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REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES

APAYAO STATE COLLEGE

North Apayao Campus

Luna, Apayao

COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements in Field Study 1

(Second Semester S.Y.:2018-2019)

Submitted By: WINIE JANE U. LIZARDO


Submitted To: Dr. Susan Bongalon

1
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 3
Acknowledgement-------------------------------------------------------------------- 4
Dedication ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5
Students Resume----------------------------------------------------------------------- 6
Learning Experience 1 -------------------------------------------------------------- 7
1.1. Exposure -------------------------------------------------------------- 8
1.2. Participation --------------------------------------------------------- 10
1.3. Identification -------------------------------------------------------- 14
1.4. Internalization ------------------------------------------------------- 18
1.5. Dissemination ------------------------------------------------------- 19
Assessment ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 20
Learning Experience 2--------------------------------------------------------------- 21
2.1. Exposure----------------------------------------------------------------- 22
2.2. Participation------------------------------------------------------------24
2.3. Identification-----------------------------------------------------------26
2.4. Internalization----------------------------------------------------------28
2.5. Dissemination----------------------------------------------------------29
Assessment -----------------------------------------------------------------------------30
Learning Experience 3 ------------------------------------------------------------- 31
3.1. Exposure ----------------------------------------------------------------- 32
3.2. Participation------------------------------------------------------------- 33
3.3. Identification ------------------------------------------------------------ 34
3.4. Internalization ----------------------------------------------------------- 34
3.5. Dissemination ----------------------------------------------------------- 35
Assessment ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 36
Learning Experience 4 -------------------------------------------------------------- 37
4.1. Exposure------------------------------------------------------------------- 38
4.2. Participation ------------------------------------------------------------ 39
4.3. Identification ------------------------------------------------------------ 39
4.4. Internalization ----------------------------------------------------------- 40
4.5. Dissemination ----------------------------------------------------------- 41
Learning Experience 5 -------------------------------------------------------------- 42
5.1. Exposure ------------------------------------------------------------------- 43
5.2. Participation ------------------------------------------------------------- 45
5.3. Identification ------------------------------------------------------------- 47
5.4. Internalization ------------------------------------------------------------ 48
5.5. Dissemination ------------------------------------------------------------ 49
Learning Experience 6 --------------------------------------------------------------- 51
6.1. Exposure ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 52
6.2. Participation ----------------------------------------------------------------- 53
6.3. Identification ---------------------------------------------------------------- 54
6.4. Internalization --------------------------------------------------------------- 55
6.5. Dissemination --------------------------------------------------------------- 56
Assessment ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 57
2
As I observe children, I imagine myself when I was a child like them. I
observe their attitude and their action.

Children are freewill, sometimes reserved, joyful now, sad later, friendly
and reserved competent, naive, talkative and quiet. To be childlike is to
experience an almost unpredictable array of discovering emotions and levels of
energy. Children are exceptional and complex and thus often difficult to
understand.

In my observation in my field study I learned that in order to comprehend


children I must begin by observing them as they play and how they are inside
the classroom. But what do I see as I observe, and how I use my observation to
enhance my effectiveness as teacher in the future.

Children are competent in learning, but as teacher, I have to slow down,


carefully observe and study my documented observation in order to understand
the ideas that they are attending convey. In addition to slowing down,
observing children theories requires a general knowledge of child develop a
willingness to speculate.

3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING:

First of all to our Almighty God who bestowed me the idea and wisdom to
make my project finish. Thank you for giving me strength, thank you for the
guidance.

The school that I observed for 9 hours

SAN JUAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

The people who help me in this project thank you for your help, the
principal of San Juan Elementary School, Ma’am Teresita J. Hipolito thank you
for entertaining me and thank you for giving the chance to observe in your
school, thank you for giving your time. And also thank you to the faculty, the
grade III teacher Ma’am Lily Ann Guillermo, the grade I teacher Ma’am Rhea
Calban, the grade IV teacher Ma’am Charie May Rebiajos, the grade VI
teacher Sir Roberto Cascayan and ma’am Gretchen Calban, thank you for the
highly appreciated mentors who gave me knowledge to be remembered and
the experiences to be unforgotten. Thank you permitting and letting me to
conduct my observation in your school. Thank you ma’am and sir for sharing
your knowledge and opinion God bless…

Finally, I would like to offer my labor or love to my beloved families,


instructors and friends who serve as my inspiration in the entire task that I do.

4
DEDICATION
As well as everything I do, I would like to dedicate this book to my family.

To my mother inang Linda Lizardo who is always there willing to support


me. She always supports me on every step I make, and decisions I take. I will
never finish to thank you for all the opportunities that you’ve offer and gave me,
for all the teachings that you’ve told me and for every advice that come out on
your mouth. I am so grateful for trusting me that I can do it, and letting me come
to achieve a higher education. Thank you for the sacrifice and hardship, I know
how hard for you to work hard in order to give me the things I need. I am so
thankful that God gave me such a great mother; I am so lucky that you are my
mother. Inang thank you for loving me unconditionally I will promise that I will do
my best to finish my study so that your effort and sacrifice will not lose. I love you
so much inang. I hope that someday I can make you proud.

To my brothers and sister who are always there willing to help me


financially thank you so much for your support I will not be able to pay you now
but I will promise that soon I will repay all your efforts and sacrifices for me to
finish my study…I love you all may God continue to bless and guide us always.

Lastly I dedicate this book to our Almighty God, thank you so much Lord; I
was not be able to finish this book without you guidance. Thank you for giving
me strength and knowledge to answer the entire question in this book. Thank
you and may you continue to guide and protect us..

5
STUDENTS RESUME
NAME: WINIE JANE U. LIZARDO

AGE: 25

GENDER: FEMALE

DATE OF BIRTH: ALLACAPAN CAGAYAN

CIVIL STATUS: SINGLE

ADDRESS: SAN JUAN, STA. MARCELA APAYAO

CITIZENSHIP: FILIPINO

RELIGION: ROMAN CATHOLIC

FAMILY BACKGROUND:

MOTHERS NAME: LINDA U. LIZARDO

AGE: 60

OCCUPATION: HOUSEKEEPER

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:

ELEMENTARY: SANTA MARCELA CENTRAL SCHOOL

SECONDARY: MGABMSAT

COLLEGE: APAYAO STATE COLLEGE

COURSE: BACHELOR IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

6
Outcome- Based

LEARNING

EXPERIENCE 1
Learners We Were!

Learning experience 1 is your initial guide in entering the world you would
possibly see yourself in as a future teacher. However, the passage will
interestingly bring you back in time when you, yourself, were a learner like the
learners you will meet in the school where you are now assigned as a pre-service
teacher. You will not however, be alone in this initial journey! You will be
accompanied by your co-partners in FS 1 and together, you will collaboratively
recall your experiences when you were in basic education. It will be interesting
to find out how and where this trip will lead you. Hopefully, this organized
recollection of experiences will make you identify with the learners you will
encounter in this field study program. Remember, you were young learners
yourselves!

Your Intended Learning Outcome:


Draw similarities of learners’ characteristics across domains and stages of
development
Your Experiential Tasks Your Reflection Trigger/s
1.1 Exposure
Recalling one’s experiences in early
childhood, and adolescent period
while in school
1.2Participation
Analyzing experiences according
to the various domains of growth
and development.
1.3 Identification  Did we, as young learners, follow
Discovering the growth patterns in the same patterns of growth and
the various stages of development development?
across domains
1.4 Internalization
Recognizing and accepting one’s  What seemed to have allowed
characteristics across growth and learners to become good while
development levels in school?
1.5 Dissemination

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Reflecting on the value of
addressing the characteristics and
needs of learners during the various
stages of development

Recalling one’s experiences in early childhood, middle childhood, and


adolescent period while in school

In many cases, there is more than one FS Student assigned to one


school. It will then enable you to work together to gather the necessary
data you need for LE 1.

1. Organize yourselves in discussion groups of three to five. You can stay one
group if you are less than six. There are three focal topics which each
group will discuss one after the other.

a. Interesting things we did when we were in Grade 1


b. Interesting things we did when we were in Grade 6
c. Interesting things we did when we were in Fourth Year High school

Elect a group facilitator-rapporteur for every topic.

2. Within 15 minutes, each members of the group will write on a ¼ sheet of


pad paper at least three interesting experiences s/he remembers while in
Grade 1, Grade 6 and Year IV. The experience could be on individual or
group level while you were in school. Each member will submit his/her
three outputs separately to the topic rapporteurs. Each rapporteur will
then summarize all submitted entries using FS 1 Form A for the particular
grade level. There should be at least 9 entries in each form if there are
three members in the group. There will be more entries if there are more
members. Do not write anything in the third column.

8
FS 1 FORM A-1: GRADE 1 EXPERIENCE (5-6 YEARS OLD) MIDDLE CHILDHOOD

MEMBER ID Experiences
A 1. Learn to read alphabet
2. Playing with my classmate
3. Learn to write

B 1. Sharing toys with my friend


2. Learn how to read
3. Excited to participate in the class

C 1. Playing in the playground with my friend


2. Sharing my foods to my friends.
3. Being friendly to my classmate

FS 1 FORM A-2: GRADE 6 EXPERIENCES (11-12 YEARS OLD) LATE CHILDHOOD

Member ID Experiences
A 1. Sometimes do things that make no sense.
2.I care more about the opinions of the peer
group than anything else
3.I idolize the character in a movie
B 1.I am eager to know new things
2.Discover what is right or wrong
3.Having a crush

C 1.Learn to read

2.Making love letter for my crush

3.Sharing my secrets to my best friends

9
FS 1 FORM A-3 4TH YEAR EXPERIENCES (15-16 YEARS OLD) EARLY ADOLESCENCE

MEMBER ID EXPERIENCES
A 1. Having a boyfriend.
2.I am eager to know more things
3.Responsible in my study

B 1.I discover changes in my physical


appearance
2.Sharing problems to my classmate
3.Having fun in adventure
C 1.Having a suitor
2.I am curious in the changes of my physical
appearance
3. Begin to fall in love..

1.2 PARTICIPATION
Analyzing experiences according to the various domains of growth and
development
ACTIVITY 1
The group facilitator will lead the group in analyzing what each experience is
all about. This unifying theme is called a domain. Using the same FS 1 Form A,
write the domain of each entry in the third column. The general domains are:
 Physical/Motor
 Mental (Literacy/Cognitive/Intellectual)
 Social-Emotional
FS 1 FORM B-1: GRADE 1 EXPERIENCES (6-7 YEARS OLD) MIDDLE CHILDHOOD

MEMBER ID SAMPLE EXPERIENCES DOMAIN


1.Cutting shapes using scissors Physical-Motor
A 2.Playing with female classmates Social
3.Counting marbles and stick Mental
1.Painting using water color Physical—Motor
B 2.Helping my classmates Social
3.Sometimes they are very hyper in the class Mental

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1.Learn to identify the different colors Mental
C 2.Eating lunch with my classmate Social
3.Reciting in the class Physical-Motor

FS 1 FORM B-2: GRADE 6 EXPERIENCES (11-12 YEARS OLD) LATE CHILDHOOD

MEMDER ID EXPERIENCES DOMAIN

A 1.Becoming more friendly Social


2.Loves to hang out with friends Social
3.Responsible in school activity Mental
B 1.Keeping secret Mental
2.Playing volleyball Physical-Motor
3.Participating in the school activity Social
C 1. Reciting in the class discussion Physical-Motor
2.Beginning to have crush Social
3.Becoming more sensitive Mental

FS 1 FORM B-3: 4TH YEAR EXPERIENCES (16 YEARS OLD ABOVE) EARLY
ADOLESCENCE

MEMBER ID EXPERIENCES DOMAIN

A 1. Interested to try something even if it is not Physical-Motor


good because of their curiosity
2.They get easily irritated Mental
3.They like to hang out with their friends Social
B 1.They want to do their works alone Mental
2.They are prone to trial and error of life Physical-Motor
3.Theyn like to attend school activities Social
C 1.Interested to work with friends Social
2.Responsible in their studies Mental
3.They like to be dependent Mental

Activity 2

This time, the rapporteurs will recognize and copy the entries for each grade
level according to domains of development. Follow the matrix below.

11
FS 1 FORM C-1: GRADE 1 EXPERIENCES (6-7YEARS OLD) MIDDLE CHILDHOOD

PHYSICAL-MOTOR SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LINGUISTIC-COGNITVE

1. Coloring 1.Playing with classmate 1.asking question

2. Reading books 2.watching cartoons 2.problem solving

3. running 3.interested in fairy tales 3.developing an increase


attention span

4. drawing lines 4.interested in reading in 4.visual discrimination,


front of their class matching and
comparing

5. drawing shapes 5.They want to play with 5.understanding fact and


friends fiction

6. writing letters 6.Active in the class 6.simple reasoning


discussion

7. jumping 7.Active in joining school 7.visit interesting places


activity

8. counting numbers 8.They want to be the 8.Practice the alphabet


smartest in the class

9. counting sticks 9. They want to be 9.practice shapes and


always perceptible. colors

FS 1 FORM C-2: GRADE 6 EXPERIENCES (11-12 YEARS OLD) LATE CHILDHOOD

PHYSICAL-MOTOR SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LINGUISTIC-COGNITIVE

1.Participating in the 1.chatting with friends Write stories


class

2.dancing 2.reading in front of the Likes to write letters

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class

3.playing volley ball 3.go out with friends Reads well

4.reading stories 4.playing with classmate Solve problems

5.painting 5.making group activities Writing poem

6.singing 6.eating snacks with Writing essay


friends

7.running 7.playing in the Joining contest


neighborhood

8.gymnast 8.participating in the


schools activities

9. 9.dancing in a school
program

FS 1 FORM C-3: 4TH YEAR EXPERIENCES (16 YEARS OLD AND ABOVE) EARLY
ADOLESCENCE

PHYSICAL- MOTOR SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LINGUISTIC-COGNITIVE

1.Joining in a sport fest 1.having boyfriend Solving math problems

2.dancing 2.having a group Writing essay


discussion

3.participating gymnastic 3.sharing secrets with Composed a song


friends

4.singing 4.joining in the school Make their own story


activities

5.playing volleyball 5.have picnic or outing Having plans in their own


with friends life

6. drawing cartoon 6.sharing problems with Making their own


characters friends decision

7.painting 7.performing in a school Make their own projects


13
programs

8.playing basketball 8. want to be an Have an idea in making


independent their life successful and
independent

9.learn how to cook 9.Having their own Have their own work
decision

1.3 IDENTIFICATION
Discovering the growth patterns in the various stages of development across
domains

This time reorganize the entries into domains across the three stages. Follow
the matrix below. You will have one matrix for every domain

FS FORM D-1: PHYSICAL/MOTOR DOMAIN


MIDDLE CHILDHOOD LATE CHILDHOOD EARLY ADOLESCENCE
1.playing volleyball 1.know how to play
1.Writing letters basketball applying the
rules
2.they listen to their 2. painting
2.playing marbles teacher carefully
3.they are active in the 3. cooking some foods
3.counting numbers class
4. chatting with their 4.picnic with their friends
4.reading fairy tales best friend
5.dancing 5.know how to play
5.practice to write music instrument
6.playing basketball 6.read in front of the
6.shouting during class confidently
classes
7.performing gymnastic 7.perform gymnastic
7.transferring seat while perfectly
the teacher is discussing
8.playing with their best 8.starting to change
8.chating with friend their style
seatmates
9.draw cartoon 9.having their own crush
9.draw the different characters
shapes
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Analyze the entries in the three stages of development for each domain.

 What do you notice of the entries belonging to the same level or


stage? Are they similar or different? Why?
They are similarities and deference’s, because as we get older, we
become more mature and the capacity our understanding is higher.
But all of us undergo the same stages. Development is similar for
everyone. All children go through the same stages of development in
approximately the same order. All babies lift their bodies before they lift
their bodies. Development proceeds at an individual rate. All children
follow a similar pattern of development, but the style and rate of
growth differs for each children. As children grow, many kinds of
changes are taking place at once. All areas of development-physical,
intellectual, social and emotional-interact continually. The different
areas of development are interrelated. As children grow, many kinds of
changes are taking place at once.
 Compare the entries across stages in the domain. Are there greater
differences or variations in the experiences across stages? What do
you observe?
Yes, there are greater differences or variations in the experiences
across stages, because as a child gets older they become matured
and the capacity of their understanding is higher. As they get matured
they more develop their skills.

FS 1 FORM D-2: SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL DOMAIN

MIDDLE CHILDHOOD LATE CHILDHOOD EARLY ADOLESCENCE


They are interested in They spend less time at Sharing problems and
reading in front of their home. secrets to their friends.
class
They enjoyed playing They share their secrets Starting to have their
with their classmate. to their friends. boyfriend.
They are active in They always want to play The first sign of puberty
participating in the class with their friends. usually begins to appear.
discussion
They are interested in Chatting with friends They always want to
watching cartoons and about their crush. picnic or adventure with
fairy tales. their friends.
They want to sing in front They feel shy in They have their group
of people. performing in front of conversation.
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people.
They strive to accomplish Eating snacks and They change their
competence. sharing with friends. physical appearance.
They are very competent Make group activity. Improved emotional
and confident. understanding.
They always want an Starting to have their They spend less time with
attention. crush. their parents.
They are confident in Peer friendships take on They are usually
performing in front of more prominent role restricted to members of
people. than ever before. the same sex.

Analyze well the entries in the three stages of development under social
relationship.

 What do you notice of the entries belonging to the same level or


stage? Are they more similar or different? Why?
They are more different because every level or stages are having
different experiences as a child get older they develop different skills
and the capacity of their thinking is getting higher as they become
matured.

 Compare the entries across stages in this domain. Are there greater
differences in the social/emotional experiences across stages? What
could have brought these differences about?
Yes, there greater differences in the social/emotional experiences. If a
child is in a middle childhood stage they are confident and they
always want to expose. They always want to recognize and they want
to catch all your attention. But if a child is in a late childhood stage
sometimes they feel ashamed and they don’t want to criticize and if a
child is in an early adolescence stage this is the beginning of their
puberty.

FS 1 FORM D-3: LITERACY/COGNITIVE/ INTELECTUAL DOMAIN

MIDDLE CHILDHOOD LATE CHILDHOOD EARLY ADOLESCENSE

Encourage kids to read Social comparison Develop the ability to


think abstractly.

16
Improving concentration Problem solving Move from being
concrete thinkers.

Increasing language skills Decision making Can imagine things not


seen or experienced.

Consider bilingual Leadership skills. Have the capacity to


education love.

Try to build extrinsic Differing Reasoning skills Physically present or real


motivation objects in problem
solving.

Naming types of object. Individual identify Decision making.

Know how to solve using Use of analogies Leadership skills


basic operation. explanation

Recognize simple words. Can read stories. They can decide


independently.

Recognize colors. Can solve using different Consider many points of


operation. view.

Analyze well the entries in the three stages of development.

 What do you notice of the entries belonging to the same level or


stage? Are they more similar or different? Why?
They are more different because cognitive development means the
growth of a child’s ability to think and reason. In the middle childhood
they depend on their parents or teachers. As a child grow their
understanding goes wider. In the adolescence stage, each child
develops his or her own view of the world.
 Compare the entries across stages in this domain. Are there greater
differences in the experiences across stages? What could have
brought this about?
Yes, there are greater differences as the child; they are difference in
the experiences across stages because as a child grows up everything
changes his/her experience become more challenging. Every stages
changes because as a child grow up the ability of a child to think is
higher.
17
1.4 INTERNALIZATION
Recognizing and accepting one’s characteristics across growth and
development levels

Using the organized list of your group’s experiences by domain as you guide,
prepare a profile of your own characteristics using the matrix below. You
narrative are an answer to the question in each domain.

MY PROFILE

NAME: WINIE JANE U. LIZARDO DATE OF BIRTH: MAY 18, 1993


AGE: 25
DOMOIN DEVELOPMENT STAGES OF GROWTH
MIDDLE LATE CHILDHOOD EARLY ADOLESCENCE
CHILDHOOD (INTERMEDIATE) (HIGH SCHOOL)
(PRIMARY)
Dancing in a Reading watt
A.PHYSICAL/MOTOR Playing hide school pad and
and seek with program. pocketbooks.
What physical-motor my friends.
abilities could you
perform during each
period?
Be with my Be with my Be with my best
B.SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL mother all the friends and friends having
What social time. classmates. outing and
relationships were picnic.
important to you during
each period?
Know how to Can solve Know how to
C.LITERACY/COGNITIVE/ write my problem write essay and
INTELLECTUAL name, identify solving, can poem.
What literacy and colors and read correctly.
cognitive/intellectual numbers.
abilities were you
capable of doing
during each period?

18
1.5 DISSEMINATION
Reflecting on the value of addressing the characteristics and needs of
learners during the various stages of development

By this time, you have met neither your Resource Teachers nor the children in
school. However, the profile you have written of yourself could be part of the
schema you have of learners in the different stages of levels.

Being aware of your characteristics and abilities during these periods of


growth, what do you think should a classroom teacher or a school provide to
address and maximize the characteristics and abilities of learners at each
level? You can think in terms of meaningful learning experiences and
important learning resources for each stage in each of the domains or
aspects of development.

PERCIEVED NEEDS OF LEARNERS


Stages of Growth Domain of Development
Physical/Motor Social/Emotional Literacy/Cognitive/
Intellectual
They should give The teacher Teach them how
Middle them a time to should be patient to read, write and
Childhood play, and they and give them count numbers.
(Primary) should some attention.
understand their
behavior.
Teach them how
Late Childhood They should The teacher gives to solve and read
(Intermediate) teach them how them advice and words
to clean and moral lesson.
protect their self.

They should They should be Teach them how


Early teach them to patient and to solve problem
Adolescence become teach them to solving, write a
(High School) independent become a role composition or
and give them model and a essay.
advice. good person.

19
ASSESSMENT

For use of the FS Program Coordinator

Criterion: Depth of understanding

Rubric
Rating Description
Output is reflective of learner’s deep understanding of how the
91-100 concept of growth and development is applied to learners.

Output is suggestive of some understanding of the concept of


81-90 growth and development of learners.

Output has minimal and understanding of the concept of


71-80 growth and development in learners.

Output shows very minimal understanding of the growth and


61-70 development as applied to learners.

Output shows no understanding at the entire concept of


51-60 growth and development.

Rating for LE 1:_____________

________________________________________

Signature of FS Program Coordinator

20
Outcome –Based
LEARNING EXPERIENCE 2
Knowing Your Learners Better
Learning experience 2 will allow you to hear directly from teachers how well
they are aware of the characteristics of the children they are teaching in school.
You have learned these characteristics in your Child and Adolescent
Development course earlier to this field will help you validate them.
You will initially interview three teachers of different grades particularly at lower
primary level (Gr 1-2), middle primary (Gr 3-4) and intermediate level (Gr 5-6) to
determine the characteristics of the learners along physical, social, emotional,
and intellectual domains of development. These teachers are teaching children
of middle childhood ages which is significant development stage. There is an
observation checklist that you can use in asking about these characteristics.
Your Intended Learning Outcome:
Recognize learner’s characteristics in middle childhood development stage
Your Experiential Tasks Your Reflection
Trigger/s
1.6 Exposure
Gathering teacher’s observation of middle childhood
learners.
1.7 Participation
Nothing patterns in the perception if teachers of  As a
learners’ characteristics future
1.8 Identification teach
Validating the observable characteristics of middle er, are
childhood you
1.9 Internalization aware
Inferring implications of varying characteristics of of the
learners in middle childhood devel
1.10 D opme
issemination nt
Giving importance to knowing the characteristics of chara
learners in one’s class cteristi
cs of
middl
e
childh
ood
learne

21
rs?

2.1 EXPOSURE
Gathering teachers’ observation of middle childhood learner

Use the Observation Checklist in Table 2.1 to ask three teachers of different
grades in the school. Ask each of them how the characteristics of middle
childhood children (i.e. 6 to 12 years old) are manifested on the learners of the
class they are teaching. Put a check on appropriate column to indicate their
responses.
Focal question: “As a teacher of Grade ___, please indicate how well the
children in your class manifest the known characteristics in the different
domains.”
TABLE 2.1 OBSERVATION CHECKLISTS

Teacher’s Name:_______________________________ Grade being taught:________


Domain Characteristics Strongly Observable Not
Observable Sometimes Observable
Social &
Emotional
Development
1.Children show signs of 
growing independence
2. Children average five 

22
best friends and at least
one “enemy”.
3. Children act nurturing 
and commanding with
younger children but
follow and depend on
older children.
4. There are fewer 
outbursts and more
accepting of delays in
getting things they want
“done”.
5.Children are self- 
conscious and feel if
everyone notices even
small differences (e.g.
new hair cut)
6. Children’s feelings 
get hurt easily and
often know how to deal
with failure.
Domain Characteristics Strongly Observable Not
Observable Sometimes Observable
Physical
development
1. Growth is slower than 
in preschool years, but
steady.
2. Children recognize 
that there are
differences between
boys and girls.
3. Muscle coordination 
and control are
uneven and
incomplete in the early
stages.
4. Small muscles 
develop rapidly,
making playing musical
instruments or building
things enjoyable.
23
5. Permanent teeth 
may come in before
the mouth has fully
grown, causing dental
crowding.
Mental
Development
1. They can group 
things that belong
together.
2. Children begin to 
read and write early in
middle childhood and
should be skillful in
reading and writing by
the end of this stage.
3. They can think 
through their actions
and trace back events
that happened to
explains situations.
4. Children learn best 
when they are active
while they are learning
rather than just listening
to an adult explain
rules.
5. Children can focus 
attention and take
time to search for
needed information.
6. There is greater 
memory capability
because many routines
are automatic now.

24
2.2 PARTICIPATION
Noting patterns in the perception of teachers of learners’ characteristics

Go over the Observation checklist you have used for the three
teachers. Arrange them according to the grades they are teaching
following the matrix below.
 Indicate the response of each teacher as indicated in his/her form in
the appropriate column using symbols. SO= Strongly Observable, OS =
Observable Sometimes, NO = Not Observable
TABLE 2.2 OBSERVATION CHECKLISTS
Teacher’s Name:_________________________ Grade being taught:______

Domain Characteristics Teacher A Teacher B Teacher C


(Gr 1-2) (Gr 3-4) (Gr 5-6)
Social &
Emotional
Development
1. Children show signs OS SO SO
of growing
INDEPENDENCE.
2. Children average OS OS SO
five friends and at least
one “enemy”.
3. Children act OS SO SO
nurturing and
commanding with
younger children but
follow and depend on
older children.
4. There are fewer OS OS OS
outbursts and more
accepting of delays in
getting things they
want “done”.
5.Children are self- OS SO SO
conscious and feel if
everyone notices even
small differences (e.g.
new hair cut)
6. Children’s feelings SO SO SO
hurt easily and often
know how to deal with
25
failure.

Domain Characteristics Strongly Observable Not


Observable Sometimes Observable
Physical
Development
1. Growth is slower than SO
in preschool years, but
steady.
2. Children recognize SO
that there are
differences between
boys and girls.
3. Muscle coordination NO
and control are uneven
and incomplete in the
stages.
4. Small muscles OS
develop rapidly making
playing musical
instruments or building
things enjoyable.
5. Permanent teeth NO
may come in before
the mouth has fully
grown, causing dental
crowding.
Mental
Development
1. They can group SO
things that belong
together.
2. Children begin to SO
read and write early in
middle childhood and
should be skillful in
reading and writing by
the end of this stage.
3. They can think SO
through their actions
and trace back events
that happened to
26
explain situations.
4. Children learn best SO
when they are active
while they are learning
rather than just listening
to an adult explain
rules.
5.Children can focus OS
attention and take time
to search for needed
information
6. There is greater OS
memory capability
because many routines
are automatic now.

2.3 IDENTIFIACTION
Validating the observable characteristics of middle childhood

1. For each domain select the characteristics which all teachers have
claimed to be “strongly observable”? They are those that get “SO-SO-SO”
response.
Domain Characteristics
Social 1. Children show signs of growing independence.
Emotional 2. Children act nurturing and commanding with younger
children but follow and depend on older children.
3.Children are self-conscious and feel if everyone notices
even small differences (e.g. new hair cut)
4. They are fewer outbursts and more accepting of delays
in getting things they want “done”.
5.
6.
Physical 1. Growth is slower than in preschool years, but steady.
Development 2. Children recognize that there are differences between
boys and girls.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Mental 1. They can group things that belong together.
Development 2. Children begin to read and write early in middle
childhood and should be skillful in reading and writing by
27
the end of this stage.
3. They can think through their actions and trace back
events that happened to explain situations.
4. Children learn best when they are active while they are
learning rather than just listening to an adult explain rules.
5.
6.

 Which domain shows the most number of strongly observable characteristics


during middle childhood? What does that suggest?
The most number of strongly observable characteristics during
middle childhood are social emotional and mental development.
This suggests that the development of a child is more on their social
emotional characteristics and their mental development. This
means that the capacity of a child to develop is more on their
emotional understanding and their capacity to develop their
thinking. This suggests that the teacher must focus on mental and
social emotional development, they must know the strength and
weaknesses of a child.
 Which domain shows the least number? What does that suggest?
The domain shows the least number of strongly observable is the
physical development of a child. The physical development of a
child is not strongly observable because the teacher should focus
on the mental and social development of the child for them to
adjust so that they will know to deal with them.
2. Identify the characteristics not observed in the same manner by all three
teachers. They suggest that the characteristics are still developing during
the stage.

VARYING CHARACTERISTICS ACROSS AGES IN MIDDLE CHILDHOOD


DOMAIN CHARACTERISTICS
Social 1. There are fewer outbursts and more accepting of delays
Development in getting things they want.
2. Children’s feelings get hurt easily and often know how to
deal with failure.

Physical 1. Muscle coordination and control are uneven and


Development incomplete in the early stages.
2. Permanent teeth may come in before mouth has fully
grown, causing dental crowding.
Mental 1. There is greater memory capability because many
28
Development routines are automatic now.

 Which domains shows the most numbers of varying or differing characteristics


observed during middle childhood? What does that suggest?
The most numbers of varying or differing characteristics observed
during middle childhood is the mental development. This suggests
that the teacher should give more attention for their mental
development for them to know the strength and weaknesses of the
child.

2.4 INTERNALIZATION
Inferring the implication of varying characteristics of learners in middle
childhood

 There are characteristics observed by all teachers across grades. What does
that suggest?
There are characteristics observed, the grades of learners
sometimes they got high grades and lower grades this only suggest
that the capacity of a child to think is not steady.

 There are characteristics observed by the intermediate teachers but not by


the lower. What does this suggest?
a. This only suggest that the children in the intermediate is more
mature and their behavior is most observable, so the teacher
should give them more attention for them to teach good moral
to develop their mental and socio emotional development.
b. This only suggests that the children in the lower grades are much
focus in their environment and they only want their freedom in
playing.

 There are characteristics which are not observable at all by any of the
teachers? What does that suggest? Any likelihood that these characteristics
are not found among the children in this school community?
This only suggests that the teacher focus on the behavior of
children. Avoidance to the misbehavior of the learners, such as
making noise will have a fine, co speaking bad words and no
littering.

29
2.5 DISSEMINATION
Giving importance to knowing the characteristics of learners in one’s
class

You were applying for a teaching position in elementary school and the
Head of school wants to have an idea of how well you know your future
students. You were asked to write an essay regarding the grade level you
want to teach and why you want to this this grade. Include the
description of the characteristics of the learners.

As a future teacher I will choose to teach in any grade level. But If I will
choose one I want to teach Grade I because I like kids very much. I want
their happiness and their energy. I think if I teach Grade I, I will be very
happy because I want to teach them how to read, write and count.
Grade I pupils are very importunate but I want to experience how to
handle them and teach them how to behave and how to become a
better person. I want to share to them my experience when I was a child
also.
I think that if I teach Grade I, It would be enjoyable and very memorable
because children is a kind of a happy pill for me I am very much happy to
teach. I want to teach them good moral and I want them to become a
better person.
As I observe I observe that teaching Grade I is hard but I know that I can
do it, I want to become their mentor and a model to them. I want them
to be successful; I want to be a part of their journey and to become their
guide in achieving their dreams.

30
ASSESMENT

For use of the FS Program Coordinator

Criterion: Relevance of implications

Rubric
Rating Description

91-100 Implications given were very relevant to available information.

81-90 Exemplifications show substantial understanding of suggested


teaching-learning guidelines for concrete-operational learners.

71-80 Exemplifications show minimal understanding of suggested


teaching-learning guidelines for concrete-operational learners.

61-70 Exemplifications reflect very minimal understanding of the concept


of growth and development as applied to teaching-learning.

51-60 Output shows no understanding at the entire concept of growth


and development to learning teaching.

Rating for LE2:___________________

__________________________________
Signature of FS Coordinator

31
Outcome- Based
LEARNING
EXPERIENCE 3
Instruction and Learner’s Development
Learning Experience 3 leads you to the pathway of discovering how teachers
adapt classroom instruction to where and what the learners are in terms of their
growth and development. As you have experienced yourself, curriculum
content and methodology used across your years in school follow your
framework to recognize certain development theories and principles. All
children invariably follow the same stages of development from infancy to
adolescence but necessary at the same rate. They all go through the same
physical, social, emotional, cognitive stages of development and the school
tries its best to appropriately meet their characteristics and contextual needs.
In LE 3, you will get close to a group of learners belonging to a more or less the
same cognitive stage. Try to discover how the teacher manages instruction
suited to their level. If you are a BEED student, obtain permission to observe
elementary level class who are cognitively classified as concrete-operational. If
a BSE student, observe a Grade 9 or 10 classes who are classified to be in formal
operation stage.
Your Intended Learning Outcome:
Establish the relationships between instructions and learners cognitive
development
Your experiential Tasks Your Reflections Trigger/s
3.1 Exposure
Recalling characteristics of children in the different
stages of cognitive development
3.2 Participation
Recognizing the instructional key events of a lesson in
a primary level class
3.3 Identification  How should teachers
recognizing the guidelines followed in teaching provide for concrete-
concrete-operational children operational children in
3.4 Internalization school?
Inferring the application of the cognitive
characteristics of children in teaching-learning
practices
3.5 Dissemination
Exemplifying instructional strategies for teaching
concrete-operational children

32
3.1 EXPOSURE
Recalling characteristics of children in the different stages of cognitive
development
Table 3.1 summarizes the cognitive stages of development according to
Jean Piaget and the underlying characteristics of children belonging to each of
the stages.
Study the characteristics well and see how they utilized in managing
instruction in the class you will be observing.
TABLE 3.1 PIAGET’S STAGES OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
STAGES Approximate Age Characteristics
Sensorimotor 0-2 years Begins to make used of imitation,
memory, and thought. Begins to
recognize that objects do not cease to
exist when they are hidden. Moves from
reflex actions to goal-directed activity.
Pre- 2-7 years Gradually develops used of language
operational and ability to think in symbolic form. Able
to think operations through logically in
one direction.
Concrete- 7-11 Able to solve concrete (hands on)
Operational problems in logical fashion.
Understand laws of conversations and is
able to classify and seriate.
Understand reversibility.
Formal 11 to adult Able to solve abstract problems in logical
Operational fashion.
Becomes more scientific in thinking.
Develops concerns about social issues,
identity.

 In what stages are the learners attending Basic Education (K-12) found in the
cognitive continuum? Approximate the cognitive stage of the learners in
school using the information in Table 3.1.
Grade Level Age Range Approximate Cognitive Stage
Preschool 4 years old Pre-Operational
Grade 1 6-7 years old Pre-Operational
Grade 2-4 7-9 years old Concrete-Operational
Grade 5-6 10-11 years old Formal – Operational

33
3.2 PARTICIPATION
Recognizing the instructional key events of a lesson in a primary level class

Observation Proper
Use the observation form in writing down your field notes every 3 seconds.

TABLE 3.2 CLASSROOM OBSERVATION FORM


School: San Juan Elementary School
Grade Observed: Grade V Name of Teacher: Ma’am Teresita J. Hipolito
Subject Area Observed: Math Time: 8:00 to 10:00 pm
Number of Students:15
Episode Time Key Event
1 7:30-8:30 English
2 8:30- 9:30 Math
3 9:30- 10:30 Break time
4 10:30-11:30 Filipino
5 11:30-12:00 Science
6 12:00-1:30 Lunch Break
7 1:30 -2:30 Araling Panlipunan
8 2:30-3:30 MAPEH
9 3:30-4:30 PLAY
10 4:30-5:00 CLEAN THE CLASSROOM
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20

34
3.3 IDENTIFICATION
Recognizing the guidelines followed in teaching concrete- operational
children
 Go over your field notes in your Observation form to see if there are other
things you may want to add or revise.
 The matrix below gives a list of suggested instructional guidelines in teaching
class of concrete-operational children. Study each guideline and identify if
there are episodes or parts of the lesson you have observed that exhibit each
one. Write the Episode Number in the second column. There could be more
than one episode you can cite for every guideline.

Teaching the Concrete Operational Child


Guidelines Episode Key Event(s) in the
Number Lesson Observed
1. Continue to use concrete props and 1 English
visual aids.
2. Give the students a chance to 5 Science
manipulate and test objects.
3. Make sure presentations and reading 1&5 English & Filipino
are brief and well organized.
4. Use familiar examples to explain more 1&2 English & Math
complex ideas.
5. Give opportunities to classify and 1&2 English & Math
group objects and ideas on increasingly
complex levels.
6. Present problems that require logical, 5&7 Science & Araling
analytical thinking. Panlipunan

3.4 INTERNALIZATION
Inferring the application of the cognitive characteristics of children in
teaching- learning practices

 Were all the teaching guidelines for concrete-operational learners


demonstrated in the lesson observed? Which were clearly shown?
Yes, they are all demonstrated in the lesson I observed, but the most clearly
shown are the guideline no. 1 and guideline no. 4.
 Which guidelines were not shown at all?
Give the students a chance to manipulate and test objects.
 What could be the reason/s why the teacher did not have the opportunity to
observe the guidelines for this stage?

35
They don’t have enough time and also they don’t have appropriate
materials.
3.5 DISSEMINATION
Exemplifying instructional strategies for teaching concrete-operational
children

You have learned earlier the cognitive characteristics of concrete-


operational children now enrolled in Basic Education. You have also seen
how these characteristics can be optimized through some guidelines for
teaching them.
 A workshop is being organized on teaching strategies in different subject
areas that effectively address characteristics of learners. Give examples of
specific instructional techniques you can apply following the guidelines for
teaching concrete-operational learners.

Guidelines Examples of Teaching Techniques


1. Continue to use a. e.g. Use 3- dimensional models in teaching
concrete props and visual about the Solar System in science
aids. B. Using manila paper as their visual aids.
2. Give the students a a. Using the globes to locate different places.
chance to manipulate and B. Painting using water color.
test objects.
3. Make sure presentations a. Use manila paper as their visual aid.
and reading are brief and B. Using different instructional material.
well-organized.
4. Use familiar examples to a. Using pictures or realias.
explain more complex B. Using objects in teaching mathematics.
ideas.
5. Give opportunities to a. Used picture in teaching araling panlipunan
classify B. They used familiar example in teaching
science.
6.Present problems that a. Using sticks in teaching mathematics.
require logical, analytical B. Using map or globe to locate places.
thinking

36
ASSESSMENT
For use of the FS Coordinator

Criterion: Understanding of Guidelines thru Exemplifications


Rubric

Rating Description

91-100 Exemplifications provided show exemplary understanding of


teaching-learning guidelines for concrete-operational
learners.

81-90 Exemplifications show substantial understanding of


suggested teaching-learning guidelines for concrete-
operational learners.

71-80 Exemplifications show minimal understanding of suggested


teaching learning guidelines for concrete-operational
learners.

61-70 Exemplifications reflect very minimal understanding of the


concept of growth and development as applied to
teaching learning.

51-60 Exemplifications show no understanding at all in relating


learners’ development of teaching learning.

Rating for LE 3:___________

___________________________________
Signature of FS Program Coordinator

37
Outcome – Based
Learning
Experience 4
Assisted Learning
Learning Experience 4 focuses on how learning better facilitated by the
guidance and assistance the learners can receive from adults and peers
around them. This based on Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory in the cognitive
development of children, that is, children learn through their interactions with
others using cultural tools (e.g. language and numbers) (Wool folk 2007). This
theory supports the significance role of teachers, parents, other adults and peers
in child’s learning and development through assisted learning.

Assisted learning or guided participation in the classroom requires


scaffolding. This in the support a teacher provides “through clues, reminders,
encouragement, breaking the problem down into steps, providing an examples,
or anything else that allows the student to grow independence as a learner”. LE
4 challenges you to discover and identify all forms of scaffolding strategies
teachers give students for assisted learning.

Your Intended Learning Outcome:


Identify strategies for assisted learning
Your Experiential Tasks Your Reflection Trigger/s

4.1 Exposure
Observing daily learning routine of learners
in school
4.2 Participation
Noting teachers’ practices in providing
assistance learning
4.3 Identification  Why is assisted learning
Identifying effective teachers’ ways of important for cognitive
assisting learners development
4.4 Internalization
Recognizing the importance of assisted
learning
4.5 Dissemination
Making a commitment to use assisted
learning for learners

38
4.1 EXPOSURE
Observing daily learning routine of learners in school
 Choose a class of any grade which you can observe for one full session,
either morning of afternoon. As much as possible, the class is taught by more
than one teacher. With your Resource Teacher’s approval, be inside the
classroom before the session starts.
 On the first day, observe how the class schedule is carried out. Use the form
given in Table 4.1 to note down your observation.

TABLE 4.1 CLASS PROGRAM


Grade Observed: Grade V Number of students: 15
Date of Observation: December 12, 2018 AM/PM: am
Subject Name of Schedule Subject Matter
Teacher
Starts Ends
Math Teresita J. 9:00 11:00 Polygon
Hipolito

39
4.2 PARTICIPATION
Noting teachers’ practices in providing assistance learning

 You will be observing how teachers are assisting learners individually or as a


group while teaching. Note down every the teacher does to help or assist
her/his students understand an idea, solve a problem, answer a question,
perform a procedure, follow directions, etc. These are some common tasks
the students are expected to do. Use the form in Table 4.2 for this purpose.
Use one form for every subject observed. An example is given below.

TABLE 4.2 SCAFFOLDING STATEGIES OBSERVED


Subject Area: Mathematics Name of Teacher: Lily Ann Guillermo
Time Observed: 1:00 to 3:00
Learning Task Form of Assistance Given

Example: Solving a math problem  Repeats explanation

 Demonstrates steps in doing it.


1. What is tessellation? 1. Presents a picture.
2. Gives a lot of examples.

4.3 IDENTIFICATIONS
Identifying effective teacher’s ways of assisting learners

3. Gather the field notes you have completed for the class by subject area
or teacher. Study the scaffolding strategies you have written in the forms.
See if you classify them according to some forms of assisted learning given
below. You can identify other forms which you can write in the last row.
Forms a Assisted Learning Scaffolding Strategies Observed

1.Procedural facilitators- these helps A. Explain the lesson step by step.


students learn a skill or procedure B. Gives example for them to
understand the lesson.
c.
2. Modeling- demonstrating or A. Used real objects.
showing examples. B.
C.
3. Providing prompts- giving clues to A. Giving hints for them to know the
40
give the correct answer. correct answer.
B.
C.
4. Regulating difficulty of problem or A. Making an essay.
task- starting first with something easy B. Reading Stories.
to do or answer. C.
5. Providing half- done examples- A. Fill in the black.
starting the task first and letting B. Matching type.
students finish it. C.

4.4 INTERNALIZATION
Recognizing the importance of assisted learning
1. Form your experience, what other strategies have your teachers used
which have helped you understand a complex subject matter? Can you
site a specific example?
My teachers used strategies which help me understand a complex subject
matter is by explaining very well the lesson and by giving examples. The
teacher should not be able to move to another lesson unless we understand
the present lesson. For example, when we are discussing in math subject my
teacher explain very well the lesson. She will teach us step by step to get the
correct answer. She always asks us one by one if we understand our lesson.
She let us she lets us solve in the blackboard for her to know if we understand
our lesson.
2. What benefits do students derive from assisted learning? How this related
to their cognitive development?
The benefit that the students derive from assisted learning is for them to
understand very well the lesson. If the teacher assists very well his/her student
the student will be very active and they will be eager in participating in a
class discussion. They can be more interested in the subject and they can be
more confident in participating.
3. What about the teachers? What do they get out of using scaffolding
strategies?
Using scaffolding strategies would be a benefit to teachers for them to be
easily in teaching. If they know how to use scaffolding strategies it would be
a big help for them to teach the lesson immediately and for the student to
understand the lesson very well.

41
4.5 DISSEMINATION
Making a commitment to be competent in providing assisted learning for
learners

You have seen how important it is to scaffold learning for cognitive


development of learners. As a future teacher, what can you do to develop your
competency for assisted learning?

My favorite theory is; through scaffolding, learners could be developed from


their actual zone of development to the zone of proximal development. This
really inspires me because I could feel that a teacher’s task is very rewarding
since they are instrument of making the child reach its fullest potentials.

Teaching is both a vocation and a mission. Responding to God’s call is not a


simple task and gets even harder when you will do the mission of being the
catalyst for change. Yet, touching one’s life is priceless and molding them into
best of what can be is the hardest job, but rewarding.

As a future teacher, I could be developing my competency for assisted


learning; I should have the patience and a wide understanding for the children.
Children have different behavior and they have different talent and intellect. As
a future teacher I should know to deal with the children individually, I should
respect their abilities and skills. I should give them attention for them to learn and
I will teach them very well for them to become a better person.

As a person, helping someone achieve their dreams is like; they have something
that I myself can no longer achieve in my current capacity. Seeing someone
surpass you in one field specially your own student is an accomplishment. When
I teach my goal is to try to push my students to achieve their goals and their
dreams anyway they possibly can, if they cannot, they need to look for another
dream and goal to accomplish. I want them to achieve something in life that
they can be proud of, that once in their short lives they did something right and
was on the top of the world.

42
Outcome Based
Learning
Experience 5
Learners’ World in the classroom

Learning experience 5 now brings you face to face with the actual world of
learning for the basic education of children. As you have experienced as a
young learners and nurtured utilizing strategies that can effectively address the
development stage they are in. LE 5 then focuses on the classroom structure
and displays used by teachers. Through observation, be sensitive to how a
teacher structures a classroom in order to promote active learning for the
development level of his/her students.

Your Intended Learning Outcome:


Recommended an appropriate classroom structure and display for promoting
learning
Your Experiential Tasks Your Reflection Trigger/s
5.1 Exposure
Observing features of two classrooms of
different grade levels
5.2 Participation
Recognizing differences in the structure and
display of classroom of two different levels 4. How should a classroom
5.3 Identification be structured to enhance
Identifying the purpose of the resources found learning of his/her class?
in the classroom
5.4 Internalization
Matching the classroom resources with the
learner characteristics
5.5 Dissemination
Designing an ideal classroom structure that
can promote active learning for a given
development stage

43
5.1 EXPOSURE
Observing features of two classrooms of different grade levels

Arrange with the FS Coordinator of your school to allow you to observe two
classrooms of two different levels (e.g. Preschool or Grade 1 and Grade 5 or 6).
Using the Classroom Resources checklist below, note down the features/displays
found in each classroom. Separate your observation notes for the two
classrooms. Check YES column if present or available in the classroom.

CLASSROOM RESOURCES CHECKLIST

Classroom 1 Classroom 2
Grade: I and II Grade: Grade V
No. of Children: 14 Boys: 6 Girls:8 No. of Children: 15 Boys: 6 Girls:9
Furniture How many? Furniture How
 Learners’  Yes 6 many?
desks  Learners’  Yes 15
 Teacher’s  Yes 1 desks
table  Teacher’s  Yes 1
 Book  Yes 2 table
cabinets  Book  Yes 2
 Book  Yes 2 cabinets
shelves  Book  Yes 2
 Learners’ Yes shelves
locker  Learners’ Yes
 Teacher’s  Yes 1 locker
locker  Teacher’s  Yes 1
 Others: locker
 Others:

44
Classroom 1
Displays Yes Location Classroom 2
 Visual for  Teachers Displays Yes Location
cabinet
new or  Visual for  Cabinet
current new or
lesson current lesson
 Learners’ art On the wall  Learners’ art Cabinet
 
work
work 
Bulletin  Honor roll Bulletin
 Honor roll   Group Bulletin
 Group  Bulletin task/responsi
task/respons bility
ibility  Attendance Record
 Record book 
 Attendance Cabinets
 Experiments book
 Experiments   Project  Cabinets
Cabinets
 Project   Rules &  Bulletin
 Rules &  wall standards
standards  Others
 Others
Teaching Aids

Teaching Aids  Musical


Yes
instrument
 Musical  Maps/Globes  On the top
instrument  Math kits of the
 Maps/Globes

 Teachers  Art kits cabinet
 Math kits 
 table  Charts Cabinet
 Art kits 
 Cabinet  Flannel Cabinet
 Charts board 
 Flannel  Computer
board  LCD
 Computer  Story
 LCD  books/Trade Book
 Story Book 
 books shelves
books/Trade shelves  Reference  Book
books  Book books shelves
 Reference  shelves  Audio tapes
books  Blackboard
 Audio tapes
In front of  Bulletin  On the wall
 Blackboard board
 Bulletin
the class
  Others
board
 Others

45
5.2 PARTICIPATION
Recognizing differences in the structure and display of classrooms used by
two different levels

Study well your notes for the two classrooms and answer the questions that
follow.
 What resources are available in both classrooms? Write those common
resources in the matrix.

COMMON RESOURCES
Learners desk
Furniture Teachers table
Book shelves
Book cabinets
Visuals for new and current lesson
Honor roll
Displays Group task/Responsibilities
Attendance
Projects
Rules and standards
Bulletin boards
Teaching Aids Charts
Story books/trade books
LCD
Black boards

 What resources are exclusively found only in one classroom?


Resources Classroom 1 (Lower Grade) Classroom 2 (Upper grade)
Learners desk Learners desk
Furniture Teachers table Book shelves
Book shelves Teachers table
Book cabinets
Honor roll Honor roll
Displays Group task Group task
Rules and standards Rules and standards
Teaching Aids Black board Blackboard
Chart chart
Story books Story books

46
 How will you differentiate the resources found in the two classrooms in
terms of type, size arrangement, color, number, or location?
Resources Classroom 1 (Lower Grade) Classroom 2 (Upper Grade)
The learners table in The learners table in
classroom 1 is made of classroom 2 is made up off
wood and it was painted wood.
Furniture brown. The teachers table in upper
The teachers table in grade is 2 there is one table
classroom 1 was located at in front of the class and 1 at
the back of the pupils. the back.
The book shelf in the lower The book shelves in the
grade room 1 is messy. upper grade are well
organized.
The displays in the lower The display in the upper
grade are very colorful grade is beautiful too but
Displays there are different colors compare to classroom 1 it
and different pictures was lesser in arts and there
painted in it. There is lot of are only sayings painted in
colorful flowers and it was the wall.
very nice and well
organized.
Teaching Aids The bulletin in the lower The bulletin is put at the left
grades are 4 there are 2 side and at the right side of
bulletin at the back an 1 at the classroom.
the left side and 1 at the
right side and there are lot
of beautiful and colorful
flowers glued in it.

 What could have significantly made the type of resources in the two
classrooms different?
It was the classroom management how the teachers manage their own
classroom to become a conducive learning for the children. It was very
important to organize the classroom very well so that the pupils will be
comfortable. Putting a bulletin board boards, pictures, sayings, and
different displays will be great idea to encourage children to go attend
their class every da

47
5.3 IDENTIFICATION
Identifying the purpose of the resources found in the classroom

You have identified the resources found in the two classrooms particularly the
classroom displays. Based on what you have learned before in your professional
education course, give a possible reason for putting on the various displays in a
classrooms share the same purpose or reason for the displays. You may consult
the Resource Teacher in the room to specify the purpose.

Classroom Display Classroom 1 Classroom 2


(Beginning Grade) (Upper Grade)
1.Materials for new lesson Ready for the new Ready for the new
lesson. lesson.
2.Model art works Pupils will have an idea To motivate pupils in
to make their own art doing art works.
works.
3.Honor Roll To inspire pupils to To cope up more to
achieve and focus on be in top rank.
their studies.
4.Group Tasks/Assignment To practice the lesson To know their
Responsibilities and for them to study responsibilities.
the lesson.
5.Status of student projects/ So that the parents will To know every pupils
experiments be proud. talents.
6.Exemplary learners’ written
output
7.Supplementary books and For them to study and To practice their
other materials practice how to read. reading skills.
8.Rules and standards for class To practice how to For them to know
to follow follow rules and for what is right and
them to behave. what is wrong.

 Do the two classrooms always share the same purposes or reasons for
having those displays? What could be the reason why they vary?
Yes, the two classrooms always share the same purposes or reasons for
having those displays. They want their student to become knowledgeable
and they want their students to learn for them to achieve their goals. They
want that their student would be more comfortable, to encourage them
to focus on their studies, to give them a memorable experience in their
school.

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5.4 INTERNALIZATION
Matching the classroom resources with the learner characteristics
 Given the physical, social, and intellectual characteristics you have
learned about Preschool or Grade I learners, how do you describe or
characterize the resources that must be found in their classroom.
Basic Resources of Preschool Suggested Characteristics/Descriptions
or Grade 1 classroom /Contents
1.Learners desk Discipline-they must be disciplined in order
to have a well-organize desk.
2.Bulletin boards Artistic-they must have an idea to beautify
their bulletin board.
3.Books Discipline- they should know how to return
the books on where they get it.
4.Learning kits Responsible- to know their parts.
5.Classroom space Responsibilities and discipline- they should
be disciplined in order to have a clean
and well- organized classroom.
6.Play materials Discipline- they should know their own toys.
7.Musical devices Obedient-they should follow their teachers.

 Given the physical, social/ emotional, and cognitive /intellectual


characteristics of upper grade learners, what activities will interest them to
carry out in or outside their classroom? What classroom resources should
be available to carry these out?
Interesting Activities for Upper Grade Useful Resources
Learners
1. They will dance. Speaker & music
2. They will sing. Mike, and speaker
3. They will have a stage drama. Props
4. They will play a cooking contest. Kitchen utensils
5. They will have a contest in pageant Props

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5.5 DISSEMINATION
Designing an ideal classroom structure that can promote active learning for
a given development stage

Based on the observations you have made of the classrooms, reflect on


what can be an ideal classroom structures that can promote active learning.

1. Write a narrative of your idea of a classroom for Grade level of your


choice. Given the characteristics of your learners, describe what they can
do inside the classroom you have in mind.
MY IDEA OF A CLASSROOM FOR GRADE 1
My own idea of a classroom for Grade I, the room should be spacious, properly
ventilated and properly decorated. I want a conducive classroom for my pupils
that have a proper lightning properly decorated and the furniture’s are properly
arranged and the colors must benign in the eye of the children. Classrooms that
complete in materials in teaching the children to become imbibe learners. My
ideal classroom would have all of the services for of my children to learn, grow,
and thrive. At the same time, I want my classroom to be simple and not too
busy.

I feel a busy classroom tends to make children feel overwhelmed and more
easily distracted. As far as seating arrangements go I would have to be with my
class for at least a full week to figure out the configurations of the classroom. I
would most likely situate the children in a group format so that they can socialize
and interact with each other. I would form this group configuration based on my
observations on who works well together and where the distractions originate
from etc. My desk would be situated where I could see all of my students.

I would try to enclose a couple of desks off in a corner with bookshelves for any
children who need some alone or work time. My classroom would also have
many visuals. I want very part of my classroom to be learning aides. The children
should learn from what I put on the walls. I would have many signs up for the
different centers and put up the alphabet (in Murray format course), drawings,
pictures, colors, numbers, shapes, basically everything to cater to the grade level
that I teach. I would also make sure that I cater to any of the special needs of
my children that I probably will have.

This write up of my ideal classroom is obviously not perfect; however, I feel that it
is adequate sketch of how I would visualize my own classroom.

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2. Sketch the interior of your classroom that will show the various displays,
furniture and teaching aids. Consider the floor plan that will allow for
group activities. Label the wall displays and the contents shelves.

MISSION VISION

BLACK BOARDS

LEARENERS DESK AND CHAIRS


BULLETIN BULLETIN
BOARD BOARD

BOOK SHELVE BOOK SHELVE

TEACHER’S

TABLE

DOOR

TRASH CAN

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Outcome- Based
Learning
Experience 6
The School for the learners

Learning experience 6 opens a wider door for you to enter and gaze at the
bigger world for providing learning opportunities, the school! As the teacher
converts the classroom to become an environment for active learning for
his/her class, the school head, together with all the other personnel, organizes
the school to make available resources that will support the development of the
learners. This is what you will aim at doing in this episode i.e. discover these
school resources for supporting learners developmental needs.
Your Intended Learning Outcome:
Advocate a school program for addressing learners’ developmental needs
Your Experiential Task Your Reflection Trigger/s
6.1. Exposure
Sketching the map of the school showing its
structure.
6.2. Participation  How can the school
Identifying the programs and resources of the support the development
school of learners across
6.3. Identification different domains?
Establishing the purpose of the school facilities
and resources
6.4. Internalization
Identifying the challenges of a school in
providing opportunities for development
6.5. Dissemination
Writing a program proposal on how a school
could meet the physical, social, emotional,
and intellectual needs of learners

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6.1 EXPOSURE
Sketching the map of the school showing its structure

Name of school: San Juan Elementary School

Bldg. 4 Bldg. 3
Bldg. 2 Bldg. 1

School Ground

Bldg. 5

Basketball court
Path
Bldg. 6 way

Bldg.
.8

Garden
Bldg. 7

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6.2 PARTICIPATIONS
Identifying the programs and resources of school
This time, try to determine what is/are found inside each building. List them
according to how you have numbered them in your map and enumerate the
specific facilities and resources found in each one.

Number of Building/ Facilities Resource found


structure
Bldg. Classroom for Grade 1 and Books, black board and
2 furniture.

Bldg. 2 School canteen, computer Computer, furniture,


room, office and Grade 3 kitchen utensils and
classroom. snacks. Flat screen tv
Bldg. 3 Grade 5 classroom Furniture, displays and
teaching aids
Bldg. 4 Waiting shed
Bldg. 5 Classroom for grade 4 and Furniture, display,
6 teaching aids.
Bldg. 6 Classroom for kinder Display, furniture,
teaching aids flat screen
TV and laptop
Bldg. 7 Classroom for preschool Teaching materials,
television furniture and
displays.
Bldg. 8 pathway

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6.3 IDENTIFICATION
Establishing the purpose of the school facilities and resources
Below is a list of possible facilities in a school. Check those which available in
your school. With the resources you have found, indicate which domain(s) is/are
being developed and provided for by each one. Indicate program(s) the
school carries out under the three developmental domains. You may want to
consult the Head of the school and the teacher in-charge of the programs.
Facilities Availability Programs
Physical/ Social/ Cognitive/
Motor Emotional Intellectual
Classrooms
Library /  To practice e.g. Reading
Reading room their skills in Enhancement
reading.
Computer  To learn how
Room to used
computer.
Home Enhance their
Technology skills in using
Center technology.
Industrial Arts To enhance To keep their
Center their talent in confidence.
arts.
Health Clinics  For them to
become
physically fit.
Guidance  To teach
Room them and
guide them.
Gymnasium To gain their
confidence
Canteens  For them to
eat healthy
foods
Music Room For them to
relax their
mind.
Play Ground  For them to
relax and play
with others
Science For them to
Center learn about
55
science.
Performance To gain their To have
Center confidence. confidence in
performing.
Office of  Where the
School Head school heads
meet the
visitors.
Others
(specify)

6.4 INTERNALIZATION
Identifying the challenges of the school in providing opportunities for
development
 You have identified the facilities and resources of your school. What
facilities and resources are needed for other development programs?
The facilities that are needed for other development programs are lightning,
proper temperature of school, classroom size and space. Learning materials are
important because they can significantly increase the student achievement by
supporting students learning. This process aids in the learning process allowing
the student to explore the knowledge independently as well as providing
repetition.

Educational facilities include buildings, fixtures, and equipment necessary for the
effective and efficient operation of the program of public education,
classrooms, libraries, rooms and space for physical education, space for fine
arts, restrooms, specialized laboratories cafeterias, media centers and building
equipment are very important facilities and resources needed for development
program.

56
6.5 DISSEMINATION
Looking Ahead: Writing a program proposal on how a school could meet the
physical, social, emotional, and intellectual need of learners
Imagine yourself applying for a teaching position. The principal would like to
get your vision of a school that adequately supports learner’s developmental
needs: physical, social, emotional, and intellectual. Prepare a paper which you
can submit for this purpose. Mention if learners of all grades can participate in
the program or if it is intended only for a specific developmental level or group.
Include in your proposal the objectives of the program, the target group, some
proposed activities and resources needed.

A PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAM FOR LEVEL


Program Target Group Proposed Needed
Objectives Activities Resources
They must Art Club -contest They need paint,
enhance their -proper training bound paper,
talents in arts such illustration board,
as painting, paint brush, and a
drawing and etc. good mentor.
They must show
their talents in Dancing & singing -they must do Musical
dancing and Club audition instrument,
singing. -contests speaker, music
and auditorium.
The students -try out
should develop Sports Club -contest Sports material
their skills in sports. -sport activities and play ground

The student should -auditions Costume and


show their talent in Drama Club -contest auditorium.
acting or drams.

The students Musical Club -contest Different musical


should show their -practice and instrument and a
talents in playing auditions music room.
different musical
instrument.

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ASSESMENT

For use of the FS Program Coordinator


Criterion: Relevance of Program Proposal

Rubric
Ratings Description
Proposal shows exemplary relevance in meeting specific
91-100 developmental needs of target learners through the proposed
workable activities.
Proposal can adequately meet specific development needs of
81-90 the target learners through some relevant activities.

Proposal shows bearing on the present needs of the school


71-80 children but activities given are not relevant.

Proposal shows very little bearing on what the school learners


61-70 currently need.

No proposal was presented at all


51-60

Rating for LE 6:_________________

__________________________________
Signature of FS Program Coordinator

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