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Templates

Sector : TVET

Qualification Title: TRAINING METHODOLOGY I

Unit of Competency: Plan Training Session

Module Title: Planning Training Session

Technical Education & Skills Development Authority


NATIONAL TVET TRAINERS ACADEMY
Marikina City
Plan
Training
Session

Date Developed: Document No.


July 2010 Issued by:
Trainers
Date Revised:
Methodology Level I February 2012 Page i of vii
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
Sample Data Gathering Instrument for Trainee’s
Characteristics
Please answer the following instrument according to the
characteristics described below. Encircle the letter of your choice that best
describes you as a learner. Blank spaces are provided for some data that
need your response.
Characteristics of learners

Language, literacy Average grade in: Average grade in:


and numeracy English Math
(LL&N)
a. 95 and above a. 95 and above
b. 90 to 94 b. 90 to 94
c. 85 to 89 c. 85 to 89
d. 80 to 84 d. 80 to 84
a. 75 to 79 e. 75 to 79

Cultural and Ethnicity/culture:


language a. Ifugao
background
b. Igorot
c. Ibanag
d. Gaddang
e. Muslim
f. Ibaloy
g. Others( please specify)_____________

Education & Highest Educational Attainment:


general a. High School Level
knowledge
b. High School Graduate
c. College Level
d. College Graduate
e. with units in Master’s degree
f. Masteral Graduate
g. With units in Doctoral Level
h. Doctoral Graduate
Sex a. Male
b. Female

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 2 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
Characteristics of learners
Age Your age: _____
Physical ability 1. Disabilities(if any)_____________________
2. Existing Health Conditions (Existing illness if
any)
a. None
b. Asthma
c. Heart disease
d. Anemia
e. Hypertension
f. Diabetes
g. Others(please specify) ___________________

Previous TM Certificates
experience with a. TQ certified
the topic b. TM graduate
c. TM trainer
d. TM lead trainer
Number of years as a competency trainer ______

Previous List down trainings related to TM


learning ___________________________
experience ___________________________
___________________________
National Certificates acquired and NC level
Training Level
___________________________
completed
___________________________

Special courses Other courses related to TM


a. Units in education
b. Master’s degree units in education
c. Others(please specify)
_________________________

Learning styles a. Visual - The visual learner takes mental


pictures of information given, so in order for
this kind of learner to retain information,
oral or written, presentations of new
information must contain diagrams and
drawings, preferably in color. The visual
learner can't concentrate with a lot of activity
around him and will focus better and learn
faster in a quiet study environment.
b. Kinesthetic - described as the students in
the classroom, who have problems sitting
still and who often bounce their legs while
Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01
Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 3 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
Characteristics of learners

tapping their fingers on the desks. They are


often referred to as hyperactive students with
concentration issues.
c. Auditory- a learner who has the ability to
remember speeches and lectures in detail
but has a hard time with written text. Having
to read long texts is pointless and will not be
retained by the auditory learner unless it is
read aloud.
d. Activist - Learns by having a go
e. Reflector - Learns most from activities where
they can watch, listen and then review what
has happened.
f. Theorist - Learns most when ideas are linked
to existing theories and concepts.
g. Pragmatist - Learns most from learning
activities that are directly relevant to their
situation.
Other needs a. Financially challenged
b. Working student
c. Solo parent
d. Others(please specify)
___________________________

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 4 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
FORM 1.1 SELF-ASSESSMENT CHECK

INSTRUCTIONS: This Self-Check Instrument will give the trainer necessary


data or information which is essential in planning training
sessions. Please check the appropriate box of your answer
to the questions below.
CORE COMPETENCIES
CAN I…? YES NO
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Note: In making the Self-Check for your Qualification, all required competencies
should be specified. It is therefore required of a Trainer to be well- versed
of the CBC or TR of the program qualification he is teaching.

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 5 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
Evidences/Proof of Current Competencies(Sample)

Form 1.2: Evidence of Current Competencies acquired related to


Job/Occupation

Current
Proof/Evidence Means of validating
competencies

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 6 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
Identifying Training Gaps

From the accomplished Self-Assessment Check (Form 1.1) and the


evidences of current competencies (Form 1.2), the Trainer will be able to
identify what the training needs of the prospective trainee are.

Form 1.3 Summary of Current Competencies Versus Required


Competencies (Sample)

Required Units of Current Training


Competency/Learning Competencies Gaps/Requirements
Outcomes based on CBC
1.

Required Units of Current Training


Competency/Learning Competencies Gaps/Requirements
Outcomes based on CBC
2.

3.

4.

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 7 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
Using Form No.1.4, convert the Training Gaps into a Training Needs/
Requirements. Refer to the CBC in identifying the Module Title or Unit of
Competency of the training needs identified.

Form No. 1.4: Training Needs (Sample)

Training Needs Module Title/Module of


Instruction
(Learning Outcomes)
1.

2.

3.

6.

7.

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


Trainers July 2010 Issued by:
Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 8 of 250
Developed by: NTTA
Templates Redilyn C. Agub
Revision # 01
In template form, the session plan will look like this.
SESSION PLAN
Sector :
Qualification Title :
Unit of Competency :
Module Title :
Nominal Duration :
Learning Outcomes:

A. INTRODUCTION

B. LEARNING ACTIVITIES
LO 1: Assemble computer hardware
Learning Content Methods Presentation Practice Feedback Resources Time
1. OH&S policies Self-study Read Information Answer Self- Compare Informa 1 h
and procedures sheet 1.1-1 on check 1.1-1 answers to tion r
OH&S policies answer key sheet
and procedures Self-
check
Answer
key

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


July 2010 Issued by:
Trainers Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 9 of 250
Templates Developed by: NTTA
NTTA
Revision # 01
2.Tools, Equipment , Lecture/Discussion with Listen to your Answer Self- Compare Informa 1
Testing Devices and PowerPoint Presentation teacher’s check 1.1-2 answers to tion hr
Materials discussion on answer key sheet
Information sheet Self-
1.1-2 on Tools, check
equipment and Answer
testing devices key
and Materials Comput
using powerpoint er
presentation LCD
projecto
r
3. Computer Group Discussion Participate in Answer Self- Compare Informa 1hr
Hardware group discussion check 1.1-3 answers to tion
Assembly on Information answer key sheet
sheet 1.1-3 on Answer
Computer key
Hardware Self-
Assemble check

1
Video clip viewing View video clip on Compu
hr
Computer er
hardware Video
assemble clip

Demonstration Observe your Perform Task Check Comput 3


teacher’s sheet 1.1-3 performanc er hrs
demonstration on Assemble e using Hand
Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01
July 2010 Issued by:
Trainers Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 10 of 250
Templates Developed by: NTTA
NTTA
Revision # 01
computer computer performanc tools
hardware hardware e criteria PPE
assemble checklist

LO 2:

C. ASSESSMENT PLAN
 Written Test
 Performance Test
D. TEACHER’S SELF-REFLECTION OF THE SESSION

Date Developed: Document No. NTTA-TM1-01


July 2010 Issued by:
Trainers Methodology Level I Date Revised:
February 2012 Page 11 of 250
Templates Developed by: NTTA
NTTA
Revision # 01
PARTS OF A COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING MATERIAL

References/Further Reading

Performance Criteria Checklist


Operation/Task/Job Sheet

Self Check Answer Key

Self Check

Information Sheet

Learning Experiences

Learning Outcome Summary

Module
Module Content
Content

Module
List of Competencies
Content

Module Content

Module Content

Front Page
In our efforts to standardize CBLM,
(Please refer to page 139 of the the above parts are recommended for
CBLM in Plan Training Session for use in Competency Based Training
the format) (CBT) in Technical Education and
Skills Development Authority (TESDA)
Technology Institutions. The next
sections will show you the
components and features of each part.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 12 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
COMPETENCY BASED LEARNING
MATERIALS
SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING
(NC II)

Sector : METALS & ENGINEERING


Qualification Title : SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW)

Unit of Competency : WELD CARBON STEEL PLATES


Module Title : WELDING CARBON STEEL PLATES

SAN FRANCISCO NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL


San Francisco, Surigao del Norte

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 13 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

This accomplishment would be impossible without the people who


contributed in the realization of this portfolio.

To the personnel of the Division of Surigao del Norte, headed by Dr.


Nelia S. Lomocso, CESE, for the initiative in conducting this training which
is timely and relevant to become entrenched with the 21 st century
teaching and learning.

To Dr. Manuel P. Limjuco, Jr., Division Senior High School Coordinator,


for the support and assistance extended to the participants which made
the training meaningful and successful.

To my TM Trainers, Lilian C. Garces, Master Teacher I and


Julian T. Salao, for extending and sharing their expertise in the
discipline that helped me to become more empowered and
knowledgeable in this line of work.

To Mr. Victorio A. Beltran, principal of San Francisco National


High School for the consent and opportunity to grow and develop
professionally by enrolling to this Teaching Methodology.

To my family, for their unwavering moral and financial


support which is translated into an inspiration in order to pursue
this undertaking.

To my colleagues and friends, for their unending


encouragement and motivation that propel the author to
accomplish this educational journey.

Above all, overflowing gratitude is offered to our Almighty


God for the gift of wisdom and guidance in making this portfolio
successful.

My success is yours!

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 14 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
HOW TO USE THIS COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING
MATERIAL

Welcome!

The unit of competency, “Weld Carbon Steel Plates”, is one of the


competencies of the SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING NCII, a course
which comprises the knowledge, skills, creativity and attitudes required to
develop welder to possess.

This module contains training materials and activities related to basic


welding skills specifically Weld Carbon Steel Plates using SMAW.
In this module, you are required to go through series of learning
activities in order to complete each learning outcome. In each learning
outcome are Information Sheets, Self-Checks, And Tack Sheets. Follow and
perform the activities on your own. If you have questions, do not hesitate to
ask assistance form your trainer.

Remember to:
 Read information sheets and compete the self-checks.
Suggested references are included to supplement the materials
provided in this module.
 Perform the task until you are confident that your outputs
conform to the performance criteria checklist that follows the
sheets.
 Submit output of the task sheets to your trainer for evaluation
recording in the accomplishment chart. Outputs shall serve as
your portfolio during the Institutional Competency Evaluation.
When you feel confident that you have sufficient practice, ask
your trainer to evaluate you. The results of your assessment will
be recorder in your Progress Chart and Accomplishment Chart.
You must pass the Institutional Competency Evaluation for this
competency before moving to another competency.
Date Developed: Document No. 00
February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 15 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
You need to complete this module before you can perform the
module on Weld Carbon Steel Plates.

SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING NCII


COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING MATERIALS

List of Competencies

No. Unit of Competency Module Title Code

Weld Carbon Steel Welding Carbon Steel


1.
Plates using SMAW Plates Using SMAW

Weld Carbon Steel Weld Carbon Steel Pipes


2.
Pipes using SMAW using SMAW

3.

4.

5.

6.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 16 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT………………………………………………………………..i
HOW TO USE THIS COMPETENCY-BASED LEARNING MATERIAL……..ii
LIST OF COMPETENCIES……………………………………………………………iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS………………………………………………………………..iv
MODULE CONTENT……………………………………………………………………1
LEARNING OUTCOME #
PERFORM ROOT PASS……………………………..………………………..………2
ESSENTIALS OF WELDING………………………………………………………….4
SELF CHECK 1.1-1……………………………………………………………………..9
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….10
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT…………………………………………11
SELF CHECK 1.1-2…………………………………………………………………….16
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….17
INTERNATIONAL WELDING CODES & STANDARDS………………………..18
SELF CHECK 1.1-3…………………………………………………………………….21
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….22
WELDING PROCEDURE SPECIFICATION………………………………………23
SELF CHECK 1.1-4…………………………………………………………………….27
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….28
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ADMINISTRATION……………..29
SELF CHECK 1.1-5…………………………………………………………………….32
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….33
PERFORM ROOT PASS………………………………………………………………34
SELF CHECK 1.1-6…………………………………………………………………….52
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….53
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA CHECKLIST 1.1-6………………………………….54
WELD DEFECTS, CAUSES AND REMEDIES…………………………………..55
SELF CHECK 1.1-7…………………………………………………………………….62
ANSWERS KEY………………………………………………………………………….63
JOB SHEET 1.1-7………………………………………..…………………………….64

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 17 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
MODULE CONTENT

UNIT OF COMPETENCY: WELD CARBON STEEL PLATES

MODULE TITLE : WELDING CARBON STEEL PLATES

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 18 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
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MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
MODULE DESCRIPTOR: This module covers the skills, knowledge and
attitudes required in welding carbon steel plates and pipes using SMAW
process.

NOMINAL DURATION: 120 hrs.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:
At the end of this module you MUST be able to:
1. Perform root pass
2. Clean root pass
3. Weld subsequent/filling passes
4. Perform capping

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
1.1 Root pass is performed in accordance with WPS
And/or client specifications.
1.2 Task is performed in accordance with company or
Industry requirement and safety procedure.
1.3 Weld is visually checked for defects and repaired, as
Required
1.4 Weld is visually acceptable in accordance with
applicable codes and standards
2.1 Root pass is cleaned and free from defects and
discontinuities
2.2 Task is performed in accordance with approved WPS
3.1 Subsequent/ filling passes is performed in
accordance with approved WPS
3.2 Weld is visually checked for defects and repaired, as
required
3.3 Weld is visually acceptable in accordance with
applicable codes and standards
4.1 Capping is performed in accordance with WPS and/or
client specifications
4.2 Weld is visually checked for defects and repaired, as
required
4.3 Weld is visually acceptable in accordance with
applicable codes and standards

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 19 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
LEARNING OUTCOME NO. 1

Perform Root Pass

Assessment Contents Conditio Methodologi Assessment


Criteria n es Methods
1.1-1Essentials  Essentials Laptop, Discussion, Demonstrati
of welding of welding LCD Demonstrati on, written
 Practice of projector, on, test, Oral
1.1-2Practice of PPE Observation Questioning
PPE Welding
 Internationa
Suit
l Welding
1.1-3 Codes and Welding
International standards Gloves
Welding Codes  Occupation
and standards Chipping
al safety
Hammer
and Health
1.1-4 Welding Administrati Grinder
Procedure on (OS&HA)
Specification Safety
 Welding
Goggle
Procedure
1.1.-5 Specificatio Steel
Occupational n Brush
safety and  PPerform
Health Hack saw
Root Pass in
Administration 1G, 2G, 3G,Tongs,
(OS&HA) and 4G welding
machine(
1.1-6 Perform  WWeld
defects, AC or
Root Pass in
1G, 2G, 3G, causes and AC/DC)
and 4G remedies Carbon
Steel
1.1-7 Weld Plates
defects, causes
Electrode
and remedies
s

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 20 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
Learning Experiences
Learning Outcome #1
PERFORM ROOT PASS

Learning Activities Special Instructions


Participate in the group discussion on 1. Always wear personal protective
Information Sheet 1.1-1 Essentials of equipment for safety purpose.
Welding
Answer Self-Check 1.1-1 Essentials of
Welding 2. Always follow the instruction
Compare answers on the answers key according to your Task Sheet.
1.1-1

Listen and Participate in the 3. Always apply the 5A’s principles


discussion of your teacher on in welding.
information sheet 1.1-2 Practice of 4. Apply Welding Procedure
Using PPE Specification.
Answer self-check 1.1-2
Compare answer with answers key
Listen and participate in the
discussion of your teacher on
information Sheet
1.1-3 International Welding Codes
and Standards
Answer Self Check 1.1-3
Refer answers on the answers key
Listen and participate in the
discussion of your teacher on
information Sheet 1.1-4 Welding
Procedure Specification

Answer Self Check 1.1-4


Compare answer with answers key
Listen to the trainer’s discussion on
Information Sheet 1.1-5 Occupational
Safety and Health Administration
(OS&HA)
Answer Self Check 1.1-5

Compare answers on the answers key

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 21 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
Listen and participate in the
discussion of your teacher on
information Sheet 1.1-6 Perform Root
Pass in 1G,2G,3G and 4G

Answer Self Check 1.1-6


Compare answer with answers key
Read Information Sheet 1.1-7 Weld
defects, causes and remedies

Answer Self Check 1.1-7

Compare answers on the answers key

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 22 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
Information Sheet 1.1-1
ESSENTIALS OF WELDING

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:

1. Identify essentials of welding;

2. Recognize the effects of the essentials of welding;

3. Appreciate essentials of welding.

Introduction:

Shielded Metal Arc Welding, otherwise known as manual metal arc


welding or flux shielded arc welding, is a process that uses a flux-coated
electrode to form the weld. As electricity passes through the electrode, the
flux forms a gas, which shields the electric arc in the space between the
electrode and the metal being welded, preventing contamination from
atmospheric gasses in the weld.

To meet the standards in welding, the following are essentials of


welding that needs to consider:

 Current Setting
 Angle of Electrode
 Length of Arc
 Manipulation of Electrode
 Speed of Travel

CURRENT SETTING

Current is measured in amperes, or amps. Each type of electrode has


recommended amperage ranges for optimum performance. Amperage ranges
are usually specified in the welding procedure or in the manufacturers’ data
sheets.

Amperage too high – The weld bead is wide and flat with excessive
penetration and spatter, and undercutting frequently occurs along the
toes

Amperage too low -The weld bead will be irregular with a crowned
appearance and insufficient penetration

The chart below shows typical amperage ranges.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 23 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
Length of Arc

Arc length is the distance from the tip of the electrode core wire to the
weld puddle. The correct arc length varies according to the electrode
classification, diameter and composition of the flux coating, as well as the
amperage and welding position. As a rule, when amperage is set within the
specified range, arc length should not exceed the diameter of the core wire.
Increasing the arc length increases the arc voltage and reduces the
amperage slightly.

If the arc is too long, the metal core melts off in large globules that
wobble from side to side and drop onto the work as spatter, rather than
forming useful weld metal. The weld bead is wide with excessive spatter and
undercut. The base metal is not properly melted, so the weld metal is
deposited on top of the plate with incomplete penetration, and slag
inclusions will probably occur. Long arcing is often used to preheat the base
metal directly after striking the arc.

Shortening the arc length reduces the arc voltage and increases the
amperage slightly. If the arc length is too short, the arc tends to short out
and the electrode freezes to the work.

Angle of Electrode

There are two torch angles to


remember when welding. The first is the
work angle, which is the relationship
between the joint and the torch (or rod).
Hold your torch perpendicular, or 90
degrees, to the joint. The big exception to
the rule is T-joints, where the work angle
varies between 30 to 50 degrees. The
second angle used in welding is the travel
angle. This is the relationship between
the torch and line of travel. To see the
joint and puddle, the welder may tip the
rod up to 10 degrees in the direction of
travel, or sometimes against the direction
of travel.
Date Developed: Document No. 00
February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 24 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
As you can see in the first diagram, the angle of the torch to the work
piece (left) is 90 degrees, allowing maximum heat and current focused down
into the open groove butt joint. In the diagram on the right, the travel angle
shows a 5-10-degree tilt along the joint. This gives the welder a better view
of what's going on in the puddle. When you drag your torch or electrode, the
tilt is directed towards the puddle, which helps with penetration and
achieving a thick bead. When you push, the tilt is away from the puddle,
which limits penetration and heat going into the base metal.

Manipulation of Electrode

This refers to the movement of the


welder's hand as he or she guides the
electrode along the joint. Achieving tie-in
at the toes is paramount, but it's also
important to control penetration and
heat. As described in Types of Beads, a
weave, whip, drag or push motion are all
examples of manipulation.

Speed of Travel

Travel speed is the rate at which the electrode moves along the work.
The key to correct travel speed is “reading” the weld puddle because the
weld puddle is a liquid version of the weld bead. A properly formed weld
bead has an oval shape with an oval crater and uniform ripple pattern.
Travel speed is influenced by the type of welding current (DCEN, DCEP or
AC), amperage, welding position, electrode melt rate, material thickness,
surface condition of the base metal, type of joint, joint fit up and electrode
manipulation.

If you travel too fast, the puddle cools too quickly trapping gasses and
slag. The ripples are pointed and narrow with irregular penetration and
undercut along the toes.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 25 of 61
WELDING CARBON STEEL NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
If you travel too slowly, the weld metal piles up forming a high, wide
weld-bead with too much reinforcement that may result in overlap. So, read
the puddle, and keep the arc on the leading edge.

The following are the impact of essentials of welding

There are other factors that need to be understood before welding. The
following are:

i. Selecting Electrode
ii. Joint plates

SELECTING ELECTRODE

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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The electrodes are classified by a letter and numbering system as
follows:

Plate and Joint Preparation

 Joints should be free from


rust, paints, grease, and
other foreign materials prior
to fit up or tacking.
 Alignment of work piece is
checked in accordance with
welding standard.
 Included angle is checked in
accordance with Welding
Procedure Specification.
 Tack welding is performed in
accordance with welding
procedure requirement.

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Self- Check 1.1-1
ESSENTIALS OF WELDING

ESSAY
1. Explain the following
a. Current setting
b. Length of arc
c. Angle of electrode
d. Manipulation of electrode
e. Speed of travel

ANSWERS KEY 1.1-1


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ESSENTIALS OF WELDING

ESSAY
1. Explain the following
a. Current setting

Current setting is the current on amperes being used or


applied during welding

b. Length of arc
Arc length is the distance from the tip of the electrode
core wire to the weld puddle.
c. Angle of electrode
This is the tilt of the electrode by work and travel.
d. Manipulation of electrode
The movement or control of the hand of the welder
while welding to crate weld.
e. Speed of travel
The speed of dragging or move of the electrode
during welding

INFORMATION SHEET 1.1-2


PRACTICE OF USING PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Date Developed: Document No. 00
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Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:

1. Identify the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE);


2. Enumerate the PPE.

Introduction:

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) includes all type of equipment used to


increase individual safety while performing potentially hazardous tasks. This
may include safety glasses, hard hats, gloves, leather jackets, respirators, or
any equipment used to protect against injury or illness.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT


Goggles - To protect from slag, sparks and intense light.

Welding mask / head shield -To prevent flying object to your face and hair
like flux or spatter. Safety glasses or some other approve from eye.
Protection should be worn when welding or cutting.

Respirator -A respirator is a device which is fitted over the face to remove


contaminants from the air being breathe.

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Leather Apron – To protect against heat, fire and burns.

Leather jacket – To protect hot objects.

Over all suits – To protect body from arc, hot falling materials or heavy dirty
works during welding.

Safety shoes - To protect feet from hot objects, flux or spatter.

Welding gloves – To prevent hot objects, slag or spatters from coming


contact with the skin.
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Ear plug -Use to protect our ear from noise area.

Self- Check 1.1-2


SAFE WELDING PRACTICES

Matching Type: Match the picture to its corresponding usage


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A. Use to protect our ear from
1. ___ noise area.

B. To prevent hot objects, slag or


spatters from coming contact
with the skin.
C. To protect feet from hot
objects, flux or spatter.
1. ___
D. To protect body from arc, hot
falling materials or heavy
dirty works during welding.
E. To protect hot objects.

2. ___
F. To protect against heat, fire
and burns.

G. a device which is fitted over


the face to remove
3. ___ contaminants from the air
being breathe.
H. To prevent flying object to
your face and hair like flux
or spatter. Safety glasses or
some other approve from
eye. Protection should be
worn when
4. ___
I. To protect from slag, sparks
and intense light.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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ANSWERS KEY 1.1-2
SAFE WELDING PRACTICES

1. I
2. H
3. G
4. F
5. D

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Information Sheet 1.1-4
WELDING PROCEDURE SPECIFICATION

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Identify Welding Procedure Specification;
2. Appreciate Welding Procedure Specification.

A Welding Procedure Specification (WPS) is the formal written


document describing welding procedures, which provides direction to
the welder or welding operators for making sound and quality
production welds as per the code requirements. WPS is supported by
a Procedure Qualification Record (PQR or WPQR).

What is the Welding Procedure Specification (WPS)?

This article provides information about welding procedure specification(WPS)


based on the requirement of ASME Code Section IX. The code defines it as
"A WPS is a written qualified welding procedure prepared to provide
direction for making production welds to Code requirements".

The WPS may be used to provide direction to the welder or welding operator
to meet the code requirement. The WPS should include
all essential, nonessentialand supplementary essential variables i.e. joint
design, base material, filler metal, position, preheat and post weld heat
treatment, gas composition, electrical characteristic, etc.. These variables
have been provided in the article II QW-250 thru QW-280 of ASME Code
Section IX.

Who Should Write the Welding Procedure Specification?

A welding engineer or any knowledgeable and competent person in the


welding metallurgy with appropriate experience can write a WPS.

How to write a WPS?

There is the standard form for the WPS in ASME Code Section IX (Form QW-
482). This form can be copied and used. The welding engineer may use
different sources such as welding handbook etc. Each field in this form
must be completed. This WPS is written with the knowledgeable persons but
still we need to proof the written WPS produce a weld with desired
mechanical property.

The written welding procedure specification must be qualified by mechanical


testing that is called procedure qualification record (PQR).

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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The WPS specifies ranges, and when you need to use related WPS out of the
specified ranges, you need to revise your WPS and re-qualify it.

There are many grouping systems in ASME Code Section IX in purpose to


reduce the number of WPS's and PQR's. These groupings are P numbers, A
numbers, F numbers. These numberings are grouping similar material or
filler metal with specific characteristics and cause to reduce the number of
WPS's. This grouping reduces the costs.

The ranges indicated in the article IV ASME Code Section IX. The article IV
should not be read directly; you should refer to specified paragraph when
referred in the QW-250 thru 280 for the ranges. The article IV in ASME Code
Section IX formed from hundreds of paragraphs which are not related to
each other and each paragraph numbered and must be read when referred
from other places in the code.

For example, in SMAW (QW-253), for thickness range, it refers you to the
Article IV paragraph 403.8, you can find thickness range in this paragraph.
It will refer you to another table that you can obtain thickness range based
on your test coupon thickness.

Guide reading welding procedure Specification WPS (Welding procedure


Specification)

I. Introduction - Purpose - requirements:

- Welding Procedure Specifications is table work instructions to perform 1


weld of fabrication prescribed. To make a weld meet the specifications, the
welder must know, understand and comply with technical welding
processes.

- This document is intended to provide guidance for welders to understand


and comply with the welding process, avoid technical errors, minimize
welding defects, limiting bending deformation, understand correct welding
method applied in accordance with process, material type, thickness,
diameter, requirements for heating, gas welding, welding medicine, welding
rod type, current, welding speed, oscillation welding, electricity connection,
dimensional electrodes, weld assembly ...

- Support QC Welding, weld Formen, welding engineers monitor the


production process and quality correct.
Welding processes - technical parameters:

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Date Developed: Document No. 00
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Date Developed: Document No. 00
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Self-Check 1.1-4
WEDLING PROCEDURE SPECIFICATION

ESSAY:

1. WHAT IS WELDING PROCEDURE SPECIFICATION?

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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ANSWER KEY 1.1-4
WEDLING PROCEDURE SPECIFICATION

1. A Welding Procedure Specification (WPS) is the formal written


document describing welding procedures, which provides direction to
the welder or welding operators for making sound and quality
production welds as per the code requirements. WPS is supported by
a Procedure Qualification Record (PQR or WPQR).

Information Sheet 1.1-5


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OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:
1. Identify purpose of OSHA
2. Determine the limits of work of a welder

OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has


standards that cover many aspects of welding work, including welding
safety, welding in confined spaces, handling of compressed gases, fire and
electrical safety, ventilation, protective equipment and worker training. The
following is a summary of some of the regulations that can apply to welders.
INSIST ON SAFE WORKING CONDITIONS BEFORE YOU WELD!

Workplace Exposure Limits

There is no OSHA standard for total welding smoke, but OSHA does
set standards for individual components of welding smoke. Local exhaust or
general ventilation must be provided to keep your exposure to toxic fumes,
gases, or dusts below the OSHA permissible exposure limit.

However, NIOSH has concluded that welders can be harmed by


welding smoke even when the concentrations of the individual components
are well below OSHA permissible exposure limits. NIOSH recommends that
welding emissions be reduced to the lowest feasible concentrations using
state-of-the-art engineering controls and work practices

Labels and Other Information

Under OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200,


also known as the “Right to Know Law"), all containers of filler metal,
electrodes, and flux materials should carry warning labels alerting the
welder that welding produces hazardous fumes and gases. Base metals that
contain, or are coated with, toxic materials (such as paints, lead, or
mercury) should also be clearly labeled. Welding materials that contain
carcinogens (cancer-causing agents) must carry a warning label stating that
gases from the material may cause cancer.

The employer must also keep Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) for
all hazardous materials and make this information readily available to all
exposed workers. The MSDS must contain information on chemical
ingredients, hazardous decomposition products from welding, safe handling
procedures, protective measures, first aid procedures and health effects of
the welding material.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Signs

OSHA’s standard for signs and tags (29 CFR 1910.145) requires that
signs be used to warn workers of hazards that may lead to accidental injury.
Signs should be posted in welding areas to warn workers of exposure
hazards and serve as a reminder for the need for protective equipment.
Signs should also notify all workers in the area that eye injury may occur
from looking at the welding arc.

OSHA’s Welding Standard

Specific requirements for assuring the safety of welding, cutting, and


brazing operations are covered under OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.252.
Below are some selected requirements of the standard:

•Compressed gas cylinders must be kept away from radiators and


other heat sources and stored upright in a well-ventilated, dry location
at least 20 feet from highly combustible materials such as oil.
Cylinders should be kept away from elevators, stairs, or other spaces
where they can be knocked over or damaged.

•Piping systems must be tested and proved gastight at 1 1/2 times the
maximum operating pressure and shall be thoroughly purged with air
before being placed in service. Service piping systems must be
protected by pressure relief devices.

•Hoses showing leaks, burns, worn places, or other defects must be


repaired or replaced.

•Cutters and welders must be suitably trained in the safe operation of


their equipment and the safe use of the process.

•The welder should be enclosed in an individual booth, or by non-


combustible screens, that are painted with a finish of low reflectivity
such as zinc oxide or lamp black (to absorb ultraviolet radiation).
People next to the welding area must be protected by noncombustible
or flameproof screens or be required to wear appropriate goggles. The
booths or screens should permit circulation of air at the floor level.

•All movable fire hazards near welding operations must be taken to a


safe place. If all the fire hazards cannot be moved, guards must be
used to contain the heat, sparks, and slag.

•Suitable fire extinguishing equipment must be maintained and ready


for instant use.

•Fire watchers are required whenever welding or cutting is performed


in a location where other than a minor fire might develop. A fire watch
must be maintained for at least 1/2 hour after completion of welding
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or cutting operations to detect and extinguish possible smoldering
fires.

•No welding, cutting, or other hot work shall be performed on used


drums, barrels, tanks, or other containers until they have been
thoroughly cleaned (a purge with an inert gas is also recommended).

•Eye protection with the proper shade number must be used during
all arc welding or arc cutting operations, gas welding, oxygen cutting,
resistance welding, or brazing operations.

•When a welder must enter a confined space through a manhole or


other small opening an attendant with a pre-planned rescue
procedure must be stationed outside to observe the welder always and
to put the rescue operation into effect, if necessary.

•Special ventilation and/or respirators are required in confined


spaces, for cleaning compounds, when fluorine compounds, zinc, lead,
beryllium, cadmium, and mercury are encountered, and when cutting
stainless steel.

•Warning labels are required for all filler metals, brazing filler metals
containing cadmium, and fluxes containing fluorine compounds
(fluorides)

Self- Check 1.1-5


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OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Essay
1. What is the purpose of OSHA?

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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ANSWER KEY 1.1-5
OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

1. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has standards


that cover many aspects of welding work, including welding safety,
welding in confined spaces, handling of compressed gases, fire and
electrical safety, ventilation, protective equipment and worker training.

Information Sheet 1.1-3


Date Developed: Document No. 00
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INTERNATIONAL WELDING CODES AND STANDARDS

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:

1. Identify the sources of welding codes and standards.

2. Recognize welding codes and standards

Many aspects of the design and fabrication of welded components are


governed by documents known as codes and standards. Other names used
for such documents include guides, recommended practices, regulations,
rules, and specifications. These documents are often specified by an end
user/purchaser as a contractual agreement to control the characteristics of
the welded fabrication that may affect its service requirements. They are also
used by the manufacturer to assist in the development and implementation
of their welding quality system. The welding inspector should be aware of
what standards are applicable within their jurisdiction, understand the
requirements of the relevant documents and perform their inspection
accordingly.

Content: Welding Codes and Standards

The Scope and General Requirements. This is found at the


beginning of the documents and provide a description as to the type and
extent of welding fabrication for which the document was developed and
intended to be used. It provides information relating to the limitations for
the use of the document. Care should be taken to use cedes and standards
that are applicable for your application.

Design. The secondary source of information that contains minimum


requirements for the design of specific welded connections.

Qualification. The outline the requirements for testing of welding


procedure specifications (WPS) and those requirements for qualification of
welding personnel. It provides essential variables typically the welding
process, type and thickness of base metal, filler metal type, electrical
parameters, joint design, welding position, and others. This also provides
the qualification of testing requirements.

Fabrication. Provide information associated with the fabrication


methods and/or workmanship standards. It contains information and
requirements on items as base materials, welding consumable classification
requirements, shielding gas quality, heat treatment requirements,
preparation and care of base metal, and other welding fabrication
requirements.

Inspection. Address the welding inspector’s qualification


requirements relating to procedures for nondestructive testing.
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Sources of Codes and Standards of Interest to the Welding Industry

1. American Welding Society

The largest producer of welding codes and standards in the USA. The
AWS publishes many documents addressing the use and quality control of
welding. These documents include such general subjects as Welding
Definitions and Symbols, Classification of Filler Metals, Qualification and
Testing, Welding Processes, Welding Applications, and Safety.

 AWS D1.1 fabricating and erecting welded steel structures.


 AWS D1.2 Structural Welding Code-Aluminum.
 AWS D1.3 Structural Welding Code-Sheet Steel.
 AWS D1.4 Structural Welding Code-Reinforcing Steel.
 AWS D1.5 Bridge Welding Code.
 AWS D1.6 Structural Welding Code-Stainless Steel.
 AWS D3.5-93R Steel Hull Welding.
 AWS D3.6M Specification for Under-Water Welding.
 AWS D3.7 Guide for Aluminum Hull Welding.
 AWS D8.8-97 Automotive and Light Truck Weld Quality: Arc
Welding.
 AWS D14.1 Welding Earth Moving and Construction Equipment.
 AWS D14.5 Welding Presses and Press Components.

2. American Society of Mechanical Engineers

This society is responsible for the developments of the Boiler and


Pressure Vessel Code, which contains eleven sections and covers the design,
construction, and inspection of boilers and pressure vessels. ASME also
produces Code of Pressure Piping, which consists of seven sections. Each
section prescribes the minimum requirements for the design, materials,
fabrication, erection, testing and inspection of a piping system. Both
documents are American National Standards.

 ASME Section I Requirements for Power boilers.


 ASME Section II Material Specifications-4 Subparts(A,B,C,D).
 ASME Section III Nuclear
 ASME Section IV Rules For Construction of Heating
 ASME Section V Non-Destructive Examination.
 ASME Section VI Care and Operation of Heating Boilers.
 ASME Section VII Care of Power Boilers
 ASME Section VIII Pressure Vessel and Tank Code
 ASME Section IX Welding and Brazing Qualifications.
 ASME Section X Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Pressure Vessels.
 ASME Section XI In-service Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant
Components.
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 ASME B31.1 Power Piping-This Code
 ASME B31.2 Fuel Gas Piping-Material
 ASME B31.3 Process Piping
 ASME B31.4 Liquid Transportation Systems for Hydrocarbons, Liquid
Petroleum Gas, Anhydrous Ammonia, and Alcohol.
 ASME B31.5 Piping Refrigeration
 ASME B31.8 Gas Transmission and Distribution
 ASME B31.9 Building Services Piping
 ASME B31.11 Slurry Transportation Piping Systems

3. American Petroleum Institute

This institute publishes many documents relating to petroleum


production, several which include welding requirements.

 API 570 Piping Inspection Code


 API 620 Design and Construction of Large, Welded, Low Pressure
Tanks.
 API 650 Welded Steel Tanks for Oil Storage.
 API 653 Tank Inspection, Repair, Alteration, and Reconstruction.
 API 1104 Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Self- Check 1.1-3

INTERNATIONAL WELDING CODES AND STANDARDS

A. Enumeration:
1. What are the content and requirement of a welding code or
standard?
2. What are the sources of welding codes and standards?

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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ANSWERS KEY 1.1-3
INTERNATIONAL WELDING CODES AND STANDARDS
ENUMERATION:

1. Content: Welding Codes and Standards


 The Scope and General Requirements.
 Design
 Qualification.
 Fabrication
 Inspection.

2. Sources of Welding Codes and Standards


 American Welding Society
 American Society of Mechanical Engineers
 American Petroleum Institute

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Information Sheet 1.1-6
PERFORM ROOT PASS

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:

1. Identify the concept and procedures in welding carbon steel plates in


positions (1G, 2G, 3G and 4G)
2. Recognize Weld carbon steel plates according to the task sheet given.

INTRODUCTION:

Welding is a common process for joining metals using a large variety of


applications. Welding occurs in several locations, from outdoors settings on
rural farms and construction sites to inside locations, such as factories and job
shops. Welding processes are fairly simple to understand, and basic techniques
can be learned quickly. Welding is the joining of metals at a molecular level. A
weld is a homogeneous bond between two or more pieces of metal, where the
strength of the welded joint exceeds the strength of the base pieces of metal.
At the simplest level, welding involves the use of four components: the metals, a
heat source, filler metal, and some kind of shield from the air. The metals are
heated to their melting point while being shielded from the air, and then a filler
metal is added to the heated area to produce a single piece of metal. It can be
performed with or without filler metal and with or without pressure.

Common Terms

There is a large vocabulary of specific welding terms. Knowing these terms is


essential to learning about welding as well as understanding how to weld.

Arc Burn
Arc burn is a metallurgical notch caused by ground clamps or striking
an arc on the base metal at any point other than the weld groove or
immediate area that will be covered with the weld cap.

Base Metal
The base metal is the metal that is to be welded or cut. It is commonly
referred to as the work piece.

Butt Weld
A butt weld is a joint between two work pieces that are aligned on the
same plane.

Cover Pass

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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The cover pass finishes the welded joint. It is higher than the adjacent
surface and overlaps the groove.

Filler Pass
The filler pass follows the hot pass and fills the weld groove flush, or
almost flush, with the surface of the workpieces.

Fillet Weld
A fillet weld is the joining of two workpieces with triangular cross-
sections at approximately 90 degrees.

Heat-Affected Zone
The heat-affected zone is the area of metal near the weld metal that
was not melted during welding, but did experience changes in its
mechanical properties and/or microstructure due to the heat applied.

Hot Pass
The hot pass is the pass immediately following the stringer pass.

Joint
The hot pass is the pass immediately following the stringer pass.

Plug Weld
Plug welding is filling a hole or gap in one piece with weld or filling a
hole and attaching the piece with the hole to the surface of another
base piece.

Polarity
Polarity is the manner in which the electrode holder and workpiece
connect to the electrical supply. This can be either direct current
electrode negative, or DCEN, meaning straight polarity or direct
current electrode positive, or DCEP, meaning reverse polarity.

Spot Weld
Spot welding is the process in which the weld pieces are pressed
together with pressure, then a current is passed through them in a
small spot and the two pieces are melted together at that location.
Spot welding can be performed on metals from 0.5 to 3 mm.

Stringer or Root Bead


The stringer pass, or root bead, is the first pass in the weld. It is
typically made without any weaving motion.

Weld Groove
Weld groove refers to a V- or U-shaped groove created by the
beveling of the work piece edges that will be joined.

Weld Metal
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The weld metal is the portion of the base metal that is melted during
the welding process.

Weld Pass
A weld pass is a single progression of welding along the joint. After a
complete pass, it is referred to as a weld bead.

Welding Electrode
In arc welding, the electrode is used to pass current through the
workpiece to fuse the two pieces together.

Types of Weld Joints

There are five common types of weld joints used in all types of welding:
corner joints, edge joints, lap joints, tee joints, and butt joints.

Corner Joint – When two pieces are perpendicular to each other and one
piece’s edge meets the end of the other piece’s surface, it is referred to as a
corner joint. Common corner joints are edge to edge, flush corner, and half
overlap, each with their own benefits.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Edge Joint – An edge joint is when two edges of weld pieces are adjacent and
in parallel planes with each other. The weld does not penetrate completely
through the joint thickness so it should not be used in high stress or
pressure situations.

Lap Joint – A lap joint in welding occurs when a bead is made on the surface
of one workpiece and the edge of the other piece. It should be performed
with no gap between the two pieces.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Tee Joint – The edge of one workpiece meeting the surface of the other
workpiece with material on both sides of the edge is called a tee joint.

Butt Joints – When two workpieces are aligned on the same plane and
joined by a weld along their edges, it is called a butt joint. They are used
where high strength is required because they are reliable and can withstand
stress better than any other type of weld.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Welding Symbols

Welding can be performed in thousands of combinations regarding position,


welding type, welding dimensions, and many other varying components of
welding.
Due to its diverse nature and the precise needs of the industrial world, a
complex collection of symbols has been created to dictate exact weld details.
This allows designers to precisely indicate the type, style, and other details
of a weld using a symbol on a print for the piece being manufactured or
otherwise altered.
The joint is the basis of reference for welding symbols. It has an arrow
pointing to it and connects to the reference line. Including the arrow, there
are eight elements of a welding symbol, explained below:

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Reference Line – The reference line is used to designate the type of weld,
weld location, size of the weld, extent of the weld, contour of the weld, and
many other pieces of vital information.

Arrow and Other Side – All welded joint symbols have an arrow and other
side, which is opposite the arrow side and used to indicate the location of
the weld with respect to the joint.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Weld Symbols – Weld symbols, as opposed to welding symbols, indicate the
desired type of weld.

Dimensions and Other Data – This information provides the details


regarding the size of the weld and any other data needed to find the proper
weld size.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Supplementary Symbols – Supplementary symbols give information on
whether the weld is a “weld all around” or a “field weld.” It also indicates the
desired contour of the weld.

Finish Symbols – The finish symbol dictates how the weld should be shaped
or ground after the completion of the weld.

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Tail – The tail of the symbol is used to designate the process by which the
metals will be welded. It is also used to indicate the welding specifications,
process, and other supplementary information regarding the weld.

Specifications, Process, or Other Information – The process of the weld


includes details such as the type of filler rod, whether root chipping is
required, and other pertinent data. There are letter designations for each
type of welding process that can be performed.
FOUR (4) WELDING POSITION

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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4 types which are Flat position, Horizontal position, Vertical position and overhead position.
Now let us discuss these positions in details for clarity.

1. Flat position: Flat: It is easiest and convenient type of weld to be


performed. Let us suppose that we want to weld two plates. In this position
the both plates and the axis of the weld are horizontal. This position is
sometimes called down hand. For fillet weld it is named as 1F (1 means the
flat position and F means the fillet weld) and for Groove weld it is named as
1G ( 1 means the Flat welding and G means the groove weld). In Flat
position gravity draws molten metal downward in joint which makes the
joint easy and quick.

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2. Horizontal: In this position the plates are vertical and the axis of the
weld is horizontal. It is difficult than flat joint because the molten metal flow
down to lower plate. It is named as 2G for groove weld( 2 stands for
horizontal and G stands for groove weld) and 2F for fillet weld ( 2 stands
Horizontal position and F stands for Fillet weld).

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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3. Vertical: In this position the plates and welds axis both are vertical.
Positions are named as 3F ( 3 for Vertical and F for fillet welds) and 3G ( 3
refers as vertical position and G for Groove weld)

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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4. Overhead: Most difficult and complicated to be performed than the above
said positions. It is named as 4G ( 4 means overhead and G for groove weld
And 4F (4 means overhead and F represents Fillet weld). In this position the
face of the weld is overhead.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Electrode

Shielding Gas

Slag Weld Puddle


Arc
Solidified Weld Metal

To begin the SMAW Process, you must first strike an arc. This can be
done using one of the following techniques:
STRIKING AN ARC
SCRATCH START - Scratch the electrode on the base metal like a match.
1. Electrode
2. Work piece
3. Arc
Drag electrode across work piece
like striking a match, immediately
lift electrode slightly after touching
work. If arc goes out, electrode was
lifted too high. If electrode sticks to
the work piece, use a quick twist to
free it.
TAP START TECHNIQUE - Tap the rod against the base metal
1. Electrode
2. Workpiece
3. Arc
Bring electrode straight down
to work piece; then lift slightly to
start arc. If arc goes out, electrode
was lifted too high. If electrode
sticks to work piece, use a quick
twist to free it.

RESTARTING A BEAD

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1. Strike Arc Here
2. Move Electrode to Crown
of Crater
3. Resume Forward Travel

FILLING THE CRATER


At the end of the weld, the
operator breaks the arc
which creates a ‘crater’
Use a short pause or
slight back step at the end
of the weld to fill the
crater
Large craters can cause
weld cracking.

Back stepping is a
short move in the
opposite direction of
weld travel

ELECTRODE MOVEMENT DURING WELDING


A single stringer bead is satisfactory for most narrow groove
weld joints; however, for wide groove
weld joints or bridging across gaps, a weave bead or multiple stringer beads
work better.
1. Stringer Bead − Steady Movement along Seam
2. Weave Bead − Side To Side Movement along Seam
3. Weave Patterns- Use weave patterns to cover a wide area in one pass of

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the electrode. Limit weave width to a maximum of 2-1/2 times diameter of
electrode.

WELD BEAD
A weld resulting from pass

Weave bead
stringer bead

TECHNIQUES
STRINGER: (drag) (whip)
WEAVE: Circles Crescent ZigZag Box Weave Double J

PROGRESSION (VERTICAL)
UP
-Deeper penetration
-Higher deposit rate
-Use 90 degree travel angle or slightly up
DOWN
-Faster (point to point)
-Less penetration for thin metal
-Less dilution
-Use steep drag angle
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Positioning Electrode Holder

After learning to start and hold an arc, practice running beads of weld metal
on flat plates using a full electrode. Hold the electrode nearly
perpendicular to the work, although tilting it ahead (in the direction of
travel) will be helpful. To produce the best results, hold a short arc, travel at
a uniform speed, and feed the electrode downward at a constant rate as it
melts

Self- Check 1.1-6


PERFORM ROOT PASS

Multiple Choice: Choose the best answer.

1. When two pieces are perpendicular to each other and one piece’s
meets the end of the other piece’s surface?
a. Corner Joint
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b. Butt Joint
c. Edge Joint
d. Lap joint
2. When two edges weld are adjacent and parallel planes with each
other?
a. Corner Joint
b. Butt Joint
c. Edge Joint
d. Lap joint
3. When a bead is made on the surface of one work piece and the edge of
the other piece?
a. Corner Joint
b. Butt Joint
c. Edge Joint
d. Lap joint
4. When to work pieces are aligned on the same plane and joined by a
weld along their edges?
a. Corner Joint
b. Butt Joint
c. Edge Joint
d. Lap joint
5. The edge of one work piece meeting the surface of the work piece with
material on both sides of the edges?
a. Corner Joint
b. Butt Joint
c. Edge Joint
d. Tee Joint

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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ANSWERS KEY 1.1-6
PERFORM ROOT PASS

Multiple Choice

1. A
2. C
3. D
4. B
5.D

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Date Developed: Document No. 00
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TASK SHEET 1.1-5

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Performance Criteria Checklist 1.1-5
PERFORM ROOT PASS
CRITERIA
YES NO
Did you….
1. Prepare all the PPE needed?
2. Prepare all the materials according to
Specifications?
3. Prepare all the tools and equipment needed for the job?
4. Inspect the tools and equipment before using it?
5. Observe safety practices while doing the job?
6. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
while doing the job?
7. Did you preset the plates for angular distortion?
8. Clamp the work piece in flat manner?

9. Start welding the plate from left to right if right handed


or right to left if left handed?
10. Select size of SMAW electrode, welding current as per
requirement?
11. Deposit the root pass welds by SMAW in 1G,2G,5G
and 6G positions adapting proper welding technique and
safety aspects?
12. Inspect the root pass welds by visual inspection and
correct defects if any?
13. Make single V groove welds on carbon steel plates by
SMAW in 1G, 2G, 3G and 4G position?
14. Identify and observe site policies and procedures in
regard to illness or accident?
15. Identify Personal Productive Equipment (PPE) and use
the same as per related working environment?
16. Setting up the tacked joint in specific position?
17. Maintain an arc length of 2mm to 3mm?
18. Always wear a clear eye glasses when chipping slog?
19. Clean the bead and inspect for any defects?
20. Deposit the remaining beads?
21. Clean the area after welding?

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Information Sheet 1.1-7
WELD DEFECTS, CAUSES AND REMEDIES

Learning Objectives:
After reading this INFORMATION SHEET, YOU MUST be able to:

1. Identify welding defects and its causes

2. Apply remedies

The defects in the weld can be defined as irregularities in the weld


metal produced due to incorrect welding parameters or wrong welding
procedures or wrong combination of filler metal and parent metal. It can
simply be defined as: “Defects introduced during welding beyond the
acceptance limit that can cause a weld to fail”. A defect does not allow the
finished joint to withstand the required strength (load).

WELDING DEFECTS, CAUSES AND REMEDIES

According to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)


welding defect causes are broken down into the following percentage: -
• 41% poor process conditions
• 32% operator error
• 12% wrong technique
• 10% incorrect consumables and
• 5% bad weld grooves

Classification of Welding Defects

External Welding Defects:

1. Weld Crack

2. Undercut

3. Spatter

4. Porosity

5. Overlap

6. Crater

Internal Welding Defects:


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1. Slag Inclusion

2. Incomplete Fusion

3. Necklace cracking

4. Incompletely filled groove or Incomplete penetration

EXTERNAL WELDING DEFECTS

1. Weld Crack

This is the most unwanted


defect of all the other welding
defects. Welding cracks can be
present at the surface, inside of the
weld material or at the heat affected
zones.

Crack can also appear at different temperatures:

Hot Crack – It is more prominent during crystallization of weld joints


where the temperature can rise more than 10,000-degree Celsius.

Cold Crack – This type of crack occurs at the end of the welding
process where the temperature is quite low. Sometimes cold crack is visible
several hours after welding or even after few days.

Causes Of Weld Crack:

1. Poor ductility of the given base metal.


2. The presence of residual stress can cause a crack on the weld
metal.
3. The rigidity of the joint which makes it difficult to expand or
contract the metals.
4. If there is high content on sulfur and carbon then also the cracks
may appear.
5. Using hydrogen as a shielding gas while welding ferrous materials.

Remedies for Weld crack:

1. Using appropriate materials may decrease the chances of crack.


2. Preheating the weld and reducing the cooling speed joint helps in
reducing crack.
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3. Reduce the gap between the weld joints by using reasonable weld
joints.
4. While welding releases the clamping force slowly which increases
fill to capacity of welding material.

2. Undercut

When the base of metal melts


away from the weld zone, then a
groove is formed in the shape of
a notch, then this type of defect
is known as Undercut. It reduces
the fatigue strength of the joint.

Causes of Undercut:

1. If the arc voltage is very high then this defect may occur.
2. If we use the wrong electrode or if the angle of the electrode is
wrong, then also the defect may form.
3. Using a large electrode is also not advisable.
4. High electrode speed is also one of the reasons for this defect.

Remedies for Undercut:

1. Reduce the arc length or lower the arc voltage.


2. Keep the electrode angle from 30 to 45 degrees with the standing
leg.
3. The diameter of the electrode should be small.
4. Reduce the travel speed of the electrode.

3. Spatter

When some metal drops are expelled


from the weld and remain stuck to the
surface, then this defect is known as
Spatter.

Causes of Spatter:

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1. High Welding current can cause this defect.
2. The longer the arc the more chances of getting this defect.
3. Incorrect polarity.
4. Improper gas shielded may also cause this defect.

Remedies for Spatter:

1. Reducing the arc length and welding current


2. Using the right polarity and according to the conditions of the
welding.
3. Increasing the plate angle and using proper gas shielding.

3. Porosity

Porosity in the condition in which the gas


or small bubbles gets trapped in the welded
zone.

Causes of Porosity:

1. It occurs when the electrode is not


coated properly.
2. Using a longer arc may also increase its
chances.
3. Increased welding currents.
4. Rust or oil on the welding surface.

Remedies for porosity:

1. Proper selection of the electrode.


2. Decreasing the welding current.
3. Using smaller arc and slowing the process to allow the gases to
escape.
4. Remove rust or oil from the surface and use a proper technique.

5. Overlap

When the weld face extends


beyond the weld toe, then this
defect occurs. In this condition
the weld metal rolls and forms
angle less than 90 degrees.

Causes of Overlap:

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1. Improper welding technique.
2. By using large electrodes this defect may occur.
3. High welding current

Remedies for Overlap:

1. Using a proper technique for welding.


2. Use small electrode.
3. Less welding current.

4. Crater

It occurs when the crater is not filled


before the arc is broken, which causes
the outer edges to cool faster than the
crater. This causes a stress and then
crack is formed.

Causes of the crater:

1. Incorrect torch angle.


2. Use of large electrode:
3. Improper welding technique

Remedies for crater:

1. Using a proper torch angle may reduce the stress on the metal
2. Using a small electrode may also decrease the crater.
3. Use a proper technique.

INTERNAL WELD DEFECTS

1. Slag Inclusion

If there is any slag in the weld, then it


affects the toughness and metal
weldability of the given material. This
decreases the structural performance of
the weld material. Slag is formed on the
surface of the weld or between the
welding turns.

Causes of Slag:

1. Slag is formed if the welding current density is very small, as it does


not provide the required amount of heat for melting the metal surface.
2. If the welding speed is too fast then also slag may occur.
3. If the edge of the weld surface is not cleaned properly then also slag
may form.
4. Improper welding angle and travel rate of welding rod.
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Remedies for Slag Inclusion:

1. Increase the current density


2. Adjust the welding speed so that the slag and weld pool do not mix
with each other.
3. Clean the weld edges and remove the slags of previous weld layers
4. Have a proper electrode angle and travel rate.

2. Incomplete Fusion

Incomplete fusion occurs when the


welder does not accurately weld
the material and the metal pre-
solidifies which leads to a gap
which is not filled with the molten
metal.

Causes of Incomplete fusion:

1. It occurs because of the low heat input.


2. When the weld pool is very large and runs ahead of the arc.
3. When the angle of the joint is too low.
4. Incorrect electrode and torch angle may also lead to incomplete
fusion.
5. Improper bead position.

Remedies for Incomplete Fusion:

1. Increasing the welding current and decreasing the travel speed


helps in removing the chances of incomplete fusion.
2. Reducing the deposition rate.
3. Increasing the joint angle.
4. Try to position the electrode and torch angle properly so that the
edges of the plate melt away.
5. Positioning the bead properly so that the sharp edges with other
beads can be avoided.

3. Necklace cracking

It occurs in the use of electron beam welding where the weld does not
penetrate properly. Therefore, the molten metal does not flow into the cavity
and results in a cracking known as “Necklace Cracking”.

Causes of Necklace Cracking:

1. Improper welding technique.


2. It occurs in materials such as nickel base alloys, stainless steel,
carbon steels and Tin alloys.
3. Using high speed of electron beam welding

Remedies for Necklace Cracking:


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1. Using a proper welding technique reduce the chances of necklace
cracking.
2. Using proper materials for welding.
3. Using a constant speed during the welding process.
4. Proper welding technique

4. Incompletely filled groove or Incomplete Penetration

These defects occur only in the butt


welds where the groove of the metal is
not filled completely. It is also called as
incomplete penetration defect.

Causes of an Incomplete filled groove are:

1. Less deposition of the weld metal


2. Use of improper size of the electrode
3. Improper welding technique

Remedies for Incomplete filled groove are:

1. More deposition of the weld metal.


2. Use a proper size of the electrode.
3. By using a proper welding technique.

Self- Check 1.1-7


WELD DEFECTS, CAUSES AND REMEDIES
A. Multiple Choice: Choose the best answer.
1. In the IIW Standards, what is the homogeneous weld or a weld with a
few small scattered gas cavities
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a. Black
b. Blue
c. Green
d. Brown
2. What defect when some metal drops are expelled from the weld and
remain stuck to the surface?
a. spatter
b. crack
c. burn through
d. incomplete Fusion
3. What weld defect reduces the fatigue strength of the joint.
a. Spatter
b. Crack
c. Undercut
d. Overlap
4. Which is not the cause of incomplete penetration?
a. Less deposition of the weld metal
b. Use of improper size of the electrode
c. Improper welding technique
d. Using high speed of electron beam welding
5. What occurs at the end of the welding process where the temperature
is quite low?
a. Cold crack
b. Hot crack
c. Spatter
d. Overlap
6. What occurs when occurs when the welder does not accurately weld
the material and the metal pre-solidifies which leads to a gap which is
not filled with the molten metal?
a. Incomplete Fusion
b. Cold Crack
c. Spatter
d. Overlap

B. Enumeration: What are should be the done in the presence of weld


defects?

ANSWERS KEY 1.1-7


WELD DEFECTS, CAUSES AND REMEDIES

A. Multiple Choice
1. A. black
Date Developed: Document No. 00
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MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
2. A. Spatter
3. C. Undercut
4. D. Using high speed of electron beam welding
5. A. Cold Crack
6. Incomplete Fusion

B. Enumeration: what should be done when welding defects are detected?


1. One should reject the items and put them temporarily on hold.
2. One should determine the cause and try to implement a corrective
action to avoid future reoccurrence.
3. An authorized professional should determine, if the defects are
repairable or not.
4. If yes, by which procedure. Standard procedures may be approved for
routine application.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
JOB SHEET 1.1-7

Title: PERFORM ROOT PASS

Performance Objective: Given the materials and equipment


needed, you should be able to weld carbon steel
plates in flat position following welding procedure
and safe welding practices.
Supplies/Materials: Mild steel plates 10 mm x 75 mm x 200 mm (2pcs)
Electrode: E6011, 3.2 mm diameter

Equipment : AC or DC Arc welding machine with accessories


Angle grinder with accessories
Chipping hammer
Tong
Welding positioner/table
Wire brush
Bench vise
PPE

Steps/Procedure:
1. Check the working area to make sure it is free of Flammable
materials and well ventilated and note the location of the nearest fire
extinguisher.
2. Place plate to bevel on cutting.
3. Secure plates in a vise one at a time, grind mill scale and slag from
all surface areas to be welded, and very careful to retain the 30 0 bevel
angle 8. Grind 1/16” to 1/8” root face along the entire length of the
thinnest part of the bevel on all plates.
4. Attach ground clamp to worktable or work piece.
5. Select correct polarity for electrode
6. Turn on machine.
7. Put on safety gear and adjust to correct amperage by running a few
8. test beads on a scrap metal.
9. Align two plates face down on the work table, using a 3/32” gap wire
to properly align and space them.
10. Tack both ends of the joint and remove gap wire.
11. Position the plates so that the joint is in position indicated in
specifications.
12. Place electrode in welding holder and adjust the correct electrode
angle
13. Start an arc and adjust electrode to correct arc length.
14. Make a puddle and immediately allow the key to form.
15. Whip the rod slightly forward to allow the key to solidify, then whip
the rod back to deposit more metal in the keyhole.
16. Make a tie-in at any point where the electrode is used up with the
following procedure:
a. Clean slag off the pass just completed with the chipping
hammer and a wire brush
b. GrindCBLMtheSMAW
root
NC II
pass Date
with
February a portable Issued
Developed:
2019 grinder, and feather
Document No. 00
by:
the
Page 83 of 61
end of the pass
WELDING CARBON STEEL
PLATES so that it
Date Revised:
becomes
February 2019 a
SAN
little thinner
FRANCISCO
near the
NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
- - - - - - - - - - - Developed
- - - by: --------
17.
NOTE:Restart the When
arc deepthe in keythe
hole is properly
groove
MARLOU formed,
at a point
L. BUENAFLOR noit# 00
allowsthan
more the filler
¼ “from
- - -metal
- - - to
- -completely
- - - - - -penetrate
- - - - - -the - -joint.
- Revision
-
the keyhole, and hold a long arc to heat that portion of the pass.
Performance Criteria Checklist 1.1-7
PERFORM ROOT PASS

CRITERIA
YES NO
Did you….
1. Prepare all the PPE needed?
2. Prepare all the materials according to
Specifications?
3. Prepare all the tools and equipment needed for the job?
4. Inspect the tools and equipment before using it?
5. Observe safety practices while doing the job?
6. Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
while doing the job?
7. Did you preset the plates for angular distortion?
8. Clamp the work piece in flat manner?

9. Start welding the plate from left to right if right handed


or right to left if left handed?
10. Select size of SMAW electrode, welding current as per
requirement?
11. Deposit the root pass welds by SMAW in 1G,2G,5G
and 6G positions adapting proper welding technique and
safety aspects?
12. Inspect the root pass welds by visual inspection and
correct defects if any?
13. Make single V groove welds on carbon steel plates by
SMAW in 1G, 2G, 3G and 4G position?
14. Identify and observe site policies and procedures in
regard to illness or accident?
15. Identify Personal Productive Equipment (PPE) and use
the same as per related working environment?
16. Setting up the tacked joint in specific position?
17. Maintain an arc length of 2mm to 3mm?
18. Always wear a clear eye glasses when chipping slog?
19. Clean the bead and inspect for any defects?
20. Deposit the remaining beads?
21. Clean the area after welding?

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
BIBLIOGRAPHY
SMAW NC II Training Regulations

K-12 SMAW NC I LMG9

K-12 Basic Education Program Learning Manuals

Public Technical-Vocational High Schools CBLM

K-12 BEC Junior High School TLE and Senior High School

Technical-Vocational-Livelihood Track Industrial Arts-

SMAW NC II Curriculum Guide

CBC-Shielded Metal Arc Welding NC II

http://weldguru.com/smawoperation/

http://www.esabna.com/us/en/education/blog/welding-codes-and-
standards.cfm

https://www.millerwelds.com/resources/article-library/five-steps-to-
improving-your-stick-welding-technique

https://www.millerwelds.com/resources/article-library/the-
ergonomics-of-welding-shop-design

https://www.scribd.com/presentation/270117607/Welding-Defects-
Causes-and-Remedies

Evidence Plan

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Competency
standard:
Unit of
competency:
Ways in which evidence will be collected:

Demonstration & Questioning


Observation & Questioning
[tick the column]

Third party Report

Portfolio

Written
The evidence must show that the trainee…













NOTE: *Critical aspects of competency

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
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TABLE OF SPECIFICATION

Objectives/C Application # of items/


Compreh
ontent Knowledge Synthesis % of test
ension
area/Topics

Learning 5% 5% 10%
Content 1 (2) (2) (4)

Learning 5% 5% 5% 5% 20%
Content 2 (2) (2) (2) (2) (8)

Learning 5% 5% 10% 10% 30%


Content 3 (2) (2) (4) (4) (12)

Learning 5% 5% 5 5% 20%
Content 4 (2) (2) (2) (2) (8)

Learning 5% 5% 5% 5% 20%
Content 5 (2) (2) (2) (2) (8)

25% 100%
25% 25% 25%
TOTAL (10) (40)
(10) (10) (10)

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Performance Test

Specific Instruction for the Candidate

Qualification

Unit of Competency

General Instruction:

Specific Instruction:

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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QUESTIONING TOOL
Satisfactory
Questions to probe the candidate’s underpinning knowledge respon
se
Extension/Reflection Questions Yes No
1.  
2.  
3.  
4.  
Safety Questions
5.  
6.  
7.  
8.  
Contingency Questions
9.  
10.  
11.  
12.  
Job Role/Environment Questions  
13.  
14.  
15.  
16.  
Rules and Regulations  
17.  
18.  
19.  
20.  
The candidate’s underpinning  Satisfactory  Not
knowledge was: Satisfactory

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Templates for Inventory of Training Resources
Resources for presenting instruction
 Print Resources As per TR As per Remarks
Inventory

 Non Print Resources As per TR As per Remarks


Inventory

Resources for Skills practice of Competency #1


______________________________
 Supplies and Materials As per TR As per Remarks
Inventory

 Tools As per TR As per Remarks


Inventory

 Equipment As per TR As per Remarks


Inventory

Note: In the remarks section, remarks may include for repair, for
replenishment, for reproduction, for maintenance etc.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Supervise
Work-Based
Learning

FORM 1.1 SELF-ASSESSMENT CHECK

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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INSTRUCTIONS: This Self-Check Instrument will give the trainer necessary
data or information which is essential in planning training
sessions. Please check the appropriate box of your answer
to the questions below.
CORE COMPETENCIES
CAN I…? YES NO
6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Note: In making the Self-Check for your Qualification, all required competencies
should be specified. It is therefore required of a Trainer to be well- versed
of the CBC or TR of the program qualification he is teaching.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Evidences/Proof of Current Competencies(Sample)

Form 1.2: Evidence of Current Competencies acquired related to


Job/Occupation

Current
Proof/Evidence Means of validating
competencies

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Identifying Training Gaps

From the accomplished Self-Assessment Check (Form 1.1) and the


evidences of current competencies (Form 1.2), the Trainer will be able to
identify what the training needs of the prospective trainee are.

Form 1.3 Summary of Current Competencies Versus Required


Competencies (Sample)

Required Units of Current Training


Competency/Learning Competencies Gaps/Requirements
Outcomes based on CBC
1.

Required Units of Current Training


Competency/Learning Competencies Gaps/Requirements
Outcomes based on CBC
2.

3.

4.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Using Form No.1.4, convert the Training Gaps into a Training Needs/
Requirements. Refer to the CBC in identifying the Module Title or Unit of
Competency of the training needs identified.

Form No. 1.4: Training Needs (Sample)

Module
Gaps Title/Module of Duration (hours)
Instruction

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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TRAINING PLAN

Qualification: ____________________________

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Date
Trainees’ Training Training Mode of Facilities/Tools and Assessment
Staff Venue and
Requirements Activity/Task Training Equipment Method
Time

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Date Developed: Document No. 00
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Revision # 00
Technical Education and Skills Development Authority
___(your institution)___

TRAINEE’S RECORD BOOK

Date Developed: Document No. 00


February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II

WELDING CARBON STEEL


Date Revised:
February 2019
Developed by:
SAN I.D.
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NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
Page 99 of 61

PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
Trainee’s No._______________

NAME: ___________________________________________________

QUALIFICATION: PLUMBING NC II_______

TRAINING DURATION :____________________________

TRAINER: __________________________________________________

Instructions:
This Trainees’ Record Book (TRB) is intended to serve as record of all accomplishment/task/activities while undergoing
training in the industry. It will eventually become evidence that can be submitted for portfolio assessment and for whatever
purpose it will serve you. It is therefore important that all its contents are viably entered by both the trainees and instructor.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Developed by:
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MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
The Trainees’ Record Book contains all the required competencies in your chosen qualification. All you have to do is to fill in
the column “Task Required” and “Date Accomplished” with all the activities in accordance with the training program and to be
taken up in the school and with the guidance of the instructor. The instructor will likewise indicate his/her remarks on the
“Instructors Remarks” column regarding the outcome of the task accomplished by the trainees. Be sure that the trainee will
personally accomplish the task and confirmed by the instructor.
It is of great importance that the content should be written legibly on ink. Avoid any corrections or erasures and maintain
the cleanliness of this record.
This will be collected by your trainer and submit the same to the Vocational Instruction Supervisor (VIS) and shall form part
of the permanent trainee’s document on file.

THANK YOU.

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Date Developed: Document No. 00
February 2019 Issued by:
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MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
NOTES:

__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
Date Developed: Document No. 00
February 2019 Issued by:
CBLM SMAW NC II Date Revised:
February 2019 SAN FRANCISCO Page 103 of 61
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Developed by:
PLATES
MARLOU L. BUENAFLOR
Revision # 00
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Unit of Competency: 1 PREPARE PIPES FOR INSTALLATION

NC Level I
Learning Task/Activity Date Supervisor’s
Outcome Required Accomplished Remarks
 Lay out Sept 1, 2017
measurements
 Cut pipe
within the
required
length and
according to
job
requirements
 Thread pipes
in accordance
with standard
thread
engagement

__________________ ___________________
Trainee’s Signature Supervisor’s Signature

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Unit of Competency: 2 PERFORM MINOR CONSTRUCTION WORKS

NC Level I
Learning Task/Activity Date Instructors
Outcome Required Accomplished Remarks
Perform
piping lay
outs
Cut pipes
through walls
and floors

____________________ ______________________
Trainee’s Signature Trainer’s Signature

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Unit of Competency: 3 MAKE PIPING JOINTS AND CONECTIONS

NC Level I
Learning Task/Activity Date Instructors
Outcome Required Accomplished Remarks
Fit-up joints
and fittings
for PVC pipe
Perform
threaded pipe
joints and
connections
Caulk
joints\
_____________________ ______________________
Trainee’s Signature Trainer’s Signature

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Unit of Competency: 4 PERFORM SINGLE UNIT PLUMBING
INSTALLATION AND ASSEMBLES

NC Level I
Learning Task/Activity Date Instructor
Outcome Required Accomplishe s Remarks
d
Prepare for
plumbing works
Install pipe and
fittings
Install hot and
cold water supply
Install/assemble
plumbing fixtures

_____________________ ____________________
Trainee’s Signature Trainer’s Signature

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
Unit of Competency: 5 PERFORM PLUMBING REPAIR AND
MAINTENANCE WORKS

NC Level I
Learning Task/Activity Date Instructors
Outcome Required Accomplished Remarks
 Clear
clogged
pipes
clear
clogged
fixtures
______________________ ____________________
Trainee’s Signature Trainer’s Signature

Date Developed: Document No. 00


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Revision # 00
TRAINEE’S PROGRESS SHEET

Name : JUAN DELA CRUZ Trainer :


Nominal
Qualification : Machining NC I :
Duration
Training Training Date Date Trainee’s Supervisor’s
Units of Competency Rating
Activity Duration Started Finished Initial Initial

Total
Note: The trainee and the supervisor must have a copy of this form. The column for rating maybe used either by giving a numerical rating or
simply indicating competent or not yet competent. For purposes of analysis, you may require industry supervisors to give a numerical rating for
the performance of your trainees. Please take note however that in TESDA, we do not use numerical ratings
Average Ratings

PREPARATION Average
1. Workshop layout conforms
with the components of a
CBT workshop
2. Number of CBLM is
sufficient
3. Objectives of every training
session is well explained
4. Expected activities/outputs
are clarified
General Average
Facilitate
Learning
Session
Training Activity Matrix

Venue
Facilities/Tools Date &
Training Activity Trainee Remarks
and Equipment (Workstation/ Time
Area)
Prayer
Recap of Activities 8:00 AM
All to 8:30
Unfreezing Activities AM
trainees
Feedback of Training

Rejoinder/Motivation
observations
(List down all
on the
Facilities/Tools
(Specific Activities of progress of
and Equipment Name of
each Trainee for the each trainee
needed for the Workstation1
day here) for the day
workstation and
will be written
activities here)
here
observations
(Specific Activities of (List down all
on the
each Trainee here) Facilities/Tools
progress of
and Equipment Name of
each trainee
needed for the Workstation 2
for the day
workstation and
will be written
activities here)
here
observations
(List down all
on the
Facilities/Tools
(Specific Activities of progress of
and Equipment Name of
each Trainee for the each trainee
needed for the Workstation 3
day here) for the day
workstation and
will be written
activities here)
here
observations
(List down all
on the
Facilities/Tools
(Specific Activities of progress of
and Equipment Name of
each Trainee for the each trainee
needed for the Workstation 4
day here) for the day
workstation and
will be written
activities here)
here
Minutes of the Meeting Template

Minutes of the Meeting


Focus Group Discussion

Date: ________________________
Agenda:
Competency-based Training Delivery
Present:
1. ____________
2. ____________
3. ____________
4. ____________

CBT Concerns Discussions Resolutions/Agreement


1. CBT Layout
2. Monitoring of
Attendance
3. Utilization of work
area
4. Orientation
a. CBT
b. Roles
c. TR
d. CBLM
e. Facilities
f. Evaluation system
5. RPL

6. Teaching methods
and technique
7. Monitoring of
learning activities
a. Achievement
chart
b. Progress chart
8. Feedback
9. Slow learners
10. Other
concerns
Training Evaluation Report

1. Title of the Report

2. Executive summary

3. Rationale

4. Objectives

5. Methodology

6. Results and discussion


This is the body of the report. It should contain the following
parts:
Data interpretation
Data analysis
Conclusion

7. Recommendation
Maintain
Training
Facilities

Template #1
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE
Equipment Type
Equipment Code
Location
Operation Procedure:

Template #2
HOUSEKEEPING SCHEDULE
Qualification Station/Bldg Welding (WAF)

Area/Section

In-Charge

Schedule for the 2nd Semester, 2011


Responsible
ACTIVITIES Daily Every Weekly Every Month Remarks
Person other 15th ly
Day Day
1. Clean and check welding
equipment/ accessories
from dust and oil; dry and
properly laid-out/
secured/stable
2. Clean and free welding
booths and welding
positioners from
dust/rust /gums, used Mig
wire stubs and metal
scraps
3. Clean and arrange working
tables according to floor
plan/lay-out; check
stability
4. Clean and check floor,
walls, windows, ceilings
• graffiti/dust/rust
• cobwebs and
outdated/unnecessary
objects/items
• obstructions
• any used
materials/scraps
(slugs, stubs) spilled
liquid
• open cracks (floor)
5. Clean and check work shop
ventilation and
illumination by dusting
lamps/bulbs, replacing
non-functional lamps and
keeping exhaust clean
6. Clean and check computer
set -monitor, CPU,
keyboards, mouse – free,
unnecessary markings,
dust; cables and plugs are
in order; well-arranged; all
items functional
7. Clean, inspect air
conditioning equipment:
• keep screen and filter
free from dust/rust
• Check selector knobs if
in normal positions and
are functional
• Check if drainage is OK
8. Clean, check and maintain
Tool Room
• Free of dust, not damp
• Tools in appropriate
positions/locations
• With visible
labels/signage
• Logbook and forms are
complete, in order and
updated
• Lights, ventilation – OK
10. Clean and check Rest
Room
• Urinals, bowls, wash
basins, walls and
partitions are free from
stains, dirt, oils, graffiti
Template #3
GMAW WORKSHOP HOUSEKEEPING SCHEDULE
DAILY TASK YES NO
Dispose segregated waste; clean garbage cans

Sweep floors; if wet, wipe dry

Wipe and clean whiteboards

Clean and arrange working tables

Clean and check mounting of machines/equipment

Before leaving, collect stubs and other welding wastes.

WEEKLY TASK YES NO


Clean posters, visual aids and update accomplishment/Progress Charts

Clean bulbs/lamps/ceilings/walls

Clean/Wash of windows/glasses/mirrors

Clean and check tools, machines, supplies, materials

Sanitize garbage receptacles

Empty water collector; clean body of Water Dispenser

MONTHLY TASK YES NO


Conduct inventory

Clean and arrange tool room

Inspect electrical system; clean cables, wires

Clean instructional materials & modules; arrange and put in order

Inspect and clean air-conditioning equipment filter; clean body

Template #4
WELDING EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE*
8 HOURS 50 Hours 100 HOURS
•  •

Template #5
EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
EQUIPMENT TYPE
EQUIPMENT CODE
LOCATION
Schedule for the Month of March
MANPOWER Daily Every Weekly Every Monthly Remarks
ACTIVITIES Other 15th
Day Day

1. Check panel board, and


circuit breakers’
electrical connections,
cables and outlets
 Clean and kept dry
 Parts are well-
secured/attached
 Properly labeled
2. Check Mig gun (nozzle,
contact tip, diffuser)
and ground cable:
 Clean and kept dry
 Parts are well-
secured/ attached
 Inspect for damages
and replace parts if
necessary
3. Check adjustment
lever’s if functional
(amperages/speed); if
not, calibrate

4. Check Gas cylinder


outfit for any
abnormality
 Gate valve
 Co2 regulator
 Gas hose Fittings
 Fittings
5. Check/Clean wire
feeder (rollers, wire
speed/spool
adjustment); remove
used oil, dust; keep
dry.

6. Run the equipment for


5 minutes and observe
for unusual noise or
abnormal operation; if
repair is necessary,
send to technician.

Template #6

WORKSHOP INSPECTION CHECKLIST


Qualification
Area/Section In-Charge

YES NO INSPECTION ITEMS


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

Remarks:

Inspected by: Date:

Template #7
EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE INSPECTION CHECKLIST
Equipment Type :
Property Code/Number :
Location :
YES NO INSPECTION ITEMS
Remarks:

Inspected by: Date:

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