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EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL COMMENT ries in representation elections has declined. Concessio n- type bar- gaining has been mare

COMMENT

ries in representation elections has declined. Concessio n- type bar- gaining has been mare the rule than the exception. Taking advan- tage of the economic times of today, the enemies of organized labo r have been successful in changing the public's opinion of unions, and consequently, the overall approval rating of unions has declincd. Althou gh numerically weak- ened by the loss of members, the trade union movement remains an important dominant force in so- ciety, and it is the position of the IBEW that we fully prepare to " battle back" against tbose per- sons or organizations who would destroy organized labor and our union way of life. We must develop new tech - niques and strategies to reverse OUI membership losses, strengthen Our hand at the bargaining table; and regain our social, economic, and political clout. We must coun- teract our political enemies and unscrupulous employers' efforts to further dilute OUI strength, power, and unity in the labor

movement.

Work opportunities for IBEW melllbers in our outs id e line con- struction branch have been se- verel y limited by the ons laught of well-financed nonunion compa- nics successfully competing in thIs market. It is the intention of yow International to take appropriate action to put a halt to this erosion of work winch rightfully belongs to the IBEW members and IBEW signa tory employers. I am cOllfident that with each local union 's dedicated commit- ment and active involvement we can halt the encroachment of the

nnnunion cnntractors nn utility company properties and rccapture

ow work for OUI members. You wi II be ad vised as tru s effort

pro- gresses, and we expect the un-

Let Our Challenge For 1987 Be To Organize The Unorganized

Today labor unions are facing

th e most serious chall enges in the

history

m o vcmcnt . As a result 01 unfa - vo rab le demographic, economic, poli tical, and social changes, or- ganized labor 's power has been leS5cm:J in wllecti ve bargaining and political inn uenee. [n addition, antiunion conserva- tives have gained control of the admmlstration in the White House, and labor laws that were protec- tive 0.1 workers ' rights for over SO yearS have been drastically weak- ened. Antiunion consultants and attorneys have convinced the Na- tional Labor Relations Board and the courts of the land to rule in favor of the employers, thus callS- ing economic losses to millions of organized workers, and other workers to lose their jobs and sta- tllS as union members. Presently less than 18 percent of the total work force is union- ized. The number of union victo-

of

the

American

labor

wavering cooperat ion of those lo- cal unions representing the out- side line construction branch to insure the future of our IBEW line construction industry. Manufacturing membership bas declined as more and more com- panies are building plants offshore or moving to areas with nonunion climates.In addition, deregulation of thc tclcphone and railroad in- dustries has added to. the loss of IBEW members in the raijroad and telephone branches of the Broth- erhood. Members are the lifeblood of Our union. We must mount vigorous organizing campaigns to organize the unorganized. We must develop and use new techniques that tell the union story. Local unions must increase the use of ow Own rank- and-file members when organiz- ing. Over 50 percent of those un- organized workers are under age 35 . Growing industries, such as information processing, COIDIDU- nications, and computer manufac-

t urin g, must be targeted for inte n -

sified organizing campaigns. Small

industries and busincs es that em- ploy few cmployees are equally important and should be orga- nized. These are tough times whicb can bring out the best in OUI mem-

re -

SOurces are emerging. Together our members, our local union leadcrs, and your International have a tough job to do. Let our challenge for 1987 be to organize the unorga- nized.

bers.

Previously

untapped

?J'~

J. J. Bany

International President

OFFIC IAL PUBLICATION OF THE INTERNATIONA L BR OTHER HOOD OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS JOURNAL •
OFFIC IAL PUBLICATION OF THE INTERNATIONA L BR OTHER HOOD
OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS
JOURNAL
FEBRUARY
1987
I
"
J . J. BARRY , Editor
Vo l ume 86 , No. 2
Februa ry , 1987
FEf:lTLI~ES
Mela l Trades Depa rtmenl Ho lds Fo urt h Biennial
National Shipbuilding Conlerence
2
CLU W Convent ion Looks to the FUlure for
Working women
4
Presidenl Barry Announces Pact to Recaptur e Work
5
Year-Ro und Sharing and Caring al Ihe 1.0 .
5
Unions
Join Forces in Att ack Aga insl Du mping
6
Umons
Protes l Sialion Proieci In Pittsburgh
7
Raben W. McAlwee , Director of Journal Departmenl,
Retires
8
Pres iden l Barry Appoin ts New Journ al Department
Direclor
9
Internallonal Execulive Council Meehng Minutes
10
DEPA~TNlENTS
Edi iori ai Com ment
Inside Fronl Cover
Safely Tips
19
r
Research and Education
17
Local Lines
20
In MemOriam
51
Reflections
Inside Back Cover
a
ON OU R COVER-Ils cold. II s snowy.
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VICE PRESIDENTS

f If!>I DIStrICt

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IS SheJ)Pa!d Avo

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Third D!5lnd ALFRED W GILES

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rOUttl'r DoltlCt B G WILLIAMSON

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DlStnet JA MES P. CONWA'I'

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Seventn 0Isrnct.

ORVIllE A. TAT E. JR

4400 W.

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Box 12Hi

idaho Fan

Idaho BJ.t.02

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I SO North WIge1

",lie 100

lome

W.tInUl Clee~ c.atoIOmIa 1MS98 2" 'l.t '~1l1 DlsbK;1 ANDREW M. RIPP

OHare Othc:e BUIlding I. 5U11e 720 10400 IN H'991n1 Road RO!l emo nt, Il hr'lOl, 600 18

elevEnth Olsl tlct

RAV EDWARDS

300 Soultl JeHCfloOf'l. Sutle JOO Sp'ongheld M<SSCU' 65806

wolfltl [MInd JOH N A. HICHTOWER

f'(lllIIifl Burkhng Sud. 51~ CI a~8!"000911 Tet"f1M5ee 37.' I

INTERNJITIONAL EXECUTIVE COUNCIL

CLVDE BOWDEN

m~

!leta N 7tn Streel

Phoen.o. A1~ 8~1J.

F"nI Omncl JOHN J

431 \ V'{oming A

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DrsIllct JAMES F MULl ONEY

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213 1 59111 StJOOI

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r.gmn OI5!nc:I. JA MES R. McAVOY

2750 Quadra 5 ,,",. Room 12

vf(.1ona B rtllSh

VII

oI E8

Coluroa can

,

Metal Trades Department Holds Fourth Biennial National Shipbuilding Conference Mela l Trades Department President Bumsky,

Metal Trades Department Holds Fourth Biennial National Shipbuilding Conference

Melal Trades Department President Bumsky, left is shown Introducing AFL·CIO President Lane Kirkland at the conference,

The AFL-ClO Meta l Trades Dc- partment held its fourth Biennial National Shipbuilding Conference in

Washington, D.C, on Deccmber 1- 2, 1986. Delega tes to th e co nference carne from both private· and federal - sector Metal Trades Councils [rom both the East and West Coasts. The mEW delegation was headed by IBEW

Interna tional President ). J.

Add ressing more than 150 dele-

Trades Co uncils

at th e N a tion al Sh ipbui ld ing Co n- ference, Metal Trades Department Preside nt Paul Burnsky sa id a U.S.- nag merchant marine and domestic

ga t es [rom 21 M etal

Barry.

s h ipbui ld ing arc essential [or the na - tio n 's defense and security. He added

!.h at s IDce th e fir St Biennial Ship- building Conference waS held in 1980,

25 shipya rds have closed down. He

said there were about 135,000 work-

ers in

p r ivate shi pyard s i n 1980 CO m -

pared

to fewer than 70,000 today . Of

!.hat nu m be r 90 pe rcent are employed

on N avy projects . Today, he added, therc arc only 370 U .S.-flag ships

s till operating co mpared to more than ,000 sh ips at the c nc! of World War 11 . Presid e nt Burn s ky a l so s aid the

prospect s for co ngressional re vitalize th e shi pbuil di ng

itime industries improved consider- ab ly in N ovember wh en th e Se na te

maj o ri ty was reclaimed by leade rs more receptive to the department's message and more attuned to the problem. Other speakers addressing the

es·

s ia n were AFL·CIO Pres ide n t Lan e Ki rkl a nd ; Vic e Admiral William H .

U .S. Navy, com mande r, Na -

Rowde n,

ac ti on to and mar-

2 I IBEW JOURNAL! FEBRUARY

19B7

Command; Gerald

I. S\. Pc', presi de nt, In gal ls Shi pbuild -

in g Division, Litto n lndu s tri e I ln c.j

val Sea

YSteill

our s tanda rd of livi ng to t he world's

lowest

con101on

denomi nator

in-

s tead of r3 ism!; th e world's

to o urs. "

s tandard,

Br

t h er Kirkland s aid the

Senate e lect ion res ult s am o untell to

Reaga n's economic be quite so me lime

sweeping up the debris left behind by the adm int tmllOn," he said.

the delega tes

policies. " It wIll

a

rcpud13t ion o[

MondilY afternuon

at tended various wo rks hops con-

ce rn ing th e uni on's role 111 rcpre-

enung ou r m e m be rs ilOd promo tin g th~ h ipb uildi n g industry .

Tuesday morning President Burn-

,

6 arrus. Inlerna lional R ep resen tativo.

Mu garet M . Seminario, a

r ec t or , Depa r tm e nt 01 Occupat io n a l

Safety, H ea lth ,md

AFL- C IO; Ra ymon d Ram say , direc-

tor, Office of Maritime Affairs, Naval

Sea Sys tems Co mmand; and Mr. John Pe rkins, dire ctor, Comm ittee on Po- litical Education, AFL-CIO. AFL-C IO Pre ident Lan e Kirk lan d

to ld rh e delegate s t he ba sic

"is that th e adnlini str ati o Il

ha s c ho-

prob lem

socia t e di-

oeial Securi t y,

sen to pu rs u e a policy of whittling

I ~ljIV:aC~A.~mfSDEPARTMENT, AFt CONFERI I
I ~ljIV:aC~A.~mfSDEPARTMENT, AFt
CONFERI
I

PreSident ; Franz G te n, bu si ness manager , local 6 ; Guy McKee. bUSiness manager , local 91 6

Bengte l, ass ista nt Ninth D istrict; aod

busines s manager. local lOB; R ichard T R,chard A. Bamberger, Local 6

tS EW dologatos wh o attended the confe rence: are , Iront lO W. lell to right. 6111 Zen k. business rep re se ntative, Local 76; Steve DiTomo. bu si ness manager. Local 902 ; John Ann.an , pfe sl den t,

Local 902 ; Geo rge Knaly.

Dlreclor of Governmen t Ope ralions Department: J. J. Ba rry , Inl ernalional

Bill Carpine , bUSiness representative , Loca l 46 ; back rOw , Bob Crum. Interna tional Repr esenta tive, 1.0.; Ted Oaku ginon , ExecuUve Board. Local 902: GIei1n McKenna , local 26 1; Edward F. DeCosta , presidenVbuslness manag er, Loca l 261; C. M. Chapman, Executive Board, Local 733 ; Ch ar les F,

G rim es. busines s ma nage r. Local 733; Joseph Messier, reco rd ing secreta ry, Loca l 26 1;

B. R,

Pictured at the head l able, le ft to righ i , are refired MaChinists'

Pictured at the head l able, le ft to

righ i , are refired MaChinists' Pres-

Ident Roy SiemiUer. ISEW Inter- nabonal President J . J. Barry; Op· erating Engineers' Presidenll arry

Dugan, Jr. : Departmenl 01

Occu ·

pational Safety. Health and SocIal Security, AFL·CIO. Assoclale Di·

rector Margaret M Seminarlo: Di·

rector Raymond Ramsay, Ot1ice

01 Maritime Affai r s, Naval Sea Sys-

tems Command; and Dlrecror John

Perkins.

Committee on

PoUlical

Educallon . AFl·C IO

sky opened the sos Ion; and the del· egate to thc 1986 Metal Trades Dc· partment ShIpbuIlding Conference concluded theIr busmcss by recom · mendmg departmental aCllon m Ihe areas of legislation} organizing. co]· lect! ve bargainmg, occupational health and safety, and fede ral aIfairs. The i r rccommcnu::uions arc su m ~ marizcd as follow; '

*

LEGISLATION Continue to sup' I)on and enforce eXlstmg law thaI help maintam and promote a viable, dome tiC shipbulldmg industry. Sup· POrt and seck Improvement in the Occupatio nal Safcty and Heal th Act. SuppOrt Navy's Shipbu tl ding a nd ConversIOn Program to achieve the goal of a 600-slup fleet; and continue to support efforts 10 forge a compre- henSIve, fau, and workable national maritime and shipbuildmg program with an innovative research and de- velopment component to moderruze ship deSIgn and construc tIOn tec h- nology, ,, co m pone nt to upg ra de U .S , shipyard capability to help preserve

shIpya rd lobs and

preference polley Ihat WIll assure at

Icast 20 percen t of our

imports are transported on U,S.-flag

vesse ls

skills, a nd a ca rgo·

exports and

BARGAINING

* COLLECTIVE

Delcga les reVIewed cont mct bargam· in g at public ' Illd private sh ip yards and dIscussed barg,uning strategies fo r u n io ns co nfro nt ing a hos tll e e m -

ployer. T hey revie wed th e a ll eged loc kout of 900 wor kers by Lockheed Shi pbuild ers In Sea nl e a nd d iscu ssed ongo in g de m ons t rati ons and s trate-

glcs

hngham Shipyard In Ponland, Ore ·

gon

u,ed

by

workers

.Il

the

011 -

*

Empha ·

n eXl ting OSHA regulations and

standards was the main lopie dis·

by thi work gro u p, The com·

mlllee recommended that the Metal Trades Department investigate these reported violations and deliver a strong lener of protest to the appro- priate congressIOnal committee, (he

secretary of labor, and the secrelary

of the navy. They al 0 !I~commended

education by t he Me ta l Trades Dc· partm en t for the councils regarding

SAFETY ANO HEAL TH

Ihe

lack

SIS

of cnJurccmcnt of

cussed

the new Hazardous COlllmUtltC3UOn

Standard, * ORGANIZING - This work group,

whIch

from both the private and federal shipyards, had a comprehensive ma-

logue and exchange of Ideas regarding

successful * org:l nizi ng techniques.

was comprised of delegates

FEDERAL AFFAIRS- Increase III opposlllg Reagan administra·

tion cuts 10 federal worker pay, pcn· sion, and benefit programs; and inc rease Mc tal Trades Departmem leadership 10 organIZing, safety and hea lt h, steward training, and other areas of federal union aCtlVlry, in· cludl ng ex pansion of t hc g rass· roots legislative program,

fon

ex pansion of t hc g rass· roots legislative program, fon Shown during the luncheon on

Shown during the luncheon on the first day 01 the conference 8re, leh to right. Admiral J. H.

W ebber, chief enginee ri ng OHtcef, Naval Sea

Systems Command; RiChard Bamberger, business

represent ative , Local 6; Bill Zank, business

localS: Bob Crum. Inl erna llon al Represen tative , 1.0.; George Knaly, Direc tor of IBEW Governmen t Operations Depar1menl ; Richard Barrus. International Representative, Ninth Dis trict; and Bill

Carpine. business representative. Local 46

representative. Local 76: Franz Glen. business manager.

The ISEW was well represented al Ihe CLUW Convenlton. as shown in this picture 01

The ISEW was well represented al Ihe CLUW Convenlton. as shown in this picture 01 some ollhe delegales Bottom row . left to nghl , Thelma Boyd ,

shop steward , Local 1288. Memphis. T enn

Representative , 1.0 .; top row, Annemarie Galasso , business represenlallve, Local Local 18 ; Kathy T1ndall , Executive Board. Local 1245, Walnut Creek, Cal ,; Diana N .V .; and Dorothy Fortier. business representative, Loca l 1245.

Chanty Puhl , presIden t-bus iness manager. Local 2373 . Oshkosh, Wis ., Yvonne Coleman . Inlernational

Cal. ; Royetla Sanford. businc::;s representatIVe ,

Kamen . president -business manager, Local 1968 , Spring Valley ,

18. lus Angeles,

CLUW Convention looks to the Future for Workingwomen

More than 1,000 delegates to the Coalition of Labor Union Women gathered in St. LOUIS in ovcmbe r to dl cu s issues of Concern to trade union women. The theme lor the fourth blCnnial C LUW assembly was

Forgi ng

Cha nge for Ou r Futur e." Conven tion

delegates came from aU aero the c uurry, as far away as Alaska, and lrom every occupatlon represented by the American labor movement,

fro m the assemb ly line to the office,

from garment shops to coal mine. Several key isslIes were high-

lighted by CLUW Pre ident Joyce Miller in her report to the conven-

nOled that " women work

for the same reasons men do-we need the money." What j not needed

is the tension, stress, and guilt that workingwomen feel from trying to balance too many responSIbilities and

"

halle nged by Ou r Past

lion. She

too fpw

lions of women without the luxury

to chao c whether to work or !lOt,"

sa id . The convention was addressed by

several J,'llcs t peake, s, including ArL-

" We repre em mil·

he

10 Secretary-Treasu re r Tom Don·

ahue who poinled out the advantages

a

union

co ntra c t has

fo r

wurking-

conta in o n e- thir d morc t h a ll tho.c

WOlnen . "We n111

t ge l

the

wo rd OU l

uf th ei r unorganized sis te rs. tI

that a women IS place I S in her uni on, It

he sald. " Women who are covered

beller

thall no nun io n women workers. The pay enve lo pes of unionized wom en

by

T he mEW delegates prcsclll " t the LUW Convention were plea cd to

be able to wo rk together wllh their

were plea cd to be able to wo rk together wllh their isters a nd Brothers

isters a nd Brothers on t h ese lI11po r· tant i sues.

lInion

co ntrdcts

£arc

far

h ese lI11po r· tant i sues. lInion co ntrdcts £arc far Shown in Ihls plclure

Shown in Ihls plclure with Cl UW President Joyce Miller (slancung) are Diana Kamen. first National

Execulive Board member; Kathy TIndall.

Puhl. second Nalional Exoculive Board member.

second alternate ; Thelma Boyd. 'irst altemate: and Charity

PRESIDENT BARRY ANNOUNCES PACT TO RECAPTURE WORK

Jntc lnation"J Prcs ld em j . j . lInrry

III

s Igned ag reemell t

w i th the LBEW.

porta n ee to th e un io n, is the agree-

a nd

ExecutIve

V, ce Pres id c nt

jo h11

[t

provi des

that

.111

!,'Tievallecs and

ment

rea ch ed o n

ubcontra c tin g and

M .

G ra ll

of th e Na t iona l Elec tri ca l

d,spu tc . 01 : lIl y nat ll r c wi l l be s ett le d

pre ser vat i o n of w o rk

 

pr o t ec t ion

on tr ac tors

A ssoci.HlOll ~mn ounccd

that (h clr org:lIl iza tioll s have ag reed

un a Jl.1tmnal labo r agreement aImed

ill reCJptllnng transml~slOl1·lmc work,

.1"'~UC1.Ill-'d '!'uhMa tlOlls,

menlo

The OtJlslde UtllllY COnStnlC lI u n

N~1tIOI1.':d Pr(JJ~ct Agreemellt will be

mauc :lvailablc only to C() l1traclors

and

equip-

thro ugh the Council all Jndu ·trial Rel all o ns for th c El ec tri c:d Co ntract- Ill!; Indu try withou t any work In ' tcrrupt"," . Other features of the

~Igrccmcnl give the employer:, !)Ig-

mnc.nt (Jexlblllty In the pon.lbtlay

of Ill :HlP OWC T, schedu ling (If work, job l11:1nnjn~ n:quin.:nlcnt:-., :mu uth er

economIc a<ivanla);!'s. of eq ual i111'

for I13EW mem bers. The agreement may bc Imple- mented by reque t (rom the contrac- tors on 3 Joh·to·job basi and became available as o( january, 1987. The

:1gTccmCnt Wi ll remain in effec t from

yea r to

yea r

thcrc:1ftcr

lin Ie:,::.,

ter-

minated by the plflles.

Year-Round Sharing and Caring at the 1.0.

Th e L.trJn!: attItude of t h e emplo y- ees and talf m cmbe rs a t the Inter·

n :lllOl1:11

O ffice

lS

I11JlldeMl'u u n a

yenr-round hO :' 15 . \Vhc nevc r t hefe i s

a reqlle s t to h e lp thCIr

fellow hum"n

heing., ill need, the clll pJu)'ces Imem-

ber

of Local 2, OPE IU) .tnd the staff

providc the n ecess ary whcr c wllh ::t1

ns

by sh~lnng {rmn their tUfllnbuli

to the

Fund The M VD Memo l ial Fun d" named tn memory (If the late Internatl(1nal

Downey j\1t.:moTlal

lane V

n vc w h o began I hl' forma l

RL'IHc~t

·nI3

V n vc w h o began I hl' forma l RL'IHc~t ·nI3 Clothing lor the

Clothing lor the dolls IS handmade, crochelod,

knilled , or store bough t. Th e dol ls ar e then entered In a contest, and pri zes are awarded in nine categories. The two JUdges, Thomas A.

Ha nnigan. Admin istrative AS!:tI!:ttdnl

nal lonal Secretary , and Anthony

AdminlstraUve Asslstanl to Ihe International

prlze , w1nnrng

enttles and are seen here with [WO 01 the MVD Memonal Fund offICers Loft to righ I, Mlnme Holley , lund dIrector; Brothe rs Hannigan and Salamone ; and Ca therine Flora , l und trea sur e r

Pre sIdent , are holding rwo 01 the

to Ihe In ler- J. Salamone.

canng-and-shanng program at the 1.0.

m

:lI1Y

years ~tgo . Eve r sj n c~, contr i -

but ion;, arc made thlOugh outlhc yea r; a n d help to those JJ1 n eed IS p ro vided

w henever : 111 appeal (o r :l~:-.i:'I;lncc is

made.

T he

ean ng and sha rin g peak .m -

nually at the end II f the ycar dUrIng the Chnstmas and Hanukkah sea· SJln . The 19R6 ho li day ~haring re· suited III new apparel and toiletries for 2 1 e lderly reSIdents at a nu "ing

ho m e; ncw clolhmg, acccss(lric~, :a nu

tnys fur 4S necdy ch ildren ; l1ew tnys,

COImCTaS ,

rildlO , and

otht.:r

a~ "' orte I

g ift it em, for 115 fos te r ch ddr en , and

89

and handIcapped ch ilJren . Mo,t of the clot he s fo r the d o lI, were ,cwn by httnd, crocheted, and knitted by th e em pl oy ee, and staff; othc r doll clothes were purchased. Throu!;h the ir sharin g ,he bendae - to rs (If th e M VD Me monal Fund

,howed agaIn their characten stlc of caring. More importantly, th·y felt th e p""ona l benents of havi l1g helped

o th er:, .

dolls tha t we re

dl s tri butcd to n eedy

:.:--::.:~:::::: ; :,. ~- ,.,; "' ~ ~~ "P,. 4 ., t - "". ~~
:.:--::.:~::::::
;
:,.
~- ,.,;
"'
~
~~
"P,.
4
.,
t
-
"". ~~
~
j·llJitio1ll"'~

The hand ·croche led alghans and lap robes In Ine foreground and the ck>thing, accessorieS, toileuies , lays, and other Items displayed on the tables to the left and right were contribu led by emp loyees and siaft members at (he International 01(100 10 21 elderly reSidents 01 a nurSing home and 45 underprivileged children Con tri butions were made through the Ma rie V. Downey Memori al Fun d al the 1.0

IBEW JOURNAl! FEBRUARY

19B7

I

5

Unions Join Forces In Attac k Against Dumping

Unions Join Forces In Attac k Against Dumping Administrative Pre sident Assista nt Internationa l J.

Administrative

Pre sident

Assista nt

Internationa l

J. Salamone , who repre -

to

the

Anthony

sented President Barry. is shown stressing a poinl during the prO"'~ conference 10 announce Ihe filing of the anlldurnplng pel ltlon . AI his lell IS IUE PreSIdent WIlliam Bywater

gan to s parts fo

try. For example, th e Japanese s hip TV tubes to Mcx:ico where they arc repackaged and combined wllh Cir- cu it board a sembled in Mexico_ T IllS package, cnmplcte eXCCp[ for

h ip III pl Cl u rt.: lubes a ll d tJ l h e r

r fi n al a se mb ly in thi coun -

final assembly in ca binet s, is s h ipped

under the category of

t e l ev is i o n /l kit s. 1I Wh e n inc1ud.:J a s

parr or(J Iw, the du[y on televi ion

lUbe IS as c lllor

l .'i pnc PIlI . As noted by lBEW Inter-

nationa l Pre ident J- J. Barry, " J"pa-

neaking in thro ll gh

double problem because

they escape the normal 15 percent c u t oms duty and beca ll se t hey ar~ being dumped ." PreSIdent Barry em- pha Ized that lInion would " do every thing withi n their power to pre-

to t he

o nly 5 pe rc e nt , if impo rt ed

televislOll ru bes . th e duty is

nese p,c ture tub es Mex ico is a

In luly of tht s year, c1illllnaling 65 5

hour ly and

p lant 'S e mp loyees are rcpre e nted by [he IUE .

The number o f lllEW members

1.35 sa lari ed jobs . That

e mployed in the d mes tl c color pic - ture tube industry has declined Over the yea!s. The Brotherhooo reprc-

se m s worker s ,II Zeni t b' Ra ul ano

Division p lan[

a n d gl ass

l1ois, RCA 's picture tube

plant ill Mario n, Indiana, and CIT- deville, Ohio, North American Ph,,-

t pS' CPT plant in Ot[.wa , OhiO, 'lnd

ew

York. These m embers and the Illelll -

in Melrose Park, 1111

TWEC ' s plant in Horse h ead s,

bers of th e other petittoning um on

co nstit ut e

workers in the dom es ti c color P' C

ture tubc tndllstry. The a nt idlll11plllll pctitio n filed by these unio ns IS an a[[empt to save the jobs oj a pproxI-

Over

two -t hi.rds

of

all

The Int erna ti o nal Broth erhou d of

vent forc' ign produ e rs from avoiding

matel y 10,000 worker. who

nre oi -

Electrical Workers and fnur nth r

normal c ustonlS ducie s and to stop

re

c tI y e mpl oye d In t h IS In dll

Hy .

labor organizations IOintly filed a

dumping whenever it take. away

T h e u nioll coa lit ion sc or e d ~1 VI C-

pe tlli o n in N n vcmbcr wit h the In -

Am erican Jobs,lI

 

lory al the fir t Step of the

pe tlllon

[ernarional Trade CommissJOnliTCI

 

IUD te rctary-Treasu rer Elm er

process when th e ITC vot ed lInalll -

protes[ing the dumping of color rv

Chatak to ld the ne w eonicrence lhal

IIl1Ju sly on January 6, I') 7, for .1

pt ClUre tubes into the Unlled tJ[es

es<abli shmcnt

of as,cmbly opera-

prelinunary finding of injury or thre:"

b

y lapan, Korea , Singapore , " nO

an-

li

ons in the

U.

_by foreign producers

of iniury to the petllloners. WIthou t

ad.1. (Th e sole produ cer of color PIC-

is

we \com e, howev e r, if virtually all

this victory the petitio n wou ld h ave

tur e tubes in

'a nada is ;1 nOl1 un inn

Japanese firm , Mi [s u bish, Elec tron -

ICS Indusuies

n ese company is beli eved to be brio g-

mg [ubes lfllO the us through lis

sale s s ub s ldia.ry operann g 111 the U _S.,

M,t s lIbi hI Electri c al

Inc.1 Th e l BEW was iuined in [he pe titi o n by tbe El ec tron ic Worke rs tiDE), the Machmists, the Steelwo rk- ers, and th e lndu smal UnIOn D e- panment of the AFL-CIO (IUD I.

action represents the c ulm l-

u f Can ada. Thi lapa-

es Am e n ca,

Thi

nf Ih e television co mpo nen ts a rc im - poned, o nly a re lative ly s mall num - ber of I bs a rc regai ned _ Anth ony

Sal:lIll o ne, Admlni s trativ c Assis l tll1t

lo IBEW !,resident Barry and repro-

se rum g him at rhe pre s' c.:uJlleJ~n(e,

not ed, " A Job los t to Kurea, TaIwan,

or

Il1gaporc" or ot her low -wage no.·

li o n \) iOrcpr cs ents an AJ11criCJn w o rk er

unahl" In s upport IllS family . If the petltton is properly enforced, sueees In till S case should not co t a single U.S . worker Ill S pre ent Job and In

o icJ . T h e case now goes to th e In -

t e rn.111on aI Traoe Admlnl s lI'atlon a t

the Com merce Depa rtment {or con·

Sl de r a tion of the oumping Issue . If the ca c re ceives a favorab le preltm-

1I1ary A.nding

the ITC fm a final dctenninallnn lin inlury. T he dlll11Pl11g pra c ti ces o f [()fe ign

th e re, it wiU return to

pro du cL: ( s (';olltinllC

to Pfl' S l,.' lH ,1 (hn,:

Lhre Jt

tu An1crical~ co lor PIClUn.:: LUhe

IIldlL tr y. The jointly filco pelltlon IS

tJlll' (If man y ac ti o ns (h al labor mll~t

n

allon o f over a decade 's effort by

th

e I ng run would add dHlll and

of

co nunu c to

lake

in

o rd e r

tn

rC lam

various unions to $(cm lhe ntle 0

jnb s 10 our U.S . lclcvi

ion inJu ~ tr )'."

lob s for Am

e n CAn wo r kers. A s Prc ~·

unfairly trad ed imp o rl s of color TV

re ce ive rs whi ch ha s COSt dom est ic

workers tbou and,

effo n s rcs uhed car Ite r In a finding by the Comme rce Depa nm ent tha< Korean and Taiwan manufacturers had been dumpin eulor TV ~t tn [h e U .S. market at prices le ss than

The se

of

Jobs.

, h ey c h arged 111 their h om e mark e t s.

However, it was poin ted o ut at th e

pre s' co nference announcing tht.: pc·

{ition that In 19 4 "lore \\l on OJ dumping

case coverinp, color TV sets, only to be rnbbed of [h c benefits of that finding whe n fo re illn produ c er. he-

S I ISEW JOURNAL ' FEBRUARY

1987

tariff sur-

charge to "ffset oumpin' [actic - is

o ll e Strategy in a continuing b:l u lc

to preve nt til ' al most [0[31 wipcou t

o f U . S_ TV manufacturin g and ItS componcn[ parts Industrie . Dump- Ing h. led to th e clOSing of two

malo r co lor p'CLUre

La bor's

delllonel

for

a

t ube

plants

111

the pa:,t t wu yl::tls. In Augll s t, 1985,

N o rth Am e ri can Pbi l ips, whos e em-

ployees were represenled by the ted workers, closed a plant in Se- neca Falls, New Yo r k _M o re rec e ntiy , Ge n e ral Elec",c announce d It will clo e It S plnnt 111 ' j'rac ll se, New Yo r k,

Idcllt

rde,,~co t o the Engli s h -'p e ak l ng io -

Barry

note d

in

:1 State me nt

IWI1

Time s,

II Pri ci ng cxpurt:-, heln\\'

c.osts- wh l.:lh cr due \ 0 uumplng or

SUbSl dlc s- vlU lates l llrCrn a lioJ'l:11 trade agreements. InlurL'd parties III

the

IInpn rung

country

mu ~t

ch e n

,'xerClse

their full

righ ts unde r na-

tiona l and I1HCm

tlti o n al

hn\' to

fl: -

s, lorc fai r l' CU n OI11 IC c omp c l iu o n

We fo und

tu Cll hUrL'

IIl Sliln CC,

~lIld ~l'ck

I t. nece ss ary to file a C:l"'L'

f:ur pn cl ng bc ha vlOf i n thi:-,.

,1Ild we will UO II: Jgaltl

full e nf orceme nt tr o m o ur

j:!ovcmm ent. "

Unions Protest Station Project in Pittsburgh

A few yea rs ago Pittsburg h w' ol S refe rr ed

LO a s " Th e City

with the Pirates winning the World Se- nes and the Slcclcrs winning the Super Bowl in the last decade, Pittsburgh bas

of C ha mpions." A long

hi sto ri caJiy bee n in the for efro nt of or- gan ized '"bor, dating back to th e early

day s of la bor

hISt o ry . Pim bu r~h h"s

a l ·

wa ys been known as 3 strong boor tow n ;

however, 3S you rcad through the pages of t hiS Journ al, we sec our ~ISlcr locals

are suffe ri n g from such p ro ble m s ~ISope n

s hop s

douhl c- br cas lcd

and

n on uni o n

co mpanlC." j and we here tn Pittsburgh

a rc bemg hit by the sa me cancer today.

In (he heart of downtown Pittsbu rgh,

,1" op~n-s h op contracto r , T om MI ~tic k

:Lnd So ns, has pi c ked li p three lobs LUtul - II1gSS0,OOO,OOO. The Pm burgh Buil ding

Tr:uJcs sw rted picketing at one of the

Sit eS, wah ove r 500 pIckets ~huw lllg li p each day. The uld Pcnn.ylval1la Railroad

Stall On IS a 521,000,000 renovat ion proj '

bl oodi es t

and most destr u ctl vc union conl ronta · uons ml ahor's hIstory- the railroad strike o( 18771. After several days of mas, pick· CtIn g and ~c ttlng no r e:,ponsc from city leaders , the Pitts burgh BuilJlIlg

occJ(lcd thai stronger aCll on was nCl

to get t h ei r mess.1gc ac ross, especlally in

v iew of Ih e f,act that thcse samC ci t y Icaders were COOpCrJUIlg WIth MIscick.

ect j:lt

thl~ s it e wa s one uf th l

!

Tradc~

!dcd

A mess age ha d to be sent that labor wa s drawmg the line and was prepared 10 do

to tum these proj ·

ccts arounJ. The bUolncss mJl1'ger of Local 5, 1o· seph D . Mille r, a1)(1 the leaders of th e oth er craft unions came to a deciSIOn to h o ld. mass ra ll y in the tr ee t s of d own ·

whal c ver WilS Il l

!cdcd

LOw J1 P itt sb u rgh

. With less than f O llr da y:')

fo r

Novembe r 3, J986. Uni on members werc

informed

for

prepara tio n,

.bo u,

the

the

dale

rally

was

by

set

word

o (

mou t h, .1nd te leph o n e c.111s w ere p Jaced

o ( mou t h, .1nd te leph o n e c.111s w ere p Jaced

Over 1,000 members ot Loca lS, Pittsburgh, Pa., participated In the mass ratly held on November 3, 1986, in Pittsburgh.

10

rill of the lo bs.

Ills t about every job In

All egheny and the su rroun d ing co unt ies

W l, l S shu t down . CIty IC :l d ~ r s I flcd t o downplay thiS rally by .ppeanng on tele- VISIo n and 5r.1ClI1g rh:u .] ccnC3tJvc agfcc~ ment WJ.s rcached. On Mum.by murmng the third of Nu· ve mber, t h e meet ing rendezv o u s, the CIVIC arena p.nking lot, sta rted to fill up

at 6 ' .Ill. By 7 a .m. all the lots were fiJled .

The

:l.m.

w're cump letely fill ed. IBEW had over

1,000 rncmbcrs marc hing in thi s dem-

on s trati o n Inclu ding the oHiee rs o f Loe aJ

S .

m :u ch gO I under way~ and by 7:30

th e st reets o ( dow nt own Pittsburgh

0 bu ses , tru ck , o r ;l ut OS co ul d m ove .

Forry·five th ousa nd hard hats lined the

aVCnue . All arteries lcadm g 10 and from

tbc City were Lled u p. Bridges \vcrc bu mpe r

CO b umper. Pu bltc Safety Dircclur Gle nn

Cannon

of plans

sallt l " The CHY had been aware

fu r the tlcmonsu.1tlOn .since fndaY i

btu

I

dUll 't dunk that an yone anticipated

the

k

md of numbe rs t hn t w e sa w." Ca n n on

said that he didn ' t ul ink

th.11 th e dem o

n ecessary pa rade

permits, but said cilOlt It would have been WlWISC for police to try to Stop the mafcher . "A lot of people were angry

about be in g late fOf wo rk ; btl[ you ju st

dOll' l arres t 40,000 peop le and inCite J riot. You JUSt try to keep th ings m ovmg in a ceet.lln dlfeCtion , ,. Can non sail!. He

descnbed

on s trators o bulln ed t be

the

demonstratOrs

as

ram

(Continu ed Oil Page 9)

ed t be the demonstratOrs as ram (Continu ed Oil Page 9) Local 5 members were
ed t be the demonstratOrs as ram (Continu ed Oil Page 9) Local 5 members were

Local 5 members were joined by Ihou sonds 0' Olhe r building tradesm en, some o f whom are shown In th ese pictures , in the protest aga i nst open · shop construct ion in Pittsburgh .

Robert W. McAlwee, Director of Journal Department, Retires

I ntcrna U UI1 3 1 R c:prt' o C rt W . M c A J\'v~l:' 1 whl)

,L' n WlIve

Rob-

h

.

l~

~

L

' I v(:d

~'lS

direc to r of th e ISEW Jou rna l Depa rt ·

me nt since De e m ber j

1971 , re ll fed

effec ti ve

M eA lwee wa S app

Febrll~ry I , J9

7.

Bro lh c r

lnted as an Int er·

I Hl ll u llilJ Re pres en t a t iv e u n

Fchruary

24, 1969, by Illlern~tional PresIde nt

Pili a rd an d wa s a ssIg ned

o f mana g i n g e d i t o r 01

Cha rl es H

to th e pOS lli o n

I

h e

I BE W Eie c lricai W o rkers !our ·

[w i .

Pi ll ar

j o um

In

Pre id "nl

d rest ru c tur e d th e d utl cs o f the

ai s ta ff ; autb orized Ih e loumal

name d

r, mEW

De ccmber,

to

19 7 1,

logo

Bro t h e r M e A l w ee a

In urnal Depa r tm e n t.

c han ge

ibe w;

an d

D ire c t

Pre Ide n t

P il l a rd , a s di r ecto r 01 th e IB EW Jou r-

Un de r th e diIect io n of

r ecto r 01 th e IB EW Jou r- Un de r th e diIect

26 as C OPE c hairma n, Bl ood Bank

unl on ·~

p

o

n

~n

re

d

c r aft

tr3Ull n g pro -

gram

Ie ged yo ut h s in t h e Wo. h i n g lOll M e t ·

ropou tan Area.

In 196 I Broth e r M cAlw ce wa s a p'

lInde rpnv l'

for

mi nority

and

p Inted by fo rm er in te rnali o na l Pre·

Id e nt C

ber

ri ce h lP Co mmi tte e , a nd i n 19 62 w as

appoint ed

1963 he

was apPOln t ed by P r e s i d e n t F r ~em 'l n as a t rustee 01 the Suprem e Lodge

o ei a·

Con ·

o

rdo n M

t he

Nat

. Fre e man a

io na l

JOlll t

the

a 111em ·

Appre n·

Cuuncil

of

to serve on

n Indu s t ri al

Rclan o ns . In

El ec tri c a l W o rk e rs

t

io

n, elec t ed a t

th e

Benefi t As

1966 m EW

vention, and reelectc" at every sub·

sequent lnternational Convention.

A

na live

uf Was h inglon,

D. c.,

Brot her MeA lwce atte nded Stra yers

nal De partm ent, Bro t her M cAlwee

cbaim)an , and

press sce re ta r),. In Jlme,

Bus in ess Co llege and Co lumbu s Un i·

was

assigned to manage t he monthly

1955, he w as

e lected re cord in g Sec·

vers it y Law

c h o o l. He s erved in t h e

p

ub lic ation 01 the jOllflwi ; t o serve

retary of Loca l 26 and w as el ec ted

U .S. Navy duri n g W o rld Wa r II a nd

as di rec tor of pub lic rela ti on s; a nd

business manager in lune, 1959. He

is

, member oj the America n Legion,

10

d " ec t th e ac tiviti es 01 th e lB EW

was a Local 26 de legate to the lBEW

Vele rans of Foreign

Wa r

,

an d

the

Libra ry, IBEW A ud io Visua l Depart·

Convent ion s in 195 8, 1962, and 1966.

El

k s

.

m

e n t, a n d lBEW Ar chiv

es.

He al so

While busi ness manager of Local 26,

Bo

b a nd

h is w ife,

)e a n , e nj oy

fis h ·

was Convention m anager of th e 1970,

197 4 ,

19 n

,

19

2,

a n d

Conventi ons.

1 986

mew

Broth er MeA lwec wa S ba m o n Se p·

he

wa s activ e a

:l tradf.! un ioni st in

g t o n Bu i hJ in g T ra des

a tnlSleC,

vice pre idem , and presiden t. He also

t be

Cou n cil and

Wa s hin

crvcd

te rm s as

i n g,

pare nt S o f tw o ad u l t ch i ldre n , Ei lee n

and M a nin , a n d th e pro ud g ra ndp ar ·

e ne s o f s ix g n m d c hil dr c n

boa tin g,

a nd

go lf a nd

.

a rc

rh e

t

em ber 19,

192 0.

He

s e rved

a

pr o·

chaired several comm ittees of the

Th

e

lfi.cers and m e m be rs uf th e

bationary pen od

and

was initia ted

Greate r Washington Cemra l Labo r

IBEW w ill alwa ys re m e mbe r Brothe r

tnto Lucal 26, Wa s htn gt o n , D . c., III February, 1948. H e wo rked as an

SUbfo rc-

man, and fo re man. He e rved Local

appr e ntic e,

jo urn cy n1ill1J

Council and was ecrctary of the Wa ' hing ton Build in g Co n gress. H e

w as

de vel ·

opers of " Pro jeci Build," a slIccessh d ,

o n e

o f

t h e Jo u n der s

nn"

M cAlwcc for h is loyal and dedicated

se

tend best wishc

wik

for man y yea rs o f h a pp y re tir e m en t.

r vice lO th e

Bro th e r hood , a nd ex ·

to him and hi

Research an d Education

(CoIltlllu cd from Page 18)

u&.:6c ll

rum c d o ut

to

be

2 11

b il l IOn or

28 percent over ((I rget.

For fi sca l ye ar 198 7 Co ogre,> and 'h e -

p l'cshl~n t f: lIk d to

t ak e

loll''!)'

mOlor c or

rec tiv e acti o ns . To hav e th ei r init ial pro -

Iccuons

reach

the

C mnun- Rudman-

.lS5 UI11Pt I 0 I1 ~ _ T h e r ev l ~t.!d pro) l!C ll 0n~

mad e in January, 198 7, c~llm:1tcd rh m

year bJi ho n. The ac tua l defi cit will

' h e fls c.!

1987 J efi clt WIll

even hi g h e r if t he cco n o m y COnt lllU CS 1 0 So ta g -

n:He lor \

be S173

be

ors t n l.

it IS utt e rly ridi c ul ous th at uur gOVl:rt1

mc m , un

der the h!;tlic rs ill p o f Pr es lu ent

Rc a ga n , I S s p e n dmg a l m a:, t S J.OO u f e v e ry

o n

t hi S

I ss ue ,

1Il~( (: ad o f

t.1lkl ng

, I h o lll

g

l l1HllI Cks SLH.: h 3 8 IlI1c - tt CI11 VCCOCS, r e-

vi:, in g

Bud get Amcmlm c nt . Th e pro h1cm o f wh ,1t

the budge t proces.s, :'Iml J B:'Il.1nc cd

spcnd in ~ t o

c ut .lIld what

t . lX es

to

In -

C!I.!.ISC wJii

w ere

gi ve n

n: m alll , eve n i f t h e p r~ ld c nt

the se :tn d orh !.!f bullgc Llry

too ls . The Il I: W Dl.'lllo CTnll C h.:.ldcr sh lp of

th \! Co ngress. mu s t w or k with

tht:"

Ih

Ho Ilings target of a Sl44 · b, llio n de n " ,

5.00

or go v e rnm e

nt

cx pc m.litu rc!s I~ t

pu

b h c : m s.

il n d

th e

III Cfi

C ongress and the prcs l dc nr lIsed numer -

to !lilY the

tn tc rcs t

on the d

'b

t. Ddic n -

s o l tltl ol1~ t o th ese 'j) ro b h .' l ))S . if

Ous g immi c k s. These I nclu ded se l l in g o ff

re-

rcvcn u c -produc1I1g a ss et s fo r de fici

t

d uc ti o n s in fi s ca l year

19 7, bUllrus will

s p em hn g PO il C I CS, C~ P CC I.1 ll y dl1rin~ th e

prl the ~o v c rn ll1cnt from

Rc.1gan

:trC n o w prcVl

'nt

Ilh.: eu llg

It S

tn g

re -

'~l(lcncy,

ttlC reasc

th e

deficit

10

f uture

e <1f

,

SpUIlMb l )I[I CS .

Cons tde r fo r a

moment

c h an ge s

i.n lax 13w s,

wh ic h a l s o

c

rC:HC

how

the

5 18 7 bIlli o n sp

·

llt on

m

tc rcs t

!:Ih llrt ~ll.:l Ul Ic d u c tiu n s 111 t he d e fi c It b u t

u n t h e d e bt dUrin g A~c a. 1 YC;l!

1 9 8 6

c ClIll d

lo ng- ter m i n c rca CS; shifting p:ly m c l1I

spe ndmg

uoult h e S lart of fi sc al year \9~8, "In c h

sc h edul es lo r fisc al year 1987

onl y In c reases th at year's de fi c i t; and the

usc of [idiculoll iy OP lI Ol IS ti C eco nomic

ass um pt ions which :-.how higher levels

or rece ipts an d lo w er levcl~ or uu tl ays

tha n wou ld he proj ected by Ill o re -re a li ::. u c

B I IBEW JOU RNA LI FEBRUARY

1967

h

a v e b ee n u s e d In

w ays

b c n cfi

1<. 11

t o OUI

~OC IC t y.

to

rn lucc t he n.1tlO l1 a l de bt , Of

to lowe r our (.-'Xes.

The de nclt a n d J eb l prob le m> 011""

be

:h.h.l r c s~ ( .' d bCC:LU SC t h c y a rc

onl y c r en t in g

b igge r p rob l e m s f I ll u u e" rUtur c .1J1d t hat

of our

knt

Ii

P res -

RC:1~aD n ee ds to pru v ld c 1c .1d c rs hlp

c htl d.r::c n and ~ r 311d c: hll J r c. n

C on g r c!)s

m

l . lk c

S IC P\

t e v e n If th e p!e~ i dc JlI I S lI n wdlllH ~ to

r form hi S po lic ic:, .

u m c

bo l t!

l1

~

fk 171lk !JestUJ}'S If» COiltwKe

a Volunlary

_

CONTRIBUTION 10 •

President Barry Appoints New Journal Department Director

International President J. J. Barry appoin ted International Representa - tive Ma ry Ann Van Meter to the positi on of Director of the mEW Journal Department. She moved to t hat posi ti on o n Novembe r I, 1986, and assumed full duties on february I , 19 7, when Robert McAlwee re - tired. Born On Oc tober2S, 1932, In Ya tes-

bo ro, Penn sy lvania, Sis ter Van Meter became an mEW membe r when her independent telephone union affili-

ated ''li th the IBEW and was

tered as Local 1944 on April I, 1956.

In 196J sh e was elected to th e full -

char-

tim e

pos iti on of rcco rcilllg sec retary,

then

3 president / bu sine s Ill,lI1age r

ill 1970. Under the leadersh ip of Sis- ter Van Meter, Local 1944 became an outstanding mEW telephone loca l union , and she became recognized for he r dedication and hard work to advance the pri nciples of the IBEW and the trade union movement. She held the lan eroffice until 1983 when she was appointed an International Repre.entative in the Telephone Dc· partment by Int erna t io nal President Charles H. Pillard . Durin g her ca reer in th e local limo n,

Mary Ann se rved as an Executive

Board

member of the Pc nn sy lva rua

late Electrical Workers Associ.·

of the Pc nn sy lva rua late Electrical Workers Associ.· tion, alternate vice president of

tion, alternate vice president of the Pennsylvania AFL-CIO lrom 1970- 1983, registe red lobbyis! in Pennsyl· vania representing telephone work·

to the

1972 Democratic National Conven·

ers from 1968- 1980, de legate

tion and 1974 De mocratic Mini-Con· vention, and alternate delega te to th e

1976 Democratic National Conven·

tion .

President Pillard appointed her w serve on the fBEW / AT&T National Bargain ing Committees in 1974, 1977, and 1980. At the IBEW Can ventio ns

In 197 8 and 1982, Si t er Va n Meter served a a member of th e Grievance

and Appeals Committee; in 1979 she was an IBEW delegate to the national AF L·C10 Co n vention . Elec ted an o f- ficer of Ihe Telephone Coordinating Council -I in 1981, she held that position until receiving her Interna- tional Representa tive appointment. In .ddJlion to handlmg nLlIlleroUS daily ta ks in the Telephon e Depart-

menl

Mary Ann assisted with the 1983 and 1986 IBEW negotiations with AT&T and Bell Atlantic and was deeply involved with coordinating

orga n izing efforts to affiliate a "' rgc group of independent telepho ne unions located in the Second, Third, Sixt h, and Ninth IBEW Vice Presi- dential Districts. Through Ihe com · bined efforts of the Districts and the

O rgan izi ng ments, th e

gaining approxima tely 6,000 addi - tional members. Local unions with members employed by United and A1 l tel Telep h one Compa nie s have also benefited from Sister Van Me-

ter's assistance .

s ince h er 1983 appointment,

and Telephone Depart - lBEW was successful ill

T he Brolhe rhood extends congral-

ul"t iuns and best wi shes for succe

to S ister Va n Meter as she performs

the duties of her new posilion

Unions Protest Station

Project in Pittsbu rg h

(COllllnlleci from Page 7)

bunctlous and loud but not dIsor· derly In any way , Cannon said thai l he po lice night shift was held ove r to assist the day crews, and Chief William Moo re pe rsonally com· manded police operations from the

J emo nSUati Ofl site .

Some drivers interviewed on the

noon

new s were

up

Ct .

II I

a01 goi n g,

late fo r work!" said While some drive rs

were angry, many others backed the ma rchers_ Tho usands of people were

hours late for work ~nd upset, how -

ever, those people have jobs! These union workers arc fighting lor their

very exis te nce. Wh en P res id ent Rea -

ga n fi red

the au traf fic c m Io ll e rs, a

message went our to big business, " Shift aU of the economic blame onto

to be two hours one angry man.

unIOns. This IS your chance to do

t hem in

other way." These 45,000 marcher

We orc I(omg to

look Ih e

werc nOI

upset with JUS t

one co ntm clOfj that's

only th e t ip 01

fe d lip with being forced o u t of wo rk,

with being turned in to t hird-cia s citizens, with seeing their lellow workers forced to leave the state and their fam"ies in despair, with going to food banks, and with getti ng the rUllaround. This cou ld be Ihe fi rSI of

th e icebe rg. They are

many

ma rches/

not

JUS t

in

Pitt s -

burgh , bu t around th e nation . La bor

I awakening.

Police

Conl lll:H1der

Herman

Mile he ll said that he never saw any -

thing like thi s demo nstration In all

yea ts on the police f rcc. Rich-

a rd Caligiuri, mayor of Pi tt s burgh,

chairman of the

of

his

Thomas

Foerster,

Cou nty Commissioners; and Judge

Em" Nariek called a special meeti ng

a t 2 p.m . o n t he day of th e march

in

the

ludge ' chambers. By 7 p.m. th ey,

Ml

uck , and leaders Irom

the Pitt

-

burgh

Building

Trades,

IIlcluding

Business Manager Joseph D. Miller, hammered alit an agreement which

in effcct

Sla ted that all work done

On these projects would be done by skilled ulllon craftsmen and that all

nonunion

contractors ant

!

workers

would be removed Irom the ioh<

" BUV

UNION PRODUCTS

ANC USE UNION S ERVI C E S

AS

YOU WOULO

HAVE UNION WAGES

PAID UNTO vOu . "

IB EW JOURNAL/ FEBRUARY

1987

I 9

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEETING

MINUTES AND REP ORT OF T HE INTERNATIONAL EXECUT I VI COUNCIL REG ULA R MEETING

ThIS rC,I;\JL;!1 mC'ctmg of Ihe: Inll:rn;l Il Olllll Executive Council was C: dllcd to

order by Ch.l irm;tD Bowden Il t 900 11 . 111 ., M onday. ()ccembcr 1. 1986

ml'mbt"rs of the Cuuncil In . tu:ndlU\ce

Buley . 1cA voy, Swc~ney. MIss!,")' , .;1Ild Rilspbc rry

OthCI

were Mulloney. Mt:Nuhy. Act fm,

LNTERN

Secre tar y Moore rrc:sentctl

TIONAL SECRETARY

Aoanela l r'c pOtlS cove ri ng the

Fund ,ll1d the (nv e s tm ent J>n llf ulio o f till' Br o therho od-bo t h

thl' Unitt;d St.1 t Cs

lNTERNA TIO NAL PR ES IOENT

!BEW Pt:fi:sl0n

III C:lnnJ:l n nd

PIC~ldtnl Barry me l I,.ntb the. lE e \l numbtl Q{ times t o d,s-cuss ;) "'~Htt) ul

IlUIIt'TS .JUC:ClIng all br.lnches of the Brotberhood

1n con forUlIt),

wuh

CONVENT LO ~ C ITY-

19IJQ

Ih~ prOVIsion s 0 1 A rll dt!

II, S('C IJ() l1

I,

uf

the

JEEW

CQnstitutlon, the In l ern:lIionlll EXCCUCl \' C Couned dc term incJ th:u t he 1990

C()nv~ntlon of th e 18EW shnl l ~

Sc:f>t~mbt.r H , \990

he l d

IN\l f.,l, I

In

St

\ENT~

LOUI f>, M Lssourt . r:ummcf\c LnA

The rtpoll of th~ lund m\'e$tmCnt action by the' In t crJ'HlllDnoil PreS ldem anti the lntemau onaJ ccte l ary stnCC= th e! I Il')t Co un Ci l m ectmg was p res!!:n h:.1

to th e JEe, eumtncd , If.nd IlItd.

fiNANC IAL Rf l'QRTS

rhC.audll u r ·s repOrt s 101 the \,:artrlU5 funds ul the Bl othc rh(k,d wen~IHc!>~mcd

10

the lEe, ex,a min ed, and filed

T RAN ' FER OF fUN DS

I n accordance

ttl:!. the provlsions. o r A(tId~ XlV, 'St:.CUu n \ I , ut \hc .mEW

Consllt u tlon, t he Su m of 571 ,630 .90 WI19' tr a n sferred fr om

Funl.l to th e IIJfW Pc nSlOn Fund cove nn~ the

and OC t obc r l

the M lluu.y "'c r vIC!:

c plcmber ,

nlOmh~ o f A ug u st,

1986,

LEGAL. DEFENSE

Pa)'me.ms for 1"'&'11 defense made from t hr Ddens.e

fund

were eno"Um:d

and D~provcd tn :1ccord:mce. "'Hth the H:qu l1 f!mr. u\ s nf A ,.n dt" XI

of th e: CODStllU lI O n

St:ctllln 1,

C HANGES INVOLV ING TilE PEN !HO

I' l

/\N

fOR OFf( C£ £,\\l' l.O \ ' EES

Of THE IN1' ERNATrONAL BROTIIER II OO O OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS

The 33rd Internati onal Cum't'1l 1l 011 of

tbt' I BE W pa ssed a R eso luti on d c: a hll8

""' It h Arnele III , Srctien

Ttvi

accommoo:ue the tollec[1ve b.ngalnmg Dt'I;.Otl3t10nS betwee.n the IBEW and Ihl.'. ofAcf! trnployc:es' own union Such n ego ll~ ti oos have r esulted til a c h.llnf; c tn th e Office Employee s p lan

Calcula ti o n uf beneRt!! , pn :hU u.s.l )' bodoed o n II. so , <. " Hed " nlg,h·l\lI c" u b ry ,

ar e Octobe r 1, 1986,

onQrt l uti u fl and t o

be effective as of

I I. of the IBEW COruLHuuon Th e rationa l e fo r tb llt nUI \nli t )' In lhe Office Employecs Vbn In o rd e r 10

15

to

sion

t o

be

A cco

was tu plo"Yuir.

b :ule:d Ol'l

a " 11I gh f our" s abry . Sa id c ha oge

rd lLlgly, purs uan t 10 II

authori t y unde r the IDEW

rc flec t t be nc go t iatio ns with th e office emplu)'ees' u ni o n , the IE C (eviewed

th e. exulting P l an

was

Ru les

and

Reguhltion s,

An

.:ap pr oprialc

ICsol ullon

adopted to "meod thc Rulc! and Regulations to change ,ht" brnrfh r.n mpu ·

utJ on, effective OclO~' I, 1986. to reflect the- " h lgh · four" l!illia ry fano r

RETlR£J,U_I"IT Of INTERNATIO

AL REritE

ENTATI\lES

I\p prov:ll W:l 5 g.anted by Ihe IEC to the fo Uo wing r Cp r r:scn l lHlves U:quc5t1 ng retIrement :

Thomas n, Will ey (Dl suhll lty f- eHcc llv c D ece mbe r 1, 1986

(FDurth Dtstrict U t, app roved by ma d

bClwt.'e n IEC session s )

Leo I . W 15 nis kl~ff el::tlvc Oe c cmbcl I , 1 986 .

llO t.b Dibtncl ,

I It, appr o ved

b y nlall

~ 'w ct"n l Ee sessIOns !

losc ph Cava(Ugh-e fiee t IVe lanuary I. 1981

IAs51SUnI, Inlcmallon :ll Secl c t aryl

Booth Dean Grcy IDlSablltty)-cffcclIvc: lanuary I, 1987

'Q I IBEW JOURNAL! FEBRUARy

,987

(Se venth D istric t I.R.I

WIlh,lnl'il Tu c ker IDI!o3l1l11ty\· (Se venth D is tri Ct I.R.I

Robert W. McAtwer-crfec::tJ\'1," IDlrectol , lu urnal Dl:"pl .1

Rolland Th,v lL:rge-efIcC"lI ye M ,m:b I, 1987 ( 10 th D I'iuic l I.R.I

Willi J.nl F Ferry-

cUcc:tJ'o'c IJntl.HY I, 19111

ft"bruary

I

198 7

effectlve AUj.\uSt l, 1987

!Dt rcc:wr, Ag·teeme ll t App ri'lv.tl D ep l. )

R~""IHE"'ENT OF OffiCE E,,,I'LO'l'EES

rhe

fo llowlOg

em ploy~cs 0 1 the!

mEW applied

for

letHemenl

Th e IEC

dp p roved th eir . equesls tU be effc:ctlvc liS s hown:

tLl!L:an ("nn r1d-

(1,0. Employee\

Mllry ' · Iu:lmn D"vls-effe c tlve laou :II'Y 'I,

clfccu\,( lanu ilrY J, 19R7

II O. El'Ilploycel

I!JR7

1\ rdund

IU:

·UND

as authon =t:d b)' th( II:C lR ac.o.:.oulau ce w Llh the pm\l,sIons OJ

Anu:le III, Stcuen I I. Subparagraph 4, of lhc Constitu ti on 10 the bcncdic":u,,

of deceased In terna tional

Rcprcscnl.tuv~ lI elu)' Z.eman

LO ,\L

UN ION!) UNDEr< SUPERVISION

At t h \: rcqul!st of the Int er n a ll onal Pn :sn l l!lIl a nd In ac:cordJllcc wtt h t\ rw, J~ IV, SectIon J , Subp:u agrtlph 9, of Ihe IBEW Cons u t uLLoll. t he lEe lIuthOn2cd

th e conti n o,lI ion

o f th e Intcrn31101u l Charge of Loc.11 Umon 568, M Clfl ll cal

Qul.'hcc, Canada, lmd Local U n ion 614 . Quebec C u y, Quebe c, CllI1nd;t

ACTION 0

CO

VENTION RESO LUTION DEAUNG \\'11'11 PRt:.- 1974

RETIREES UNOER TilE PE."'S I ON Pl.A

fOR I NTEIU"';

TlONAL

OffICERS, REP RE.SENTAT1VES, A.ND ASSISTANTS Of TILE IRE\\'

Th e J3rd

Resolutl oll

ch:,IIl !: (: :S! 01