Gaya-gaya) Concrete 10 10

5.1.6. Land Transport

Transport facilities in the city are steadily increasing if studies will be based from
2000 to 2014. This rapid is due to City’s role in providing settlement to a large number of
population which also supplies labor in major urban growth centers in Metro Manila. There
are at least 1,708 jeepneys plying around the city everyday with recorded 16 jeepney
operators and jeepneys not recorded with route to Bigte, Norzagaray. Table 5-7
summarizes the existing jeepney routes based on 2010 study by the city.

Page | 151
Table 5-7 Summary of Registered Jeepney Units and Respective Operators and Routes

No. of
Line Operator Terminal Route
Units
Liwasan, Poblacion, Tungkong
SJTJODA 200 SJDM - Tungkong Mangga
Mangga
SPRJODA Area E, Sapang Palay Proper 120 Sampol Loop
PALNOVA Palmera, Kaypian 55 Palmera - Novaliches route
FRANHNOJODA Brgy. Mulawin, Francisco Homes 24 Francisco - Novaliches route
Bigte Individuals Bigte, Norzagaray Bigte Norzagaray
Novaliches - Sapang Palay Proper
SPTMSC Sapang Palay Proper 127
route
SAPTUGROJODA/JODA Sapang Palay Proper - Grotto
Sapang Palay Proper 130
Federation route
Sampol - SJ Muzon - Sta. Maria,
SAJOSMAJODA San Martin II 171
Sapang Palay Proper
PAGUNOVA TSC Palmera, Kaypian 77 Palmera - Novaliches route
BIGTEFEJODAP Bigte, Norzagaray 35 Bigte, Novaliches
FHMPTSC Francisco Homes 230 Francisco - Philcoa/Cubao route
BNTSC Bigte, Norzagaray 90 Bigte - Novaliches route
Marsa JODA Poblacion 210 SJ Muzon - SM Marilao route
GROTTO NOVAJODA Graceville 102 Grotto - Novaliches route
PATRASECO Tungkong Mangga 80 Tungko - Licao-licao route
CHED MPTSC Sampol, Sapang Palay 45 S.Palay, Area H - Malolos route
Sampol via Sta. Maria Bulacan
SAMEYMARIAJODA Sapang Palay Proper 12
route

Source: SEP 2012, CTTMO

City buses, on the other hand, provide transportation primarily travelling out of the
city traversing Provincial Highways to National Highways. There are at least 836 buses
registered in the city providing transportation from SJDM to as far as NAIA Terminal via
Quirino Highway. Table 5-8 summarizes public city buses which with their terminals and
respective companies and operators.

Page | 152
Table 5-8 Summary of Registered Buses and Respective Operators and Routes

Operator Terminal 1 No. of units Route

AST Transit Tialo, Minuyan Proper 10 Baclaran-SM Fairview route.


Area H, Sapang Palay Sapang Palay Proper-Sta. Cruz
BBTSC 36
Proper route.
CEMTRANS Services Inc. Tungkong Mangga 32 FTI-SM Fairview route.
SM Fairview-Baclaran/Alabang
Claro Transit Tigbe, Norzagaray 15
route.
DCOMMPTSC Brgy Maharlika 11 SM Fairview-FTI route.
Sapang Palay Proper-Sta. Cruz
Del Monte City Bus Tigbe, Norzagaray 6
route.
Old Nawasa Sto. Grotto-NAIA; Grotto-Baclaran
Elena Liner 28
Cristo route
Exodus Express Corp A-60 Minuyan Proper 2 Norzagaray-Baclaran route.
Minuyan Rd 1,
Gloren/JMK 2 SM Fairview-Baclaran route.
Sapang Palay
IETSC Minuyan Proper 4 SM Fairview-Baclaran route
IBL Norzagaray 10 Grotto-NAIA route
Jack Pherlyn Tungkong Mangga 14 SM Fairview-Baclaran route
Jayross LS Tours Tungkong Mangga 20 Grotto-NAIA route
Area E, Sapang Palay
JELL Transport 3 SM Fairview-Baclaran route
Proper
Jell Transport/Kellen/JFT Bigte, Norzagaray 11 SM Fairview/Grotto-NAIA route
JFT Liner Bigte, Norzagaray 30 Norzagaray-Baclaran route
Grotto-NAIA; SM Fairview-NAIA
JFT and LIPPAD Liner Minuyan 41
route
Road 1, Sapang NAIA-Grotto/SM Fairview-
JMK/Apex 2
Palay Proper Baclaran route
NAIA-Grotto/SM Fairview-
JMK Road II, Minuyan 2
Baclaran route
Kellen Transport Inc. Rd 2, Minuyan I 54 Grotto-Baclaran route
KELLY Transport Tialo Minuyan Proper 12 SM Fairview-Quiapo route
Pangarap, Caloocan Sapang Palay Proper-Baclaran
Luzon Bus 25
City route
Neopolitan Fairview
Mafel Transit 15 Grotto-Baclaran route
Q.C
North Diamond
Mayamy Transport 57 Norzagaray-Baclaran route
Subdivision
Mayamy Transport Brgy Maharlika 25 Norzagaray-Baclaran route
Area B Purok I, Sapang Palay Proper-Sta. Cruz
Mayamy Transport 6
Sapang Palay Proper route
Ipo Road, Minuyan Sapang Palay Proper-Sta. Cruz
Mayamy Transport 7
Proper route
Mayamy Transport Road 1 Minuyan Proper 3 Grotto-NAIA route
Mayamy Transport Gumaoc 4 Grotto-NAIA route
B10 L29 Pleasant
Mersan Transport 5 Baclaran route
Hills Subd.
Minuyan Rd. 1
Mersan/IBL/Apex/JMK 4 Baclaran route
S.Palay

Page | 153
Ipo Rd. Minuyan
Mersan 5 Baclaran route
Proper
Metrolink/Elena Tungkong Mangga 7 Grotto-NAIA route
NAIA Metrolink Sto. Niño 20 Grotto-NAIA route
Philippians Bus Liner Susano Road 18 Baclaran-Grotto route
Precious Grace Transport Brgy Graceville 20 Grotto-NAIA route
Rainbow Express Neopolitan Fairview Q.C 10 Grotto-NAIA route
Dela Costa
RBM/IBL 5 Grotto-NAIA route
III/Pecsonville
Ipo Road, Minuyan
RBM Grand Rally Trans 13 Grotto-NAIA route
Proper
Ipo Road, Minuyan
IBL Corp 10 Grotto-NAIA route
Proper
Ipo Road, Minuyan
DAR J Trans Co 10 Grotto-NAIA route
Proper
Ipo Road, Minuyan
Snow White 5 Grotto-NAIA route
Proper
Ipo Road, Minuyan
Hilltop Tours Inc. 10 Norzagaray-Baclaran route
Proper
Santrans Inc. Tigbe, Norzagaray 170 Norzagaray-Baclaran route
Quirino Hi-way Brgy.
Valisno Express line 40 Grotto-NAIA route
Sto. Cristo

Source: CSJDM website

Public utility tricycles function as feeders to the jeeps and buses. According to the
CTTMO, there were 26 Tricycle Operators and Drivers Associations (TODA) with a total of
3,485 units in 2014.

Table 5-9 Summary of Land Transportations Plying in the City

Type 2011 2012 2013 2014


Bus 700 755 821 821
Jeepney 2,000 2,046 2,036 2,036
Tricycle 3,422 3,464 3,485 3,485

Page | 154
5.2. POWER AND ELECTRICITY

The city is being served by MERALCO wherein the source of power supply is located
in Sapang Palay Proper substation. As of 2012, there are 88,305 active metering stations
across the city, 59 barangays are already serviced by MERALCO, therefore 100% barangay
electrification coverage.

Table 5-10 Summary of MERALCO Customers, 2001 and 2012

MERALCO CUSTOMERS (EP SJDM, 2001)


Type Subscribers % share
Residential 49,095 95.36%
Commercial 2,244 4.36%
Industrial 49 0.10%
Streetlights 95 0.18%
TOTAL 51,483 100.00%

MERALCO CUSTOMERS (SJDM Website, 2013)


Type Subscribers % share
Residential 82,127 94.67%
Commercial 4,530 5.22%
Industrial 40 0.05%
Streetlights 54 0.06%
TOTAL 86,751 100.00%

Based on the previous SEP and the SJDM website, number of serviced customers
have significantly grown in number to attain 100% coverage. As such, a comparative chart
is displayed on the next page to track the changes.

For instance, residential and commercial uses have grown rapidly especially
Commercial use doubled after 11 years, while Residential increased more than half.
Industrial use has changed dramatically to its all-time low, same goes with streetlight use.
Perhaps, this has to do with more active commercial establishments and less industries
engaging in SJDM, either they are moving upwards or nearer Metro Manila.

Page | 155
Percentage Variance
Quantity (2001 and 2012)

Residential Commercial Industrial Streetlights


% Variance 67.28% 101.87% -18.37% 62%
-43.16%

Figure 5-3 Comparative Growth of MERALCO Customers (2001 and 2012)

Table 5-11 Summary Table of details with regard to Power and Electricity

PARTICULAR COUNT DETAIL


Substations 1 Sapang Palay Proper Substation
Metering Stations 88,305 Active
Electric Posts 16,377 Distribution
Streetlights 20 Private Accounts
33 LGU Accounts
Barangays Served 59
Barangay Electrification 100%

Page | 156
5.3. WATER

Institutionalization of water infrastructure in the city started on July 1980 upon


establishment of San Jose del Monte City Water District by virtue of PD 198, as amended,
otherwise known as Provincial Water Utilities Act of 1973. The Local Water Utilities
Administration (LWUA) classifies it as a Category A Water District. The institution has
gradually laid its service to the City annually. Communities, which are not served by SJDM
Water District, are still dependent on deep well water extraction. Over the years, there had
been gradual decrease in the extraction of deep well water due to increasing service of SJDM
Water District.

Complementing the services of the San Jose Water District are pump stations, which
serve as accessible water resource for residents. Before the advanced growth of water
distribution in the city, the water pumps were the immediate answer to the population’s
need for water. A record is maintained by National Water Resources Board (NWRB) for
pumps stations across the city.

Table 5-12 Locations and Extraction Rates of Pump Stations in the City

PUMP STATION
LOCATION GPM LPS CU.M./HR CU.M./DAY CU.M./MO.
NO.

7 Zone 1, Hulo, Poblacion 130 8.2 29.53 708.63 21,258.81


8 Phase G, Francisco Homes Subdivision 140 8.83 31.8 763.14 22,894.10
9 Phase K, Francisco Homes Subdivision 90 5.68 20.44 490.59 14,717.64
10 Robes III Heights Subdivision 77 4.86 17.49 419.73 12,591.75
11 Phase D, Francisco Homes Subdivision 50 3.15 11.36 272.55 8,176.46
12 Phase G III, Francisco Homes Subdivision 110 6.94 24.98 599.61 17,988.22
13 Phase 2A, Ciudad Real Subdivision 30 1.89 6.81 163.53 4,905.88
16 Stallion I Subdivision 120 7.57 27.25 654.12 19,623.51
17 Block 65, Barangay Gumaoc East 100 6.31 22.71 545.1 16,352.93
18 Harmony Hills I Subdivision 200 12.62 45.42 1,090.20 32,705.86
19 Block 54, Harmony Hills I Subdivision 155 9.78 35.2 844.9 25,347.04
20 Morning Glory Subdivision 157 9.91 35.66 855.8 25,674.10
21 Phase M 1, Francisco Homes Subdivision 130 8.2 29.53 708.63 21,258.81
22 Block 10 Evergreen Heights Subdivision 110 6.94 24.98 599.61 17,988.22
23 Melody Plains Subdivision 190 11.99 43.15 1,035.69 31,070.56
24 Melody Plains Subdivision 180 11.36 40.88 981.18 29,435.27
25 Phase 2, Pabahay 2000 230 14.51 52.24 1,253.72 37,611.73
26 Phase E2, Francisco Homes Subdivision 165 10.41 37.48 899.41 26,982.33
27 Phase I, Pabahay 2000 231 14.57 52.47 1,259.18 37,775.26
28 Block 5 Sarmiento Homes 230 14.51 52.24 1,253.72 37,611.73
29 Block 8 Phase 2A Ciudad Real Subdivision 44 2.78 9.99 239.84 7,195.29
30 Block 24 Sarmiento Homes 225 14.2 51.1 1,226.47 36,794.09
31 FVR Homes, Tigbe, Norzagaray 110 6.94 24.98 599.61 17,988.22

Page | 157
32 FVR Homes, Tigbe, Norzagaray 115 7.26 26.12 626.86 18,805.87
34 Phase 5, Pleasant Hills Subdivision 40 2.52 9.08 218.04 6,541.17
35 Phase 6, Pleasant Hills Subdivision 30 1.89 6.81 163.53 4,905.88
36 Phase 5, Pleasant Hills Subdivision 165 10.41 37.48 899.41 26,982.33
37 Provincial Road, Barangay Graceville 150 9.46 34.07 817.65 24,529.39
38 Block 4, Gumaoc Central 150 9.46 34.07 817.65 24,529.39

Source: Local Water Utilities Administration website

On the other hand, on 2012 San Jose Water District serviced 78,660 households or
approximately a population of 409,000 in the city in stark contrast to its initial service on
1980, when only 200 households were serviced.

Serviced Connection (HHs)


90,000
80,000 78,660
73,705
70,000
60,000 54,186
50,000
40,000 Serviced Connection (HHs)
28,639
30,000
9,184
20,000
4,590
10,000
200 1,200
-
1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2012

Source: San Jose Water District 2012 Annual Report

Figure 5-4 Service Connections (in terms of number households)

The schematic below summarizes the activities that the water providers undertake
to deliver to the service areas.

PRODUCTION >>> PROCESSING >>>DISTRIBUTION >>> CONSUMPTION

Page | 158
5.3.1. Production

The city is sourcing its water from the Angat River coursed through the
Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage System (MWSS). The water from Angat River is
processed through San Jose Water’s treatment plants through Aqueduct no. 6 of MWSS.
Today, the aqueduct is conveying 43,500 cubic meters of water to the treatment plant. San
Jose Water is producing 80% of the total water produced by the city. Thirteen groundwater
stations around the city supply the other 20%. In 2012, The City has produced a total of
19,522,954 cubic meters of water, i.e. raw water coming from both surface and
groundwater sources.

5.3.2. Processing

From the first phase is sourcing the water from either Angat River or the 13
groundwater stations, the water passes through an aqueduct in the city where it is brought
to processing through Water Treatment Plants. Water Treatment Plants are located in
Barangay Minuyan. There are two Water Treatment Plants, to wit. First is the Water
Treatment Plant 1 (WTP1), which was constructed in 1997 producing 20,000 cubic meters
per day (cumd). Next is the Water Treatment Plant 2 (WTP2), which was completed in
2007; it has a maximum production capacity of 30,000 cumd. The treated water is then
coursed through aqueduct to be able to distribute to consumers, thereby potable water.

5.3.3. Distribution

The water is distributed by San Jose Water District. As of 2012, the distribution pie
primarily goes between government housing projects and privately developed
subdivisions. These government housing projects include Sapang Palay Resettlement Area
(SPRA), Pabahay 2000, Towerville Resettlement Project, and Liberty Farms Upgrading
Project, which comprises Barangays Gumaoc East, Gumaoc West, and Gumaoc Central.

Water Distribution
Govt. Housing Projs. Privately Dev. Subds.

48%
52%

Source: San Jose Water District 2012 Annual Report

Figure 5-5 Water Distribution Share

Page | 159
5.3.4. Processing

The Water District serves 78,660 water service connections with an average water
consumption of 18 m3/day per connection in 2013. Using the aggregate value over the
household population, the projected per capita water consumption by 2020 would average
at 23.85 m3/day by 2020.

The NWRB minimum standard for per capita water consumption per day—
accounting all types of users is 250 l/c/p/d, whereas the HLURB guidelines for housing
development sets a minimum water requirement of 150 l/c/p/d. These translate to a
minimum aggregate requirement of 122,835.5 m 3 and 73,701.3 m3 using 2013-estimated
population, respectively. Moreover, San Jose Water District has reported 19,522,944 m 3
produced in 2012, thus averaging at about 53,488 m 3 per day serving to 98% of CSJDM or
translated to 78,910 serviced connections.

Using the NWRB and HLURB minimum standard, the projected per capita
requirement would be:

Table 5-13 Projection of Water Requirements as per NWRB and HLURB Standard (2012-2020)

NWRB Standard (250 l/c/p/d) HLURB Standard (150 l/c/p/d)

Year Estimated Pop’n Minimum Requirement Minimum Requirement

l/c/p/d in m3 l/c/p/d in m3
2012 488,245 119,783,750 119,783.75 71,870,250 71,870.25
2013 506,017 122,835,500 122,835.50 73,701,300 73,701.30
2014 524,435 126,401,500 126,401.50 75,840,900 75,840.90
2015 543,523 130,542,750 130,542.75 78,325,650 78,325.65
2016 563,307 135,330,500 135,330.50 81,198,300 81,198.30
2017 583,810 140,846,500 140,846.50 84,507,900 84,507.90
2018 605,060 147,185,500 147,185.50 88,311,300 88,311.30
2019 627,083 154,456,500 154,456.50 92,673,900 92,673.90
2020 649,908 162,785,500 162,785.50 97,671,300 97,671.30

Page | 160
Estimated Minimum Water Requirement, 2012-2020
180,000,000
160,000,000
140,000,000
NWRB
120,000,000
100,000,000 NWRB-Shortage
80,000,000
60,000,000 HLURB
40,000,000
20,000,000 HLURB Shortage
-
2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Source: PIDS

Figure 5-6 Summary of Graph Estimated Water Requirement (2012-2020)

Determining water consumption and water requirement is relevant for the city
planners to assure sustainability of water resource given its limited supply. Policy makers
in the city may create a new water infrastructure or introduce technology, or partner with
companies in order to sustain the need for water in the next ten years.

The city must be prepared for this level of consumption and steps must be
undertaken to ensure the quality of service for the growing demand of the city. Importantly,
groundwater is a finite resource and over extraction of this resource may lead to land
subsidence. Additionally, the city must aim to reach at least the Class A level for surface
water bodies, so as to be classified as a Public Water Supply Class II which is intended as a
source of water supply after undergoing the required conventional treatment to meet the
Philippine National Standards for Drinking Water.

Table 5-14 Water Utility (Service Connections) 2013

Residential Government Commercial Backyard Total


77,880 146 838 46 78,910
Average water consumption: 18 m3/day
Sources of water: Groundwater and surface water from MWSS aqueduct
Extent of coverage: 58 out of 59 barangays or 98% of the city

Source: City of San Jose Del Monte Water District

Page | 161
Table 5-15 Estimated Daily Average Water Consumption (2013-2020)

Average water consumption67


Year Population66
(m3/day)
2013 506,017 18.00
2014 524,435 18.52
2015 543,523 19.13
2016 563,307 19.83
2017 583,810 20.64
2018 605,060 21.57
2019 627,083 22.63
2020 649,908 23.85

Source: Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS)

5.3.5. Rates

The prevailing rates are based on the prevailing market price as determined by the
province of Bulacan. The installation costs for residential and industrial concessionaires
arrive at an average of Php 4,000.00 with Php 280.00 for first cubic meter, and additional
Php 2.95 for 11-20 cubic meter.

Table 5-16 Current Market Rates for Water (in Php)68

Water Rates
Commodity Charge
RESIDENTIAL
Installation 4,000.00
First 10 cu.m. 280.00
11-20 cu.m. 30.95/cu
21-30 cu.m. 34.00/cu

INDUSTRIAL
Installation 4,000.00
First 10 cu.m. 280.00
11-20 cu.m. 30.95/cu
21-30 cu.m. 34.00/cu

66 Ibid

Current market price is based from San Jose Water District website.
68

Page | 162
5.4. TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Philippines Long Distance Telephone Co. (PLDT) largely provides the telephone
services. These lines are servicing the residential and commercial establishments in the
Poblacion and nearby barangays. The table below summarizes the telecommunications
providers in the city.

Table 5-17 Telecommunication Providers in the City

COMMUNICATION SYSTEM SERVICE PROVIDER LOCATION OF FACILITY


City Hall Bldg, Poblacion I
Post Office Philippine Postal Corp. Annex; Bgy. Bagong
Buhay II
Sampol Market, Sta.
Express Mail LBC Cruz, Tungko, Muzon,
Starmall
Air21 Tungkong Mangga
DHL Tungkong Mangga
JRS Express Tungkong Mangga
Smart, Talk’n Text, Sun
Francisco Homes, Yakal,
Mobile Communication System Poblacion I, Sta. Cruz I,
Globe, TM
Muzon

Philippine Long Distance


Landline phones
Telecommunication Co.

Source: City of San Jose Del Monte SEP 2008 and telecom websites.

5.5. CEMETERIES

As the population of the city grows, demand for funeral lots have been steadily
increasing through the decades. The existing cemeteries in the City is listed in the table
below.

Table 5-18 List of Cemeteries

Name Location Owner/Operator Area


1. Citrus Public Cemetery Citrus LGU of CSJDM 4.7 has.
2. Holy Haven Eternal Park Poblacion I Highlander Development Corp. 4.3706 has.
3. Our Lady of Eternal Muzon (Zone 4) Our Lady of Eternal Peace Inc.
13.5469 has.
Peace, Inc.
4. Poblacion Catholic Poblacion I St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church
1.0 ha.
Cemetery
5. San Jose Cemetery Poblacion I Sarmiento Enterprises Inc. 3.4991 has.
6. Providence Memorial Gaya-gaya Sto. Niño de Cebu Resources and
6.7142 has.
Park Development Corp.
7. Garden of Macphelah Gaya-gaya Church of God in Christ Jesus the Pillar and
4.2583 has.
Cemetery Ground of Truth

Page | 163
6. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
6.1. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
6.1.1. Air Quality

The City of San Jose Del Monte is a part of the Bulacan-Pampanga-Bataan Airshed,
which is once part of the bigger Metro Manila Airshed before the re-designation in 2011 by
the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. The Philippine Clean Air Act of
1999 defines an airshed as a contiguous area that shares the same climate, weather, and
topography and is also affected by the same interchange and diffusion of pollutants in the
atmosphere. The closest air quality monitoring station to the city is the Pamantasan ng
Lungsod ng Valenzuela, which is approximately 25 kilometers away. However, it is
important to note that even though they have close proximity, the total suspended
particulate (TSP) recorded must be viewed as an indicator of the pollution level at the
vicinity of the monitoring station.

As seen in Table 6-1, there is a decreasing trend in the TSP for the said monitoring
station that signifies improving air quality. However, it is still higher compared to the
annual ambient air quality standard of 90 µg/NCM as stipulated in the Philippine Clean Air
Act of 1999. Sources of TSP include diesel vehicles, coal-burning power plants, and open
burning. Dust, especially on dry months, is also a major source of TSP and can come from
unpaved roads and construction activities.

Air pollution is brought by anthropogenic sources due to intensive urbanization. It


largely comes from motor vehicles, industrial facilities, and waste burning. Even though the
city currently has a relatively small number of industries, the city experiences rapid
urbanization and is prone to experiencing poor air quality if no preventive actions will be
done. Additionally, the city also suffers from foul odor from piggery and poultry farms.
Morbidity and mortality due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases are the possible
health implications of air pollution.

Strict implementation of emission standards for motor vehicles, emission testing


prior to Land Transportation Office (LTO) registration and renewal, intensified anti-smoke
belching operations and stack emission testing program of industrial facilities must be done
to ensure that the air quality of the city will be maintained at healthy levels.

Page | 164
Table 6-1 Air Quality Monitoring Results for Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Valenzuela (2004-2012)

YEAR TOTAL SUSPENDED PARTICULATE (µg/NCM)

2004 206
2005 152
2006 157
2007 146
2008 156
2009 164
2010 162
2011 121
2012 123

Source: Environment Management Bureau

In 2012, the city utilized 170,953,509 kWh of electricity from its 86,751 service
connections. Assuming that the electricity consumption per capita is maintained, CSJDM
may be expected to utilize 232,325,641.90 kWh by 2020. The city must be prepared for the
increasing demand in energy to support its continuously growing population.

Carbon dioxide is one of the many greenhouse gases that functions as a regulator of
the Earth’s surface temperature. However, increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere
may lead to global warming. It is important to note that carbon dioxide also comes from
natural sources, but human activities lead to its increasing amount in the atmosphere.
Anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide include burning of fossil fuels for power
generation and transport, among others. Table 6-2 presents the projected carbon dioxide
emission using the 0.54861 kgCO2/kWh based on emission factor data for the Philippines
from the International Energy Agency Data Services.

Table 6-2 Estimated Electricity Consumption and CO2 Emission (2012-2020)

NUMBER OF SERVICE ANNUAL ELECTRICITY CO2 EMISSION72


YEAR POPULATION69
CONNECTIONS70 CONSUMPTION71 (kWh) (kgCO2)
2012 488,245 86,751 170,953,509.00 93,786,804.57
2013 506,017 88,961 175,309,293.26 96,176,431.38
2014 524,435 91,544 180,398,804.71 98,968,588.25
2015 543,523 94,543 186,309,150.32 102,211,062.96
2016 563,307 98,011 193,142,173.48 105,959,727.79
2017 583,810 102,006 201,014,546.89 110,278,590.57
2018 605,060 106,596 210,061,496.67 115,241,837.69
2019 627,083 111,862 220,438,586.41 120,934,812.89
2020 649,908 117,895 232,325,641.90 127,456,170.40

69 Based on projections in the Population and Demography Section of this Report


70 Projections based on the number of service connections in 2012 from the Manila Electric Company
71 Projections based on per capita consumption using the 2012 Annual Electricity Consumption from the Manila Electric Company
72Computed as 0.54861 kgCO /kWh based on emission factor data for the Philippines from the International Energy Agency Data Services, 2011and
2
mainly sourced from the GHG Protocol website, http://www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

Page | 165
6.1.2. Water Quality

The rivers and creeks that flow within the city are direct tributaries to the Angat
River. Kipungoc, Sto. Cristo, and Sta. Maria river systems are the major natural waterways
of the city. Additionally, Kipungoc River is directly connected to Marilao River, which flows
downward to Manila Bay.

Angat River is classified as Class B in its upstream section and Class C in its
downstream section. Table 6-3 presents the monitoring results for Angat River based on
parameters including dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and TSS
(total suspended solids). An increasing DO concentration per year is observed, which is
ideal to sustain the growth and productivity of aquatic resources, since organisms cannot
survive at DO levels lower than 5 mg/L. The higher the BOD, the higher is the level of
pollution. A sudden increase in BOD is observed in 2005, but it is still under the 7mg/L
threshold where most aquatic resources could not survive. The DO and BOD criteria for
Class B and Class C standards were met for the four-year period for Angat River. An abrupt
increase in TSS was observed in 2004 with a 345.5mg/L value against the 2003 value of 4.7
mg/L. It lowered back to 28.1 mg/L in 2005. Higher TSS corresponds to the inability of the
water to support aquatic life due to reduced light penetration affecting photosynthesis.
Fecal coliform concentration was beyond the water quality criterion. Additionally, heavy
metals concentrations met the DENR criteria for Class B and C waters.

Table 6-3 Monitoring Results for Angat River (2002-2005)

AVERAGE CONCENTRATION PER YEAR (mg/L)


PARAMETER
2002 2003 2004 2005
Dissolved Oxygen 5.9 7.5 7.2 7.8
Biochemical Oxygen Demand 1.1 0.9 0.6 2.3
Total Suspended Solids 5.6 4.7 345.5 28.1

Source: Manila Water (2005)

Marilao River is classified as Class A in its upstream section and Class C in its
downstream section. Table 6-4 presents the monitoring results for Marilao River. It can be
noticed that Marilao River has extremely poor water quality based on its low BOD, and high
DO and TSS. BOD values for the three sampling stations were below the 5mg/L standard to
sustain the growth and productivity of aquatic resources. Very high BOD values were also
observed and were way higher compared to the 7mg/L threshold. High TSS values were
also recorded for the three-year average. Additionally, two-year lead average concentration
was high in all stations.

Page | 166
Table 6-4 Monitoring Results per Station for Marilao River (2002-2004)

Parameter Average Concentration per Year (mg/L)


Ibayo Bridge* McArthur Bridge Expressway Bridge

Three-year Average (2002-2004)


Dissolved Oxygen 1.9 2.2 2.4
Biochemical Oxygen Demand 24.7 35.5 100.0
Total Suspended Solids 63.1 57.4 48.9
Two-year Average (2003-2004)
Chromium 0.004 0.004 0.004
Lead 0.071 0.068 0.071
One-year Average (2004)
Cadmium 0.010 0.007 0.006
Copper 0.006 0.006 0.006
Zinc 0.153 0.003 0.003

Note: *Ibayo Bridge is classified as Class A.


Source: Environmental Management Bureau Region 3

The pollution in the city’s rivers, creeks, and streams is evident in their brown to
dark brown color and the foul odor that they emit in the more populated areas of the city.
Pollution sources include siltation, dumping of solid wastes, domestic effluents, and
wastewater on tributaries in residential areas and residues of fertilizers, pesticides, and
agricultural wastes from agricultural areas. Initiatives from the city government include the
Kalinisan and Bantay-Ilog program that aims to protect the rivers and streams from
dumping of solid wastes and other illegal activities.

Groundwater is also prone to contamination from leachate from dumpsites, septic


tanks, and untreated wastewater. Moreover, it is also susceptible to the ill- effects of
fertilizers and pesticides.

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6.2. WASTE MANAGEMENT
6.2.1. Solid Waste Management

Waste Generation and Collection

Based on the 2012 data, the city generated 91,207 tons of solid waste and only
collected 47,472.97 tons or only 52% of the total, leaving an uncollected solid waste
amounting to 43,734.03 tons (47.95%). The collected solid wastes include bio waste
(2.83%), derived fuel/recyclables (0.20%), factory returnable (30.00%), and residuals
(19.02%).

The collected solid wastes are disposed by different methods. Biowaste are
disposed by composting, derived fuel/recyclables by pyrolysis, factory returnables are
brought to junkshops, residual waste to the sanitary landfill, and hazardous waste to the
accredited hazardous waste treater.

Table 6-5 Solid Waste Generated and Collected by Source, Method of Collection, and Disposal (2012)

Source Volume Collection Disposal Location of Disposal


Generated Collected System/Method System/Method Site
47,472.97 tons
Biowaste Composting City MRF, Barangay
2,577.12 tons Minuyan Proper
Derived Pyrolysis Holcim Cement Plant &
Fuel/Recyclables The City collects LA FARGE Cement
Domestic and 182.470 tons and segregates Plant, Norzagaray,
Commercial 91,207 tons waste at 109 Bulacan Plant
Factory Returnables Barangay MRFs Junkshops Junkshops within the
27,362 tons and sorting area Area of CSJDM
Residuals Sanitary landfill VGP Sanitary Landfill,
17,351.38 tons CSJDM
Hazardous Waste BFL Treater Accredited Hazardous
2,000 pcs. Waste Treater

Source: City Environment and Natural Resources Office, City of San Jose del Monte, 2012 Socio-Economic Profile

Page | 168
2,577.12
182.47

27,362 Biowaste
43,734.03
Derived Fuel/Recyclables
Factory Returnables
17,351.38 Residuals
Uncollected

Figure 6-1 Breakdown of Total Solid Waste Generated (tons), 2012

Based on the city data, as shown in Figure 6-1 the waste collection system is
inadequate to fully cover the total volume of waste generated for 2012 owing to the limited
logistics of the city.

Using the population projection and assuming that the solid waste generated per
capita, the city can expect 112,445,747.46 kilograms of solid waste by 2020. Should the
same level of collection service remain, the City would have about 69,378,993.51 kilograms
of uncollected solid waste by 2020 (Table 6-6).

Table 6-6 Estimated Solid Waste Generation and Service Gap Collection (2012-2020)

Year Population73 Solid Waste Generated74 (kg) Uncollected Solid Waste75 (kg)
2012 488,245 82,741,599.00 39,674,845.05
2013 506,017 84,849,801.15 41,783,047.20
2014 524,435 87,313,127.69 44,246,373.74
2015 543,523 90,173,738.44 47,106,984.49
2016 563,307 93,480,925.67 50,414,171.73
2017 583,810 97,291,159