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UNIT 2 - MATTER & CHANGE

HOMOGENEOUS VS. HETEROGENEOUS MATTER WORKSHEET


Classify the following as either homogeneous or heterogeneous.
1. flat soft drink (no bubbles) 9. air (with smog)
2. chocolate chip ice cream 10. paint
3. Italian salad dressing 11. alcohol
4. sugar 12. iron
5. soil 13. beach sand
6. aluminum foil 14. pure air
7. black coffee 15. chunky spaghetti sauce
8. sugar water
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PURE SUBSTANCES VS. MIXTURES WORKSHEET


Classify the following as pure substances or mixtures.

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1. sodium 11. iron
2. water 12. salt water
3. soil 13. chocolate chip ice cream
4.
5.
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coffee
oxygen
14.
15.
nitrogen
eggs
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6. 70% isopropyl alcohol 16. blood
7. carbon dioxide 17. table salt
8. cake batter 18. nail polish
9. air 19. milk
10. chicken noodle soup 20. soda
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UNIT 2 - MATTER & CHANGE

CLASSIFICATION OF MATTER WORKSHEET


Check the appropriate categories for the substances listed below. All substances will have a
check in more than one column.
Heterogeneous Homogeneous Pure
Substance Solution Element Compound Mixture
Matter Matter Substance
lead metal
table salt
(NaCl)
Kool-Aid
drink
vegetable
soup
oxygen gas
distilled
water
concrete

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pure gold
brass
metal

soda

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flat 7-Up

raw egg
(cracked
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open)
air
pure iron
iron rust
(Fe2O3)
soil
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baking
soda
(NaHCO3)

PHYSICAL VS. CHEMICAL CHANGES 1 WORKSHEET


Classify the following as being a chemical or a physical change.
1. Sodium hydroxide dissolves in water.
2. Hydrochloric acid reacts with potassium hydroxide to produce a salt, water, and heat.
3. A pellet of sodium is sliced in two.
4. Water is heated and changed to steam.
5. Potassium chlorate decomposes to potassium chloride and oxygen gas.
6. Iron rusts.
7. When placed in water, a sodium pellet catches on fire as hydrogen gas is liberated and sodium
hydroxide forms.
8. Evaporation.

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UNIT 2 - MATTER & CHANGE
9. Ice melting.
10. Milk sours.
11. Sugar dissolves in water.
12. Wood rotting.
13. Pancakes cooking on a griddle.
14. Grass growing in a lawn.
15. A tire is inflated with air.
16. Food is digested in the stomach.
17. Water is absorbed by a paper towel.

PHYSICAL VS. CHEMICAL PROPERTIES & CHANGES 2 WORKSHEET


Part 1 - Indicate whether each of the following describes a chemical or a physical property.
1. Sulfur is a bright yellow solid.
2. Sulfur has a low melting point.
3. Sulfur causes silver to tarnish.

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4. Aluminum is very malleable.
5. Monuments made of copper corrode in acid rain.
6. Copper is a good conductor of electricity.

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Part 2 - Classify the following as chemical or physical properties.
7. color
8. reactivity
14. solubility
15. expansion
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9. flammability 16. melting point
10. odor 17. rusting
11. porosity 18. reacts with oxygen
12. stability 19. density
13. ductility 20. conductivity
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Part 3 - Indicate whether these changes are chemical, physical, or nuclear.


21. Lead reacts with acid in a car battery. 31. burning of gasoline
22. Gasoline burns in a car engine. 32. liquefying oxygen
23. Frost forms on a car window. 33. digestion of food
24. Formation of plutonium from uranium. 34. tarnishing of silver
25. Formation of clouds from water vapor. 35. magnetizing steel
26. formation of dew on grass 36. reacting sodium and water
27. melting of ice cream 37. dissolving sugar in water
28. exploding of dynamite 38. burning sugar to produce carbon
29. fission of uranium 39. decay of radon to lead
30. sublimation of moth balls 40. fusion of hydrogen into helium

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UNIT 2 - MATTER & CHANGE
OBSERVING A CHEMICAL REACTION (REACTION IN A BAG)
PURPOSE: To learn how to make careful observations during a laboratory experiment and to illustrate several
common indicators of a chemical reaction
MATERIALS: zip lock bag, sodium bicarbonate, calcium chloride, teaspoon, dropper pipet, balance, phenol red
solution
PROCEDURE:
PART ONE
1.) Open a zip lock bag. Add about 1 spoonful of sodium bicarbonate to the bag.
2.) Completely fill a plastic pipet with phenol red solution. (Pay close attention to your instructor’s
demonstration of this technique.)
3.) Place the filled dropper pipet inside the zip lock bag and seal it completely.
4.) Fold the zip lock bag in thirds.
5.) Place your zip lock bag and all of its contents on the balance. Record the mass on your
paper.
6.) Unfold the zip lock bag and squeeze the phenol red solution into the sodium bicarbonate.
(Be sure to empty the dropper pipet of all of the phenol red.) Record your observations.

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7.) Place the zip lock bag on the balance again. Record this mass on your paper.
8.) Pour the contents of your zip lock bag in the beaker that is labeled “WASTE – PART 1”.
Rinse your bag and dry it thoroughly. You will use it again for Parts 2 and 3.
PART TWO

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1.) Open a zip lock bag. Add about 1 spoonful of calcium chloride to the bag.
2.) Repeat steps 2 – 7 from Part One.
3.) Pour the contents of your zip lock bag in the beaker that is labeled “WASTE – PART 2”.
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Rinse your bag and dry it thoroughly. You will use it again for Part 3.
PART THREE
1.) Open a zip lock bag. Add about 1 spoonful each of sodium bicarbonate and calcium
chloride to the bag.
2.) Repeat steps 2 – 7 from Part One.
3.) Pour the contents of your zip lock bag in the beaker that is labeled “WASTE – PART 3”.
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Rinse your bag and dry it thoroughly.


4.) Clean up your lab station and return to your seat.

DATA TABLE:
TRIAL OBSERVATIONS MASS BEFORE MASS AFTER
sodium bicarbonate

calcium chloride

sodium bicarbonate
& calcium chloride
CONCLUSIONS:
1.) Did your observations agree with the Law of Conservation of Mass? Explain.

2.) Write a paragraph (that means complete sentences!) summarizing how chemists know when a
chemical change occurs.

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UNIT 2 - MATTER & CHANGE
GEOGRAPHY OF THE PERIODIC TABLE

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SIDE 1:


1.) Darken the line that separates metals and nonmetals in black.

2.) Color the metalloids light blue. (Metalloids have atomic numbers 5, 14, 32, 33, 51, 52, and 84.)

3.) Color the metals yellow. (Metals are on the left side of the “staircase” line that separates metals from
nonmetals – see #1 above. NOTE: Hydrogen (top left of Periodic Table) is considered a NONmetal.)

4.) Color the noble gases green. (Not ALL gases – just the group called the noble gases.)

5.) Color the nonmetals pink. (Nonmetals are the boxes you haven’t yet colored to the right of the “staircase”
line.)

6.) Write the number of each group at the top of the column (1 – 18).

7.) Draw diagonal lines (from the lower left to the upper right - /) in the boxes of the elements that are gases at
room temperature. (NOTE: The boxes that you will draw these lines in will already be colored.)

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8.) Draw diagonal lines (from the upper left to the lower right - \) in the boxes of the elements that are liquids
at room temperature. (NOTE: These boxes will also already be colored.)

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UNIT 2 - MATTER & CHANGE
GEOGRAPHY OF THE PERIODIC TABLE
INSTRUCTIONS FOR SIDE 2: (NOTE: There will be parts of this Periodic Table that are not colored.)
1.) Color the noble gases blue.

2.) Color the transition metals yellow.

3.) Color the alkaline earth metals orange.

4.) Color the halogens green.

5.) Color the inner transition elements purple. (The inner transition elements are the two rows at the bottom –
seemingly separated from the rest of the Periodic Table.)

6.) Color the alkali metals red. (Hydrogen is not considered an alkali metal.)

7.) Write the number of each group at the top of the column (1 – 18).

8.) Draw diagonal lines (from the lower left to the upper right - /) in the boxes of the elements in the Lanthanide
Series. (NOTE: The boxes that you will draw these lines in will already be colored.)

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9.) Draw diagonal lines (from the upper left to the lower right - \) in the boxes of the elements in the Actinide
Series. (NOTE: These boxes will also already be colored.)

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