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Tourist Attractions in Aihole - The riverbank village of Aihole is scattered with many

number of abandoned temples, built between 450 and 650 A.D. They appear as
architectural workshop site during the rule of early Chalukyan kings.
The kings had a guild of architects, artists, and artisans working for them. The
construction style is a combination of Gupta (north India), Dravidian and Buddhist
architecture.
The chief attraction among these, built along the lines of a Buddhist chaitya (prayer hall),
is Durga Temple, with its magnificent circular colonnaded veranda studded with stunning
sculptures and intricate carving. In contrast to this there is the Jain Meguti Temple
situated atop a nearby hill. This perhaps was the last temple to be built in Aihole in the
year 634 A.D. as per inscriptions.
The main sightseeing spots in Aihole include:

Kontigudi group and the Galaganatha group of temples


The prominent temple groups here are the Kontigudi group and the Galaganatha group of
temples, although historians have divided all the temples into 22 groups. A group of three
temples is referred to as the Kontigudi group of temples. One of these is the Lad Khan
temple, named after a mendicant that lived in this temple in the 19th century, the
Huchiappayyagudi temple and the Huchiappayya math.

Lad Khan Temple


Lad Khan Temple consists of a shrine with two mantapas in front of it. The shrine bears
a Shiva lingam. The mukha mantapa in front of the sanctum has a set of 12 carved pillars.
The Sabha mantapa in front of the mukha mantapa has pillars arranged in such a manner
as to form two concentric squares. There are also stone grids on the wall carrying floral
designs.

Huchappayyagudi Temple
Huchappayyagudi Temple has a rounded tower (shikhara) over the sanctum (unlike the
Lad Khan temple). The interior of the temple has beautiful carvings.

Huchimalligudi Temple
Huchimalligudi Temple at Aihole, built in the 7th century shows an evolution in the
temple plan, as it shows an ardhamantapam or an ante-chamber annexed to the main
shrine.

Galaganatha group of temples


The Galaganatha Temples' group is one of nearly thirty temples on the bank of the river
Malaprabha. The main shrine of the Galaganatha temple enshrining Shiva - Galaganatha
has a rounded tower or shikhara, and has images of Ganga and Yamuna at the entrance to
this shrine.
Durga fortress temple
The DurgaTemple or fortress temple is the best known of the Aihole temples. A pillared
corridor runs around the temple, enveloping the shrine, the mukhamantapa and the
sabhamantapa. All through the temple, there are beautiful carvings. The temple appears
to be of the late 7th or early 8th century.

Meguti Jain Temple


Meguti Jain Temple stands on a hillock. It is the only dated monument built in 634 A.D.
The temple sits on a raised platform, and a flight of steps leads one to the mukhamantapa.
The pillared mukhamantapa is a large one. A flight of stairs leads to another shrine on the
roof, directly above the main shrine.
From the roof, one can have a panoramic view of the plain with a hundred temples or
so. The temple which was possibly never completed gives important evidence of early
development in Dravidian style of architecture. The dated inscription found on the outer
wall of the temple records the construction of the temple by Ravikeerthi, a scholar in the
court of emperor Pulakeshi II.

Ravanaphadi temple
Ravanaphadi temple is a rock cut temple, with a rectangular shrine, with two mantapas
in front of it and a rock cut Shivalinga. This temple dates back to the 6th century.
Ravanphadi cave is located south-east of Hucchimalli temple. This is a Shaivite cave
temple with a sanctum larger than that of the Badami cave temples. The sanctum has a
vestibule with a triple entrance and has carved pillars.

Gowda temple
Gowda temple is built on similar lines as the Ladh Khan temple. It has sixteen plain
pillars and is dedicated to goddess Bhagavathi.

Suryanarayana Temple
Suryanarayana Temple has a 2 ft. high statue of Surya along with his consorts Usha and
Sandhya being drawn by horses. The temple dates from the 7th or 8th century, has a four
pillared inner sanctum and a nagara style tower over it.

Aihole Musuem
The Museum & Art Gallery is a sculpture gallery maintained by the Archaeological
Survey of India in the Durga Temple complex.

Travel Tips
• Do carry a flashlight as the some of the temple interiors are dark.
• The entry at the main gate of temple complex is free.
• There is an entrance fee to Durga Temple.
• The site can be visited during the day time (dawn to dusk).
• Wear loose cotton clothes as it is humid in this region. Carry water or juices to
keep yourself hydrated
• Hats, Caps and Goggles protect you from the Sun. Caryy suncreens also.
• On your Badami holiday tour, it is best if you combine his with Aihole and
Pattadkal since they are closeby.
• There may be entrace fees to the Cave temples and / or some other sites

Aihole tours would help you explore the landscape of Aihole, dotted
with numerous temples.

Durga Temple
Best known of the Aihole temples, the Durga temple resembles a
Buddhist chaitya for its apsidal plan. The composite temple structure
comprises a high moulded adisthana, a mukha mandapa, sabha
mandapa and a shikhara over the garba griha. A pillared corridor runs
around the temple, enveloping the shrine, the mukhamandapa and the
sabhamandapa. The pillars are ornamented with intricate carvings of
Siva on his Rishaba vaahnam and Vishnu on his Garuda vaahanamon
one side and Vaarahar and Mahishasura Mardini trampling the buffalo
demon on the other side.

Ravanaphadi Temple
Tours to Aihole would be incomplete without a visit to the Ravanaphadi
temple. Scooped out of rocks, this temple dates back to the second
half of the 7th century. The rectangular shrine has two mandapams in
front of it and a rock cut Shivalingam. On the ceiling of the chamber
connecting the front square mandapa and the main shrine are carvings
of Lord Vishnu on his Garuda Vaahanam, a central lotus design and
Indraa on his Airaavatam.

Ladh Khan Temple


One of the most ancient temples in Aihole, the Ladh Khan temple
consists of a shrine with two mandapams in front of it. The temple
derives its name from a Muslim mendicant Ladh Khan, who used to live
in the temple premises in the 19th century. The mukhamandapa in
front of the sanctum has a set of 12 carved pillars. The sabhamandapa
in front of the mukhamandapa has pillars arranged in such a manner
as to form two concentric squares.
Meguti Jain Temple
Perched atop a hillock, the Meguti Jain temple sits on a raised platform,
and a flight of steps leads one to the mukhamandapa. The roof of the
mukhamandapa is an ideal vantage point to have a panoramic view of
the plain with a hundred or more temples. From a historic standpoint,
the Meguti temple has an inscription on its foundation stating that it
was built in the year 634 CE. This inscription also contains a reference
to the poet Kalidasa.

FACTS & FIGURES


Population 2,549 (1981 Census)
Area 4 sq km
Altitude 593 meters
Best Season October to March
INTRODUCTION

All across Karnataka, invaders, conquerors and dynasties have come and gone. They
have left their imprint on the land, its people and their folkways. Nowhere is this more
evident than at Aihole in Northern Karnataka. Aihole is a glorious part of India and a trip
to this great center of medieval Indian art and architecture would make you aware of a
great heritage. Plan your trip to Aihole in India with us and fix your date with history.

HISTORY

The Chalukya Dynasty was founded by Pulakesin I, or the Great Lion, in AD 543. In all
likelihood, his family were feudatories of the earlier Kadamba dynasty before they
declared their independence from their former lords.

This period saw the construction of great architectural wonders not only at Aihole but the
whole region including Badami, Pattadakal, and other places. The early Chalukya
dynasty was ousted by its own district officers, the Rashtrakutas in AD 757. Later on,
Aihole became a part of the Bahmani and other local Muslim dynasties. In the 17th
century, Aurangzeb annexed the Deccan and made it a part of the Mughal Empire and
Aihole, as a part of that region, came under the Mughal rule.

LOCATION

Aihole is situated on the banks of river Malaprabha. The cave temple of Ravana Phadi
stands all by itself backed against the rocky hill out of which it has been carved.

TOURISTS ATTRACTIONS
The sculptures here are superb, particularly the beautiful dancing Shiva who seems
to be trembling with motion. Then there is image of the fearsome Mahishasuramardini or
the Mother Goddess Durga destroying the demon Mahisha. This cave is well worth a
long visit.

The main Aihole temple complex is some distance away. There are about a hundred
shrines, large and small, dotted all across this abandoned capital of the Chalukyas though
only a few of them are in the fenced area. At one time, Aihole was a thriving trading
town with a guild of 500 merchants. Today, it is a hamlet, though fenced out of the area
protected by the Archeological Survey of India.

Of particular interest is the Durg Temple, which is not only the most decorated
monument in Aihole, but it is also famous as an imitation of a Buddhist rock-cut chaitya
hall. There is also the unusual Lad Khan temple. Some historians believe that this was
never intended to be a temple but a village meeting place built to resemble a thatched
hall. It is also likely that the early Chalukyan architects created these two shrines when
they first attempted to build structural temples for the Hindus to worship in.

PLACES AROUND AIHOLE

Mohammed Shah Wali of Bahmani Dynasty selected Bidar as his capital in 15th century.
The ancient fort at Bidar has a length of 5.5 km and is hewn out of solid rock. It is a very
impressive structure, which once held 37 bastions and seven gates, royal baths, audience
halls, pleasure pavilions, and water gardens in the style of West Asia. Other interesting
monuments include the Rang Mahal, a huge college (madarsa) constructed in 1472, the
Barid tombs, Bahmani tombs, and the Chaukhandi of Hazrat Khalil-Ullah.

Gulbarga was the first capital of the Bahmanis and the main attractions here are the tomb
of Hazrat Khwaja Band Nawaz Gesu Daraz and a mosque in the old fort.

Bijapur is a large town with the Gol Gumbaz rising like a humpbacked monarch above
the trees, dominating the town even from a distance. But the Gol Gumbaz is only one of
the many impressive monuments in Bijapur. Other monuments include the Ibrahim Roza
built in 1626, the Taj Baoli, Assa Mahal, Gaggan Mahal, Bara Khamba, and All Saints
Church.

Badami was once the capital of the Chalukya kings and the place is famous for many
Hindu and Jain rock-cut cave shrines. There are around four caves, each better than the
other. Apart from the cave shrines, there are some old structural temples around the lake.

Pattadakal is famous for its 150 temples constructed within a radius of 48 km by the
Chalukya kings. The famous ones are the Papanatha, Kashivishvanatha, Jambulinga,
Galganatha, Sangamesvara, Mallikarjuna, and Virupaksha.

WHERE TO STAY
We offer excellent accommodation facilities in and around Aihole.
Tourism-of-India.com provides complete information about tourism in Aihole. Tourism-
of-India.com offers various tour packages to make your visit comfortable. You can pick
the one that suits you most.

Aihole
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Durga Temple at Aihole

Aihole

Location of Aihole
in Karnataka and India

Coordina
tes
District(s
Bagalkot
)
Time
IST (UTC+5:30)
zone
Codes[show]
• Pincode
• 587138

• Telephone
• +08351

Aihole (Kannada ಐಹೊಳ) is a temple complex in the Bagalkot district of Karnataka,


India. It is a very popular tourist spot in north Karnataka. Aihole is to the east of
Pattadakal, along the Malaprabha River, while Badami is to the west of both.
Aihole has the potential to be included as a UNESCO World heritage site.[1]

Contents
[hide]
• 1 History

o 1.1 Aihole inscription

• 2 Early Chalukya Style of Architecture


• 3 Tourism
• 4 See also
• 5 References
• 6 Articles and Travelers' experiences
• 7 External links

[edit] History
Main articles: Chalukya dynasty and Badami Chalukya Architecture
Early inscriptions call this town Ayyavole and Aryapura. Aihole has its own historical
significance and is called as cradle of Hindu rock architecture. Many temples and caves
of historical importance can be found at Aihole.
Poetry on stone at the Meguti temple (Aihole inscription) dated 634 CE,
in Sanskrit language and old Kannada script
.
Aihole was the first capital of the early Chalukyas.[2] Here they built over 125 temples in
various styles and is said to be a laboratory of experiments in rock cut architecture.
Pulakesi I, one of the greatest rulers of this dynasty, moved the capital to Badami nearby.
Badami was then known as Vatapi. It is from these temples that the Chalukyas gained
their experience and went on to build the great temples of Pattadakal. The first phase of
temple building in Aihole dates back to the 6th century CE, the second phase up to the
12th century CE. Some temples were even built as early as the 5th century CE.

[edit] Aihole inscription

Chalukya Territories during Pulakeshi II c. 640 C.E.


The famous Badami Chalukyas King Pulakeshi II (during 610-642 A.D.) was follower of
Jainism. The Shilalekh of Ravikirti in praise of Pulakeshi[3] is still available in Meguti
temple, Aihole inscription dated 634 CE, in Sanskrit language and old Kannada script.
In Aihole inscription which mentioning achievements of Pulakeshi II, he defeated king
Harshavardhana.[4]
Aihole inscription of Pulakesin II mentioned as akrantatma-balonnatim Pallavanam
patim, that means the Pallavas had attempted to nip in the bud the rise of the Badami
Chalukyas. The conflict of the two powers before the campaign of Pulakesin II against
the Pallavas.
Inscription which prepared by Pulakeshi II (634 AD) found in the Jain Temple at Aihole,
that all the scholars have relied on this inscription related to Mahabharath War and
Kaliyuga.[5]
In the Aihole inscription referred that Mangalesha's (Paramabhagavat) victory over the
Kalachuris and the conquest of Revatidvipa.
According to the Aihole inscription of Pulakeshin II, a civil war between Mangalesha and
Pulakeshin II, due to Mangalesa's attempt to secure the succession for his own son, which
was the end of Mangalesha's reign.[6]
In inscription of Amoghavarsha I found at Aihole, mentioned about his new
administration (navarajyam geyye).[7]

[edit] Early Chalukya Style of Architecture

Konti Gudi at Aihole

Inside the Ravana Phadi cave, Aihole


Aihole, was the cradle of ancient Hindu temple architecture.[8] It has more than 70
temples. The experimentation with different styles was undertaken by the artisans. The
artisans worked on the rocks to create the earliest rock cut shrines.[9] The artisans
graduated to the full fledged Chalukya style of architecture.
The early Chalukyas inherited architectural styles largely from their neighbours to the
north and south of their kingdom.[10] Usage of curved towers decorated with blind arches
came from northern India. Pilastered walls with panel inserts are a southern Indian style.
The usage of Deccan style is in their balcony seating, angled eaves and sloping roofs, and
elaborately carved columns and ceilings (George Michell,1997). In short, they artistically
brought together the prevailing styles in their neighbourhood to create the Chalukya style.
Typical features unique to Badami Chalukyas architecture include mortarless assembly,
an emphasis on length rather than width or height, flat roofs, richly carved ceilings, and,
sculpturally, an emphasis on relatively few major figures, which tend to be isolated from
each other rather than arranged in crowded groups. The aesthetic sensibility of sculpture
from this period also seems to retain a certain classical quality whose impulse does not
carry over into later periods of Indian art (Susan Huntington, 1985).

[edit] Tourism

Lad Khan Temple at Aihole

Galaganatha Group of Temples at Aihole

Temple tank at Aihole


Ravana Phadi cave at Aihole

Temple at Aihole
The prominent temple groups at Aihole are the Kontigudi group and the Galaganatha
group of temples, although historians have divided all the temples into 22 groups.
A group of three temples is referred to as the Kontigudi group of temples. One of these is
the Lad Khan temple(The oldest temple at Aihole is the Lad khan temple dating back to
the fifth century[8]), named after a mendicant that lived in this temple in the 19th century ,
another the Huchiappayyagudi temple and the Huchiappayya math.
• Lad Khan temple[11] consists of a shrine with two mantapas in
front of it. The shrine bears a Shiva lingam. The mukha mantapa in
front of the sanctum has a set of 12 carved pillars. The
sabhamantapa in front of the mukha mantapa has pillars
arranged in such a manner as to form two concentric squares.
There are also stone grids on the wall carrying floral designs. The
temple is built in a Panchayat hall style, indicating a very early
experiment in temple construction. The windows are filled with
lattice style which is a north Indian style. The temple was built in
late 7th or early 8th century.

• Huchappayya (gudi) temple has a curvilinear tower (shikhara)


over the sanctum (unlike the Lad Khan temple). The interior of
the temple has beautiful carvings.

• Huchimalli (gudi) temple at Aihole, built in the 7th century shows


an evolution in the temple plan, as it shows an ardhamantapa or
an ante-chamber annexed to the main shrine.
• Galaganatha group temples is one of nearly thirty temples on the
bank of the Malaprabha River. The main shrine of the Galaganatha
temple enshrining Shiva - Galaganatha has a curvilinear
shikhara, and has images of Ganga and Yamuna at the entrance
to this shrine.

• Durga temple or fortress temple is the best known of the Aihole


temples and is very photogenic. It is apsidal in plan, along the
lines of a Buddhist chaitya, a high moulded adisthana and a
tower - curvilinear shikhara. A pillared corridor runs around the
temple, enveloping the shrine, the mukhamantapa and the
sabhamantapa. All through the temple, there are beautiful
carvings. The temple appears to be of the late 7th or early 8th
century.

• Meguti Jain temple stands on a hillock. It is the only dated


monument built in 634. The temple sits on a raised platform, and
a flight of steps leads one to the mukhamantapa. The pillared
mukhamantapa is a large one. A flight of stairs leads to another
shrine on the roof, directly above the main shrine. From the roof,
one can have a panoramic view of the plain with a hundred
temples or so. The temple which was possibly never completed
gives important evidence of early development in dravidian style
of architecture. The dated inscription found on the outer wall of
the temple records the construction of the temple by Ravikeerthi,
a scholar in the court of emperor Pulakeshi II.

• Ravana Phadi cave is one of the oldest rock cut temples in


Aihole, is located south east of Hucchimalli temple. This temple
dates back to the 6th century, with a rectangular shrine, with two
mantapas. There is a Shivalinga in the inner room or sanctum
sanctorum. This is a Shaivite cave temple with a sanctum larger
than that of the Badami Cave Temples. The sanctum has a vestibule
with a triple entrance and has carved pillars. The walls and sides
of the temple are covered with large figures including dancing
Shiva.

• Gowda temple is built on similar lines as the Ladh Khan temple


but earlier. It has sixteen plain pillars and is dedicated to
goddess Bhagavathi.

• Suryanarayana temple has a 0.6 m high statue of Surya along


with his consorts Usha and Sandhya being drawn by horses. The
temple dates from the 7th or 8th century, has a four pillared
inner sanctum and a nagara style tower over it.

• The Museum & Art Gallery is a sculpture gallery maintained by


the Archaeological Survey of India in the Durga Temple complex.

Pattadakal
Pattadakal
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pattadakal
— town —

Group of monuments At Pattadakal


Pattadakal

Location of Pattadakal

in Karnataka and India

Coordina
tes
Country India

State Karnataka
District(s
Bagalkot
)
Nearest
Badami
city
Time
IST (UTC+5:30)
zone
Pattadakal (Kannada - ಪಟಟದಕಲುಲ) is a town in the Indian state of Karnataka The town lies
on the banks of the Malaprabha River in Bagalkot district of North Karnataka region. It is
22 km from Badami and about 10 km from Aihole. The group of 8th century CE
monuments in Pattadakal are the culmination of the earliest experiments in the vesara
style of Hindu temple architecture. They were designated a World Heritage Site in 1987.
The town displays both Dravidian (Southern) and the Nagara (Northern, Indo-Aryan)
styles of temple architecture.
Contents
[hide]
• 1 World Heritage site
• 2 History

o 2.1 Chalukya style of architecture

o 2.2 Kannada Inscription

• 3 Tourism

o 3.1 Group of monuments in Pattadakal

• 4 See also
• 5 Articles and Travelers' experiences
• 6 External links
• 7 References

[edit] World Heritage site

Kashivishvanatha temple at Pattadakal, Karnataka


UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) in 1987
included Pattadakal[1] in its list of World Heritage sites.
Group of Monuments at Pattadakal*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

State Party India


Type Cultural

Criteria iii, iv
Reference 239
Region** Asia-Pacific

Inscription history
Inscription 1987 (11th Session)

* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.


** Region as classified by UNESCO.

[edit] History

Old Kannada inscription on victory pillar, Virupaksha Temple, Pattadakal,


733–745 CE
Pattadakal, the capital of the Chalukya dynasty of Southern India, who built the temples
in the seventh and eighth centuries. There are ten temples including a Jain sanctuary
surrounded by numerous small shrines and plinths. Four temples were built in Dravidian
style, four in Nagara style of Northern India and the Papanatha temple in mixed style.

[edit] Chalukya style of architecture


Aihole is considered a School of Architecture, Badami a Degree College, and The
University of architecture is Pattadakal.[1]
The Chalukya style originated in Aihole (450 CE), Architects experimented with
different styles, blended the Nagara and Dravidian styles, and evolved their own
distinctive style. At Pattadakal, the Chalukya kings were crowned, in the middle of the
7th century, temple building activity shifted from Badami to Pattadakal. There are 10
temples here, 4 are in Nagara style and 6 are in Chalukya style.

[edit] Kannada Inscription


At Virupaksha Temple, there is 8th (733–745 CE) century Old Kannada inscription on
victory pillar at Pattadakal.

[edit] Tourism
[edit] Group of monuments in Pattadakal
The group of monuments in Pattadakal[2][3][4][5] was designated a World Heritage Site in
1987.
• Virupaksha Temple

Virupaksha temple at Pattadakal


The best known is the Virupaksha temple, built by Queen Lokamahadevi
(Trilokyamahadevi)in 745 to commemorate her husband's victory (Vikramaditya II) over
the Pallavas of Kanchi. The temple closely resembles the Kailashnatha temple in Kanchi
which served as a model for this temple. The Virupakhsa temple in turn served as an
inspiration for the Kailashnatha (Kailash Temple) temple built by the Rashtrakuta
(During 757 -783 A.D. by Krishna I) dynasty in Ellora. The Virupaksha temple is rich in
sculptures like those of lingodbhava, Nataraja, Ravananugraha and Ugranarasimha.
Virupaksha is the earliest dated temple with the sukanasika, being closely followed by
the Mallikarjuna temple.
• Sangameshvara Temple

Sangameshvara temple 725 CE Pattadakal


Sangameshwara Temple (was called Vijayewara) is oldest temple in Pattadakal, built by
Chalukya King Vijayaditya Satyashraya ( 696-733 AD), it has no sukanasika. The temple
is in Dravidian style and it consists of a Sanctum, Inner passage and a Hall. On the outer
wall there is Ugranarasimha, Nataraja sculptures. Both the Sangamesvara temple and
the Virupaksha temple are similar to each other in being square on plan from the base to
sikhara. The main vimana is of three storeys. The lowermost storey is surrounded by two
walls. The second storey being an upward projection of the inner wall. While the outer
wall encloses the covered circumambulatory round the sanctum.
• Mallikarjuna Temple

Mallikarjuna Temple is a smaller version of the Virupaksha temple and was built by
Vikramadiyta's second queen Trilokyamahadevi in 745. This temple is also was
constructed by Rani Trilokyamahadevi to celebrate the victory (by Vikramaditya II) over
the Pallavas. The Mallikarjuna temple was built immediately after and close to the
Virupaksha temple (It has a similar plan), with a 4 storeyed vimana with a circular griva
and sikhara. Mallikarjuna temple in Dravidian style.

Mallikarjuna and Kasivisvanatha temples at Pattadakal, built 740 CE


• Kashivisvanatha Temple

Kasivisvesvara temple was the last to be built in early Chalukya style. This temple was
built by the Rashtrakutas in the 8th century. Kashi Vishwanatha temple in Nagara style
• Kadasiddhesvara and Jambulingeswara' temples

Kadasiddhesvara and Jambulingeswara temples both attributed to 7th century A.D.


Kadasiddeshvara temple which has a sculpture of Shiva holding a Trident or Trishul in
his hands and its twin temple, the Jambulinga Temple are all built in Nagara style and
resemble the Hucchimalli' Guddi at Aihole.

Jain Narayana temple at Pattadakal


• Galganatha temple

Galaganatha temple was built a century later in the architecture style of Rekha Nagara
Prasada. Temple contains a sculpture of Lord Shiva killing the demon Andhakasura.
• Jain Temple

Jain Temple located on the Pattadakal-Badami Road, is built in the Dravidian style by the
Rashtrakutas of Manyakheta. It has some very beautiful sculptures & probably dates from
the 9th century and was built by either King Amoghavarsha I or his son Krishna II.

Papanatha temple at Pattadakal


• Papanatha temple is built in the vesara style dated to 680. The
temple was started in nagara style but later changed to a more
balanced Dravidian style. Sculptures here speak of scenes from
Ramayana and Mahabharatha. This temple has many similarities
with the Navabrahma temples in Alampur, Andhra Pradesh, which
were also built by Badami Chalukyas.

• Museum of the Plains and Sculpture gallery is maintained


by the Archeological Survey of India on the Bhutanatha temple
road.

Other important monuments here are the monolithic stone pillar bearing inscriptions,
Naganatha temple, Chandrashekara temple and inscriptions in the Mahakuteshwara
temple.