Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

 Case Study 19:   STUXNET and the Changing Face of

Cyberwarfare
Q1: Is cyberwarfare a serious problem? Why or why not?

Cyberwarfare is definitely a serious problem that should be addressed. With technology that being 
utilised worldwide to control the missiles and warfare, having a cyber­threat is as serious as or even 
more serious than having a physical threat. Cyberwarfare can also act as a catalyst and induce an 
all­out strike of terror on other countries. The most prominent threats so far include:

Stuxnet wiped out about one­fifth of Iran’s nuclear centrifuges by causing them to spin at too high a 
velocity. The damage was huge and irreparable; it was believed to have a delayed Iran’s ability to 
make nuclear arms by as much as five years.

Successful attacks on the FAA airline system, including one in 2006 that partially shut down air 
traffic data systems in Alaska.

Intruders successfully penetrated the Pentagon’s $300 billion Joint Strike Fighter project and stole 
several terabytes of data related to design and electronics systems.

Cyberspies infiltrated the U.S. electrical grid in April 2009 and left behind software programs whose 
purpose is unclear.

Q2: Assess the management, organization, and technology factors that have created this problem.
Management:

From a management standpoint, there is no increase focus on ensuring that policies are in place to 
prevent cyberwarfare attacks from occurring in an organization until recently. An increased focus is 
essential to be in place to prevent this. The users of targeted systems are still too careless about 
security and do not do enough to protect their systems while the cybercriminals has no shortage 
nowadays as the technology is getting more and more advance.

Organization:

The organization is left vulnerable and potential physical harm to users and workers becomes a 
social issue that has to be addressed by the organization. For instances, U.S. has no clear policy 
about how the country would respond to a catastrophic level of cyber­attack. Even though the U.S. 
Congress is considering legislation to toughen cyber security standards, the standards are still 
insufficient to defend against attacks.

Technology:

The advancement of technology nowadays and always being readily available to the public has made 
cyberwarfare more likely to occur. Technology has brought the serious issue of cyber­attack and the 
advancement of technology will only making the situation worse in the future if security is not being 
done well.

Q3: What makes Stuxnet different from other cyberwarfare attacks? How serious a threat is this 
technology?
Most of the cyberwarfare attacks are only attempting to steal information and espionage, Stuxnet is 
even capable to infect the very well­secured computer systems that follow industry best practices 
making it nearly impossible to defend. Stuxnet’s mission was to activate only computers that ran 
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition. One part was designed to lay dormant for long periods, 
then speed up Iran’s nuclear centrifuges so that they spun wildly out of control. Another secretly 
recorded what normal operations at the nuclear plant looked like and then played those recordings 
back to plant operators so it would  appear that the centrifuges were operating normally when they 
were actually tearing themselves apart. With this type of cyberwarfare attack, an entire country could
be destroyed and without recognition, from inside out.

Q4: What solutions have been proposed for this problem? Do you think they will be effective? Why 
or why not?

The solutions have been proposed for this problem stated below:

Congress is considering legislation that would require all critical infrastructure companies to meet 
newer, tougher cybersecurity standards. As cyberwarfare technologies develop and become more 
advanced, the standards imposed by this legislation will likely be insufficient to defend against 
attacks.

Many security experts believe that U.S. cyber security is not well­organized. Several different 
agencies, including the Pentagon and the National Security Agency (NSA), have their sights on being 
the leading agency in the on­going efforts to combat cyberwarfare. The first headquarters designed to
coordinate government cyber security efforts, called Cybercom, was activated in May 2010 in the 
hope of resolving this organizational tangle. It will coordinate the operation and protection of 
military and Pentagon computer networks. It will coordinate efforts to restrict access to government 
computers and protect systems that run the stock exchanges, clear global banking transactions, and 
manage the air traffic control system. Its ultimate goal will be to prevent catastrophic cyber­attacks 
against the U.S. Some insiders suggest that it might not be able to effectively organize the 
governmental agencies without direct access to the President, which it currently lacks.
CASE 11 : STUXNET AND THE CHANGING FACE OF
CYBERWARFARE