Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 24

lOMoARcPSD|3657985

Summary - The Respiratory System (Ch22)

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology I (University of Wollongong)

StuDocu is not sponsored or endorsed by any college or university


Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)
lOMoARcPSD|3657985

CH  22  THE  RESPIRATORY  SYSTEM  


 
Major  function  of  the  respiratory  system:  
• Supply  the  body  with  oxygen  and  dispose  of  carbon  dioxide  
 
Respiration:  
• Involves  both  the  respiratory  and  the  circulatory  systems  
• Four  processes,  collectively  called  respiration,  accomplish  this  function:  
-­‐ Pulmonary  ventilation  (breathing):  movement    of  air  into  and  out  of  the  lungs  
-­‐ External  respiration:  O2  and  CO2  exchange  between  the  lungs  and  the  blood  
-­‐ Transport  of  respiratory  gases:  O2  and  CO2  in  the  blood  
-­‐ Internal  respiration:  O2  and  CO2  exchange  between  systemic  blood  vessels  and  tissues  
 
Only  the  first  two  processes  are  the  responsibility  of  the  respiratory  system,  but  it  cannot  accomplish  its  goal  unless  the  
third  and  fourth  processes  occur.  
 
Functional  anatomy  of  the  respiratory  system  
 
• Major  organs  (from  upper  tracts  to  lower  tracts):  
-­‐ Nose,  nasal  cavity,  paranasal  sinuses  
-­‐ Pharynx  
-­‐ Larynx  
-­‐ Trachea  
-­‐ Bronchi  and  their  branches  
-­‐ Lungs  and  alveoli  

 
• Respiratory  zone:  site  of  gas  exchange  
-­‐ Microscopic  structures:  respiratory  bronchioles,  alveolar  ducts,  and  alveoli  
• Conducting  zone:  conduits  to  gas  exchange  sites  
-­‐ Includes  all  other  respiratory  structures  
-­‐ Provide  conduits  for  air  to  reach  the  gas  exchange  sites  
-­‐ Conducting  zone  organs  also  cleanse,  humidify  and  warm  incoming  air  
• Respiratory  muscles:  diaphragm  and  other  muscles  that  promote  ventilation  
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  1  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

The  Nose  and  Paranasal  Sinuses  


• Functions:  
-­‐ Provides  an  airway  for  respiration  
-­‐ Moistens  and  warms  the  entering  air  
-­‐ Filters  and  cleans  inspired  air  
-­‐ Serves  as  a  resonating  chamber  for  speech  
-­‐ Houses  olfactory  receptors  (picks  up  smell)  
• divided  into  two  regions:  external  nose  and  nasal  cavity  
 
External  nose:  root  (area  between  eyebrows),  bridge,  dorsum  nasi  (anterior  margin),  apex  (tip  of  the  nose)  
• philtrum:  a  shallow  vertical  groove  inferior  to  the  apex  
• nostrils  (external  nares):  bounded  laterally  by  the  alae  
• framework  of  the  external  nose:  nasal  and  frontal  bones,  maxillary  bones,  plates  of  hyaline  cartilage  

 
Nasal  cavity:  in  and  posterior  to  the  external  nose  
• divided  by  a  midline  nasal  septum  (formed  anteriorly  by  the  septal  cartilage  and  posteriorly  by  the  vomer  bone  
and  perpendicular  plate  of  the  ethmoid  bone)  
• posterior  nasal  apertures  (choanae)  open  into  the  nasal  pharynx  
• roof:  ethmoid  and  sphenoid  bones  
• floor:  hard  and  soft  palates  (separates  nasal  cavity  from  oral  cavity)  
• nasal  vestibule:  superior  to  the  nostrils,  lined  with  skin  containing  sebaceous  and  sweat  glands  and  hair  follicles  
• olfactory  mucosa:  lines  the  superior  nasal  cavity  and  contains  smell  receptors  
• respiratory  mucosa:  
-­‐ pseudostratified  ciliated  columnar  epithelium  
-­‐ mucous  and  serous  secretions  contain  lysozyme  (an  antibacterial  enzyme)  and  defensins  (natural  
antibiotics)  à  the  sticky  mucus  traps  inspired  debris,  while  lysozyme  attacks  and  destroys  bacteria.    
Defensins  help  get  rid  of  invading  microbes.  
-­‐ cilia  move  contaminated  mucus  posteriorly  to  throat  where  it  is  swallowed  and  digested  by  stomach  juices  
-­‐ inspired  air  is  warmed  by  plexuses  of  capillaries  and  veins  
-­‐ sensory  nerve  endings  –  contact  with  irritating  particles  triggers  sneezing  
 
• superior,  middle  and  inferior  nasal  choncae:  
-­‐ protrude  from  the  lateral  walls  
-­‐ increase  mucosal  area  
-­‐ enhance  air  tubulence  
-­‐ groove  inferior  to  each  concha  is  a  nasal  meatus  
-­‐ functions  of  the  nasal  mucosa  and  choncae:  
§ during  inhalation:  the  conchae  and  nasal  mucosa  filter,  heat  and  moisten  air  
§ during  exhalation:  these  structures  reclaim  heat  and  moisture  
This  process  minimizes  the  amount  of  moisture  and  heat  lost  from  the  body  through  breathing,  
helping  us  to  survive  in  dry  and  cold  climates.  
 
Paranasal  sinuses:  
• the  nasal  cavity  is  surrounded  by  a  ring  of  paranasal  sinuses  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  2  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

• located  in  the  front,  sphenoid,  ethmoid  and  maxillary  bones  


• lighten  the  skull  and  help  to  warm  and  moisten  the  air  
• produce  mucus  that  flows  into  the  nasal  cavity  
 

 
Pharynx  
• Muscular  tube  that  connects  the  nasal  cavity  and  mouth  superiorly  and  the  larynx  and  esophagus  inferiorly  
• From  the  base  of  the  skull  to  the  level  of  C6  
• Divided  into  three  regions  (from  superior  to  inferior):  
-­‐ Nasopharynx  
-­‐ Oropharynx  
-­‐ Laryngopharynx  
 
Borders:  
-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐Internal  nares-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  
Nasopharynx  
-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐Uvula-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  
Oropharynx  
-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐Level  of  the  hyoid  bond-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  
Laryngopharynx  
-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐Top  of  trachea-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  3  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

The  Nasopharynx:  
• Posterior  to  nasal  cavity,  inferior  to  the  sphenoid  bone,  superior  to  the  
level  of  the  soft  palate  
• Air  passageway  only  
• Soft  palate  and  uvula  close  nasopharynx  during  swallowing  (prevents  
food  from  entering  the  nasal  cavity)  
• Lining:  pseudostratified  columnar  epithelium  
• Posterior  nasal  aperture:  opening  of  the  nasal  cavity  
• Pharyngeal  tonsil  (adenoids)  on  posterior  wall  
• Pharyngotympanic  (auditory)  tubes  open  into  the  lateral  walls  –  drain  
the  middle  ear  cavities  and  allow  middle  ear  pressure  to  equalize  with  
atmospheric  pressure  
 
The  Oropharynx:  
• Posterior  to  oral  cavity  
• From  uvula  to  level  of  hyoid  bone  
• Food  and  air  passageway  
• Lining:  stratified  squamous  epithelium  (more  protective  –  accommodates  increased  friction  and  greater  chemical  
trauma  accompanying  food  passage)  
• Isthmus  of  the  fauces:  opening  of  the  oral  cavity  
• Palatine  tonsils  –  in  the  lateral  walls  of  the  fauces  
• Lingual  tonsil  –  on  the  posterior  surface  of  the  tongue  
 
The  Laryngopharynx:  
• Posterior  to  the  upright  epiglottis  
• Food  and  air  passageway  
• Lining:  stratified  squamous  endothelium  
• Extends  to  the  larynx,  where  it  is  also  continuous  with  the  esophagus  
• NOTE:  esophagus  carries  food  and  fluids  to  the  stomach  (posterior  tube)  and  air  enters  the  larynx  (anterior  tube)  
• When  swallowing,  food  has  right  of  way  
 
The  Larynx  
 
Basic  anatomy:  
• Voice  box  (extends  for  about  5cm)  
• Attaches  to  the  hyoid  bone  and  opens  into  the  laryngopharynx  
• Continuous  with  the  trachea  
• Functions:  
-­‐ Provides  a  patent  (open)  airway  
-­‐ Routes  air  and  food  into  proper  channels  
-­‐ Voice  production  (houses  the  vocal  folds/vocal  cords)  
• Intricate  arrangement  of  nine  cartilages  connected  by  membranes  and  ligaments  (except  for  the  epiglottis,  all  
cartilages  are  hyaline)  
-­‐ Thyroid  cartilage  with  laryngeal  prominence  (Adam’s  apple)  
-­‐ Cricoid  cartilage  (below  thyroid  cartilage)  
-­‐ Paired  arytenoid,  cuneiform  and  corniculate  cartilages  –  form  part  of  the  lateral  and  posterior  walls  of  the  
larynx  (the  most  important  are  the  pyramid-­‐shaped  arytenoid  cartilages  which  anchor  the  vocal  folds)  
-­‐ Epiglottis  –  elastic  cartilage  (almost  entirely  covered  by  a  taste  bud-­‐containing  mucosa)  à  during  
swallowing,  the  epiglottis  tips  to  cover  the  laryngeal  inlet  
• Vocal  ligaments:  
-­‐ Attach  the  arytenoid  cartilages  to  the  thyroid  cartilage  
-­‐ Composed  of  elastic  fibers  
-­‐ From  the  vocal  cords  (true  vocal  cords)  
§ Glottis  -­‐  The  vocal  cords  and  the  opening  between  them  
§ Folds  vibrate  to  produce  sound  as  air  rushes  up  from  the  lungs  
§ Inferior  to  false  vocal  cords  
• Vestibular  folds  (false  vocal  cords)  
-­‐ Superior  to  true  vocal  cords  
-­‐ No  part  in  sounds  production  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  4  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐ Help  to  close  glottis  during  swallowing  


• Superior  portion  of  larynx  (above  vocal  folds)  is  lined  with  stratified  squamous  epithelium  
• Below  the  vocal  folds  is  lined  with  pseudostratified  ciliated  columnar  epithelium  (acts  as  a  dust  filter)  

 
Voice  production:  
• Speech:  intermittent  release  of  expired  air  while  opening  and  closing  the  glottis  
• Pitch  is  determined  by  the  length  and  tension  of  the  vocal  cords  (changed  by  muscles  around  the  cartilages)  
• Loudness  depends  upon  the  force  of  the  air  
• Chambers  of  pharynx,  oral,  nasal  and  sinus  cavities  amplify  and  enhance  sound  quality  
• Sound  is  ‘shaped  ‘  into  language  by  muscles  of  the  pharynx,  tongue,  soft  palate  and  lips  
 
Sphincter  functions  of  the  larynx  
• Vocal  folds  may  act  as  a  sphincter  to  prevent  air  passage  
• Example:  Valsalva’s  maneuver  
-­‐ Glottis  closes  to  prevent  exhalation  
-­‐ Abdominal  muscles  contract  
-­‐ Intra-­‐abdominal  pressure  rises  
-­‐ Helps  to  empty  the  rectum  or  stabilizes  the  trunk  during  heavy  lifting  
 
The  Trachea  
• Windpipe  
• Descends  from  the  larynx  to  the  mediastinum  
• Ends  by  dividing  into  the  two  main  bronchi  or  the  midthorax  
• Very  flexible  and  mobile  à  stretches  and  moves  inferiorly  during  inspiration  and  recoils  during  expiration  
• Wall  composed  of  three  layers:  
1. Mucosa:  ciliated  pseudostratified  epithelium  with  goblet  cells  
2. Submucosa:  connective  tissue  with  seromucous  glands  
3. Adventitia:  outermost  layer  made  of  connective  tissue  that  encases  the  C-­‐shaped  rings  of  hyaline  cartilage  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  5  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

• Cartilage  rings  prevent  the  airway  from  collapsing  and  keep  the  airway  patent  despite  the  pressure  changes  that  
occur  during  breathing  
• Trachealis  muscle:  
-­‐ Connect  the  open  posterior  parts  of  the  cartilage  rings  
-­‐ This  muscle  allows  the  esophagus  to  expand  anteriorly  as  swallowed  food  passes  through  it  
-­‐ Contraction  decreases  the  diameter  of  the  trachea,  causing  expired  air  to  rush  upward  from  the  lungs  with  
greater  force  (to  expel  mucus  from  the  trachea  when  we  cough)  
• Carina  
-­‐ Last  tracheal  cartilage  
-­‐ Point  where  trachea  branches  into  two  bronchi  
 

The  Bronchi  and  Subdivisions  


• Air  passages  undergo  23  orders  of  branching  
• Branching  pattern  called  the  bronchial  (respiratory)  tree  
• The  bronchial  tree  is  the  site  where  conducting  zone  structures  give  way  to  respiratory  zone  structures  
 
Conducting  zone  structures:  
• Trachea  à  right  and  left  primary  (main)  bronchi  
• Each  main  bronchus  enters  the  hilum  of  one  lung    
-­‐ Right  main  bronchus  is  wider,  shorter,  and  more  vertical  than  the  left  (this  is  where  foreign  objects  will  get  
lodged)  
• Each  main  bronchus  branches  into  lobar  (secondary)  bronchi  (three  right,  two  left  à  each  lobar  bronchus  supplies  
one  lobe)  
• Each  lobar  bronchus  branches  into  segmental  (tertiary)  bronchi  
-­‐ Segmental  bronchi  divide  repeatedly  
• Bronchioles  are  less  than  1mm  in  diameter  
• Terminal  bronchioles  are  the  smallest,  less  than  0.5mm  diameter  
• the  tissue  composition  of  the  walls  of  the  main  bronchi  is  the  same  as  the  trachea,    but  as  the  conducting  tubes  
become  smaller,  the  following  structural  changes  occur:  
-­‐ support  structure  changes  :  cartilage  rings  give  way  to  plates  of  cartilage;  cartilage  absent  from  
bronchioles  
-­‐ epithelium  type  changes:  epithelium  changes  from  pseudostratified  columnar  to  cuboidal;  cilia  and  goblet  
cells  become  sparse  
-­‐ relative  amount  of  smooth  muscle  increases  
 
Respiratory  zone  structures:  
• defined  by  the  presence  of  alveoli  (thin-­‐walled  sacs)  
• respiratory  bronchioles,  alveolar  ducts,  alveolar  sacs  (clusters  of  
alveoli)  
• ~300  million  alveoli  account  for  most  of  the  lungs’  volume  and  are  
the  main  site  for  gas  exchange  
• NOTE:  the  alveoli  and  alveolar  sacs  are  different  structures:  
-­‐ Alveolar  sacs:  like  a  bunch  of  grapes  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  6  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐ Alveoli:  an  individual  grape  (site  of  gas  exchange)  


 
• The  Respiratory  membrane  
-­‐ Alveolar  walls:  composed  of  a  single  layer  of  squamous  epithelial  cells  (type  I  cells)  
-­‐ ~0.5µm  thick  air-­‐blood  barrier  that  has  gas  on  one  side  and  blood  flowing  past  on  the  other  
-­‐ Respiratory  membrane:  the  alveolar  and  capillary  walls  and  their  fused  basement  membrane  
-­‐ Gas  exchange  occurs  readily  by  simple  diffusion  across  the  respiratory  membrane  (O2  passes  from  the  
alveolus  into  the  blood,  and  CO2  leaves  the  blood  to  enter  the  gas-­‐filled  alveolus)  
-­‐ Amongst  the  type  I  cells  are  cuboidal  type  II  cells  which  secrete  a  fluid  containing  a  detergent-­‐like  
substance  called  surfactant  that  coats  the  gas-­‐exposed  alveolar  surfaces  (reduces  surface  tension  of  the  
alveolar  fluid  and  keeps  alveoli  open).    Also  secrete  antimicrobial  proteins.  
• Alveoli  
-­‐ Three  significant  features:  
§ Surrounded  by  fine  elastic  fibers  
§ open  alveolar  pores  connecting  adjacent  alveoli  that  allow  fair  pressure  throughout  the  lung  to  
be  equalized  and  provide  alternate  air  routes  
§ houses  alveolar  macrophages  that  keep  alveolar  surfaces  sterile  
 
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  7  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

 
The  Lungs  and  Pleurae  
• the  lungs  occupy  all  of  the  thoracic  cavity  except  the  mediastinum  

 
Gross  anatomy  of  the  lungs:  
• each  lung  is  surrounded  by  pleurae  and  connected  to  the  mediastinum  by  vascular  and  bronchial  attachments  
(called  the  lung  root)  
• costal  surfaces:  anterior,  lateral,  and  posterior  surfaces  
• apex:  superior  tip  
• base:  inferior  surface  that  rests  on  the  diaphragm  
• hilum:  on  mediastinal  surface;  site  for  attachment  of  blood  vessels,  bronchi,  lymphatic  vessels  and  nerves  
• cardiac  notch  of  the  left  lung:  concavity  that  accommodates  the  heart  
• Left  lung:  
-­‐ Smaller  
-­‐ Two  lobes  –  superior  and  inferior  lobs  
-­‐ Separated  by  an  oblique  fissure  
• Right  lung:  
-­‐ Three  lobes  –  superior,  middle  and  inferior  lobes  
-­‐ Separated  by  horizontal  and  oblique  fissures  
• Bronchopulmonary  segments  (10  right,  8-­‐9  left):  
-­‐ In  each  lobe  
-­‐ Separated  from  one  another  by  connective  tissue  septa  
-­‐ Each  segment  is  served  by  its  own  artery  and  vein  and  receives  air  from  an  individual  segmental  (tertiary)  
bronchus  

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  8  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐ Important  because  pulmonary  disease  is  often  confined  to  one  or  a  few  segments  –  their  connective  tissue  
partitions  allow  diseased  segments  to  be  surgically  removed  without  damaging  neighbouring  healthy  
segments  and  impairing  their  blood  supply  
• Lobules  are  the  smallest  subdivisions  –  served  by  bronchioles  and  their  branches  
 
NOTE:  the  ventilation  and  blood  supply  of  each  section  of  the  lungs  if  not  equal  à  blood:air  ratio  is  not  equal  

 
 
Blood  supply  and  innervation  of  the  lungs:  
• Two  circulations  in  the  lungs:  the  pulmonary  and  bronchial  circulations  
• Pulmonary  circulation:  
-­‐ Low  pressure,  high  volume  
§ Because  the  blood  travels  a  short  distance  and  it  is  at  relatively  the  same  level  of  your  body  as  the  
heart  (so  the  body  doesn’t  have  to  pump  against  gravity)  
-­‐ Pulmonary  arteries  delivers  deoxygenated  blood  to  the  lungs  
§ Arteries  branch  profusely,  along  with  bronchi  
§ Feed  into  the  pulmonary  capillary  network  surrounding  the  alveoli  
-­‐ Pulmonary  veins  carry  freshly  oxygenated  blood  from  the  respiratory  zone  back  to  the  heart  
• Systemic  circulation:  
-­‐ High  pressure,  low  volume  
-­‐ Bronchial  arteries  provide  oxygenated  blood  to  lung  tissue  
§ Arise  from  aorta  and  enter  the  lungs  at  the  hilum  
§ Supply  all  lung  tissue  except  the  alveoli  (alveoli  receives  blood  from  pulmonary  circulation)  
-­‐ Bronchial  veins  anastomoses  with  pulmonary  veins  
-­‐ most  venous  blood  returns  to  the  heart  via  pulmonary  veins  
• all  of  the  body’s  blood  passes  through  the  lungs  about  once  each  minute  
• lungs  are  innervated  by  parasympathetic  and  sympathetic  motor  fibers,  and  visceral  sensory  fibers  
-­‐ nerve  fibers  enter  each  lung  through  the  pulmonary  plexus  on  the  lung  root  
-­‐ run  along  the  bronchial  tubes  and  blood  vessels  into  the  lungs  
-­‐ parasympathetic  fibers  constrict  the  air  tubes,  sympathetic  nervous  system  dilates  them  
 
The  pleurae:  
• thin,  double-­‐layered  serosa  
• parietal  pleura  on  thoracic  wall  and  superior  face  of  diaphragm  
• visceral  pleura  on  external  lung  surface  
• pleural  fluid  fills  the  slitlike  pleural  cavity  
-­‐ provides  lubrication  during  breathing    
-­‐ creates  surface  tension  
• helps  divide  the  thoracic  cavity  into  three  chambers:  the  central  mediastinum  and  two  lateral  pleural  
compartments  (each  containing  a  lung)  
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  9  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

Mechanics  of  Breathing  


 
Breathing,  or  pulmonary  ventilation,  consists  of  two  phases:  
1. inspiration:  gases  flow  into  the  lungs  
2. expiration:  gases  exit  the  lungs  
 
Pressure  relationships  in  the  thoracic  cavity  
• Atmospheric  pressure  (Patm)  
-­‐ pressure  exerted  by  the  air  surrounding  the  body  
-­‐ 760  mm  Hg  at  sea  level  
• respiratory  pressures  are  always  described  relative  to  atmospheric  pressure  
-­‐ negative  respiratory  pressure  is  less  than  Patm  
-­‐ positive  respiratory  pressure  is  greater  than  Patm  
-­‐ zero  respiratory  pressure  =  Patm    
-­‐ example:  if  negative  respiratory  pressure  =  -­‐4  mm  Hg,  the  pressure  in  that  area  is  lower  than  atmospheric  
pressure  by  4  mm  Hg  (760  –  4  =  756  mm  Hg)  
 
Intrapulmonary  pressure:  
• intra-­‐alveolar/intrapulmonary  pressure  (Ppul)  
• pressure  in  the  alveoli  
• fluctuates  with  breathing  
• always  eventually  equalizes  with  atmospheric  pressure  
 
Intrapleural  pressure:  
• pressure  in  the  pleural  cavity  
• fluctuates  with  breathing  
• always  a  negative  pressure  (<Patm  and  <  Ppul)  
• negative  Pip  is  caused  by  opposing  forces:  
-­‐ two  inward  forces  pull  the  lungs  (visceral  pleura)  away  from  the  thorax  (parietal  pleura)  and  cause  lung  
collapse:  
§ elastic  recoil  of  lungs  decreases  lung  size  
§ surface  tension  of  alveolar  fluid  reduces  alveolar  size  
-­‐ one  outward  force  tends  to  enlarge  the  lungs  
§ elasticity  of  the  chest  wall  pulls  the  thorax  outward  
• Which  force  wins?    Neither.    Pleural  fluid  secures  the  pleurae  together.    They  move  from  side  to  side  easily  but  
they  remain  closely  apposed.  Net  result  is  negative  Pip  
• The  amount  of  pleural  fluid  in  the  pleural  cavity  must  remain  minimal  in  order  for  the  negative  Pip  to  be  maintained  
• Pip  =  Patm  causes  immediate  lung  collapse  
• (Ppul  -­‐  Pip)  =  transpulmonary  pressure  
-­‐ Keeps  the  airways  open  and  reduces  the  work  of  breathing  
-­‐ The  greater  the  transpulmonary  pressure,  the  larger  the  lungs  
 
Pulmonary  ventilation  
• Consists  of  inspiration  and  expiration  
• Mechanical  processes  that  depend  on  volume  changes  in  the  thoracic  cavity  
-­‐ Volume  changes  lead  to  pressure  changes  
-­‐ Pressure  changes  lead  to  the  flow  of  gases  to  equalize  pressure  
 
Boyle’s  Law:  
• The  relationship  between  the  pressure  and  the  volume  of  a  gas  
• Pressure  varies  inversely  with  volume:  
P1V1  =  P2V2  
 
REMEMBER:  GAS  ALWAYS  FLOWS  DOWN  ITS  PRESSURE  GRADIENT  à  FROM  HIGH  PRESSURE  TO  LOW  PRESSURE  
 
Inspiration:  
• Inspiratory  muscles:  diaphragm  and  external  intercostals  
• An  active  process:  
-­‐ Inspiratory  muscles  contract  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  10  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐ Thoracic  volume  increases  


-­‐ Lungs  are  stretched  and  intrapulmonary  volume  increases  
-­‐ Intrapulmonary  pressure  drops  (to  -­‐1  mm  Hg)  
-­‐ Air  flows  into  the  lungs,  down  its  pressure  gradient,  until  Ppul  =  Patm  
• Deep  inspiration:  scalenes,  sternocleidomastoid  muscle  and  pectoralis  minor  

   
Expiration:  
• Quiet  expiration  is  normally  a  passive  process:  
-­‐ Inspiratory  muscles  relax  
-­‐ Thoracic  cavity  volume  decreases  
-­‐ Elastic  lungs  recoil  and  intrapulmonary  volume  decreases  
-­‐ Ppul  rises  
-­‐ Air  flows  out  of  the  lungs  down  its  pressure  gradient  until  Ppul  =  0  
• Forced  expiration:  active  process  using  abdominal  and  internal  intercostal  muscles  

 
 
 
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  11  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

Physical  Factors  Influencing  Pulmonary  Ventilation  


 
Inspiratory  muscles  consume  energy  to  overcome  three  factors  that  hinder  air  passage  and  pulmonary  ventilation:  
• Airway  resistance  
• Alveolar  surface  tension  
• Lung  compliance  
 
1. Airway  resistance:  
• Friction  is  the  major  nonelastic  source  of  resistance  to  gas  flow  
• The  relationship  between  flow  (F),  pressure  (P),  and  resistance  (R)  is     F  =  
∆P/R  
-­‐ ∆P  is  the  pressure  gradient  between  the  atmosphere  and  the  
alveoli  (2  mm  Hg  or  less  during  normal  quiet  breathing)  
-­‐ Gas  flow  changes  inversely  with  resistance  
• Resistance  is  determined  mostly  by  diameters  of  the  conducting  tubes  
• Resistance  is  usually  insignificant  because:  
-­‐ Large  airway  diameters  in  the  first  part  of  the  conducting  zone  
-­‐ Progressive  branching  of  airways  as  they  get  smaller,  increasing  
the  total  cross-­‐sectional  area  
• Resistance  disappears  at  the  terminal  bronchioles  where  diffusion  drives  
gas  movement  
 
2. Alveolar  surface  tension:  
• Surface  tension:  
-­‐ Attracts  liquid  molecules  to  one  another  at  a  gas-­‐liquid  interface  
-­‐ Draws  the  liquid  molecules  closer  together  and  reduces  their  contact  with  the  dissimilar  gas  molecules  
-­‐ Resists  any  force  that  tends  to  increase  the  surface  area  of  the  liquid  
• Major  component  of  the  liquid  film  that  coats  the  alveolar  walls  is  water  (highly  polar,  high  surface  tension)  
-­‐ Water  is  always  acting  to  reduce  the  alveoli  to  their  smallest  possible  size  
• Alveolar  film  contains  surfactant:  
-­‐ Detergent-­‐like  lipid  and  protein  complex  produced  by  type  II  alveolar  cells  
-­‐ Reduces  surface  tension  of  alveolar  fluid  and  discourages  alveolar  collapse  
-­‐ Insufficient  quantity  in  premature  infants  causes  infant  respiratory  distress  syndrome  
 
3. Lung  compliance:  
• Healthy  lungs  are  unbelievably  stretchy  and  this  distensibility  is  referred  to  as  lung  compliance  
• A  measure  of  the  change  in  lung  volume  that  occurs  with  a  given  change  in  transpulmonary  pressure  
• Normally  high  due  to:  
-­‐ Distensibility  (expansion)  of  the  lung  tissue  (healthy  lungs  –  distensibility  is  high)  
-­‐ Alveolar  surface  tension  (healthy  lungs  –  surface  tension  kept  low  by  surfactant)  
• The  higher  the  lung  compliance,  the  easier  it  is  to  expand  the  lungs  at  any  given  transpulmonary  pressure  
• High  compliance  favours  efficient  ventilation  
• Diminished  by:  
-­‐ Nonelastic  scar  tissue  replaces  normal  lung  tissue  (fibrosis)    
-­‐ Reduced  production  of  surfactant  
-­‐ Decreased  flexibility  of  the  thoracic  cage  
• Homeostatic  imbalances  that  reduce  compliance  
-­‐ Deformities  of  thorax  
-­‐ Ossification  of  the  costal  cartilages  
-­‐ Paralysis  of  intercostal  muscles  
 
Respiratory  volumes  and  pulmonary  function  tests  
 
The  amount  of  air  flushed  in  and  out  of  the  lungs  depends  on  the  conditions  of  inspiration  and  expiration.    Consequently,  
several  respiratory  volumes  can  be  described.    Specific  combinations  of  these  respiratory  volumes,  called  respiratory  
capacities,  are  measured  to  gain  information  about  a  person’s  respiratory  status.  
 
Respiratory  volumes:  
• Used  to  asses  a  person’s  respiratory  status:  

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  12  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐ Tidal  volume  (TV)  


-­‐ Inspiratory  reserve  volume  (IRV)  
-­‐ Expiratory  reserve  volume  (ERV)  
-­‐ Residual  volume  (RV)  
 

 
 
Respiratory  capacities:  
• Inspiratory  capacity  (IC)  
• Functional  residual  capacity  (FRC)  
• Vital  capacity  (VC)  
• Total  lung  capacity  (TLC)  
 

 
 
Dead  space:  
• Some  inspired  air  never  contributes  to  gas  exchange  
• Anatomical  dead  space:  volume  of  the  conducting  zone  conduits  (~150mL)  
• Alveolar  dead  space:  alveoli  that  cease  to  act  in  gas  exchange  due  to  collapse  or  obstruction  
• Total  dead  space:  sum  of  above  nonuseful  volumes  
 
Pulmonary  function  tests:  
• Spirometer:  instrument  used  to  measure  respiratory  volumes  and  capacities  
• Spirometry  can  distinguish  between:  
-­‐ Obstructive  pulmonary  disease  –  increased  airway  resistance  (eg.  bronchitis);  and  
-­‐ Restrictive  disorders  –  reduction  in  total  lung  capacity  due  to  structural  or  functional  lung  changes  (eg.  
fibrosis  or  TB)  
• Minute  ventilation:  total  amount  of  gas  flow  into  or  out  of  the  respiratory  tract  in  one  minute  
• Forced  vital  capacity  (FVC):  gas  forcibly  expelled  after  taking  a  deep  breath  (subject  takes  a  deep  breath  and  then  
forcefully  exhales  maximally  and  as  rapidly  as  possible)  
• Forced  expiratory  volume  (FEV):  the  amount  of  gas  expelled  during  specific  time  intervals  of  the  FVC  
• Increases  in  TLC,  FRC  and  RV  may  occur  as  a  result  of  obstructive  disease  (hyperinflation  of  the  lungs)  
• Reduction  in  VC,  TLC,  FRC  and  RV  result  from  restrictive  disease  
 
Alveolar  ventilation:  
• Alveolar  ventilation  rate  (AVR):  flow  of  gases  into  and  out  of  the  alveoli  during  a  particular  time  
AVR  =  frequency  (breaths/min)  x  (TV  –  dead  space)  (mL/breath)  
• Dead  space  is  normally  constant  
• Rapid,  shallow  breathing  decreases  AVR  
• Increasing  the  volume  of  each  inspiration  (breathing  depth)  enhances  AVR  and  gas  exchange  more  than  raising  the  
respiratory  rate  
 
Nonrespiratory  are  movements  
• Many  processes  other  than  breathing  move  air  into  or  out  of  the  lungs  

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  13  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

• These  processes  may  modify  the  normal  respiratory  rhythm  


• Most  result  from  reflex  action  
• Examples:  cough,  sneeze,  crying,  laughing,  hiccups,  yawn  

 
 
Gas  Exchange  between  the  Blood,  Lungs  and  Tissues  
• External  respiration  –  oxygen  enters  and  carbon  dioxide  leaves  the  blood  in  the  lungs  by  diffusion  
• Internal  respiration  –  the  same  gases  move  in  opposite  directions,  also  by  diffusion  
 
Basic  properties  of  gases  
 
Dalton’s  Law  of  Partial  Pressure:  
• States  that:    the  total  pressure  exerted  by  a  mixture  of  gases  is  the  sum  of  the  pressures  exerted  independently  by  
each  gas  in  the  mixture  
• The  partial  pressure  (the  pressure  exerted  by  each  gas)  of  each  gas  is  directly  proportional  to  its  percentage  in  the  
mixture  
• At  high  altitudes,  where  the  atmosphere  is  less  influenced  by  gravity,  partial  pressures  decline  in  direct  proportion  
to  the  decrease  in  atmospheric  pressure  
 
Henry’s  Law:  
• States  that:  when  a  mixture  of  gases  is  in  contact  with  a  liquid,  each  gas  will  dissolve  in  the  liquid  in  proportion  to  
its  partial  pressure  
• The  greater  the  concentration  of  a  particular  gas  in  the  gas  phase,  the  more  and  the  faster  that  gas  will  go  into  
solution  in  the  liquid  
• At  equilibrium,  the  partial  pressures  in  the  two  phases  will  be  equal  
• The  amount  of  gas  that  will  dissolve  in  a  liquid  also  depends  upon  its  solubility  (and  also  on  the  temperature  of  the  
liquid)  
-­‐ Carbon  dioxide  is  20  times  more  soluble  in  water  than  oxygen  
-­‐ Very  little  nitrogen  dissolves  in  water  
 
Composition  of  alveolar  gas  
• Alveoli  contain  more  CO2  and  water  vapour  than  atmospheric  air,  due  to:  
-­‐ Gas  exchanges  in  the  lungs  (O2  diffuses  from  the  alveoli  into  the  pulmonary  blood  and  CO2  diffuses  in  the  
opposite  direction)  
-­‐ Humidification  of  air  by  conducting  passages  
-­‐ Mixing  of  alveolar  gas  that  occurs  with  each  breath  (gas  in  the  alveoli  is  a  mixture  of  newly  inspired  gases  
and  gases  remaining  in  the  respiratory  passageways  between  breaths)  
• The  alveoli  partial  pressures  of  O2  and  CO2  are  easily  changed  by  increasing  breathing  depth  and  rate  
-­‐ A  high  AVR  (alveolar  ventilation  rate)  brings  more  O2  into  the  alveoli,  increasing  PO2  and  rapidly  eliminating  
CO2  from  the  lungs  
 
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  14  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

External  respiration  (pulmonary  gas  exchange  -­‐  respiration  at  lung  level)  
• Exchange  of  O2  and  CO2  across  the  respiratory  membrane  
• Three  factors  influence  movement  of  oxygen  and  carbon  dioxide  across  the  respiratory  membrane:  
1. Partial  pressure  gradients  and  gas  solubilities  
2. Ventilation-­‐perfusion  coupling  
3. Structural  characteristics  of  the  respiratory  membrane  
 
1. Partial  pressure  gradients  and  gas  solubilities:  
• Partial  pressure  gradients  of  O2  and  CO2  drive  the  diffusion  of  these  
gases  across  the  respiratory  membrane  
• Partial  pressure  gradient  for  O2  in  the  lungs  is  steep  
-­‐ Venous  blood  PO2  =  40  mm  Hg      
 steep  gradient  between  these  points  
-­‐ Alveolar  PO2  =  104  mm  Hg        
 (so  O2  diffuses  rapidly)  
§ O2  partial  pressure  reach  equilibrium  of  104  mm  Hg  
in  ~0.25  seconds,  about  1/3  the  time  a  red  blood  
cell  is  in  a  pulmonary  capillary  à  so  blood  can  flow  
through  the  pulmonary  capillaries  three  times  as  
quickly  and  still  be  adequately  oxygenated.  
§ RBC  transit  time  –  only  a  short  time  for  loading  of  
O2  (in  lungs)  
• Partial  pressure  gradient  for  CO2  in  the  lungs  is  less  steep  
-­‐ Venous  blood  PCO2  =  45  mm  Hg  
-­‐ Alveolar  PCO2  =  40  mm  Hg  
• CO2  diffuses  in  equal  amounts  with  oxygen.    WHY?  Because  CO2  is  
about  20  times  more  soluble  in  plasma  and  alveolar  fluid  than  
oxygen  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. Ventilation-­‐perfusion  coupling  
• Ventilation:  the  amount  of  gas  reaching  the  alveoli  
• Perfusion:  blood  flow  reaching  the  alveoli  
• Ventilation  and  perfusion  must  be  matched  (coupled)  for  efficient  gas  exchange  
• Changes  in  PO2  in  the  alveoli  cause  changes  in  the  diameters  of  the  arterioles  (pulmonary  blood  vessels):  
-­‐ Where  alveolar  O2  is  high  (ventilation  is  maximal),  arterioles  dilate  
§ Increases  blood  flow  into  the  associated  pulmonary  capillaries  
-­‐ Where  alveolar  O2  is  low  (ventilation  is  inadequate),  arterioles  constrict  
§ Blood  is  redirected  to  respiratory  areas  where  PO2  is  high  and  oxygen  pickup  may  be  more  
efficient  
• Changes  in  PCO2  in  the  alveoli  cause  changes  in  the  diameters  of  the  bronchioles:  
-­‐ Where  alveolar  CO2  is  high,  the  bronchioles  dilate  
§ So  CO2  is  eliminated  from  the  body  more  rapidly  
-­‐ Where  alveolar  CO2  is  low,  bronchioles  constrict  
• SO:  to  synchronize  alveolar  ventilation  and  pulmonary  perfusion,  the  diameters  of  local  bronchioles  and  arterioles  
are  changed  
 
   
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  15  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

 
3. Thickness  and  surface  area  of  the  respiratory  membrane  
• Respiratory  membranes  
-­‐ 0.5  to  1  µm  thick  
-­‐ Large  total  surface  area  (40  times  that  of  one’s  skin)  
• Thicken  if  lungs  become  waterlogged  and  edematous  (as  in  pneumonia  or  left  heart  failure)  –  the  total  time  that  
RBCs  are  in  transit  through  the  pulmonary  capillaries  may  not  be  enough  for  adequate  gas  exchange  
• The  greater  the  surface  area  of  the  respiratory  membrane,  the  more  gas  can  diffuse  across  it  in  a  given  time  period  
• Reduction  in  surface  area  with  emphysema,  when  walls  of  adjacent  alveoli  break  down  
 
Internal  respiration  (capillary  gas  exchange  in  the  body  tissues)  
• Partial  pressures  and  diffusion  gradients  are  reversed  compared  to  external  respiration  
-­‐ PO2  in  tissue  (=  40  mm  Hg)  is  always  lower  than  in  systemic  arterial  blood  (=  100  mg  Hg)  à  so  O2  moves  
rapidly  from  the  blood  into  the  tissues  until  equilibrium  is  reached  
-­‐ PO2  of  venous  blood  is  40  mm  Hg  and  PCO2  is  45  mm  Hg  
 
SUMMARY:  the  gas  exchanges  that  occur  between  the  blood  and  the  alveoli  and  between  the  blood  and  the  tissue  cells  
take  place  by  simple  diffusion  driven  by  the  partial  pressure  gradients  of  O2  and  CO2  that  exist  on  the  opposites  side  of  the  
exchange  membranes.  
 
 
Transport  of  Respiratory  Gases  by  Blood  
 
Oxygen  transport           (two  ways  of  transporting  O2  –  attached  to  hemoglobin  or  in  plasma)  
• Molecular  oxygen  is  carried  in  the  blood  in  two  ways:  
-­‐ Bound  to  hemoglobin  within  red  blood  cells  (carries  98.5%  of  oxygen  in  blood)  
-­‐ Dissolved  in  plasma  (carries  1.5%  of  oxygen  in  blood)  
-­‐ Four  O2  per  hemoglobin  (Hb)  
 
Association  of  Oxygen  and  hemoglobin:  
• Hemoglobin:  four  polypeptide  chains,  each  bound  to  an  iron-­‐containing  heme  group  
-­‐ Each  Hb  molecule  can  combine  with  four  molecules  of  O2  
-­‐ oxygen  loading  is  rapid  and  reversible  
• Oxyhemoglobin  (HbO2):  hemoglobin-­‐O2  combination  
• reduced  hemoglobin  (HHb):  hemoglobin  that  has  released  O2  
 
 
 
à  Reversible  reaction  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  16  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

 
• loading  and  unload  of  O2  is  facilitated  by  change  in  shape  of  Hb  
-­‐ as  O2  binds,  Hb  affinity  (binding  strength)  for  O2  increases  (more  readily  take  up  more  oxygens)  
-­‐ as  O2  is  released,  Hb  affinity  for  O2  decreases  
• fully  (100%)  saturated  if  all  four  heme  groups  are  carrying  O2  
• partially  saturated  when  one  to  three  hemes  carry  O2  
• Rate  of  loading  and  unloading  of  O2  is  regulated  by:  
-­‐ PO2  
-­‐ Temperature  
-­‐ Blood  pH  
-­‐ PCO2  
 
Influence  of  PO2  on  Hemoglobin  saturation:  
• Oxygen-­‐hemoglobin  dissociation  curve  
• Hemoglobin  saturation  plotted  against  PO2  is  not  linear  
• S-­‐shaped  curve  
• Shows  how  binding  and  release  of  O2  is  influenced  by  the  PO2  
-­‐ Steep  slope  for  PO2  values  between  10  and  50  mm  
Hg  
-­‐ Plateaus  between  70  and  100  mm  Hg  
• In  arterial  blood  (under  resting  conditions)  
-­‐ PO2  =  100  mm  Hg  
-­‐ Contains  20ml  of  oxygen  per  100ml  blood  (20  vol  %)  
-­‐ Hb  is  98%  saturated  
• Further  increases  in  PO2  (eg.  breathing  deeply)  produce  
minimal  increases  in  O2  binding  
• As  arterial  blood  flows  through  the  systemic  capillaries,  
about  5ml  of  O2  per  100ml  of  blood  is  released  
• In  venous  blood  
-­‐ PO2  =  40  mm  Hg  
-­‐ Contains  15ml  of  oxygen  per  100ml  blood  (15  vol  %)  
-­‐ Hb  is  75%  saturated  
-­‐ NOTE:  deoxygenated  blood  is  not  completely  void  of  
oxygen  
• Hemoglobin  is  almost  completely  saturated  at  a  PO2  of  70  
mm  Hg  
-­‐ Further  increases  in  PO2  produce  only  small  increases  in  O2  binding  
-­‐ This  means  O2  loading  and  delivery  to  tissues  is  adequate  when  PO2  is  below  normal  levels  (a  situation  
common  at  higher  altitudes  and  in  people  with  cardiopulmonary  disease)  
• Only  20-­‐25%  of  bound  O2  is  unloaded  during  one  systemic  circulation  
-­‐ Substantial  amounts  of  O2  are  still  available  in  venous  return  
-­‐ Consequently,  of  O2  drops  to  very  low  levels  in  the  tissues  (as  might  occur  during  vigorous  exercise)  more  
oxygen  dissociates  from  hemoglobin  to  be  used  by  cells  
-­‐ Respiratory  rate  or  cardiac  output  need  not  increase  
 
Other  factors  influencing  hemoglobin  saturation:  
+
• Changes  in  temperature,  H ,  PCO2  and  BPG  (enzyme)  
NOTE:  BPG,  which  binds  reversibly  with  hemoglobin,  is  produced  by  RBCs  as  they  break  down  glucose  by  the  anaerobic  process  of  
glycolysis  
-­‐ Modify  the  three-­‐dimensional  structure  of  hemoglobin  
-­‐ An  increase  in  any  of  these  factors  causes  a  decrease  in  Hb’s  affinity  for  O2  
§ Enhance  O2  unloading  
§ Shift  the  O2-­‐hemoglobin  dissociation  curve  to  the  right  
-­‐ Decrease  in  any  of  these  factors  increases  Hb’s  affinity  for  O2  
§ Decreases  oxygen  unloading  
§ Shifts  dissociation  curve  to  the  left  
• Occur  in  systemic  capillaries  where  oxygen  unloading  is  the  goal  
• As  cells  metabolize  glucose  and  use  O2  
+
-­‐ PCO2  and  H  increase  in  concentration  in  capillary  blood  
§ Declining  pH  (acidosis)  and  increasing  PCO2  weakens  the  hemoglobin-­‐O2  bond  (Bohr  effect)  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  17  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐
Heat  production  increases  
§ Increasing  temperature  directly  and  indirectly  decreases  Hb  affinity  for  O2  
Homeostatic  imbalance:  
• Hypoxia:  inadequate  oxygen  delivery  to    body  tissues  
-­‐ Due  to  a  variety  of  causes:  
§ Too  few  RBCs       (anemic  hypoxia)  
§ Abnormal  or  too  little  Hb     (anemic  hypoxia)  
§ Blocked  circulation       (ischemic  hypoxia)  
§ Metabolic  poisons     (histoxic  hypoxia)  
§ Pulmonary  disease     (Hypoxemic  hypoxia)  
§ Carbon  monoxide       (hypoxemic  hypoxia)  
 
 
Carbon  dioxide  transport   (three  ways  of  transporting  CO2  –  in  plasma,  bound  
to  globin  or  as  a  bicarbonate  ion  in  plasma)  
• Co2  is  transported  in  the  blood  in  three  ways:  
-­‐ 7-­‐10%  dissolved  in  plasma  
-­‐ 20%  bound  to  globin  of  hemoglobin  (carbaminohemoglobin)  
§ CO2  transport  in  RBCs  does  not  compete  with  oxyhemoglobin  transport  because  carbon  dioxide  
binds  directly  to  the  amino  acids  of  globin  (and  not  to  the  heme)  
§ CO2  loading  and  unloading  to  and  from  Hb  are  directly  influenced  by  the  PCO2  and  the  degree  of  
Hb  oxygenation  –  CO2  rapidly  dissociates  from  hemoglobin  in  the  lungs,  where  the  PCO2  of  alveolar  
air  is  lower  than  that  in  blood.    Carbon  dioxide  is  loaded  in  the  tissues,  where  the  PCO2  is  higher  
than  that  in  the  blood  
-­‐
-­‐ 70%  transported  as  bicarbonate  ions  (HCO3 )  in  plasma  
 
• Transport  as  bicarbonate  ion  in  plasma:  
-­‐ In  systemic  capillaries  (at  tissues):  
§ Dissolved  CO2  diffuses  into  the  RBCs  and  combines  with  water,  forming  carbonic  acid  
§ Carbonic  acid  is  unstable  and  dissociates  into  hydrogen  ions  and  bicarbonate  ions  
+ -­‐
CO2      +      H2O      ↔      H2CO3      ↔      H      +      HCO3  
§ Most  of  the  above  occurs  in  RBCs,  where  carbonic  anhydrase  reversibly  and  rapidly  catalyses  the  
reaction  
+
§ H  ions  released  during  the  reaction  (as  well  as  CO2  itself)  bind  to  Hb,  triggering  the  Bohr  Effect  
+
(pH  weakens  the  hemoglobin-­‐O2  bond).    Because  of  the  buffering  effect  of  Hb,  the  liberated  H  
causes  little  change  in  pH  under  resting  conditions  à  so  blood  becomes  only  slightly  more  acidic  
-­‐  
§ HCO3 moves  quickly  from  RBCs  into  the  plasma,  where  it  is  carried  to  the  lungs  
-­‐ -­‐
§ The  chloride  shift  occurs:  outrush  of  HCO3  from  the  RBCs  is  balanced  as  Cl  moves  in  from  the  
plasma  (occurs  via  facilitated  diffusion  through  a  RBC  membrane  protein)  

 
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  18  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

-­‐ In  pulmonary  capillaries  (in  the  lungs):  


§ Process  is  reversed  
§ As  blood  moves  through  the  pulmonary  capillaries,  its  PO2  declines.    For  this  to  occur,  CO2  must  
first  be  freed  from  its  ‘bicarbonate  housing’  
-­‐   +
§ HCO3 moves  into  the  RBCs  and  binds  with  H  to  form  H2CO3  
§ H2CO3  is  split  by  carbonic  anhydrase  into  CO2  and  water  
§ CO2  diffuses  into  the  alveoli  

 
Influence  of  CO2  on  Blood  pH:  
-­‐
• HCO3  (generated  in  RBCs  and  diffuses  into  the  plasma)  in  plasma  is  the  alkaline  reserve  part  of  the  blood’s  
carbonic  acid-­‐bicarbonate  buffer  system  à  very  important  in  resisting  shifts  in  pH  
+ -­‐
• If  H  concentration  in  blood  rises,  excess  H+  is  removed  by  combing  with  HCO3  
+ +
• If  H  concentration  in  blood  drops,  H2CO3  dissociates,  releasing  H  
• Changes  in  respiratory  rate  can  also  alter  blood  pH  by  altering  the  amount  of  carbonic  acid  in  the  blood  
-­‐ slow  shallow  breathing  allows  CO2  to  accumulate  in  the  blood,  causing  pH  to  drop  
-­‐ rapid,  deep  breathing  quickly  flushes  CO2  out  of  the  blood,  reducing  carbonic  acid  levels  and  increasing  
blood  pH  
• Changes  in  ventilation  can  be  used  to  adjust  pH  when  it  is  disturbed  by  metabolic  factors  
 
 
Control  of  Respiration  
 
Neural  Mechanisms  
• The  control  of  respiration  primarily  involves  neurons  in  the  reticular  formation  of  the  medulla  and  pons  
 
Medullary  Respiratory  Centres:  
• Clustered  neurons  in  two  areas  of  the  medulla  oblongata  are  critically  important  in  respiration:  
1. Dorsal  respiratory  group  (DRG)  
2. Ventral  respiratory  group  (VRG)  
 
1. Dorsal  respiratory  group:  
-­‐ Near  the  root  of  cranial  nerve  IX  (posterior)  
-­‐ Integrates  input  from  peripheral  stretch  and  chemoreceptors  
-­‐ Communicates  the  information  to  the  VRG  
 
2.  Ventral  respiratory  group:  
-­‐ Rhythm-­‐generating  and  integrative  centre  
-­‐ Contains  groups  of  neurons  that  fire  during  inspiration  and  others  that  fire  during  expirations  
-­‐ Sets  eupnea:  normal  respiratory  rate  and  rhythm  (12-­‐15  breaths/minute)  
-­‐ Repeats  over  and  over  again  (inspiratory  phases  of  2  seconds,  expiratory  phases  of  3  seconds)  
-­‐ Inspiratory  neurons  excite  the  inspiratory  muscles  (diaphragm  and  external  intercostals)  via  the  phrenic  
and  intercostal  nerves  
-­‐ Expiratory  neurons  inhibit  the  inspiratory  muscles  (expiration  occurs  passively  as  the  inspiratory  muscles  
relax  and  the  lungs  recoil)  
SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  19  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

 
C  3  4  5  keeps  me  alive  (to  phrenic  nerve  –  attaches  to  diaphragm)  
 
Pontine  Respiratory  Centres:  
• Influence  and  modify  the  activity  of  medullary  neurons  
• Smooth  out  transition  between  inspiration  and  expiration  and  vice  versa  
• Transmit  impulses  to  the  VRG  of  the  medulla  that  modifies  and  fine-­‐tunes  the  breathing  rhythms  generated  by  the  
VRG  during  certain  activities  
• The  pontine  respiratory  centres  receive  input  from  higher  brain  centres  and  from  various  sensory  receptors  
 
Genesis  of  the  Respiratory  Rhythm:  
• Not  well  understood  
• Most  widely  accepted  hypothesis:  
-­‐ Reciprocal  inhibition  of  two  sets  of  interconnected  neuronal  networks  in  the  medulla  sets  the  rhythm  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  20  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

Factors  Influencing  Breathing  Rate  and  Depth  


• Depth  is  determined  by  how  actively  the  respiratory  centre  stimulates  the  respiratory  muscles  
-­‐ The  greater  the  stimulation,  the  greater  the  number  of  motor  units  excited  and  the  greater  the  force  of  
respiratory  muscle  contractions  
• Rate  is  determined  by  how  long  the  inspiratory  centre  is  active  
• Both  are  modified  in  response  to  changing  body  demands  
 
Chemical  factors:  
+
• Changing  levels  of  CO2,  O2  and  H  in  arterial  blood  
• Chemoreceptors:  sensors  responding  to  such  chemical  fluctuations  
-­‐ found  in  two  major  body  locations:  
§ central  chemoreceptors:  located  throughout  the  brain  stem,  including  the  ventrolateral  medulla  
§ peripheral  chemoreceptors:  located  in  the  aortic  arch  and  carotid  arteries  
• influence  of  PCO2:  
-­‐ Of  all  the  chemical  influencing  respiration,  CO2  is  the  most  potent  and  the  most  controlled  
-­‐ if  PCO2  levels  rise  (hypercapnia),  CO2  accumulates  in  the  brain  
+  
-­‐ CO2  is  hydrated;  resulting  in  carbonic  acid  dissociation,  releasing  H (pH  drops)  
-­‐ Increase  in  H+  stimulates  the  central  chemoreceptors  of  the  brain  stem    
-­‐ Chemoreceptors  synapse  with  the  respiratory  regulatory  centres,  increasing  the  depth  and  rate  of  
breathing  (increase  ventilation  rate)  
 

 
 
• Hyperventilation:  increased  depth  and  rate  of  breathing  that  exceeds  the  body’s  need  to  remove  CO2  
-­‐ Causes  CO2  levels  to  decline  (hypocapnia)  
§ May  cause  cerebral  vasoconstriction  (cerebral  blood  vessels  constrict)  and  cerebral  ischemia  
• Influence  of  PCO2:  abnormally  low  
-­‐ Respiration  is  inhibited  and  becomes  slow  and  shallow  
-­‐ Apnea:  period  of  breathing  cessation  that  occurs  when  PCO2  is  abnormally  low    

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  21  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

• Influence  of  PO2:  


-­‐ Peripheral  chemoreceptors  in  the  aortic  and  carotid  bodies  are  O2  sensors  (sit  with  barorecpetors)  
§ When  excited,  they  cause  the  respiratory  centres  to  increase  ventilation  
-­‐ Under  normal  conditions,  the  effect  of  declining  PO2  on  ventilation  is  slight  and  mostly  limited  to  
enhancing  the  sensitivity  of  peripheral  chemoreceptors  to  increased  PCO2  
-­‐ Substantial  drops  in  arterial  PO2  (to  60  mm  Hg)  must  occur  in  order  to  stimulate  increased  ventilation  
§ There  must  be  such  a  substantial  drop  because  hemoglobin  is  remains  almost  entirely  saturated  
unless  or  until  the  PO2  of  alveolar  gas  and  arterial  blood  falls  below  60  mm  Hg  
• Influence  of  arterial  pH:  
-­‐ Can  modify  respiratory  rate  and  rhythm  even  if  CO2  and  O2  levels  are  normal  
+
-­‐ Little  H  diffuses  from  the  blood  into  the  brain  (stopped  by  blood-­‐brain  barrier)  so  the  direct  effect  of  
+ +
arterial  H  concentration  on  central  chemoreceptors  is  insignificant  compared  to  the  effect  of  H  
generated  by  elevations  in  PCO2  
-­‐ Decreased  pH  may  reflect:  
§ CO2  retention  
§ Accumulation  of  lactic  acid  
§ Excess  ketone  bodies  in  patients  with  diabetes  mellitus  
-­‐ Respiratory  system  controls  will  attempt  to  raise  the  pH  by  increasing  respiratory  rate  and  depth  
(increased  ventilation)  
 
SUMMARY  OF  CHEMICAL  FACTORS:  
• Rising  CO2  levels  are  the  most  powerful  respiratory  stimulant  
+
-­‐ As  CO2  is  hydrated  in  brain  tissue,  liberated  H  acts  directly  on  the  central  chemoreceptors,  causing  a  
reflexive  increase  in  breathing  rate  and  depth  
• Normally  blood  PO2  affects  breathing  only  indirectly  by  influencing  peripheral  chemoreceptors  sensitivity  to  
changes  in  PCO2  
• When  arterial  PO2  falls  below  60  mm  Hg,  it  becomes  the  major  stimulus  for  respiration  (ventilation  is  increased  via  
reflexes  initiated  by  the  peripheral  nervous  chemoreceptors)  
• Changes  in  arterial  pH  resulting  from  CO2  retention  or  metabolic  factors  act  indirectly  through  the  peripheral  
chemoreceptors  to  promote  changes  in  ventilation,  which  in  turn  modify  arterial  PCO2  and  pH  
 
Influence  of  Higher  Brain  Centres:  
• Hypothalamic  controls:  act  through  the  limbic  system  to  modify  rate  and  depth  of  respiration  
-­‐ Strong  emotion  and  pain  send  signals  to  the  respiratory  centres,  modifying  respiratory  rate  and  depth  
-­‐ Example:  breath  holding  that  occurs  in  anger  or  gasping  with  pain  
-­‐ A  rise  in  body  temperature  acts  to  increase  respiratory  rate  
• Cortical  controls:  are  direct  signals  from  the  cerebral  motor  cortex  that  bypass  medullary  controls  during  voluntary  
control  of  breathing  
-­‐ Example:  voluntary  breath  holding  
-­‐ Our  ability  to  voluntarily  hold  our  breath  is  limited  because  the  brain  stem  respiratory  centres  
automatically  reinitiate  breathing  when  the  blood  concentration  of  CO2  reaches  critical  levels  
 

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  22  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)


lOMoARcPSD|3657985

 
Isometric  contraction:  good  way  of  proving  that  the  muscles  can  provide  information  to  the  brain  stem  to  affect  respiration  
 
Homeostatic  imbalances:  
 
Chronic  obstructive  pulmonary  disease  (COPD):  
• Exemplified  by  chronic  bronchitis  and  emphysema  
• Irreversible  decrease  in  the  ability  to  force  air  out  of  the  lungs  
• Other  common  features:  
-­‐ History  of  smoking  in  80%  of  patients  
-­‐ Dyspnea:  labored  breathing  (‘air  hunger’)  
-­‐ Coughing  and  frequent  pulmonary  infections  
-­‐ Most  victims  develop  respiratory  failure  (hypoventilation)  accompanied  by  respiratory  acidosis  
 
Asthma:  
• Characterized  by  coughing,  dyspnea  (difficulty  breathing),  wheezing,  chest  tightness  
• Marked  by  acute  exacerbations  followed  by  symptom-­‐free  periods  –  that  is,  the  obstruction  is  reversible  
• Active  inflammation  of  the  airways  precedes  bronchospasms  
• Airway  inflammation  is  an  immune  response  caused  by  release  of  interleukins,  production  of  IgE,  and  recruitment  
of  inflammatory  cells  
• Airways  thickened  with  inflammatory  exudates  magnify  the  effect  of  bronchospasms  
 

SHS111  Anatomy  &  Physiology  I  -­‐  23  

Downloaded by i Kukkukku (ltracylene@gmail.com)