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EstablishEd 1879 | Columbus, mississippi

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‘BETTER BECAuSE oF GEnE TAyloR’

| a ugust 6, 2019 FREE! ‘BETTER BECAuSE oF GEnE TAyloR’ Dispatch file photo Columbus Ward

Dispatch file photo

Columbus Ward 1 Councilman Gene Taylor, 65, died Monday after serving 13 years on the council.

Supes ask state auditor to investigate EMCC

Probe request comes after college shows $10 million loss over past decade

BY MARY POLLITZ mpollitz@cdispatch.com

Lowndes County super- visors are now asking the State Auditor’s Office to investigate the financial decline at East Mississippi Community College. Supervisors voted unani- mously to request the state investigation in its regular meeting Monday morning, with EMCC President Scott Alsobrooks, who was pres- ent at the Lowndes County Courthouse, vowing to co- operate. But when the EMCC board of trustees met

Monday night in Scooba, a potential auditor’s investi- gation or any discussion of the college’s

investi- gation or any discussion of the college’s Sanders Alsobrooks See EMCC , 3A Sheriff’s office

Sanders

investi- gation or any discussion of the college’s Sanders Alsobrooks See EMCC , 3A Sheriff’s office

Alsobrooks

See EMCC, 3A

Sheriff’s office employee subject of a AG investigation

DISPATCH STAFF REPORT

COLUMBUS — A Lowndes County Sheriff’s Office employee is on adminis- trative leave after Sheriff Mike Arledge learned the employee is a subject of a crimi- nal investigation by the state Attorney Gen- eral’s Office. Arledge announced the decision in a press release Monday. The press release did not name the employee, who has not been charged. Arledge became aware of the allegations when the AG’s office informed him of the in- vestigation, the press release said. The alle- gations that led to the investigation are not related to the employee’s duties with LCSO. The employee will remain on admin- istrative leave pending the investigation’s outcome.

Ward 1 councilman remembered for kindness, service to community

BY ISABELLE ALTMAN ialtman@cdispatch.com

COLUMBUS — Ward 2 Coun- cilman Joseph Mickens can re- member the last words he heard Ward 1 Councilman Gene Taylor say, Sunday afternoon as the two men were leaving church. “I was with him all day Satur- day. I was with him all day Sunday, at church, and he was just telling the mayor, ‘We’ve just got to get along better. We’ve got to make Columbus a better place,’” Mick- ens remembered. “These were

the last words I heard him saying:

‘We’ve got to work better togeth- er.’” Taylor, 65, died Monday morn- ing at Baptist Memorial Hospi- tal-Golden Triangle of natural causes. According to Lowndes County Coroner Greg Merchant, he became ill that morning and was taken to the hospital where he passed away a short time later. By all accounts, the last words Mickens heard him say reflected Taylor’s attitude toward Colum- bus, and certainly his ward, where residents knew him as a kindly vol-

unteer who served food and played with kids at events at Townsend Community Center, which was built during his tenure on the council. A lifelong Columbus resident, Taylor was a self-professed sports fan who especially loved cheering on the Columbus High School bas- ketball team. Before becoming a councilman, he worked for Cisco Foods in its transportation depart- ment for nearly 30 years. He was the father to three daughters and a grandfather, and he had been married to his wife Terry for more than 20 years. His friends and co-workers de- scribed him as caring, and always ready to extend a hand to help. He

See TAYLOR, 6A

AT THE CEnTER oF THE GolFInG WoRlD

Bryan’s dream takes center stage at 2019 U.S. Women’s Amateur

dream takes center stage at 2019 U.S. Women’s Amateur Courtesy photo/Wilkes Bryan George Bryan (left), grandson

Courtesy photo/Wilkes Bryan

George Bryan (left), grandson Wells Williams and son Wilkes Bryan pose for a family photo. George founded Old Waverly Golf Club in 1988, while Wilkes currently serves as the club’s COO.

BY BEN PORTNOY bportnoy@cdispatch.com

A s the wee hours of Saturday

morning’s practice rounds

for the 2019 Women’s U.S.

Amateur began, a thick fog coats the entrance to Old Waverly Golf Club. Passing the guardhouse and heading down Magnolia Drive, the course is deathly silent. Play does not begin for another few minutes. There’s a peaceful serenity to the scene as the clubhouse comes into view.

Guarded by a circular patch of flowers and shrubbery, the columned building is aptly reminiscent of that of Augusta

‘We know that old Waverly can put on a great test and we know that they can put on a great championship.’

National Golf Club — home of The Masters. “If you look at Augusta they probably do it the best,” said Wilkes Bryan, Old Waverly’s chief operating officer said. “And we strive to do the best and they’re just a great model to try to follow.” With practice rounds for this week’s tournament that morning, a handful of players have made their way to the putting green just between the clubhouse and the first tee box.

The fog is thickest here. It rolls across the narrow fairways and subtle hills of holes No. 1 and 9 that run parallel to each other just off in the distance. The early morning dew is progressively erased with cleat marks and the wheels of push- carts — though the natural scene still persists. For nearly 31 years Old Wa- verly has harbored this placid beauty and challenged golfers

See BRYA n, 3A

Weather

beauty and challenged golfers See BRYA n , 3A Weather Gavin Denton Second grade, New Hope

Gavin Denton Second grade, New Hope

High 92 Low 72

Muggy Full forecast on page 2A.

Five Questions

1 What rating in the TV Parental

Guidelines system stands for “Parents Strongly Cautioned”?

2 What event was Abraham Lincoln

attending when he was assassinated?

3 What nun became famous for taking

TV viewers on art tours around the world’s museums?

4 What is the seventh planet from the

Sun?

5 According to the commercial, what

does Almond Joy have that Mounds doesn’t?

Answers, 6B

inside

Classifieds 5B

Health 6A

Comics 4B

Obituaries 5A

Crossword 6B Dear Abby 4B

Opinions 4A

caLendar

Today through Sunday, Aug. 6-11

U.S. Women’s Amateur Champion-

ship: Top female golfers from more than 20 countries compete in this USGA event at Old Waverly Golf Course in West Point. Complimentary tickets will be available at the gate. For more information, contact the Golf Club, 662-494-6463, or visit oldwaverly.com.

Today

Night Out on Crime: The Columbus

Police Department observes National Night Out on Crime with neighborhood out- reach offering safety information, school supplies, food and family fun from 5-7 p.m. at: Sim Scott Park, Townsend Park Stage, Sandfield Community Center and the Columbus High School patio. For more information, call 662-244-3528.

LocaL FoLks

patio. For more information, call 662-244-3528. LocaL FoLks Cardaye Coleman , 2, likes helping his mom

Cardaye Coleman, 2, likes helping his mom around their home and interacting with everyone they meet. His favorite color is blue.

PubLic

meetings

Today: Starkville Board of Aldermen, 5:30 p.m., City Hall Aug. 12: Starkville- Oktibbeha school board, 6 p.m., Greensboro Center Aug. 16: Board of Aldermen, 5:30 p.m., City Hall

DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471

2A Tuesday, a ugus T 6, 2019

DiD you hear?

 

Louisiana launching medical marijuana

The AssociATed Press

 

BATON ROUGE, La. — Louisiana is becoming the first Deep South state to dispense medical mar- ijuana on Tuesday, four years after state lawmak- ers agreed to give patients access to therapeutic can- nabis. Nine pharmacies are licensed to dispense med- ical marijuana across Lou- isiana and most are ex- pected to open this week. Louisiana joins more than 30 other states that al- low medical marijuana in some form. And though marijuana is banned at the federal level, a congres- sional amendment blocks the Justice Department from interfering with states’ medical marijuana programs. GB Sciences, one of two state-sanctioned growers, will begin ship- ping medical marijuana to Louisiana’s registered dispensaries Tuesday morning, after state regu- lators recently completed final tests and cleared it for release. Hundreds of patients in Louisiana have been awaiting the start of the program after years of work by lawmakers, who created the regulato-

ry framework in 2015 for dispensing the cannabis. There also have been reg- ulatory disputes and other hurdles. State Sen. Fred Mills, a pharmacist in St. Martin Parish who sponsored the medical marijuana law, never thought it would take years for patients to gain access. He said he has repeatedly received “difficult calls” from peo- ple with cancer, seizures and other debilitating conditions and their fami- ly members asking when cannabis will reach phar- macy shelves. “The toughest thing has been not being able to give people a definitive timeline that they could make plans for,” Mills said. Nine pharmacies are licensed to dispense med- ical marijuana across Lou- isiana. Most are expect- ed to open this week. It joins more than 30 other states that allow medical marijuana in some form. And though marijuana is banned at the federal lev- el, a congressional amend- ment blocks the Justice Department from inter- fering with states’ medical marijuana programs.

   

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The Commercial Dispatch, P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703 Published by Commercial Dispatch Publishing Company Inc., 516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39703

 

The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com

Tuesday

Say What?

“You always want to go out there and get better every day, regardless of if you’re first, second or third string.”

MSU quarterback Keytaon Thompson response to reporters about competition with Tommy Stevens to line up under center in the season opening Aug 31. Story 1B.

eLeCtioNS 2019: MiSSiSSiPPi GoVeNor PriMarieS

Governor primaries headline Mississippi ballots on Tuesday

By JeFF AMy The Associated Press

JACKSON — Mississippi Democrats and Republicans de- cide their nominees for gover- nor and several other state and local offices in primary elections Tuesday. In the Republican primary for governor, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves is seeking to fend off opposi- tion from former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Bill Waller Jr. and state Rep. Robert Foster. On the Democratic side, Attorney General Jim Hood is challenged by seven candidates, including Hinds County District Attorney Robert Shuler Smith and retired Jackson State University admin- istrator Velesha P. Williams. GOP voters also will weigh in on contested primaries for lieu- tenant governor, attorney gener- al, secretary of state and treasur- er, while Democrats will decide a nominee for secretary of state. Voters in some parts of the state will also see contested primaries for public service commissioner and transportation commission- er.

Voters also will decide nom- inees for state legislative and county races. Runoffs will be Aug. 27 in any races in which a candidate doesn’t get a majority Tuesday, while winners advance to the Nov. 5 general election.

The key races:

Governor

Reeves and Hood, clear favor- ites for governor in their respec- tive parties from the outset, have focused their fire on each other.

Other candidates are trying to de- rail them. Reeves says Hood is a liberal tied to the national Demo- cratic party. Waller presents him- self as a pragmatist who would do more to improve roads and extend

health insurance coverage. Foster gained attention when he told a female reporter that she could not ride in his truck to report on his campaign unless she were chaper- oned by a male colleague. Hood ar- gues that a less partisan approach

would benefit Mississippians, and he criticizes Republican tax cuts as aimed at corporations, as opposed to his own proposal to remove the sales tax on groceries.

Lieutenant Governor

Three-term Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann faces little known Shane Quick of Lake Cor- morant in a Republican primary. The winner will face Democratic state Rep. Jay Hughes in Novem- ber.

Attorney General

Republicans will choose among three candidates: state Treasurer Lynn Fitch, longtime Republican activist Andy Taggart and state Rep. Mark Baker. Bak- er promises an activist agenda on hot-button topics such as im- migration and religious freedom, while he also says he would elim- inate contracts with outside law- yers that he has long criticized. Taggart notes his experience as chief of staff for former Gov. Kirk Fordice and says he’s running to fight illegal drugs after one of his sons took his own life after strug- gling with drugs. Fitch says she wants to fight opioids and human trafficking and protect vulnerable Mississippians from harm. The Republican nominee will face Jen- nifer Riley Collins, a military vet- eran and former director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Mississippi.

Secretary Of State

The Republican primary be- tween state Sen. Michael Watson and southern district Public Ser- vice Commissioner Sam Britton has been contentious, with the two frequently trading accusations. The Democratic race has been quieter, with former Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree and Lexing- ton resident Maryra Hodges Hunt seeking the nomination. Britton wants to expand the office’s role in promoting economic growth. Wat- son wants the secretary of state to take over issuing driver’s licenses. DuPree wants a no-excuses early voting period.

Treasurer

State Sen. Eugene “Buck” Clarke and David McRae are tout- ing money management skills as they compete for the Republican nomination. Clarke is an accoun- tant who helped write state budgets as Senate Appropriations Commit- tee chairman. McRae is an invest- ment manager descended from

a family that owned department

stores and is making his second run for treasurer, spending heavily from his own money. The winner faces Democrat Addie Lee Green, a former Bolton alderwoman.

Public Service Commissioner

Northern district Democrat Brandon Presley is unopposed. In the central district, Democrats will choose among frequent candi- date Dorothy “Dot” Benford, cur- rent commission employee Ryan Brown, lawyer Bruce Burton, and Jackson City Councilman De’Kei- ther A. Stamps. Central district Republicans will choose from 2015 nominee Brent Bailey and Missis- sippi Development Authority em- ployee Nic Lott. In the southern district, former Ocean Springs Mayor Connie Moran faces Sugar Stallings of Biloxi for the Demo- cratic nomination, while Pascagou-

la Mayor Dane Maxwell faces Kiln

contractor Kelvin Schulz.

Transportation Commissioner

The northern district features a five-way Republican battle among Trey Bowman, John Caldwell, E.A. Hathcock, Jeremy Martin, and Geoffrey Yoste. The winner faces Democrat Joey Grist, who is unop- posed. In the central district, state Sen. Willie Simmons faces Ed- wards Mayor Marcus Wallace for the Democratic nod, while Bran- don Mayor Butch Lee is seeking the GOP nomination against Ricky Pennington Jr. of Vicksburg. In the southern district, incumbent Tom King is challenged in the Republi- can primary by former state Sen. Tony Smith and former Mississip- pi Department of Transportation employee Chad Toney. No Dem- ocrats qualified in the southern district.

arouND the State

Employees return to work after Mississippi Walmart shooting

SOUTHAVEN — Em- ployees of a northern Mississippi Walmart are back at work less than a week after two store managers were killed by a gunman described as a disgruntled worker. WREG-TV reports em- ployees returned to the Southaven store Monday. Authorities say 39-year- old Martez Tarrell Abram fatally shot two coworkers and wounded a police of-

ficer before he was shot

and arrested on July 30. Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite said Abram was a disgruntled worker. He had recent- ly been suspended after showing a knife to a co- worker.

A statement by

Walmart says employees

are being assigned shifts to complete work needed to reopen the store.

The statement didn’t

give a timeframe for the reopening. It said cleanup crews were at the store this week in response to

the fire that investigators believe Abram set.

Jackson police make second arrest in 2018 shooting deaths

JACKSON— A second Mississippi man has been

arrested in two August 2018 shooting deaths. Jackson police Sgt. Roderick Holmes said Monday that 27-year-old Tijah Cowart of Clinton has been charged with two counts of murder. Cowart is accused in the killing of two men

who were found dead in a pickup truck near a hos- pital north of downtown Jackson. Found shot to death were 22-year-old Na- thaniel Rashad Allen and 26-year-old Kenyatta Mc- Gee. Cowart remains jailed Tuesday. It’s unclear if he has a lawyer. In June, police arrest- ed and charged 27-year- old Kendrick Claiborne with two counts of mur- der and drug possession with intent to distribute. — The Associated Press

with intent to distribute. — The Associated Press SOLUNAR TABLE The solunar period indicates peak-feeding

SOLUNAR TABLE

The solunar period indicates peak-feeding times for fish and game.

 

Tues.

Wed.

Major

5:45a

6:36a

Minor

12:42a

1:47p

Major

6:10p

6:36a

Minor

12:30a

Courtesy of Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks

Major 6:10p 6:36a Minor — 12:30a Courtesy of Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks

msu sPorts bLog

Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breaking Bulldog news: www.cdispatch.com/msusports

@

Tuesday, augusT 6, 2019 3A

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EMCC

continued from Page 1a

financial situation, took about 90 seconds of a near- ly two-hour open session. “(The Lowndes Coun- ty board of supervisors) passed a motion to call the state auditor and ask them to do an audit on East Mis- sissippi Community Col- lege,” Alsobrooks told the EMCC board of trustees. “I don’t know what will

but Lown-

des County board of su- pervisors (is) going to ask them to come in and take a deep dive into our books. I don’t know what will come of that, but I will keep you informed.”

The board’s response to that revelation was mute and members in- stead heard presentations about campus updates, upgrades, student involve- ment and the Communi- versity — a $42 million workforce training center in Lowndes County fund- ed by local, state, EMCC and Appalachian Regional Commission funds. Supervisors’ request for a state auditor’s inves- tigation comes after infor- mation about the college’s finances came to the fore last week. EMCC’s gener- al operating fund balance has declined by about $10

Bryan

continued from Page 1a

come of that

million since 2010, with athletics spending and de- clining enrollment dubbed the primary culprits. Logan Reeves, a repre- sentative from the State Auditor’s Office, said as of Monday afternoon the office had not received the board’s request for an investigation of EMCC. He added he could not com- ment if EMCC had any open investigations, but an investigation would begin once the office receives the county’s complaint. “Each community col- lege in the state of Mis- sissippi undergoes audit every year,” Reeves said. “Our office will be happy to look into any complaint by the board of supervi- sors and we will take that seriously.” EMCC’s main campus is in Scooba, but also has a Golden Triangle campus in Mayhew, the Commu- niversity and Lion Hills Center and Country Club in Columbus. EMCC’s board of trust- ees is comprised of two members from each of the counties EMCC serves:

Lowndes, Lauderdale, Oktibbeha, Clay, Noxu- bee and Kemper. Those members are voted to the

EMCC board from each county’s board of supervi- sors.

‘I don’t want you to take this personally’

During the board of supervisors meeting Mon- day morning, Alsobrooks addressed board members with a fact sheet, showing the college’s reliance on Lowndes County. Nearly 1,100 students from Lown- des County attended an EMCC campus in 2018-19, Alsobrooks said, which is the most students from any county. President Harry Sand- ers requested Alsobrooks be present after last week’s supervisors meeting where a citizen requested supervi- sors replace the Lowndes County representatives, Lance Walters and Greg Stewart, on the EMCC board of trustees. Alsobrooks said Mon- day that Stewart and Wal- ters served as valued mem- bers of the board. “Coming from an indus- trial background, I think it’s good to have represen- tation from the industrial sector,” Alsobrooks said. “We are being asked to train the workforce of to- morrow. … It’s very good

to have people from Paccar or business manager from Aurora, like Lance and

Greg are.” While Alsobrooks — who began his role as EMCC president in Janu- ary — still stood at the po- dium following his presen- tation, Sanders called for

a motion to investigate the college’s finances. “I don’t want you to take this personally because you

just got here,” Sanders said.

“I feel like you probably just

jumped into a hornets’ nest. After (the citizen) accused our board members … a lot of people called me — I

guess you would say they were whistleblowers — and talked about the funding. You said the reserves have gone down and there’s some accusations that’s be- cause of the athletics. “I’m concerned and I think the board of supervi- sors should be concerned,” he added. “We’ve obligated $10 million over the next 10 years for the Communi- versity. … We’re concerned that our money might be used for some of these oth- er things.” The Communiversity is the college’s new industrial building slated to open this month. The facility was

funded through $18 million in state bonds, $10.7 mil- lion from the Appalachian Regional Commission, $10 million from Lowndes County, $2.5 million from Oktibbeha County, $1 mil- lion from Clay County and $400,000 from EMCC. With the financial decline

of EMCC, the loss of $10 million in its general fund over the last decade, Sand- ers said he had growing concerns of the allocation

of the county’s fund. Super- visors unanimously agreed to move forward with the request for the state auditor to investigate.

‘We can’t compromise education’

District 5 Supervisor Leroy Brooks addressed Alsobrooks and said the college’s priority should be educating students. “I understand the role of athletics,” Brooks said. “This is no reflec- tion of those doing their job. I don’t want anybody to misunderstand (and think) that we have prob- lem with EMCC. It is an integral part of our com- munity. I think it’s our re- sponsibility to make sure it is sound and those peo- ple that have a desire to

go to EMCC can. We can’t compromise education.” While standing silent- ly at the podium after the board’s vote, Alsobrooks thanked supervisors and vowed to help with the up- coming investigation. “I respect what you’re doing,” Alsobrooks said. “I will cooperate in any and all manners. We have a great faculty and staff at East Mississippi Commu- nity College and they’re embarrassed by some of what’s happening, and I want to stand up for our faculty and staff.” After the meeting, Sanders told The Dis- patch that, with rumors circulating, his concerns with the county’s invest- ment in the Communi- versity have steadily in- creased. “I want to make sure it’s spent properly,” Sand- ers said. “I’m concerned about that. We’ve got some industry and man- ufacturers making dona- tions and I want to make sure that money is spent where it’s supposed to go. There’s no oversight other than our two board members. There’s some people that don’t want that to happen.”

from around the world on one of the country’s most prestigious courses — one conceived by Wil- kes’ father and founder George Bryan. “Some days it seems like it was yesterday and, when you think about it, it’s been a long time,” he said. “But it’s been a lot of ups, mostly highs.”

Building an all-star squad

Bryan Foods began as a small operation in West Point in 1936. George’s father and un- cle began the company and turned it into one of the South’s premier meat packing operations. The business was eventually purchased by the Sara Lee Corpora- tion in 1968. For years, George worked as an executive. But in the early 1980s he proposed a new venture in the state his family’s company called home for so many years: a state park golf course in West Point. Much to his chagrin, legislation for the initial project fell short. Heading back to the drawing board, George decided to start a championship club of his own. With a group of project managers that numbered about 30, he began the outlines for what is now Old Waverly. Seeking a marketing figurehead and course designer for the project, George turned to char- ismatic Georgian Jerry Pate. The 1976 U.S. Open winner brought the course name recog- nition in golf circles. Pate also helped enlist Bob Cupp — a for- mer club pro from Flor- ida who had designed a

— a for- mer club pro from Flor- ida who had designed a Ben Portnoy/Dispatch Staff

Ben Portnoy/Dispatch Staff

The Old Waverly clubhouse and entrance are built in a slight ode to those at Augusta National Golf Club in Augus- ta, Georgia — home of The Masters.

number of courses with PGA legend Jack Nick- laus. When Cupp hopped on board, George had his all-star squad. “(Pate) got Bob and they formed a partner- ship to build the course and design it,” George said. “And they were a really good team. Jerry was a good marketing spokesperson and Bob was good designer.” Construction at Old Waverly began in the mid-1980s. The course opened in September 1988 as Pate, LPGA golfer Heather Farr, two-time Masters champion Ben Crenshaw and three-time LPGA Championship winner Nancy Lopez played its

inaugural round. “Everything just seemed like it was a per- fect fit,” said Wilkes, a freshman at Mississippi State at the time.

‘We all signed the line’

Old Waverly is no stranger to major tour- naments. In the club’s almost 31-year history it has held the SEC Women’s Championship, the Women’s U.S. Mid-Am- ateur and, most notably, the 1999 Women’s U.S. Open won by World Golf Hall of Famer Juli Inkster. This week’s U.S. Women’s Amateur is the latest big-ticket event on the club’s resume. In its pitch to host

the event, Old Waverly’s leadership leaned on its previous experience hosting large-scale tour- naments. “ We know that Old Waverly can put on a great test and we know that they can put on a great championship,” United States Golf As- sociation Championship Director Rachel Sadows- ki told The Dispatch. “History is very import- ant to the USGA and the fact that they’ve hosted the U.S. Women’s Open in 1999 is a really big deal. I think the players here will see that as a big deal.” The USGA announced Old Waverly’s winning bid in March 2017. “Mr. Bryan got a call

and we talked it over and thought it was best to host here,” Old Waverly Head Golf Professional Greg Flannagan said. “And we all signed the line and (are) now fortunate and excited to have 156 ladies test their skills here at Old Waverly.”

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A sense of accomplishment

As the sun gleamed over the practice green just below the clubhouse, George Bryan and Pate traded words. The two have remained friends for more than three decades, though Pate doesn’t get out to Old Waverly much anymore. Saturday, Bryan insisted he take him around the course to show off the latest devel- opments in its design. “He’ll always have a lot to say about that,” Bryan quipped. “He wants to change this and do that.” Today, Wilkes runs the day-to-day operations, though George is still heavily involved and lives on property. Close to 31 years since the opening of Bryan’s dream course, Magnolia Drive will serve as the red carpet for the best wom- en’s amateur golfers in the world this week. And as has become an annual tradition at Augusta, Old Waverly is once again at the center of the golfing world. “It goes by so fast — it’s like a flurry,” Wilkes said. “You’re working so hard every day to make sure ev- erybody is doing their jobs and when you get through you have this sense of accomplishment.”

ev- erybody is doing their jobs and when you get through you have this sense of

99.49%

The DispaTch

4A Tuesday, augusT 6, 2019

Opinion

the

Dispatch

PETERBIRNEYIMESEditor/Publisher BIRNEYIMESIII Editor/Publisher 1998-2018 BIRNEYIMESJR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003 BIRNEYIMESSR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947

ZACKPLAIR, ManagingEditor BETHPROFFITTAdvertisingDirector MICHAELFLOYDCirculation/ProductionManager MARYANNHARDYController

State of the nation

Trump framing election as a referendum on white people

If you are a regular here, you may have heard this story before. But it bears repeating. In 1958, George Wallace ran for governor of Alabama against John Patterson, a fire-breathing segregationist. Wallace, though also a segregation- ist, was considered enough of a racial moderate to be endorsed by the NAACP.

So naturally, he was trounced. Sometime afterward, as recounted by biographer Marshall Frady, a rueful Wallace made a defining declaration to a room full of politicos:

“John Patterson out-nigguhed me. And boys, I’m not goin’ to be out-nigguhed again.” As history shows, he never was. Which is to say Wallace, who became governor in 1963, was never again found deficient in stoking racial animosity for political gain. He understood its power to drive white voters to the polls. As is beyond obvious by now, Donald Trump does, too. His Twitter attack on Baltimore over the weekend — “a disgusting, rat and rodent-infested mess,” “a very dangerous & filthy place” — was but the latest in a long line of racist invective de- signed to gin up white support. The tweets — they came in a rebuke of Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Trump critic whose district includes much of the city — set in motion a se- quence both predictable and unavoidable: condem- nation from those still possessed of working souls, rationalization from those who are not. Baltimore is a troubled place, said his enablers. How is it racist to say that? But America is full of troubled places. The Fifth District of Kentucky, for instance, has the nation’s second-highest rate of opioid use, its second-low- est median income, its highest poverty rate and its lowest life expectancy. But unlike majority-black Baltimore, the Fifth is one of the whitest (over 96 percent) places in the country, its congressional delegation uniformly white and Republican. So you’ll never hear Trump disparage that region in terms that otherize and dehumanize its people. Its desperate condition notwithstanding, he’ll never call it a place “where no human being would want to live.” No, that kind of abuse is re- served for black and brown places with black and brown leaders. That said, Trump himself is not what should trouble us most. After all, we’ve seen his type before. He is a throwback, retro as a Jordan jersey, latest iteration of a long line of racist blowhards stretching back to Wallace and beyond. No, what should trouble us — what should leave white people in particular offended — is Trump’s implicit bet that what worked for Patterson in 1958, what worked for Wallace in 1962, what worked for Nixon in 1968, what worked for Bush in 1988, will work for him, now. As low an opinion as Trump holds of black and brown people, his opin- ion of white people is nothing to write home about. He is wagering his presidency, after all, that they share his patronizing disdain for people of color, his atavistic fear of the coming America, his slimy bigotry. He is betting that if you use every hateful word but the one that begins with “n,” if you thereby give them room to rationalize and equivocate, you’ll find that white people are essen- tially the same now as 60 years ago. Is he right? That’s the question upon which the future teeters. It’s been said that Trump is framing this election as a referendum on race. What he’s really doing, albeit unintentionally, is framing it as a referendum on white people, on how they have changed — or have not — in the past 60 years. Trump is betting on the latter. He thinks white people are an ignorant rabble, readily roused by appeals to their basest, most racist selves. Fifteen months from now, we’ll see how many prove him right. Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for commentary, is a columnist for the Miami Herald. Email him at lpitts@miamiherald.com.

Leonard Pitts
Leonard Pitts

Our View: Local Editorials

Local editorials appearing in this space represent the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board: Peter Imes, editor and publisher; Zack Plair, managing editor; Slim Smith and senior newsroom staff. To inquire about a meeting with the board, please contact Peter Imes at 662-328-2424, or e-mail voice@cdispatch.com.

Voice of the People

We encourage you to share your opinion with readers of The Dispatch. Submit your letter to The Dispatch by:

E-mail: voice@cdispatch.com Mail: P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703 In person: 516 Main St., Columbus, or 101 S. Lafay- ette St., No. 16, Starkville. All letters must be signed by the author and must include town of residence and a telephone number for verification purposes. Letters should be no more than 500 words, and guest columns should be 500-700 words. We reserve the right to edit submitted informa- tion.

words. We reserve the right to edit submitted informa- tion. home baSe Pray away gun violence?

home baSe

Pray away gun violence? OK. Let’s do it

The venerable Tex- as lieutenant governor may have a point. Bringing teach- er-led prayer back into public schools may just be the ticket for turn- ing back the tide of gun violence. I’m sure nothing in his record would suggest ties to gun lobbies that would sully his objectivity on

the gun control argu- ment, so let’s for a moment, take him at his word. In any case, I think this could work if done correctly. So I’ll play — or pray, as it were. I’m not being sarcastic, I swear. First off, I like guns. I own at least a dozen, though the Rambo or mountain militia types would cer- tainly get bored quickly with these

as most are of the “bolt-action” variety and not outfitted to take out a mall full of people without having to reload. Also, and I mean this with not the slightest hint of humor, I am a Christian. Of the born-again, evan- gelical order, even. So I believe in the power of earnest prayer, in that God will answer in ways that are most needed, even if not in the ways we expect. So, if we’re going to make a public show of it, a la returning the vaunted corporate prayer model to the classroom, I offer these suggestions. Let’s have our teachers and children pray for an education system that allows teachers to teach and students to learn beyond the moving goalpost of ever-chang- ing standardized tests assembled by the lowest bidder, as well as pray for consistent funding that

Zack Plair
Zack Plair

will adequately supply public schools with the resources they need and teachers with a sal- ary that will make more candidates want to enter the field. Then, they can move on to praying for infrastructure policy that will guarantee roads and bridges won’t crumble under our cars and our water won’t

poison us. From there, let’s have them throw in earnest pleas to God for a health care system that expands truly affordable coverage to everyone and improves the health outcomes for our most impover- ished and otherwise vulnerable populations. While they’re at it, they can pray for a society that places more value on people than profit, and whose people commit themselves to helping the poor — in any way they can — have their basic needs. Lastly, and most importantly, we can have them pray our society eradicate racism, sexism, hatred and bigotry in all its forms, with each praying person making a personal commitment to stand on the front line by combating any intolerance in their own hearts and minds. If God hears those prayers and delivers on the promise to heal the land, then I reckon the leaders He would put in place for that purpose would, by default, take stronger gun legislation more seriously. Gone would be the days where voters would actually consider election candidates who troll them with a fake war with Hollywood over a license plate. No more

could a man with, at minimum, a suspect record of grooming young children for personal purposes get within 2 percent of a U.S. Senate seat just because of a party label. And a candidate who uses hate speech, narcissism and shock value to propel himself to the White House, then crowd-sources public policy via Twitter rants — those days would be relegated to antiquity. The whole enterprise of the “Christian” label in the South so often being a stand-in for “white, angry segregationist” — this prayed-for society would make such a thing blasphemy again. Wouldn’t this be so nice? I know I’d enjoy living in such an America. But why wait? We don’t have to ask our public school teachers to violate the Constitution by com- pelling their students to do this for us. Teachers have enough to do already, what with peppering in active shooter training between worrying the state test scores of their lowest 25th-percentile stu- dents won’t be high enough to get them a contract renewal. We can do this praying thing ourselves. Since at least the days of Daniel in the Old Testament, you can pray at home. You can pray at the park, at your work. Anywhere. The cool thing about faith is you don’t have to force other people to do it for it to be real. And the less superstitious it is, the better results it will render. So, as my Hollywood-proof license plate proudly purports, in God I do trust. And these are the things I’m praying for, especially on election day. Zack Plair is managing editor of The Dispatch. His email address is zplair@cdispatch.com.

LetterS to the editor

Voice of the people

Response to letter on recent shootings

I really thought long and hard about a response to Mr. Fortenberry’s letter, but I could not let it go without a response. To blame President Trump and the NRA for the shootings this past week is as crazy as blaming the Jews for the Holocaust. It was a really an irresponsible statement. What has the NRA got to do with it? Oh! I got it! You are against my Second Amendment right to bear arms. You want only the criminals to have them. What about the killing of babies? I guess you are for that too. What about open boarders? Yep, that’s a Democratic taking point. I’m not a card-carrying Republican, but God bless Presi- dent Trump and shame on you. God Bless America!

Lee Roy Lollar Columbus

Thinking of this summer

This summer, after a long time I went out of town to do a summer teaching job for five weeks at the Uni- versity of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, VA. A single regular course was condensed down into five weeks. It’s always rewarding to gain different experi- ences of different settings in every profession. As for me, it was exciting to see a new environment and new faces with a new friendship. Even though I had an extremely busy schedule, I made some time to read the local newspaper, “The Free Lance-Star.” One day there was a news headline

on delaying the expansion of a university parking area because of the potential disruption to several nesting bluebird’s chicks. This lasted until they flew off. What soulful news! Immediately, I penned down, “We nurture bluebirds, why not fellow men?” The host of my Airbnb house handed me the paper and remarked, “I see, you are a writer?” Long back, the Indian saint, Sawmi Vivekananda said, “Those who show kindness to lives, serve the God.” Are we serving God? Going to church, temple, mosque, synagogue may make it seem we are. But actions and not just reac- tions should follow. This Sunday morning, a friend of mine texted, two mass shootings within a daytime apart. I texted back, in my native country, Bangladesh, people are dying every day because of mosqui- to-borne dengue fever and here in the USA, innocent people are dying because of gun fever. However, both can be managed to a minimum level of death, if we truly believe in human lives and prepare to act accordingly. This summer I learned while watching Netflix, that there is a “designated survivor” in the White House. I have also finished the documentary narrat- ed by Morgan Freeman on God and religions. That’s my summer, a combination of sorrow and happiness. Probably, that’s life.

Jiben Roy

Columbus

The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com

Tuesday, a ugus T 6, 2019 5A

COMMERCIAL DISPATCH OBITUARY POLICY

Obituaries with basic informa- tion including visitation and service times, are provided free of charge. Extended obit- uaries with a photograph, de- tailed biographical information and other details families may wish to include, are available for a fee. Obituaries must be submitted through funeral homes unless the deceased’s body has been donated to science. If the deceased’s body was donated to science, the family must provide official proof of death. Please submit all obituaries on the form provided by The Commercial Dispatch. Free notices must be submitted to the newspa- per no later than 3 p.m. the day prior for publication Tues- day through Friday; no later than 4 p.m. Saturday for the Sunday edition; and no later than 7:30 a.m. for the Monday edition. Incomplete notices must be received no later than 7:30 a.m. for the Monday through Friday editions. Paid notices must be finalized by 3 p.m. for inclusion the next day Monday through Thursday; and on Friday by 3 p.m. for Sunday and Monday publication. For more information, call 662-

328-2471.

Gene Taylor

COLUMBUS — Councilman Gene A. Taylor, 65, died Aug. 5, 2019, at Baptist Memo-

AREA ObiTUARiEs

rial Hospital-Golden Triangle. Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by Carter’s Funeral Services of Columbus.

Deon Young

COLUMBUS — Deon “DJ” Young, 28, died Aug. 4, 2019, in Knoxville, Tennessee. Arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by Carter’s Funeral Services of Columbus.

Sheldon Kohn

STARKVILLE — Sheldon Scott Kohn, 61, died July 29, 2019. A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. Sunday at the Epis- copal Church of the Resurrection. A private graveside service will be held for the family. Visitation will follow the service. Welch Funeral Home of Starkville is in charge of arrangements. Mr. Kohn was born April 1, 1958, in Starkville, to Ellen Winfield Kohn and the late Lonnie Kohn.

He was a 1975 gradu- ate of Starkville High School and a graduate of several universities, including George State in Atlanta. He was formerly employed as a professor at Zayed Uni- versity in Abu Dhabi and Mississippi State University. In addition to his mother, he is survived by his wife, Irina Kohn; son, Nick Kohn of London, England; stepfather, Bob Ken- dall of Starkville; and brothers, Bryan Kohn of Huntsville, Alabama, and David Kohn of Spring Hill, Florida.

Wanda Walters

HAMILTON — Wanda Beth Plaxico Walters, 74, died Aug. 4, 2019, at Philwood Suites of Windsor Place. Services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Tisdale-Lann Memorial Funeral Home, with Robert Earl Fowlkes officiating. Burial will follow at Hatley Cemetery. Visitation is from 4-7 p.m. today at the funeral home.

Tisdale-Lann Memo- rial Funeral Home of Aberdeen is in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Walters was born Aug. 15, 1944, in Amory, to the late James Henry Plaxico and Verdie Mae Noe Plaxico. She was a 1962 graduate of Aberdeen High School and was formerly employed in the garment industry and as a office manager with Walters Plumbing in Aberdeen. In addition to her parents, she was pre- ceded in death by her brother, James Runnell Plaxico Sr. She is survived by her daughter, Debbie Thompson of Hamilton; sons, Mike Walters of Aberdeen and Richard Walters of Hamilton; brothers, Bobby Plaxi- co and Jimmy Plaxico, both of Aberdeen; sev- en grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. Pallbearers will be Matt Bennett, Brent Thompson, Justin Baulch, James “Pon- cho” Plaxico, Lee Plaxi- co, Hayden Plaxico and Mike Little.

Jenny Mahoney Visitation: Tuesday, Aug. 6 • 9:30-11 AM Annunciation Catholic Church Mass of Resurrection:
Jenny Mahoney
Visitation:
Tuesday, Aug. 6 • 9:30-11 AM
Annunciation Catholic Church
Mass of Resurrection:
Tuesday, Aug. 6 • 11 AM
Annunciation Catholic Church
Burial
Memorial Gardens
of Columbus
College St. Location
Anthony Brown
Visitation:
Thursday, Aug. 8 • 6-8 PM
New Salem Baptist Church
Services:
Friday, Aug. 9 • 11 AM
New Salem Baptist Church
Burial
Egger Cemetery
College St. Location
memorialgunterpeel.com

AROUND THE WORLD

Restored World War II Spitfire begins round-the-world trip

The AssociATed Press

LONDON — A restored World War II Spitfire has taken off from an En- glish aerodrome on the first leg of a planned 27,000-mile (43,000-kilome- ter) trip around the globe. Pilots Steve Brooks and Matt Jones hope to circle the world in about four months with stops in 30 countries. They will take turns flying the sin- gle-seat Mk IX Spitfire, originally

built in 1943, while the other follows in a chase plane. Brooks said Monday that his big- gest worry is the weather, adding that “landing is always the tricky part.” The plane’s first stop will be Scotland, before it heads west to Iceland, Green- land and North America. The lightweight fighter plane helped defeat the German air force in the Battle of Britain and the Spitfire has become an icon of World War II.

North Korea fires more weapons, denounces US military drills

SEOUL, South Ko- rea — North Korea con- tinued to ramp up its weapons demonstrations by firing two presumed short-range ballistic mis- siles into the sea Tues- day while lashing out at the United States and South Korea for continu- ing military exercises that the North says could derail fragile nuclear di- plomacy. North Korea’s fourth round of weapons launch- es in less than two weeks came amid a standstill in nuclear negotiations and after President Donald Trump repeatedly dis- missed the significance of the country’s recent tests despite the threat the weapons pose to al- lies South Korea and Japan and to U.S. bases there. Experts say Trump’s downplaying of the North’s weapons display has allowed the country more room to advance its military capabilities as it attempts to build leverage ahead of negoti- ations, which could pos- sibly resume sometime after the end of the allies’ drills later this month. South Korea’s mili- tary alerted reporters to the launches minutes be- fore the North’s Foreign Ministry denounced Washington and Seoul over the start of their joint exercises on Mon- day. The ministry’s statement said the drills, which North Korea sees as an invasion rehearsal, leave the country “com- pelled to develop, test and deploy the powerful physical means essential for national defense.” The statement from an unidentified spokes- person said Pyongyang

remains committed to di- alogue, but it could seek a “new road” if the allies don’t change their posi- tions.

Asian stocks follow Wall Street lower as trade war worsens

BEIJING — Asian stocks followed Wall Street lower on Tuesday after China let its cur- rency sink and halted purchases of U.S. farm goods, fueling fears Bei- jing’s trade war with Pres- ident Donald Trump will harm the global economy. China’s main index lost

2.5% and Tokyo fell 2%. Markets in Hong Kong, Sydney and Seoul also re- treated. Beijing allowed its yuan to fall past the politi- cally sensitive level of sev- en to the dollar on Mon- day following Trump’s threat last week to extend punitive tariffs to an addi- tional $300 billion of Chi- nese imports. Also, the Ministry of Commerce announced it was sus- pending promised pur- chases of American farm products. On Tuesday, the yuan fell further to 7.052 to the dollar in early trading. That came after the U.S. Treasury Department officially labeled Beijing

a currency manipulator,

a status that opens the

way to possible additional sanctions. “Equities are slump- ing. They will slump more. Bond yields are tumbling. They will tum- ble far more,” said Rabo- bank in a report. “Worry about global trade flows, as a stronger USD rumbles through the real economy and U.S.-China divorce smashes supply chains,” the bank said. The Shanghai Compos- ite Index fell to 2,749.85

and Tokyo’s Nikkei 225 retreated to 20,299.69. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng gave up 2.2% to 25,560.68 and Seoul’s Kospi shed 0.5% to 1,937.92. Sydney’s S&P-ASX 200 retreated 2.6% to 6,468.30 and markets in Taiwan, New Zealand and South- east Asia also declined.

— The Associated Press

Walter Blanton

On Sunday, July 7, 2019, Walter Alton Blanton, loving husband, father and grandfather, went to be with the Lord. Walter was born July 9, 1946, to Harold and Doris Blanton of Columbus, MS. He attended Lee High School, where he played football under

Hall of Fame Coach Billy Brewer. Walter went on to play college football under legendary Coach “Bull” Sullivan at East Mississippi Community College. Walter was married to the love of his life, Judy Ledlow Blanton, for 53 years. They raised two sons, Shane of Jackson, Mississippi, and Lantz of Starkville, Mississippi. For twenty-two years, Walter worked for Chevron Oil. Called into ministry, Walter served the Lord at Palmer Home for Children in Columbus, Mississippi for several years, before being called to serve at Baptist Children’s Homes of North Carolina for the past twenty-seven years. Throughout those many years in ministry, Walter was a spiritual father, friend and counselor to countless children in his care. His favorite Bible verse was Jeremiah

29:11.

Walter was preceded in death by his father, Harold; and his mother, Doris. He is survived by his devoted wife, Judy; his son, Shane (Dawn); their four sons, Shane, Jr., Seth, Sam, and Stone, and his son, Lantz (Susan), their daughter, Mandalin, and son, Gatlin. He is also survived by the many children the Lord brought to Truett and Wall Cottage.

A private graveside service was held Tuesday,

July 9, 2019, at Decatur Cemetery in Decatur,

Mississippi, followed by a memorial service Friday, July 12, 2019, at Broyhill Baptist Children’s Home in Clyde, North Carolina.

In lieu of flowers, gifts may be made to Broyhill

Baptist Children’s Home at 111 Sneed Drive, Clyde, North Carolina 28721.

Paid Obituary - Milling Funeral Home

Broyhill Baptist Children’s Home at 111 Sneed Drive, Clyde, North Carolina 28721. Paid Obituary - Milling
North Carolina 28721. Paid Obituary - Milling Funeral Home Jenny Mahoney Martha Virginia “Jenny” Mahoney, age
North Carolina 28721. Paid Obituary - Milling Funeral Home Jenny Mahoney Martha Virginia “Jenny” Mahoney, age

Jenny Mahoney

Martha Virginia “Jenny” Mahoney, age 77, of Columbus, MS, passed away peacefully on

August 3, 2019, at North Missis- sippi Medical Center in Tupelo, MS.

A Mass of Resurrection will

Medical Center in Tupelo, MS. A Mass of Resurrection will be held Tuesday, August 6, 2019,

be held Tuesday, August 6, 2019, at 11:00 AM at Annun- ciation Catholic Church, with Father Jeffrey Waldrep concelebrating Mass. The interment will immediately follow at Me- morial Gardens of Columbus. Visitation will be Monday, August 5, 2019, from 6:00 – 8:00 PM in the atrium of Annunciation Catholic Church and also from 9:30 AM until the time of the service on Tuesday. Memorial Gunter Peel Funeral Home & Crematory, College St. location, is in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Mahoney was born May 14, 1942, in Eth- elsville, AL, to the late Thomas Henry and Lady Grace Harris Jaynes. She was a cosmetologist for 56 years and was the owner of Jenny Mahoney’s Salon and Gift Shop. She was a life member of the Mississippi Cosmetology Association and had won numerous awards at hair styling shows ear- lier in her career. She was very dedicated to her clientele and had great compassion for people, especially the elderly. Jenny was outgoing and welcoming to newcomers and was always ready to assist those whom she perceived to have had a need. She loved to travel and had seen much of the world. Antique collecting was a favorite hob- by. Family was important to her, and she enjoyed visiting grandchildren and helping support their education. Mrs. Mahoney was predeceased by her moth- er and father, and first husband, Davis Abrams, as well as her brother, Thomas Edgar Jaynes (Barbara). She is survived by her husband, Richard Leo Mahoney; her sons, Jeffery Davis Abrams (Pam) and Randall Scott Abrams; her daugh- ter, Dr. Meagan Elizabeth Mahoney Beasley (Holt); and stepchildren, Dr. Michael Andrew Mahoney (Shelley) of Daphne, AL, and Dr. Kev- in Leo Mahoney (Maribel) of Arlington, VA. She is also survived by her sisters, Gracie Lee Sabinson of Columbus, MS, and Paralee Tilley of Ethelsville, AL. She leaves grandchildren, Michael Andrew Mahoney, II, Taylor Clare Ma- honey, Peyton Elizabeth Mahoney, Sean Griffin Mahoney, Aubrey Isabella Mahoney, Keegan Pat- rick Mahoney, Hunter Reed Abrams, Brantley Hayward Abrams and Haley Abrams Farnham; great-grandchildren, Eva Farris Abrams, Davis Mitchell Abrams, Annie Ruth Abrams, Brantley Clay Abrams and Jack Jeffery Farnham; special cousin, Katie “Tootie” Ward; and numerous niec- es, nephews and cousins.

Pallbearers will be her grandchildren, Dr. Hunter Reed Abrams, Brantley Hayward Abrams, Michael Andrew Mahoney, II, Sean Griffin Mahoney, Keegan Patrick Mahoney and Tyler Farnham.

Honorary pallbearers will be parishioners of Annunciation Catholic Church.

In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to

Annunciation Catholic Church, St. Vincent de Paul Society, 823 College St., Columbus, MS, 39701, Annunciation Catholic School, 223 North Browder, Columbus, MS, 39702, or Alzheimer’s Association of Mississippi, 207 W. Jackson St., Suite 1, Ridgeland, MS, 39157.

207 W. Jackson St., Suite 1, Ridgeland, MS, 39157. Sign the online guest book at www.memorialgunterpeel.com

Sign the online guest book at www.memorialgunterpeel.com 903 College Street • Columbus, MS

6A Tuesday, a ugus T 6, 2019

The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com

Health

2 0 1 9 T he D ispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Health heaLth tiP ■ Get enough

heaLth tiP

Get enough sleep. Poor sleep is one of the strongest individual risk factors for weight gain and obesity. One study linked insufficient sleep to an 89% and 55% increased risk of obesity in children and adults, respectively. Source: healthline.com

Health tips from Dr. oz and Dr. roizen

Bad added sugar, good natural sugars

Dwight Howard, a 6-foot-11 NBA rebounding machine, wasn’t playing well when he joined the 2013 Lakers. The team’s nutrition- ist, Cate Shanahan, soon discov- ered the cause: a massive sugar addiction. “You name it; he ate it,” she said. He had been eating two dozen chocolate bars’ worth of sug- ar every single day for years! Like any addict, he had boxes of treats stashed around his house and the locker room. A dietary intervention saved his game — and, we bet, his life. Added sugar can ruin your life, too! It contributes to obesity and that starts a cascade of health problems, including heart disease,

Drs. Oz and Roizen
Drs. Oz and Roizen

diabetes and cancer. A study pub- lished in JAMA: Internal Medicine found that folks who consumed a lot of added sugar (17% to 21% of total daily calories) had a 38% greater risk of dying from heart

disease than folks eating far less (8% of their diet). Also, elevated blood sugar levels can encourage cancer growth, recurrence and resistance to chemotherapy. It is the peak sugar levels generated by these quickly absorbed sugars that are addictive and cause immune dysfunction, inflammation and overeating. Being overweight or obese is clearly linked to the occur- rence of 13 cancers. But the natural sugars found in fruit, 100% whole grains and veg- etables are absorbed much more slowly. In addition, these whole foods provide disease-fighting fiber and essential phytonutrients that are the building blocks of a healthy diet. Remember, it’s added sugars and syrups that are your foe.

Remember, it’s added sugars and syrups that are your foe. Courtesy photo Ward 1 Councilman Gene

Courtesy photo

Ward 1 Councilman Gene Taylor, right, serves food during an event at Townsend Community Center in this photo provided to The Dispatch. Taylor, 65, died Monday. First elected in 2006, Taylor oversaw the building of Townsend Community Center and surrounding basketball courts and made quality of life a focus of his in Ward 1.

courts and made quality of life a focus of his in Ward 1. Taylor continued from
courts and made quality of life a focus of his in Ward 1. Taylor continued from

Taylor

continued from Page 1a

was quiet and unassuming, though he

had a clever sense a humor. “The best word to describe Gene Tay- lor is ‘gentle,’” Taylor’s friend, Columbus Mayor Robert Smith, said in a statement. “He always found the best in every situa- tion and would lift the spirits of those he met each and every day.” He was thoughtful and never said a bad word about anybody, said his pas- tor James Boyd, who knew Taylor for 11 years. Boyd said Taylor regularly attend- ed Zion Gate Missionary Baptist Church for 10 years and served on the board of trustees. Boyd said Taylor clear- ly thought about Boyd’s sermons and sometimes talked to his pastor about how to apply them to his own life. “I’ve never known him to condemn another person,” Boyd said. “If he had problems, or somebody had problems with him, he would never make a case against them. “He was always conscious of wheth- er he was right or wrong and he made amends for it,” he added. Any time there were events or volun- teer opportunities, Taylor was there to help out, said Columbus resident and volunteer Annie Barry. “He would be our councilman, then he would be our janitor if he had to be,”

task we asked

she

said. “

Whatever

Gene to do, he would do it, from master of ceremonies to janitor.” Mickens said Taylor talked to every- one he could, whether in his neighbor- hood and ward or employees in different city departments, making himself avail- able. “He was talking to everyone,” Mick- ens said. “Everyone who knew him loved him. He was a lovable guy, he really was. We’re going to miss him.”

A legacy in Ward 1

Taylor was first elected to the coun- cil in 2006, following in the footsteps of Smith, who was Ward 1 councilman be- fore he was mayor. At the time of his death, Taylor was the most senior member of the council. Ev- ery other councilman said when they first joined, Taylor would offer to help them out, answer questions and give them any guidance they asked for — such as how to talk to the press, Mickens said.

“He sort of talked to me and told me what to expect,” said Ward 5 Councilman Stephen Jones. In the 13 years Taylor was on the coun- cil, quality of life improved throughout

his ward, said Barry, who is a lifelong res- ident of Ward 1. Taylor oversaw the build- ing of basketball courts and Townsend Community Center, and took steps to remove abandoned homes and other eye- sores in the area. “Him and the mayor totally have

changed

who said Taylor “fought tooth and nail” for his ward and constituents. “Southside don’t look like the old Southside since he’s been there. The streets are clean- er, they’ve got paved streets over there. They’ve got sidewalks. He was really ded- icated to Southside.” Ward 3 Councilman Charlie Box said if there was one project Taylor was par- ticularly immersed in, it was Townsend Community Center. “He was passionate about that park,” Box said. With the building of the park, Barry and other regular Southside volunteers and residents would host events there, such as National Night Out. During those events, Taylor would frequently be pres- ent, serving food or playing sports with kids. “Every event that we had at Townsend, we could depend on Councilman Taylor’s support and most of the time his pres- ence,” Barry said. His work as councilman went beyond just his ward, though. Box said he was as committed to the city of Columbus as a whole as he was to his ward. “I frequently called Councilman Tay- lor for his thoughts on important items concerning our city,” Smith said. “His guidance on many items helped our city. “Columbus is better because of Gene Taylor,” he added. “He will always be re- membered.” While city officials have not released any information on a special election to fill Taylor’s seat, it was already on Barry’s mind Monday. “I hope the person that replaces him will be as caring as Gene,” she said. “Gene was our councilman, but Gene was also a human being that cared about other people, and to me, that spoke vol- umes.”

Southside,” agreed Mickens,

Visit us on the web at cdispatch.com

other people, and to me, that spoke vol- umes.” Southside,” agreed Mickens, Visit us on the

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THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019

ArMS rACE

n CDISPATCH.COM n TUESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2019 ArMS rACE Aaron Cornia/MSU athletics Mississippi State quarterback

Aaron Cornia/MSU athletics

Mississippi State quarterback Tommy Stevens throws a pass in individual drills during a fall camp practice Friday in Starkville.

Call from a legend: How Tommy Stevens found mentors in Archie and Peyton Manning

By BEN PORTNOy bportnoy@cdispatch.com

STARKVILLE — Mississippi State quarterback Tommy Stevens was in the shower when his phone rang. Checking his notifications, Stevens listened to the voicemail that had been left. “I had no idea what the number was,” Stevens told The Dispatch. “Pull it up and it’s a voicemail from Archie Man- ning. I about dropped my phone in the

sink.” He returned the call shortly thereaf- ter, only to find out the former Ole Miss legend had invited him to be a counsel-

or at the prestigious Manning Passing

Academy in June at McNeese State. “He was awesome,” Stevens said of Manning. “As good of a man as I’ve ever met and couldn’t be thankful for the Manning family for letting me be a part

of something like that.”

For years, the former Penn State sig- nal caller wanted to attend the MPA as

a collegiate quarterback. He previous-

ly took part in the camp as a junior at

Decatur Central in Indianapolis despite not having any college offers at the

time. Learning from stars like Alabama’s AJ McCarron and Heisman Trophy win- ner Marcus Mariota, Stevens cherished the opportunity to participate as a prep player. With his previous experience in tow, this summer marked his chance to showcase his talent and give back to the next crop of elite high school quar- terbacks — albeit not without a slight hiccup. Stevens gave Manning a call when he entered the transfer portal in April. Worried he may not be able to attend the camp given his future was in flux, Manning reassured Stevens of his spot. “I did the camp as a junior in high school, my brother was signed up to do the camp too, so it was something I wanted to be at,” Stevens said. “(The Mannings) were great. All the way first-class organization, first-class fami- ly. I can’t say enough good things about them.” Though the MPA ran from June 27- 30, Stevens announced his commitment to Mississippi State in mid-May. When Manning caught wind of his pledge, the

See StevenS, 3B

Manning caught wind of his pledge, the See StevenS , 3B Jennifer Mosbrucker/Dispatch staff Mississippi State

Jennifer Mosbrucker/Dispatch staff

Mississippi State quarterback Keytaon Thompson throws a pass during an individ- ual drill at a Fall Camp Practice on Friday.

Thompson keeping composure despite added competition

By GARRICK HODGE ghodge@cdispatch.com

STARKVILLE — Mississippi State quarterback Keytaon Thompson isn’t letting pressure get to him. As recently as MSU’s spring football game in April, the 6-foot-4, 225-pound junior signal caller seemed to have a firm grasp on the starting quarterback job. Now, he’ll have to beat out graduate transfer Tommy Stevens in fall camp if he wants to line up under center in MSU’s season opener against Louisiana on Aug. 31. And Thompson doesn’t plan on back- ing down. “There’s always competition,” Thompson told reporters Monday. “You always want to go out there and get better every day, regardless of if you’re first, second or third string.” Stevens announced his intention to transfer to MSU from Penn State in May, a move Thompson and the rest of the quarterback room knew was possi- ble. “Our coaches let us know ahead of time he may or may not be coming in,” Thompson said.

Reading between the lines, all signs point to Stevens as the frontrunner to start Week One considering Stevens only has one year of eligibility remain- ing and spent two years learning coach Joe Moorhead’s system when Moor- head was an offensive coordinator at Penn State. But publicly, Moorhead says the quarterback competition is wide open. Fall camp opened Friday evening, and Stevens and Thompson rotated reps between the first and second team in different drills. The timeframe for either to make a significant impres- sion on the coaching staff is narrow, as Moorhead has said he’d like to name a starter at least 10 days before MSU’s opener. Nonetheless, Thompson isn’t put- ting any extra pressure on himself. For now, Thompson said he’s only focused on self-improvement and how far he’s come along in Moorhead’s offense since last fall. “It’s totally different for me. I feel much more confident with the offense,” Thompson said. “With the installs, I’ve seen them before and I know most of

See thompS on, 3B

MAjOr LEAGUE BASEBALL: TwIn 5, BrAvES 3

Sanó’s pinch-hit HR in 9th gives Twins 5-3 win over Braves

By BRIAN HALL Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — After sit- ting four powerful right-handed bats against Atlanta All-Star starter Mike So-

roka, Minnesota

Twins manager

Rocco Baldel-

li had plenty of

pinch-hitting op- tions late in an- other close game against a likely

playoff team. Baldelli chose wisely with the surging Miguel Sanó and Minnesota came up with another meaningful win. Sanó’s pinch-hit, two-run homer in the ninth inning gave Minnesota a 5-3 victory over the Braves on Monday night. The home run came after work- ing with assistant hitting coach

home run came after work- ing with assistant hitting coach Sanó Rudy Hernandez inside during the

Sanó

Rudy Hernandez inside during the game. “I felt when the game got tied, I told Rudy, if nobody does anything, I’m going to take care of it,” Sanó said. “When you’ve got something in your heart and you feel it, that’s one of the biggest things. When I went out and hit, I was just thinking, one swing and come back to the dugout. It’s unbelievable.” With Mitch Garver, C.J. Cron, and Jonathan Schoop all available, Sanó entered and hit the first pitch he saw for his 19th home run of the season and the first pinch-hit, walkoff home run for the Twins since Michael Cuddyer against the Los Angeles Angels in 2006 at the Metrodome. Sanó’s homer went an esti- mated 443 feet off reliever Chris Martin, hitting high off the wall in center field. Martin (0-3) was

making his second appearance

for Atlanta since being acquired at the trade deadline. He got two quick outs before allowing

a single to Luis Arraez in front of Sanó. “He’s got long arms,” Mar-

tin said. “He’s got leverage. I’ve faced him a lot. I kind of attack him the same way every time.

I think he finally figured it out and he got good wood on it.” Trevor May (5-3) pitched two

innings with one hit allowed for the Twins, who have won four in

a row to stretch their lead over

Cleveland in the AL Central to four games. They’ve won nine of their past 11 games. The Braves have lost three of four and are 12-11 since the All- Star break. “It’s just been some tough

games late,” Atlanta manag- er Brian Snitker said. “Well- played, just having a hard time

bunching anything to get a re- ally big inning going or some- thing like that. It’s kind of what we need to get us off the mat a

little bit.” Freddie Freeman hit his 27th homer for the Braves. Max Kepler followed with his 31st homer. Kepler has eight home runs in his past 15 games.

Dramatic games

The Twins are playing their fourth series against possible playoff teams since the All-

Star break with four of the 11 games decided in the final at- bat. Three of the 11 games have been decided by one run. “I think when we play against these teams, we step up to the plate and we take our game to a different level and we play well,” Baldelli said. “I’ve been very impressed with the way our guys have competed against all

these teams that have shown up here, and we expect nothing less of ourselves.”

More on dyson

Twins reliever Sam Dyson, who was placed on the injured list on Sunday with right biceps tendinitis, said the injury dates back to a series in Colorado while he was a member of the San Francisco Giants. Dyson allowed six runs in two appear- ances for Minnesota after being acquired at the trade deadline. “I had an issue in Colorado like the second series after the All-Star break,” Dyson said. “My shoulder started bug- ging me and I just kept throw- ing through it and throwing through it. I had contacted (Twins general manager Thad Levine) and let him know the

See Brave S, 3B

2B Tuesday, a ugus T 6, 2019

SPoRTS BRiEFS

Summer Camps

TOP Soccer returning to Columbus

Columbus Soccer Organization announced the return of TOP Soccer after a five-year hiatus. TOP Soccer is a program run in partnership with the YMCA for 4-19 year olds with special needs. Registration forms can be picked up and/or filled out at the YMCA at Sixth St. N. or can be done online at https://columbusmssoccer.org/. Sign up will run through Aug. 16 while play will begin Sept. 9 at the Downtown Soccer Complex. For further information please contact Tom Velek at tvelek@yahoo.com.

CALENDAR

Today

PREP SOFTBALL Heritage Academy at Kemper Academy (in Scooba), 5 p.m. PREP SOCCER Mag Heights at Heritage Academy, 5 p.m.

Thursday

PREP SOCCER Starkville Academy at Lamar, 4:30 p.m. PREP SOFTBALL Heritage Academy at Pillow Academy, 5 p.m. Oak Hill Academy at Hebron Christian, 4 p.m.

Friday

PREP SOFTBALL Heritage Academy at Carroll Academy, 5 p.m. Calhoun Academy at Hebron Christian, 4 p.m.

PREP VOLLEYBALL New Hope at Ridgeland Classic Tourney, TBA

Saturday

PREP SOFTBALL Columbus at Houlka Classic, TBA New Hope at Eupora Classic, TBA PREP VOLLEYBALL New Hope at Ridgeland Classic Tourney, TBA

Monday, August 12

PREP SOFTBALL Starkville Academy at Kemper, 5:30 p.m. Heritage Academy at Hebron Christian, 4 p.m. Houston at New Hope, 5/6:30 p.m. PREP SOCCER Starkville Academy at Pillow, 6 p.m. PREP VOLLEYBALL New Hope at Tishomingo, 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, August 13

PREP VOLLEYBALL Columbus at West Lowndes, 5:30 p.m. PREP SOFTBALL Columbus at Louisville, 5/6:30 p.m. Winston Academy at Heritage Academy, 6:30 p.m. Hebron Christian at Kemper Academy, 4 p.m. Leake Central at New Hope, 5/6:30 p.m.

Thursday, August 15

PREP SOCCER Mag Heights at Starkville Academy, 5 p.m. PREP SOFTBALL Louisville at Columbus, 5/6:30 p.m. Oak Hill at Starkville Academy, 4/6 p.m.

oN ThE AiR

Today

JR. NBA BASKETBALL p.m. — Global Championship, FS1

p.m. — Global Championship, FS1 LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL

5

6:30 p.m. — Global Championship, FS1

8

p.m. — Southeast Regional: Teams TBD, semifinal, Warner Robins, Ga., ESPN

p.m. — Southwest Regional: Teams TBD, semifinal, Waco, Texas., ESPN MLB BASEBALL

12

MLB

p.m. — Oakland at Chicago Cubs OR Atlan- ta at Minnesota, MLB

10

Washington at San Francisco (games joined

in progress), MLB PAN AMERICAN GAMES 9:55 a.m. — Day 15: From Peru, ESPNU p.m. — Day 15: From Peru, ESPNU p.m. — Day 15: From Peru, ESPNU TBT BASKETBALL p.m. — TBT Tournament: Carmen’s Crew

8

6

2

p.m. — Chicago White Sox at Detroit,

6

4

7

p.m. — St. Louis at LA Dodgers OR

vs. Golden Eagles, Championship, Chicago, Ill., ESPN

TENNIS

10

Early Round, Ontario, TENNIS

10

Early Round, Ontario, TENNIS

a.m. — Rogers Cup: Men’s and Women’s

p.m. — Rogers Cup: Men’s and Women’s

Wednesday

3

GOLF p.m. — U.S. Women’s Amateur, FS1

HORSE RACING p.m. — Saratoga Live: From Saratoga

12

Springs, Calif., FS2 JR. NBA BASKETBALL

6:30 p.m. — Global Championship, FS1

8

p.m. — Global Championship, FS1 LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL p.m. — Southwest Regional: Teams TBD,

12

final, Waco, Texas, ESPN p.m. — Southeast Regional: Teams TBD, final, Warner Robins, Ga., ESPN

2

MLB BASEBALL p.m. — Atlanta at Minnesota OR Texas at

12

Cleveland, MLB p.m. — Washington at San Francisco

OR Colorado at Houston (games joined in progress), MLB p.m. — TBA, ESPN p.m. — Philadelphia at Arizona (joined in progress), MLB

9

6

3

8

1

6

PAN AMERICAN GAMES a.m. — Day 16: From Peru, ESPNU p.m. — Day 16: From Peru, ESPNU p.m. — Day 16: From Peru, ESPNU TENNIS

10

Early Round, Ontario, TENNIS

10

Early Round, Ontario, TENNIS

a.m. — Rogers Cup: Men’s and Women’s

p.m. — Rogers Cup: Men’s and Women’s

The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com

Baseball

American League

East Division

New York

Tampa Bay

Boston

Toronto

Baltimore

Central Division

Minnesota

Cleveland

Chicago

Kansas City

Detroit

Houston

Oakland

Texas

Los Angeles

Seattle

W

73

65

60

46

38

W

70

66

49

40

32

L

39

49

55

69

74

L

42

46

61

74

76

Pct

.652

.570

.522

.400

.339

Pct

.625

.589

.445

.351

.296

West Division

W

73

64

58

56

47

L

40

49

54

58

67

Pct

.646

.566

.518

.491

.412

GB

9

14½

28½

35

GB

4

20

31

36

GB

9

14½

17½

26½

Sunday’s Games Baltimore 6, Toronto 5 Chicago White Sox 10, Philadelphia 5 Cleveland 6, L.A. Angels 2 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 2 Houston 3, Seattle 1 Minnesota 3, Kansas City 0 Texas 9, Detroit 4 Oakland 4, St. Louis 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, Boston 4

Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 9, Baltimore 6 Boston 7, Kansas City 5 Chicago White Sox 7, Detroit 4 Cincinnati 7, L.A. Angels 4 Texas 1, Cleveland 0 Toronto 2, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago Cubs 6, Oakland 5 Minnesota 5, Atlanta 3

Tuesday’s Games Chicago White Sox (Cease 1-4) at Detroit (Nor- ris 3-8), 12:10 p.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (Holder 5-2) at Baltimore (Wo- jciechowski 2-4), 6:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Santiago 1-0) at Detroit (VerHagen 1-2), 6:10 p.m., 2nd game Kansas City (Junis 6-10) at Boston (Cashner 10-6), 6:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Suarez 2-2) at Cincinnati (DeScla- fani 6-6), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Jurado 6-6) at Cleveland (Plesac 6-3), 6:10 p.m. Toronto (Thornton 4-7) at Tampa Bay (Kittredge 1-0), 6:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 9-7) at Chicago Cubs (Les- ter 9-7), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Foltynewicz 2-5) at Minnesota (Berrios 10-5), 7:10 p.m. Colorado (Marquez 10-5) at Houston (Greinke 10-4), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (Lamet 0-2) at Seattle (LeBlanc 6-4), 9:10 p.m.

Wednesday’s Games Atlanta at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 12:10 p.m. Texas at Cleveland, 12:10 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 12:10 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 1:10 p.m. Oakland at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m. San Diego at Seattle, 5:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m. Kansas City at Boston, 6:10 p.m.

National League

East Division

Atlanta

Philadelphia

Washington

New York

Miami

W

66

59

59

57

42

L

48

53

53

56

69

Pct

.579

.527

.527

.504

.378

Central Division

Chicago

St. Louis

Milwaukee

Cincinnati

Pittsburgh

Los Angeles

Arizona

San Francisco

Colorado

San Diego

W

61

58

58

53

48

L

51

53

56

58

64

Pct

.545

.523

.509

.477

.429

West Division

W

75

56

56

52

51

L

40

57

57

60

60

Pct

.652

.496

.496

.464

.459

GB

6

6

22½

GB

4

13

GB

18

18

21½

22

Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox 10, Philadelphia 5 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 2 Cincinnati 6, Atlanta 4, 10 innings N.Y. Mets 13, Pittsburgh 2 Chicago Cubs 7, Milwaukee 2 Colorado 6, San Francisco 2 Oakland 4, St. Louis 2 Arizona 7, Washington 5 L.A. Dodgers 11, San Diego 10

Monday’s Games N.Y. Mets 6, Miami 2, 1st game Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 7 Cincinnati 7, L.A. Angels 4 N.Y. Mets 5, Miami 4, 2nd game Chicago Cubs 6, Oakland 5 Minnesota 5, Atlanta 3 Philadelphia 7, Arizona 3 Washington 4, San Francisco 0 L.A. Dodgers 8, St. Louis 0

Tuesday’s Games Milwaukee (Anderson 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Brault 3-1), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Suarez 2-2) at Cincinnati (DeScla- fani 6-6), 6:10 p.m. Miami (Yamamoto 4-2) at N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 8-6), 6:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 9-7) at Chicago Cubs (Les- ter 9-7), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Foltynewicz 2-5) at Minnesota (Berrios 10-5), 7:10 p.m. Colorado (Marquez 10-5) at Houston (Greinke 10-4), 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Arrieta 8-8) at Arizona (Leake 9-8), 8:40 p.m. Washington (Sanchez 6-6) at San Francisco (Menez 0-0), 8:45 p.m. San Diego (Lamet 0-2) at Seattle (LeBlanc 6-4), 9:10 p.m. St. Louis (Mikolas 7-11) at L.A. Dodgers (Ker- shaw 10-2), 9:10 p.m.

Wednesday’s Games Miami at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Atlanta at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 1:10 p.m. Oakland at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m. St. Louis at L.A. Dodgers, 2:10 p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 2:45 p.m. San Diego at Seattle, 5:40 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Arizona, 8:40 p.m.

Twins 5, Braves 3

Atlanta

Acn Jr. rf-cf 5

Albies 2b

F.Frman 1b 4 Dnldson 3b 3

B.McCnn c

Duvall lf

Joyce dh

Camargo ss 3 0

Incarte cf

Clbrson rf

Totals

Atlanta

Minnesota

E_Cave (2). DP_Minnesota 1. LOB_Atlanta 9, Minnesota 3. HR_F.Freeman (27), Kepler (31), Sano (19).

Atlanta

7

Ch.Martin L,0-3

6

R.Harper H,10

2

Umpires_Home, Laz Diaz; First, Vic Cara- pazza; Second, Jeremie Rehak; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T_3:01. A_26,722 (38,649).

T.May W,5-3

Odorizzi

Soroka

Melancon

Minnesota

ab

5

4

3

4

3

1

35

r

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

Minnesota

h

2

1

2

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

9

bi 0 Kepler cf

0 J.Plnco ss 1 Cruz dh 1 E.Rsrio lf 0 Gnzalez 3b 0 Arraez 2b 0 Adranza 1b 0 Sano ph 0 J.Cstro c 0 Cave rf 2 Totals

ab

4

4

4

4

4

4

2

1

3

3

33

000

000

010

210

200—3

002—5

r

1

0

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

5

hbi

1

0

1

1

1

2

0

1

1

0

8

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

0

0

5

IP

1

2-3

2-3

1-3

H

6

0

2

5

2

1

1

R

3

0

2

1

2

0

0

ER BBSO

3

0

2

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

3

0

0

1

3

2

0

7

1

0

2

Duffey BS,1

Reds 7, Amgels 4

r

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

4

h

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

5

Cincinnati

0 Winker lf

1

0 Votto 1b 0 E.Sarez 3b

0 Aquino rf

0

2 J.Iglss ss 0 Senzel cf 0 Peraza 2b 0 Brnhart c 1 L.Cstll p 0 W.Prlta p 0 Lrenzen p 0 Dav.Hrn p 0 R.Iglss p 4 Totals

bi

ab

1

r

2

Ervin ph-lf-rf 1

3

4

3

1

1

0

1

VnMeter ph-lf1 0

4

4

4

4

2

0

0

0

0

31

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

001

001

002—4

510

000

10x—7

hbi

1

1

1

0

1

0

1

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

Los Angeles

ab

3

4

4

3

3

0

1

2

0

2

1

1

32

Fltcher ss-3b4 0

Trout cf

K.Clhun rf

Upton lf

Thaiss 3b-1b3 1

K.Smith c

Goodwin ph 1

Walsh 1b

L.Grcia p

Pujols ph

Rengifo 2b

T.Cole p

Pat.Snd p

Tovar ss

Ohtani ph

Totals

Los Angeles

Cincinnati

E_Trout (2). LOB_Los Angeles 5, Cincinnati 4. 2B_J.Iglesias (15), Peraza (11). HR_Trout (37), Goodwin (10), Rengifo (4). SB_Trout (9), Votto (4). CS_Peraza (5). S_L.Castillo (4).

IP

H

R

ER BBSO

Los Angeles

5

L.Garcia

7

Lorenzen

Dav.Hernandez

R.Iglesias S,22-25

Pat.Sandoval pitched to 2 batters in the 7th WP_Pat.Sandoval 2, L.Garcia. Umpires_Home, Ted Barrett; First, John Tump- ane; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, John Bacon.

T_3:07. A_21,895 (42,319).

Cubs 6, Athletics 5

Oakland

W.Peralta

L.Castillo W,11-4

Cincinnati

Pat.Sandoval

T.Cole L,1-3

2

1

5

3

0

5

2

0

5

2

0

1

2

0

2

8

1

1-3

2-3

2-3

1-3

3

1

0

1

0

2

0

0

2

0

2

0

0

2

0

1 13

1

0

2

0

0

1

2

1

Chicago

Heyward cf-rf4 1

r

ab

hbi

0

1

Semien ss

ab

5

r

2

h

2

bi

3

Grssman lf

Soria p

M.Chpmn 3b4 0

M.Olson 1b 4

Canha

Pscotty

Profar

Hrrmann c

K.Davis ph

Bassitt

Treinen

Buchter

Martini

Pinder

Wick p

I.Happ ph-lf

Totals

Oakland

Chicago

DP_Oakland 2, Chicago 1. LOB_Oakland 5, Chicago 6. 2B_Profar (16), Castellanos (40), Schwarber (17). HR_Semien 2 (19), Martini (1), Castellanos (12), J.Baez 2 (28), I.Happ (1). SB_Rizzo (5). S_Bassitt (1).

2

0

0

0 Cstllns rf

0

0 Bryant 3b 0 Rizzo 1b 0 J.Baez ss

0 Schwrbr lf 0 Cishek p 0 Kntzler p 0 Bote 2b 0 Cratini c 0 Kemp 2b 0 Ryan p 2 Phelps p 0 Hndrcks p

0

1

5

4

2

3

2

cf

rf

2b

p

p

p

0

3

4

3

3

0

1

0

0

ph-lf 1

ph

1

0

2

31

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

5

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

1

6

002

100

Almr Jr cf

0

4

4

3

4

0

0

0

3

4

0

0

2

Totals

000

001

34

030—5

40x—6

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

2

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

6 12

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

IP

H

R

ER BBSO

Oakland

6

Buchter

Soria

Chicago

Hendricks

Wick W,2-0

Cishek

Kintzler

Ryan H,11

Phelps

HBP_by Hendricks (Grossman).

Umpires_Home,

Reyburn; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Fieldin Cubreth. T_3:17. A_40,721 (41,649).

CB Bucknor; First, D.J.

Bassitt

Treinen

8

2

2

2

5

L,6-4

H,15

S,1-4

2-3

1-3

1

4

0

0

4

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

6 1-3

2-3

1-3

2-3

2-3

1-3

0

3

1

1

0

1

0

3

0

0

0

2

0

3

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

2

0

1

1

0

0

5

Dodgers 8, Cardinals 0

St. Louis

M.Crpnt 3b 4

De.Fwlr cf

Knizner

Gldschm 1b 3

Helsley

Edman

Ozuna

DeJong

Y.Munoz ph-ss1

0

J.Mrtin rf

Wong 2b

Wieters

Wacha

A.Mejia p

Thomas ph-cf10

Totals

St. Louis

Los Angeles

DP_St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 1. LOB_St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 9. 2B_Wong (18), J.Turner (21), C.Seager (26), Beaty (15). HR_Pederson (24), Bellinger (37). SB_Ozuna (9), J.Turner (2). S_Gonsolin (1).

ab

Los Angeles

r

h

bi

ab

r

hbi

1b

3

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0 Pderson rf-cf4

0 Muncy 2b 0 J.Trner 3b 0 Ru.Mrtn 3b

2

4

1

2

1

2

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

p

ph

lf

ss

0

1

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 Bllnger 1b-rf 4

0 Will.Sm c 0 C.Sager ss 0 Sadler p

4

4

0

1

0

1

0

1

1

2

0

3

0

1

0

c

p

3

2

3

1

0

28

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0 0 Negron cf-ss

0

1

0

0

0

0 Beaty lf 0 Gnsolin p

4

2

0 Chrgois p

0

0

White ph-1b 1

0

0

2

0

0

000

301

Totals

000

220

34

000—0

00x—8x

4

0

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

8 12

2

2

0

0

0

8

IP

H

R

ER BBSO

St. Louis

Wacha

3

6

Sadler

HBP_by Sadler (Wong). WP_A.Mejia 2. Umpires_Home, Chad Whitson; First, Bill Mill- er; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Chris Conroy. T_2:59. A_45,254 (56,000).

Nationals 4, Giants 0

Washington

1

Helsley

A.Mejia

Los Angeles

Gonsolin W,1-1

Chargois

2

L,6-5

3 2-3

1 1-3

1

2

0

0

7

4

0

0

0

0

6

2

0

0

0

0

6

2

4

1

0

1

2

0

2

7

2

0

3

0

San Francisco

r

1

Eaton rf

1

0

M.Adams 1b3 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

4

c

Suzuki

B.Dzier 2b

J.Soto lf

Rendon

T.Trner ss

2

ab

4

4

5

2

h

0

1

2

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6

bi

001

000

ab

4

4

4

0 Pab.Snd 3b 4

1 Gennett 2b 0 Solano ph

0 B.Crwfr ss 0 Pillar cf 0 Duggar rf 0 Smrdzja p 0 Coonrod p 0 Panik ph 0 Gott p

0

0

0

2 Totals

3

1

4

3

3

1

0

1

0

0 Belt 1b 0 Ystrzms lf 1 Posey c

r

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

hbi

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

1

1

3b

4

3

4

3

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

33

V.Rbles cf

Fedde

p

Dan.Hds p

Parra ph

Rodney

p

Dlittle p

Moronta p

Vogt ph

Selman

p

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

Washington

San Francisco

LOB_Washington 10, San Francisco 6. 2B_M.

Adams

(11), Samardzija (2). SB_T.Turner (23),

Rendon (2), J.Soto (9).

33

0

001—4

000—0

7

0

020

000

IP

H

R

ER BBSO

Washington

6

1

1

1

Samardzija L,8-9

Coonrod

1

1

Umpires_Home, Greg Gibson; First, Gerry Da- vis; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Pat Hoberg. T_3:12. A_32,366 (41,915).

Moronta

1

Gott

Selman

Fedde

Dan.Hudson H,9

Rodney

Doolittle

San Francisco

4

2

W,2-2

H,8

6

0

1

0

3

1

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

3

3

0

2

0

2

1

0

0

3

2

0

1

2

Phillies 7, Diamondbacks 3

Philadelphia ab C.Hrnan 2b 5

Hoskins 1b

B.Hrper rf

1

Ralmuto c

Segura

Kingery

Haseley lf

Vlsquez p

C.Dckrs ph 1

Nicasio

J.Alvrz p

Neris p

Quinn

McFrlnd p

Flores

Totals

Philadelphia

Arizona

E_C.Kelly 2 (8), McFarland (1), Segura (11). DP_Philadelphia 4, Arizona 2. LOB_Philadel- phia 9, Arizona 5. 2B_Realmuto (25), Kingery

(22), Haseley (5), D.Peralta (27), Flores (11). 3B_K.Marte (8). HR_Kingery (14). SB_Real- muto (5), Quinn (7). SF_E.Escobar (8). S_Ve-

lasquez

Philadelphia

7

Nicasio

1

Arizona

6

Ginkel

McFarland

G.Holland

Ginkel

WP_G.Holland. Umpires_Home, Phil Cuzzi; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Ben May. T_3:05. A_18,319 (48,519).

Velasquez W,4-6

J.Alvarez H,8

Neris

M.Kelly L,7-12

R.Scott

1

1

Arizona

1 K.Marte cf 0 D.Prlta lf

0

1 C.Wlker 1b 2 Lamb 3b

1 Lcastro ph 0 G.Hllnd p 0 A.Jones rf 0 Ahmed ss 0 C.Kelly c 0 M.Kelly p 0 R.Scott p 1 Ginkel p

0

0

6 Totals

2

r

1

1

h

2

0

bi

ab

4

4

r

1

0

hbi

1

2

0

2

5

1

2

4

1

1

ss

3b

p

cf

4

5

5

2

0

0

0

4

0

1

2