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PROBLEM STATEMENT

As a major employment generator in many parts of the world, construction is also a sector
associated with a proportionately high number of job-related accidents and diseases. Despite
mechanization, the industry is still largely labor-intensive, while working environments are
frequently changing and involve many different parties. According to ILO estimates', each year
there are at least 60,000 fatal accidents on construction sites around the world. This is one fatal
accident every ten minutes. The construction industry has also worse accident record than other
industries in most countries (king & Hudson 1994).

Approximately 4% of the world’s gross domestic Product is lost with the cost of injury, death and disease
through absence from work, sickness treatment, and disability and survivor benefits. In addition to the
above statistical figures there are also other major non-quantifiable costs, such as the insurance
and health care costs, that affected individuals face, the indirect costs that companies incur (e.g.
the cost of training inexperienced replacement workers, administrative expenses, production
bottlenecks, low employee morale), the impact on families and communities and the inefficiency
of having a large proportion of a potentially active workforce being disabled, idle or prematurely
retired (Pouliakas and Theodossiou, 2010).

According to estimated report by ILO (2008), the global number of work-related fatal and non-
fatal accidents and diseases does not seem to have changed significantly during the past 10 years.
This is mainly driven by the globalization process and by rapid industrialization in relatively
poor countries that are not capable of maintaining effective health and safety systems. It has,
therefore, been argued that the need to focus on health and safety is as paramount as ever, given
that the traditional hazard and risk prevention and control tools are still effective but need to be
completed by strategies designed to address the consequences of a continuous adaptation to a
rapidly changing world of work (ILO, 2008,).

According to estimated report by ILO (2008), the global number of work-related fatal and non-
fatal accidents and diseases does not seem to have changed significantly during the past 10 years.
This is mainly driven by the globalization process and by rapid industrialization in relatively
poor countries that are not capable of maintaining effective health and safety systems. It has,
therefore, been argued that the need to focus on health and safety is as paramount as ever, given
that the traditional hazard and risk prevention and control tools are still effective but need to be
completed by strategies designed to address the consequences of a continuous adaptation to a
rapidly changing world of work (ILO, 2008,).