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SCHOOL of MECHANICAL &CONSTRUCTION

DEPARTMENT OF
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

VTUR15

Foundation courses
&
Programme core courses
Foundation Courses of VTUR15*
Class
distribution
Sl. Course per week Page
Course Name
No. Code C No
L T P
1 1150EN102 Technical Communication 3 0 0 3 5
2 1150PH101 Engineering Physics 3 0 0 3 9
3 1150CH101 Engineering Chemistry 3 0 0 3 13
4 1150CH103 Environmental Studies 3 0 0 3 16
5 1150MA103 Engineering Mathematics-II 3 2 0 4 20
6 1150MA104 Transform and Partial Differential Equation 2 2 0 3 24
7 1150EC101 Basic Electronics Engineering 2 0 0 2 28
8 1150EE101 Basic Electrical Engineering 2 0 0 2 31
9 1150CE101 Basic Civil Engineering 2 0 0 2 35
10 1150ME101 Basic Mechanical Engineering 2 0 0 2 39
11 1150ME103 Engineering Materials 2 0 0 2 41
12 1150MG101 Project Management and Finance 3 0 0 3 46
13 1150GE101 Biology for Engineers 2 0 0 2 49
14 1150GE102 Design Thinking 3 0 0 3 52
Integrated Courses
15 1150EN201 Technical English 2 0 2 3 63
16 1150MA201 Applied Statistics 2 0 2 3 69
17 1150MA202 Engineering Mathematics-I 2 2 2 4 76
18 1150CS201 Problem Solving using C 1 2 2 3 82
19 1150ME202 Engineering Graphics 1 2 4 4 89
20 1150GE205 Introduction to Engineering 1 0 4 3 55
Laboratory Courses
21 1150PH302 Engineering Physics Laboratory 0 0 2 1 94
22 1150CH302 Engineering Chemistry Laboratory 0 0 2 1 98
Basic Electrical and Electronics Engineering 101
23 1150EE302 0 0 2 1
Laboratory
Total Credits 60

*Effect from AY 2017-18 onwards till further modifications.


Programme core courses of VTUR15
Class
distribution
Sl. Course per week Page
Course Name
No. Code C No
L T P
1 1151AE101 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering 2 0 0 2 105
2 1151AE102 Engineering Mechanics 2 2 0 3 108
3 1151AE103 Strength of Materials 2 2 0 3 111
4 1151AE104 Fluid Mechanics 2 2 0 3 113
5 1151AE105 Aero Engineering Thermodynamics 2 2 0 3 116
6 1151AE106 Linear system Analysis and control 3 0 0 3 118
7 1151AE107 Incompressible Flow Aerodynamics 3 0 0 3 120
8 1151AE108 Aircraft Gas Turbine Propulsion 2 2 0 3 123
9 1151AE109 Airplane Performance 3 0 0 3 126
10 1151AE110 Compressible flow Aerodynamics 2 2 0 3 128
11 1151AE111 Rocket and Space Propulsion 3 0 0 3 131
12 1151AE112 Airplane Stability and control 3 0 0 3 133
Integrated Courses
13 1151AE213 Numerical Methods using MATLAB 2 0 2 3 136
14 1151AE214 Aircraft systems and Instruments 1 0 2 2 139
15 1151AE215 Aircraft Structural Mechanics 1 2 2 3 142
16 1151AE216 Aircraft Structural Analysis 1 2 2 3 145
17 1151AE217 Avionics 2 0 2 3 148
Computational Methods for Aeronautical 151
18
1151AE218 Engineering 2 2 2 4
Laboratory Courses
19 1151AE319 Strength of Materials Laboratory 0 0 2 1 154
20 1151AE320 Thermodynamics Laboratory 0 0 2 1 156
21 1151AE321 Fluid Mechanics Laboratory 0 0 2 1 158
22 1151AE322 Aerodynamics Laboratory 0 0 2 1 160
23 1151AE323 Propulsion Laboratory 0 0 2 1 162
Aero Engine Maintenance and Structural
24
1151AE324 Repair Laboratory 0 0 2 1 164
25 1151AE325 Flight Mechanics and control Laboratory 0 0 2 1 166
Total Credits 60
Foundation Courses
Class
distribution
Sl. Course per week
Course Name
No. Code C
L T P
1 1150EN102 Technical Communication 3 0 0 3
2 1150PH101 Engineering Physics 3 0 0 3
3 1150CH101 Engineering Chemistry 3 0 0 3
4 1150CH103 Environmental Studies 3 0 0 3
5 1150MA103 Engineering Mathematics-II 3 2 0 4
6 1150MA104 Transform and Partial Differential Equation 2 2 0 3
7 1150EC101 Basic Electronics Engineering 2 0 0 2
8 1150EE101 Basic Electrical Engineering 2 0 0 2
9 1150CE101 Basic Civil Engineering 2 0 0 2
10 1150ME101 Basic Mechanical Engineering 2 0 0 2
11 1150ME103 Engineering Materials 2 0 0 2
12 1150MG101 Project Management and Finance 3 0 0 3
13 1150GE101 Biology for Engineers 2 0 0 2
14 1150GE102 Design Thinking 3 0 0 3
15 1150EN201 Technical English 2 0 2 3
16 1150MA201 Applied Statistics 2 0 2 3
17 1150MA202 Engineering Mathematics-I 2 2 2 4
18 1150CS201 Problem Solving using C 1 2 2 3
19 1150ME202 Engineering Graphics 1 2 4 4
20 1150GE205 Introduction to Engineering 1 0 4 3
21 1150PH302 Engineering Physics Laboratory 0 0 2 1
22 1150CH302 Engineering Chemistry Laboratory 0 0 2 1
Basic Electrical and Electronics Engineering
23 1150EE302 0 0 2 1
Laboratory
Total 60
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P Credit
1150EN102 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION 3 0 0 3

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course promotes students to recognize, explain, and use the formal
elements of specific genre of Industrial communication and also imparts
competitiveness in writing analytical reports, proposals, memorandums,
applications and promotional documents.

b. Course Outcomes :
After the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Level of learning
CO
Course Outcomes domain (Based on
Nos.
revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Write grammatically, maintain coherence and logical
K2
flow
CO2 Recognize and develop various writing styles
K3
appropriate to different communication situation
CO3 Write logically, accurately and concisely with
supporting evidence K3

CO4 Transcode information from tables, graphs and charts to


verbal K3

CO5 Format the document and write technically. K3

c. COURSE SYLLABUS

Unit I L–9
Articles - Nominal Compounds - Collocation - Connectives - Cohesion and Coherence
-Paragraph Writing

Unit II L–9
Memo - Minutes - Circular - Job Applications – Resume Writing
Unit III L–9
Technical Vocabulary - Writing Instructions - Check List - Writing recommendations
– Project Writing

Unit IV L–9
Transcoding and Transfer of information (Table, Flow chart, Pie chart, Bar chart, Line
graphs) - Writing definitions - Process Description

Unit V L–9
Research Methodology (Format) – Technical Report writing - Proposal writing -
Journal Writing (Research Articles)

TOTAL = 45 periods
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
T1.M.Ashraf Rizvi, Effective Technical communication, MC Graw Hill
education Pvt.Ltd.,

ii. References :
T2.Dr.Ganesan.S,Effective Communication in Technical English, Dhanam
Agencies, Chennai, 2012.
T3.Sumant.S, Technical English,Vijay Nicole Imprints Private Limited,2006.
T4. P.SubbaRao.B.AnitaKumar.HimaBindu.Technical Communication,
Cengage learning,2013.
T5: Prof.N.LakshmanaPermal, Technical English II,Hitech Publishing
Company Pvt Ltd. 2011
T6: Jawahar, Jewelcy, P.Rathna, English workbook II, VRB Publishers pvt ltd.
2013

iii. Online Resources


http://www.lonestar.edu/useful-websites-for-students.htm
www.english-for-students.com/
www.britishcouncil.org
www.sfsu.edu/~puboff/onestop.htm
www.uefap.com
www.eslcafe.com
www.listen-to-english.com
www.owl.english.purdue.edu
e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Define compound nouns and expand the following
a). Radio waves
b). Resource utilization
c). Machine language
d). Concrete wall
e). Battery car
2. Fill in the blanks with suitable articles:

a. Everyone respects _______honest person.


b. Copper is ______useful metal.

3. Write a paragraph on the effects of Global Warming.

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Write an e-mail to a Customer Grievance Manager of XYZ bank explaining
the recent hacking of your debit card account. Invent necessary details.
2. Write briefly the general rules to be followed while communicating through
SMS.
3. Write a note on the structure of a CV for a fresher. Identify the key elements
that can make the Resume impressive.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Write a set of 16 instructions to organize an international conference without
lapse.
2. Prepare a sample project to organize prediction polls survey.
3. Write a checklist containing eight items which will help you prepare for the
Interview.

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Transcode the following Pie chart into language.
Various Expenditures (in percentage) Incurred in Publishing a Book
2. Write the definitions for the following.
1. Auditorium
2. Flow chart
3. Computer program
4. Nuclear fusion
5. Lathe

3. Describe the process of coin manufacturing.

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. Write a sample feasibility report for introducing chocolates in the market.
2. Explain the qualities of a good proposal.
3. What are the categories and effectiveness of Proposals?
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150PH101 ENGINEERING PHYSICS 3 0 0 3

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course in Engineering Physics presents brief knowledge on Laser


and Optic Fiber, Band Theory of Solids, Semiconductors, Magnetic and Dielectric
materials, Superconductivity and Advanced Nano Materials. The syllabus is
designed to prepare students for applying their knowledge in Emerging areas of
Engineering and technology

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Explain the laser operation and interaction of
CO1 lasers with matter and its use in low and high K2
energy application.
Explain the classification of materials, band
CO2 structure,and calculation of carrier density, K2
electrical conductivity.
Explain fundamentals of polarizable solids,
CO3 ferroelectricity, and magnetism and properties K2
used in device design.
Discuss the superconducting phenomenon, their
CO4 K2
properties and concepts for various applications.
Explain various methods involved in Synthesis of
nano and smart materials through different
CO5 K2
techniques and their application in nano
technology.

c. Course Syllabus :

UNIT-I LASERS AND OPTICAL FIBERS L-9


Interaction of Radiation with Matter -Essentials of Laser-Types of Laser - Ruby Laser
He - Ne Laser -semiconductor Laser-Application of Lasers -Optical Fibers –
Propagation of light through an optical fibers- Modes of Propagation -Types of
optical fibers -Optical fiber communication system- Attenuation in fibers.
UNIT-II Band Theory of Solids & Semiconductor L-9
Band Theory of solids -Energy Bands -Energy Gap -Classification of solids -Energy
Band structure of a conductor –Fermi Dirac distribution function and Fermi Energy-
Energy Band structure of an Insulator and semiconductor.
Introduction - Types of semiconductors- Intrinsic carrier electron and hole
concentration- Fermi level in intrinsic- carrier density- conductivity- Doping of
impurities- N -Type and P -Type- Fermi level in semiconductor- Hall Effect - Hall
voltage-Hall coefficient- Application.

UNIT -III Magnetic and Dielectric Materials L-9


Introduction to Magnetic materials- Types- Magnetic moment of atom- Hard and soft
magnetic materials- Hysteresis curve – Applications.
Dielectrics- Electronic - ionic - orientational and space polarizations – Internal fields
in solids – Polarization-Induced dipoles- Nonpolar and Polar dielectrics -
ClausiusMosotti equation - Dielectric loss.

UNIT-IV SUPERCONDUCTIVITY L-9


Discovery of superconductivity- persistent currents- Effect of external magnetic field-
critical current density- Meissner effect- London penetration depth- BCS Theory
descriptive- Type of superconductors- Josephson Effect (AC and DC)- Applications –
Maglev-SQUIDS.

UNIT -V NANOTECHNOLOGY AND ADVANCED MATERIALS L-9


Nano phase materials – Synthesis – Plasma arcing – chemical vapour deposition – Sol
gel method – Electro deposition – Ball milling – properties and application – Carbon
nano tubes – types.
Total: 45 Hours
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
1. B.K.Pandey and S.Chaturvedi, Engineering Physics,CengageLearning,2017

ii. Reference:
1. M.N.Avadhanulu and P.G.Kshirsagar,A Text Book of Engineering Physics,
S.Chand and Co,2012.
2. Gaur and Gupta, Engineering Physics , Dhanpat Rai publications,2009
3. T.Pradeep,The essential understanding –Nanoscience and Nanotechnology-
TMH, 2010.
4. William D.Callister,Materials Science and Engineering, John Wiley &Sons-
2010
5. Charles Kittel,Introduction to Solid State Physics -Wiley India
publications,2009.
6. Mathews and Venkatesan,Quantum Mechanics - TMH, 2008
iii. Online resources
URL1: http://www.nptel.ac.in/courses/122101002/downloads/lec-34.pdf
URL 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB0FpnWzHDw
URL 3: http://www.nptel.ac.in/courses/115101012/
URL 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeS_U9qFg7Y
URL 5: http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/solids/squid.html
URl 6: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11PynxAhebs
URL 7: http://www.nptel.ac.in/courses/118104008/
URL 8: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTGmIlkQF8M
URL 9: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k27ukETADD8
URL 10: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1DzoVjVuB2I
URL 11: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlWGIKCV_6k
URL 12: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4M2FyuqOvFU
URL 13: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CK1CuehhoP4
URL 14: http://www.nanoconsulting.de/englisch/properties.html
URL 15: http://www.understandingnano.com/nanomaterials.html
URL 16: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsWD5dJv2OE
URL 17: http://nptel.ac.in/courses/103103033/module9/lecture3.pdf
e. Sample assessment questions:
(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)
Course Outcome 1 (CO1):
1. What are the different methods of achieving population inversion?
2. Bring out the differences between step index fiber and graded index fiber.
3. Explain the construction and working of He-Ne laser. What are the merits of
He-Ne laser.

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Define Band gap.
2. Write the differences between Insulator and Conductor.
3. Explain the formation of energy bands in solids and briefly.
4. Explain how solids are classified on the basis of energy band gap.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Define dielectric constant.
2. Compare Dia, Para and Ferromagnetic materials.
3. Discuss different types of polarization mechanism in dielectrics.

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Explain Meissner effect.
2. Write a short note on BCS theory of superconductivity.
3. Discuss application of superconductor.

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. What are nanoparticals?
2. What are the applications of carbon nano tubes?
3. Discuss briefly the synthesis of chemical vapour deposition.
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150CH101 ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY 3 0 0 3

Category: Foundation
a. Preamble: This course Engineering Chemistry, imparts a sound knowledge on the
principles of chemistry for better understanding of various engineering concepts
employed to build different applications such as Water Technology, Fuels and
Combustion, Electrochemistry, Engineering Materials, Spectroscopy and
Analytical Techniques.
b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Describe the basic principles of water treatment &
CO1 various methods of water treatment that can be K2
employed in industries and domestic areas.
Classify the different types of fuels – solid, liquid and
CO2 K2
gas which are employed in different industries.
Demonstrate about electrochemical reactions, corrosion
CO3 K2
and different power sources.
Explain various engineering and polymeric materials
CO4 K2
used in our daily life.
Describe the various aspects of spectroscopic techniques
CO5 which will be used for the characterization of various K2
materials.
c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT–I WATER TREATMENT AND TECHNOLOGY L-9
Introduction- Hardness - Types - estimation by EDTA method - boiler feed water –
requirements - disadvantages of using hard water in boilers - internal conditioning
(phosphate, calgon and carbonate conditioning methods) - external conditioning
methods - demineralization process – desalination - reverse osmosis – electrodialysis -
domestic water treatment.

UNIT–II FUELS AND COMBUSTION CHEMISTRY L-9


Classification, Characteristics of fuel, Combustion processes- Calorific value: gross
and net calorific values. Solid Fuels: Coal-Classification, Analysis: Proximate and
Ultimate analysis of coal and their importance, Metallurgicalcoke: Properties,
Manufacture by Otto Hoffman process. Liquid fuels- Synthetic Petrol: Fischer-
Tropsch process and Bergius Process, Knocking and anti-knocking, octane number
and cetane number and their significance, Gaseous Fuels: Natural gas, synthetic gas
(water gas, producer gas). Flue gas analysis – Orsat apparatus

UNIT–III ELECTROCHEMISTRY L-9


Electrochemical cells- reversible and irreversible cell- EMF measurement - single
electrode potential- Nernst equation. Reference electrode – SHE - Calomel electrode -
Glass electrode - measurement of pH. Electrochemical series - significance-
potentiometric titration – Redox titration – Conductometric titration. Primary and
secondary batteries. Lead acid, Lithium batteries (Lithium ion), fuel cells (Hydrogen-
oxygen). Corrosion – Introduction and classification.
UNIT–IV ENGINEERING MATERIALS L-9
Nanomaterials: Introduction - Fullerenes-graphene-Carbon nanotubes-types (single
walled carbon nanotubes and multi walled carbon nanotubes) advantages and
applications- Nano composites. Polymeric composites: Introduction - types of composites
- Particle reinforced - fibre reinforced-structural composites. Abrasives-Classification and
properties, Refractories-Classification and properties, Lubricants- Classification and
properties.

UNIT–V SPECTROSCOPY AND ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES L-9


Introduction- Electromagnetic radiation- interaction of electromagnetic radiation with
matter- Beer- Lambert’s law- principle, instrumentation (Block Diagram) and
applications of UV- Visible spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy- colorimetry- flame
photometry and Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS).
Total: 45 hrs
d. Learning Resources
(i) Text Books:
T1. P. C. Jain and Monica Jain - “Engineering Chemistry” Dhanpat Rai Pub,
Co., New Delhi (2008).
T2. A. Ravikrishnan – Engineering Chemistry, Sri Krishna Publication,Chennai
(2012).
(ii) References:
R1. B. K. Sharma - “Engineering Chemistry”, Krishna Prakasan Media (P) Ltd.,
Meerut (2001)
R2. B. Sivasankar - “Engineering Chemistry” Tata McGraw-Hill Pub.Co.Ltd.
New Delhi (2008).
R3. B. R. Puri, L. R. Sharma, S. Pathania - “Principles of
physicalChemistry”(2000).
R4. William Kemp – “Organic spectroscopy” Macmillan publications (1991).
R5. Peter Atkins, Julio de Paula “Physical Chemistry” W. H. Freeman
publications (2009)

(iii) Online resources


1. www.nptel.ac.in
2. www.slideshare.net
3. www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry
4. www.electrochem.org
5. www.learnerstv.com

e. Sample assessment questions:


(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Define Scale and Sludge (K1)
2. Explain the various methods for internal treatment of water (K1)
3. Describe the domestic water treatment in detail (K2)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Define octane and cetane number (K1)
2. Explain proximate analysis of coal. How is it carried out? (K1)
3. Describe the manufacture of gasoline by Fisher-Tropsch method (K2)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Define electrode potential (K1)
2. Explain the charging and discharging principles of batteries (K2)
3. Explain the primary and secondary reference electrodes in detail (K2)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Define polymeric composite (K1)
2. Explain the various types of nanotubes (K1)
3. Describe the preparation, properties and uses of Abrasives in detail (K2)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. What are the difference between atomic and emission spectroscopy (K1)
2. Deduce Beer-Lambert’s law (K2)
3. How will you determine the amount of sodium present in the given solution by
flame photometer (K2)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150CH103 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 3 0 0 3

Category: Foundation

a. Preamble :This course Environmental Studies, makes an attempt to bring students


in direct contact with nature, environmental problems and the possible solutions.
To empower the students to enrich their knowledge of physics, chemistry and
biology and basic engineering aspects towards encountering environmental issues.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Describe the natural resources, conventional and
CO1 non-conventional sources of energy and their K2
advantages and disadvantages.
Demonstrate various ecological aspects of
 CO2 K2
environment and biodiversity and its conservation
Describe the analysis of various pollutants, their
 CO3 K2
effects and remedial measures.
Explain about Sustainable development, major
 CO4 environmental problems and implementation of K2
Environmental Acts for control of pollution

Explain the effect of population growth, major


 CO5 diseases with no proper vaccination and its control K2
by family welfare programmes.
c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT- I L–9
INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND NATURAL
RESOURCES
Definition, scope and importance – Need for public awareness – Forest resources:
Use, effect of their over exploitation and Deforestation, Timber extraction and Mining
– Water resources: Surface source, subsurface source and ground water, Rainwater
harvesting (Methods & merits and simple layout) floods, drought- Dams, benefits and
problems–Food resources: World food problems, changes caused by agriculture and
overgrazing, effects of modern agriculture, fertilizer-pesticide problems, water
logging, salinity, Drainage and their effects – Energy resources: Growing energy
needs, renewable and non-renewable energy sources, use of alternate energy sources –
Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, soil erosion, Desertification and
Landslides.

UNIT- II
ECOSYSTEMS AND BIODIVERSITY L-9
Concept of an ecosystem – Structure and function of an ecosystem – Producers,
consumers and decomposers – Energy flow in the ecosystem – Ecological succession
– Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids – Introduction, types, characteristic
features, structure and function of the (a) Forest ecosystem (b) Aquatic ecosystems
(ponds and oceans) – Introduction to Biodiversity – Definition: genetic, species and
ecosystem diversity –Value of biodiversity: consumptive use, productive use, social,
ethical, aesthetic and option values – Biodiversity at local level – India as a mega-
diversity nation – Hot spots of biodiversity – criteria for recognizing hot spots –
Biodiversity hot spots in India – Threats to biodiversity: habitat loss, poaching of
wildlife - Endangered and endemic species of India – Conservation of biodiversity: In-
situ and Ex-situ conservation of biodiversity.

UNIT III
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION L-9
Definition – Causes, effects and control measures of: (a) Air pollution (b) Water
pollution (c) Soil pollution (d) Marine pollution (e) Noise pollution (f) Thermal
pollution (g) Nuclear hazards – Soil waste Management: Causes, effects and control
measures of urban and industrial wastes –Pollution case studies – Disaster
management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides and tsunami

UNIT -IV
SOCIAL ISSUES AND THE ENVIRONMENT L-9
From Unsustainable to Sustainable development – Urban problems related to energy –
Water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed management – Resettlement and
rehabilitation of people; its problems and concerns, case studies –Climate change,
global warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, nuclear accidents and holocaust,
case studies. – Wasteland reclamation – Consumerism and waste products –
Environment Production Act – Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act – Water
(Prevention and control of Pollution) Act –Forest Conservation Act.

UNIT- V
HUMAN POPULATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT L-9
Population growth, variation among nations – Population explosion – Family Welfare
Programme – Environment and human health – Human Rights – Value Education –
HIV / AIDS – Women and Child Welfare – Role of Information Technology in
Environment and human health.

d. LEARNING RESOURCES
(i) Text books
1. Miller T.G. Jr., Environmental Science, Wadsworth Publishing Co 2006
2. A.Kaushik and C.P. Kaushik, Environmental Science and Engineering, New
Age International publishers, 2005.
3. A.Ravikrishnan-Environmental Science and Engineering, Sri Krishna
Publications, Chennai (2012).

(ii) References
1. Cunningham, W.P.Cooper, T.H.Gorhani, Environmental Encyclopedia, Jaico
Publ., House, Mumbai, 2001.
2. BharuchaErach, The Biodiversity of India, Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd.,
Ahmedabad India,

(iii) Online Resources


1. http://www.who.int/topics/environmental_pollution/en/
2. http://edugreen.teri.res.in/explore/explore.htm
3. www.earthtrust.org
4. www.worldwildlife.org
5. www.actionbioscience.org
e. Sample assessment questions:
(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. What is renewable energy resource? (K1)
2. Explain the impacts of deforestation?(K1)
3. Describe soil erosion in detail?(K2)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Define Ecosystem?(K1)
2. Explain the different types of Biodiversity?(K1)
3. Describe the values of Biodiversity in details?(K2)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Define Pollution? (K1)
2. Explain the causes and control of Water pollution? (K2)
3. Explain Thermal pollution in details? (K2)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Define Green house effect? (K1)
2. Explain Global warming? (K1)
3. Describe acid rain and its environmental impacts in details? (K2)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. What is Sustainable development? (K1)
2. Explain the role of IT in protection of environment? (K1)
3. Explain child welfare programme? (K2)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
ENGINEERING
1150MA103 3 2 0 4
MATHEMATICS II

Course Category: Foundation.

a. Preamble :This course aims to develop the Laplace Transform Techniques and
differential operator methods, method of undetermined coefficients and the method
of variation of parameters in solving ordinary differential equations; to provide
vector differential and integral calculus and complex analysis in evaluating
integrals.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Apply Laplace transformation techniques to convert
time-domain complex systems into simple
CO1 K3
frequency-domain algebraic equations and vice-
versa.
Apply vector differential calculus to solve problems K3
CO2
related to vector and scalar fields.
Apply vector integral calculus to solve problems K3
CO3
related to vector and scalar fields.
Apply analytical functions in conformal mapping K3
CO4
problems.
CO5 Apply the calculus of residues in contour integration. K3
c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT I LAPLACE TRANSFORM L- 9 + T-3
Laplace transform – Sufficient Condition for existence – Transform of elementary
functions – Basic properties – Transform of derivatives and integrals –– Transform of
periodic functions - Inverse Laplace transform– Convolution theorem (excluding
proof) – Initial and Final value theorems - Solution of linear ODE of second order
with constant coefficients using Laplace transform.

UNIT II VECTOR DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS L- 9 + T-3


Vector fields and scalar fields - The gradient field - The directional derivative-
Divergence and Curl of a vector field- Solenoidal and Irrotational vector fields- The
Laplacian in polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates.

UNIT III VECTOR INTEGRAL CALCULUS L- 9 + T-3


Line integrals in the plane-Line integrals as integrals of vectors- Green’s theorem
(without proof) in the plane and its verification- Line integrals in space- Surfaces in
space- Normal to the surface- Orientability- Surface integrals- Divergence theorem
(without proof) and Stokes’ theorem (without proof) and their verification involving
cubes and rectangular parallelepiped only.

UNIT IV ANALYTIC FUNCTIONS L- 9 + T-3


Functions of a complex variable – Analytic functions – Necessary conditions, Cauchy
– Riemann equation and Sufficient conditions (excluding proofs) – Harmonic and
orthogonal properties of analytic function – Harmonic conjugate – Construction of
analytic functions – Conformal mapping : w= z+c, cz, 1/z, and bilinear transformation.

UNIT V COMPLEX INTEGRATION L- 9 + T-3


Complex integration – Statement and applications of Cauchy’s integral theorem and
Cauchy’s integral formula – Taylor and Laurent expansions – Singular points –
Residues – Residue theorem – Application of residue theorem to evaluate real
integrals –Unit circle and semi-circular contour(excluding poles on boundaries).
45+15=60hrs
d. Learning Resources
i.TextBooks :
1. Kreyszig E, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 12th edition, Wiley, 2010.

ii.Reference:
1. Grewal B.S., Higher Engineering Mathematics, Khanna Publishers, New
Delhi, 44th Edition, 2015.
2. Jain R.K and Iyengar, S.R.K Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 3 rd
edition, Narosa
Publishing House, 2009.
3. Peter O’ Neil, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Cengage Learning,
Boston, USA, 2012.
4. Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright and Michael R.Cullen. Advanced
Engineering Mathematics (4th Edn) Jones & Bartlett Learning, Canada,
2011.
5. Dean G. Duffy. Advanced Engineering Mathematics with MATLAB,
2ndEdn. Chapman & Hall / CRC Press.New York, 2003 (Taylor and
Francis, e-library, 2009).
6. Kanti B. Datta, Mathematical Methods of Science and Engineering Aided
with MATLAB, CenageLearing, 2014.
7. Dennis G. Zill. First Course in Complex Analysis with Applications, Jones
and Bartlett Publishers, Inc., USA, 2003
8. P. Duraipandian, S. Udayabaskaran and T. Karthikeyan, Engineering
Mathematics Volume I & II, S. Chand & Company Pvt.Ltd., New Delhi,
2016

iii. Online resources


http://www.math.hmc.edu
https://www.khanacademy.org
http://ceee.rice.edu
www.nptel.in
http://ocw.mit.edu
www.mathforum.org

e. Sample assessment questions:


(K1 – Remember, K2-Understand, K3-Apply, K4-Analyse, K5-Evaluate,K6-Create)
Course Outcome 1 (CO1):
1. [CO1 K1] State the existence conditions for Laplace transform.
2. [CO1 K2]Verify the initial value theorem and final value theorem for 𝑓(𝑡) =
1 − 𝑒 −𝑎𝑡 .
 s+2 
3. [CO1 K3] Apply convolution theorem to find L-1  2 2
 (s  4s  13) 
Course Outcome 2 (CO2):
1. [CO2 K1] What is the physical meaning of gradient?
⃗⃗⃗ = (𝑦 + 𝑧)𝑖̂ + (𝑧 + 𝑥)𝑗̂ + (𝑥 + 𝑦)𝑘̂. Is
2. [CO2 K2] A fluid motion is given by𝐹
this motion irrotational? If so, find the velocity potential.
3. [CO2 K3]If 𝑟is the position vector of the point (𝑥, 𝑦, 𝑧) and 𝑟 = |𝑟|, then prove
𝑑2𝑓 2 𝑑𝑓
that∇2 𝑓(𝑟) = 2
+ ,Where 𝑓(𝑟)is a function of 𝑟.
𝑑𝑟 𝑟 𝑑𝑟

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. [CO3 K1] What is the total work done by force acting on a particle moving
along an arc? If it is equal to zero, what energy is conserved?

2. [CO3 K2] Using Green’s theorem, evaluate ∫𝐶 (𝑥 2 𝑦 𝑑𝑥 + 𝑥 2 𝑑𝑦), where C


is the boundary describing counterclockwise of the triangle with vertices
(0,0), (1,0), (1,1).
3. [CO3 K3]Verify Gauss divergence theorem for the vector 𝐹 = 𝑦 𝑖̂ + 𝑥 𝑗̂ +
𝑧 𝑘̂ taken over the cylindrical region 𝑥 2 + 𝑦 2 = 9; 𝑧 = 0, 𝑧 = 6.
Course Outcome 4 (CO4):
1. [CO4 K1]Define an entire function and give an example.
2. [CO4 K2]Find the bilinear transformation which maps the points ∞, i, 0 onto
0,i, ∞ respectively.
3. [CO4 K3] If ω = 𝜑 + 𝑖ψrepresents the complex potential for an electric
𝑥
field andψ = x 2 − 𝑦 2 + , determine the function 𝜑.
𝑥 2 +𝑦 2

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. [CO5 K1] Define removable singularity and essential singularity.
1
2. [CO5 K2]Obtain the Laurent’s series for f(z) = (𝑧+1)(𝑧+3) for

(i). 1 <|𝑧| < 3 and (ii). |𝑧| < 1.


3. [CO5 K3]Evaluate the Apply Cauchy’s Residue theorem to evaluate the
𝑧+2
integral ∫𝑐 (𝑧−1)(𝑧−3)
dz, where C: |𝑧| = 2.
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
TRANSFORMS AND
1150MA403 PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL 2 2 0 3
EQUATIONS

Course Category: Foundation.


a. Preamble :Phenomena of heat conduction, wave and signal propagation in media
occur in several physical and natural situations. These phenomena are described by
Partial Differential Equations or Difference equations. Solutions of PDE and
Difference equations are needed for analyzing the phenomena. Knowledge of
mathematical tools and various techniques for solving PDE and difference
equations are needed for engineering students. Comprehension and modeling of
problems which occur in heat conduction and wave propagation and signal
processing have to be under taken with logical thinking and analytical skills by the
engineering students. Accordingly, this course aims to provide sufficient
knowledge to engineering students in the specific mathematical tools and
techniques such as Fourier series, Fourier transform Z-transform and PDE.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Understand the need for a function or its approximation as
an infinite series (Fourier Series) to represent discontinuous
function which occurs in signal processing and electrical K2
circuits.
CO2 Demonstrate the use of Fourier Transform to connect the
K2
time domain and frequency domain.
CO3 Distinguish between ordinary differential equation, forming
K3
and solving PDEs.
CO4 Demonstrate understanding of basic concepts in application
of partial differential equations in heat passing through rod,
K3
vibrating membrane, two dimensional heat conduction
problems.
CO5 Demonstrate understanding Z-transform and analyzing
K3
Discrete signals by using Z-transform.
c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT I Fourier series 6+6
Dirichlet’s conditions – General Fourier series – Odd and even functions – Half
range sine series – Half range cosine series – Complex form of Fourier series –
Parseval’s identity – harmonic analysis.

UNIT II Fourier Transforms 6+6


Fourier integral theorem (without proof) – Fourier transform pair – Sine and
Cosine transforms – properties – Transforms of Simple functions – Convolution
theorem – Parseval’s identity

UNIT III Partial Differential Equations 6+6


Formation of partial difference equations – Solutions of standard types of first
order partial differential equations– Lagrange’s linear equation – Linear partial
differential equations of second and higher order with constant coefficients

UNIT IV Applications of Partial Differential Equations 6+6


Solutions of one dimensional wave equation – One dimensional equation of
heat conduction – Steady state solution of two-dimensional equation of heat
conduction (insulated edges excluded) – Fourier series solutions in Cartesian
coordinates only.

UNIT V Z-Transforms and Applications 6+6


Z-Transforms – Elementary properties – Inverse Z-transform – Convolution
theorem – formation of difference equations – Solution of difference equations using
Z-transform
Total: 60Hours
d. Learning Resources
i.TextBooks :
1. B.S. Grewal, Higher Engineering Mathematics, (44thEdn.), Khanna Publishers,
New Delhi, 2012.

ii.Reference:
1. E. Kreyszig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, (10thEdn.), John Wiley and
Sons, New York, India, 2010.
2. R.K. Jain and S.R.K. Iyengar, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, (3rdEdn.),
NarosaPublishing House, New Delhi, 2007.
3. H.K. Dass, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, (20thEdn.), S. Chand & Co,
New Delhi, 2007.
4. E.C. Zachmanoglou and D.W. Thoe, Introduction to Partial Differential
Equations With Applications, Dover, New York, 1986.
5. Brian Davies, Integral Transforms and Their Applications, Springer, 2001.
6. Alan Jeffrey. Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Harcourt/Academic Press,
New York, 2002.

iii. Online resources


This course uses exclusively for providing electronic resource, such as lecturer
notes, assignment papers, and sample solutions. Students should make appropriate use
of this recourse.
http://www.fourier-series.com/
http://www.sosmath.com/fourier/fourier1/fourier1.html
http://www.efunda.com/math/fourier_transform/index.cfm
http://ocw.usu.edu/civil_and_environmental_engineering/numerical_methods_i
n_civil_engineering/IntroToPartialDiffEqns.pdf

e. Sample questions:
(K1 – Remember,K2-Understand,K3-Apply, K4-Analyse,K5-Evaluate,K6-Create)

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1,0 < 𝑥 < 𝜋
1. Obtain the Fourier series for the function 𝑓(𝑥) = { (K2-Level)
0, 𝜋 < 𝑥 < 2𝜋
2. Determine the Fourier series expansion of 𝑓(𝑥) = 𝑥 in the interval   x   .
(K2-Level)
3. The following table gives the variations of periodic current over a period.
‘t’-sec 0 𝑇⁄ 𝑇⁄ 𝑇⁄ 2𝑇⁄ 5𝑇⁄ T
6 3 2 3 6
‘A’- 1.98 1.30 1.05 1.30 -0.88 -0.25 1.98
amp
Show that there is a direct current part of 0.75 amp in the variable current and
obtain the amplitude of the first harmonic. (K2-Level)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Prove.𝐹{𝑒 𝑖𝑎𝑥 𝑓(𝑥)} = 𝐹(𝑠 + 𝑎). (K2-Level)
𝑒 −𝑎𝑠
2. Find 𝑓 (𝑥), if its sine transform is . Hence deduce that the inverse sine
𝑠
1
transform of . (K2-Level)
𝑠
𝑑𝑥
3. Evaluate ∫ (𝑥 2 2 )(𝑥 2 2) using Fourier Transform. (K2-Level)
+𝑎 +𝑏
Course Outcome 3 (CO3)
1. Form the partial differential equation by eliminating the arbitrary
Constants from 𝑧 = 𝑎𝑥 + 𝑏𝑦 + 𝑎𝑏. (K2-Level)
2. Find the partial differential equation of the family of spheres having their Centre
on the line 𝑥 = 𝑦 = 𝑧. (K2-Level)
3. Find the singular integral of 𝑧 = 𝑝𝑥 + 𝑞𝑦 + 𝑝2 + 𝑞 2 + 𝑝𝑞 . (K2-Level)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


𝜕2 𝑢 𝜕2 𝑢
1. Write the three possible solutions of = 𝑎2 (K1-Level)
𝜕𝑡 2 𝜕𝑥 2

2. Derive the solutions of one dimensional wave equation. (K2-Level)


3. A bar of 10 cm length with insulated sides has its ends A and B kept at 20°c and
40°c
Respectively until steady state conditions prevailed. Find the steady state
temperature of the bar. (K2-Level)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


 1 
1. Find Z   (K2-Level)
 (n  1)(n  2) 
2. Using Z-transform solve𝑈𝑛+2 + 3𝑈𝑛+1 + 2𝑈𝑛 = 0, given that 𝑢0 = 1, 𝑢1 = 2.
(K2-Level)
3. Using Z-transform Solve 𝑌𝑛+2 + 4𝑌𝑛+1 − 5𝑌𝑛 = 24 n-8, given that 𝑌0 = 3, 𝑌1 =
−5. (K2-Level)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
BASIC ELECTRONICS
1150EC101 2 0 0 2
ENGINEERING

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble :Provides the knowledge and fundamentals of Electronic devices and


circuits and application oriented Electronics Engineering.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO (Based on revised
Course Outcomes
Nos. Bloom’s
Taxonomy)
CO1 Explain the operation of basic semiconductor devices. K2
CO2 Illustrate the operation and characteristics of transistor. K2
Summarize the concepts of special semiconductor devices K2
CO3
and Transducers
CO4 Explain the basic principle of digital electroniccomponents. K2
CO5 Outline the Basic Operation of Communication Systems K2

c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT–I SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES 6
Diode applications: Half-wave rectifier, Full-wave rectifier (with and without filter),
Clipper and Clamper, Voltage multiplier and SMPS. Special purpose diodes and their
applications: Working principle and application of Zener diode, Varactor diode, LED,
PIN diode and Laser diode. Digital display devices: 7 segment display and LCD.

UNIT–II TRANSISTOR AND ITS APPLICATIONS 6


Transistor and applications: Working principle of BJT, FET and MOSFET& CMOS
application of BJT and MOSFET as amplifier and switch.

UNIT–III SPECIAL SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AND TRANSDUCERS


6
Basic principle and working of SCR, SCS, UJT, PUT, IGBT, LASCR, optical
couplers and fiber optics – Introduction to Transducers and sensors.
UNIT–IV INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL ELECTRONICS 6
Logic gates, Flip Flops, Encoder, Decoder, Multiplexer, De multiplexer, A/D, D/A
converters, Microprocessors and microcontroller, IC.

UNIT–V BASICS OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS 6


Block diagram of communication system, frequency spectrum, need for modulation,
Modulation techniques: Amplitude modulation and frequency modulation, TDMA,
FDMA AND CDMA. Electomagnetic interference: EMI & EMC, Basic concepts of
EMF and EMF reduction methods. Electromagnetic compatibility;Emission and
immunity issue, SAR.
Total: 30 Hours
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. A Textbook of Electronic Circuits by Dr. R. S. Sedha.

ii. References:
1. Electronic Devices and Circuits by S.Salivahanan, N.Suresh Kumar and
A.Vallavaraj.
2. Modern Digital and Analog Communication Systems by B.P.Lathi.
3. Integrated Electronics by Millman and Halkias.
4. Communication systems by Kennedy

iii. Online resources


1. https://archive.org/details/ElectronicDevicesCircuits
2. https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and computer-science/6-
012-microelectronic-devices-and-circuits-fall-2005/

e. Sample assessment questions


Course Outcome 1 (CO1)
(1) Explain the operation of zener diode voltage regulator.
(2) Draw the VI characteristics of PN diode
(3) Draw the circuit diagram of UJT relaxation oscillator and explain.
(4) Explain the Operations of SMPS.
(5) Summarize the advantages of Full-Wave rectifier in terms of electrical
parameters
Course Outcome 2 (CO2)
(1) Explain the basic operation of transistor.
(2) How transistor works as an amplifier?
(3) Explain the different modes of FET.
(4) Discuss the differences between BJT & FET.
(5) Explain the operation of n-channel D-MOSFET.
Course Outcome 3 (CO3)
(1) Explain the operation of SCR.
(2) Explain the application of PUT.
(3) Explain the classification of transducers.
(4) Indicate the importance of SCR in high power applications.
(5) Explain the operation of UJT

Course Outcome 4 (CO4)


(1) Explain input and output commands of any microprocessor.
(2) What is the difference between combinational logic circuit and sequential logic
circuit?
(3) Explain the different types of Flipflops.
(4) Discuss the operation of Encoder & Decoder.
(5) Explain the operation of universal gates.

Course Outcome 5(CO5)


(1) Why frequency modulation is preferred over amplitude modulation?
(2) Write a brief note on FDMA and CDMA.
(3) What is EMI and how it can be reduced?
(4) Discuss the important modules in the communication system.
(5) Discuss about the need for modulation.
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150EE101 BASIC ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 2 0 0 2

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble :This course forms the basis for understanding electricity, magnetism,
circuit theory concepts, electrical machines, power generation, energy sources,
electrical wiring, electrical safety and measurements. The course deals all the
fundamental concepts of the topics required in electrical engineering. Moreover it
provides a wealth of technical information and contributes to the learning of
electric circuits and equipment based on fundamental concepts.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Explain domestic power consumption, Estimation of
CO1 wiring, Electrical safety, earthing procedures and K2
electrical measuring instruments.
Explain the fundamental electrical elements, laws and
CO2 K2
quantities
CO3 Explain about AC, DC, Mutually induced circuits
K2
Identify the constructional features, parts and working
CO4 K2
of electrical machines
Discuss the types and working of energy sources and
CO5 K2
the process of power generation structure
c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT-I ELECTRICAL WIRING, SAFETY & MEASUREMENTS 6
Electrical symbols- Indian electricity rules– Fuse & types - MCB - Power rating of
Basic house hold equipment –neutral and earth connection – types of earthing-
earthing of domestic fitting and appliances - ELCBs – Electrical installation estimate
–Electric Shock & Safety- measuring instruments – Ammeter – Voltmeter- Wattmeter.

UNIT-II INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 6


History and evolution of electricity-Electrical Quantities, Ohm’s Law, Resistance,
Resistor & types-colour coding of resistance, Temperature coefficient of resistance-
Capacitance-Capacitor& types, Introduction to Magnetism-Basic Concepts-
Introduction to A.C. Quantities.

UNIT-III BASIC CIRCUIT CONCEPTS 6


Resistance, Inductance & Capacitance in Series & parallel combination, Kirchhoff’s
laws, Star-Delta transformation, Mesh & Node analysis-Magnetic Circuits.

UNIT-IV ELECTRICAL MACHINES 6


Introduction to three phase quantities-General classification of Electrical Machines,
construction & working of D.C. Machines, A.C.Machines& Transformer-Basic
Equations-Applications

UNIT-V POWER GENERATION & ENERGY SOURCES 6


Single line diagram of Power system, Thermal & Nuclear Power Plant-fuel cell,
Renewable Energy Sources -Solar, wind & Hydro power plant structure, Energy
Storage, super capacitor–Battery-Types - rating, testing & troubleshooting.

Total = 30 Periods
d. Learning Resources

i. TEXT BOOKS:-
1. S. K. Sahdev, Basic Electrical Engineering, Pearson India; 2017.
2. S. Sivanagaraju, Dr P.K Dhal "Basic Electrical Engineering” Cengage Learning,
2nd Edition, 2015.
3. B.L.Thereja “Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering and Electronics”,
S.Chand, 2006 Edition, Reprint 2014.

ii. REFERENCE BOOKS:-


1. Smarajit Ghosh, "Fundamentals of Electrical and Electronics Engineering", PHI
Learning Private Ltd, 2nd Edition, 2010.
2. Wadhwa.C.L, "Basic Electrical Engineering", New Age International, 4th
Edition, 2007. (Reprint June 2010)
4. T. Thyagarajan, ―Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering, SciTech
Publications, 5th Edition, Reprint Jan 2010.

e. Sample assessment questions:


(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)

Course Outcome 1(CO1):


1. State why is wiring estimation needed?
2. If John uses a window fan (200 watts) 4 hours a day for 120 days per year, how
much does it cost him to run his fan per year? Assume 1 rupee/Kwh
3. What type of wiring system is commonly used for light/fan load in domestic
and commercial buildings?
4. Define fuse link.
5. Explain the operation of voltmeter and ammeter in AC circuits
6. Explain the different types of earthing.

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Define temperature coefficient of resistance
2. Define capacitance
3. Calculate the effective value of the current waveform shown in figure.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Check if KVL is satisfied for the given circuit

2. When a pure inductance is connected across a AC supply explain and show


the relation between current and voltage.
3. Two identical coils A and B, each having 750 turns, lie in parallel planes. A
current changing at the rate of 500 A/s in A induces an emf of 11.25 V in B.
Calculate the mutual inductance of the arrangement. If the self inductance of
the coil is 15 mH, calculate the flux produced in coil A per ampere and the
percentage of flux which links the turns of B.

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Define armature
2. Explain about the operation of DC generator
3. Differentiate core and shell type transformer

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. List the types of renewable energy sources
2. Explain the working of thermal power plant
3. A battery has a capacity of 4000 mAh and can dissipate 1 A of current.
Calculate the potential difference across the terminals of the battery and
suggest at least two supportive points of using this battery on mobile
devices.
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150CE101 BASIC CIVIL ENGINEERING 2 0 0 2

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: To provide the understanding the fundamental concepts of Civil


Engineering

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Describe the different construction materials available K1

Describe the various components involved in building


CO2 K1
construction.
Identify the criteria’s and standards involved in design
CO3 K2
of buildings
Explain the water supply and sanitary systems in a
CO4 K2
building
Explain about surveying and components of different
CO5 K3
types of transportation

c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT- I BUILDING MATERIALS 6
Introduction - Civil Engineering - Materials: Bricks - composition – classifications -
properties -uses. Stone - classification of building stones - quarrying - dressing -
properties -uses. Timber - properties -uses -ply wood. Cement - grades -types -
properties -uses. Steel - types - mild steel - medium steel - hard steel -properties -
uses - market forms. Concrete - grade designation – properties - uses- Advancements
in concrete – prestressed concrete - prefabricated concrete.

UNIT-II BUILDING COMPONENTS 6


Building - selection of site - classification - components. Foundations -functions -
classifications - bearing capacity. Flooring - requirements – selection - types -
cement concrete marble - terrazzo floorings. Roof - types and requirements.
UNIT-III PLANNING ASPECTS & REGULATIONS 6
Building types & design criteria - Space standards for residential, commercial &
institutional categories. Building bye laws applicable for approval by the local
governing body. Development control rules for Chennai metropolitan area – basic
guidelines for earthquake resistant structures.

UNIT-IV WATER SUPPLY AND SANITARY SYSTEMS 6


Water supply - objective - quantity of water - sources - standards of drinking water -
distribution system. Sewage - classification - technical terms - septic tank -
components and functions. Lay out of external services -water supply- sewage
disposal- water supply & plumbing layout for a residential building

UNIT-V SURVEYING AND TRANSPORTATION 6


Surveying - objectives - classification - principles of survey. Transportation -
classification - cross section and components of road - classification of roads.
Railway - cross section and components of permanent way -functions. Water
way - docks and harbor - classifications - components. Bridge - components of
bridge.
Total Periods = 30

d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
1. Edward Allen , Joseph Iano “Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials
and Methods”, 5th Edition – December 10, 2008
2. BirdieG.S. and BirdieJS.” Water supply and Sanitary Engineering” Dhanpatrai
publishers Delhi, 6th Edition,2002.
3. James Williamson “Surveying & Field Work; A Practical Text-Book on
Surveying, Levelling & Setting-Out” - Paperback – Import, 1 May 2012

ii. Reference:
1. Rangwala .S.C,” Engineering Material”s, Charotar Publishing House, Anand,
2012.
2. NatarajanK.V. – Basic Civil Engineering, M/s Dhanalakshmi, Chennai – 2012
3. Raju .K.V.B, Ravichandran .P.T, “Basics of Civil Engineering”, Ayyappa
Publications, Chennai, 2012.
4. National Building Code of India, Part V, “Building Materials”, 2005

iii. Online resources


 NPTEL lectures
e. Sample assessment questions:
(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Classify bricks based on the type of manufacturing.
2. Write notes on the properties and uses of timber.
3. List the different types of concrete.

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Enlist the points to be kept in mind during site selection for construction of a
building.
2. Define bearing capacity of soil.
3. Write short notes on the types of floorings.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Discuss briefly the design criteria for a commercial building.
2. Explain the Building Bye Laws to be followed for approval by local governing
bodies.
3. List a few guidelines to be followed during construction to make the structure
earthquake resistant

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. What is the objective of water supply system?
2. Explain the components and functions of a septic tank with neat Sketch.
3. Sketch the layout for water supply and plumbing for a residential building

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. List the objectives of surveying
2. Sketch the cross section of a WBM road
3. Define permanent way.
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
BASIC
1150ME101 2 0 0 2
MECHANICALENGINEERING

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble :This course deals with the basic concepts of Mechanical Engineering
such as manufacturing, internal combustion engine and power plants.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Describe various manufacturing techniques and
CO1 K2
joining processes.
CO2 Describe the power transmitting elements. K2
CO3 Illustrate the principles of Internal Combustion Engine K2
CO4 Describe the principles of various power plants K2
Illustrate the working principle of thermal Power
CO5 K2
cycles and Refrigeration

c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT-I MANUFACTURING TECHNIQUES AND MACHINE TOOLS
6
Introduction to Lathe and its operations, Drilling, Metal Joining Processes - Welding
processes - Arc & Gas welding – Sheet metal working - Brazing and soldering, Spot
welding, Smithy.

UNIT-II MACHINE ELEMENTS 6


Helical and leaf springs, Cams, Types of cams and followers, Gears (spur, helical and
bevel gears, gear trains). Belt drives (types). Chain drives

UNIT-III INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 6


Introduction to Otto cycle and Diesel cycle, Principle of Internal and external
combustion engines – Petrol engine, diesel engine,Two stroke and four stroke of
both CI & SI engines, emission control.
UNIT-IV POWER PLANT ENGINEERING 6
Introduction and classification of power plants – Working of thermal, hydroelectric,
diesel, nuclear power plants. Tidal Power Plant, Geo-Thermal. Introduction to steam
and gas turbines.

UNIT-V THERMAL AND REFRIGERATION CYCLES 6


Basics of thermal power cycles – Carnot cycle. Introduction to Refrigeration– Non
cyclic & Cyclic Refrigeration - Principle of vapour compression refrigeration system -
Principle of Vapour absorption refrigeration system. - Applications. Air-
Conditioning – Layout of typical domestic refrigerator – Window and Split,
centralised type Air conditioner – Applications.
Total: 30 Periods
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
1. Cambell J. S., Principles of Manufacturing Materials and Processes 14th
Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, Inc, New Delhi, 2013.
2. Rao P. N., Manufacturing Technology, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill Inc,
New Delhi 2014.

ii. Reference:
1. Mylsamy,Wickert, Mathiyalagan P, – Basic Mechanical Engineering, Cengage
Learning, 2015
2. P K Nag., - Basic Mechanical Engineering, Tata McGraw Hill Education, 2013.
3. HajraChoudhary, “Principles of Manufacturing Technology”, Media Promoters,
Volume 1, 2013
4. G. Shanmugam, M S Palanichamy, “Basic Civil and Mechanical Engineering”,
Tata McGraw Hill, Inc, New Delhi, 2014

iii. Online resources


1. https://legacy.saylor.org/me101/Intro/

e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Write the components of the lathe. (K1)
2. Write the various operations performed in the lathe. (K2)
3. List out the differences between brazing and soldering. (K1)
Course Outcome 2 (CO2):
1. What are the functions of springs? (K1)
2. What are the functions of gears? (K1)
3. Describe the application of bevel gear. (K2)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Differentiate between internal and external combustion engines. (K2)
2. What is the significance of spark plug ? (K2)
3. What are all the stages of internal combustion engines ? (K1)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Explain about the principle of water hammer in hydro electric power plant. (K2)
2. Describe with neat sketch working principle of hydro electric power plant. (K2)
3. Describe with neat sketch working principle of nuclear electric power plant.
(K2)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. List out the various types of refrigerants used. (K1)
2. What are the components of vapour compression refrigeration system?(K1)
3. Explain the working principle of compressor. (K2)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150ME103 ENGINEERING MATERIALS 2 0 0 2

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble :To understand the properties of ferrous, non-ferrous alloys, ceramic


materials, polymer and composite with special emphasis on various engineering
applications.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
K2
CO1 Explain about the different types of metals
Explain the properties and applications of high
CO2 K2
temperature materials.
Explain the types of ceramics for engineering
CO3 K2
applications
Explain the molecular structure of polymers and the
CO4 K2
types of composites for engineering applications.
CO5 Identify the special materials for various applications K2

c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT-I METALLIC MATERIALS 6
Introduction to different types of Metals -Carbon Steels, Cast Iron, Stainless Steels,
Dual Phase steels, High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels, TRIP Steels, Maraging
steel- Types, properties and applications-Aluminum, Copper, Titanium and Nickel -
Types, properties and applications.

UNIT- II HIGH TEMPERATURE MATERIALS 6


Introduction to High temperature Materials, Super Alloys – Nickel based, Cobalt
based and Iron based Super alloys – properties and applications. Oxide Dispersion
strengthened Materials, High Temperature Stainless steel - properties and applications.
UNIT- III CERAMIC MATERIALS 6
Introduction to Ceramic Materials, Glass Ceramics, Clay Ceramics, Refractory
Ceramics - Properties and Applications. Advanced Ceramics –
MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS), Optical Fibers, Ceramic ball Bearings-
properties and applications.

UNIT- IV POLYMERS AND COMPOSITES MATERIALS 6


Polymer structure, Thermosets and Thermoplastics, Polymerization, Molecule
structure – Poly Ethylene (PE), Poly Propylene(PP), Poly Tetra Fluoro Ethylene
(PTFE), Polystyrene (PS) – properties and applications. Introduction to Composite
Materials – Metal Matrix Composites, Polymer Matrix Composites and Ceramic
Matrix Composites- properties and applications.

UNIT- V SPECIAL MATERIALS 6


Introduction to nano materials -Carbon Nano Tubes(CNT), Introduction to Bio-
Materials, Graphene, Smart Materials - Shape Memory Alloy, Fundamentals of
Semiconductor Materials, Basics of Magnetic Materials and Opto Electronic Materials
– properties and applications.
Total: 30 Periods
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
T1.S. Mohan, Sujin. P. Jose, V. Arjunan, M. Kanchana Mala, Principles of
Materials Science, MJP Publishers, 2016.
T2. William D. Callister, Jr., Materials Science and Engineering an Introduction,
2nd Edition , John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2013.
T3. F.N.Billmayer, Test Book of Polymer Science, John Wiley & Sons, New York,
2006.

ii. Reference:
1. V.Raghavan, Materials Science and Engineering, Prentice –Hall of India Pvt.
Ltd.,2012
2. W.Bolton, Engineering materials technology, 3rd Edition, Butterworth &
Heinemann,2012.
3. Donald R. Askeland, Pradeep P. Phule, The Science and Engineering of
Materials 5thEdition,Thomson Learning, First Indian Reprint, 2007.
4. Kingery W. D., Bowen, H. K., Ulhmen D. R., Introduction to Ceramics, 2nd
Edition, John Wiley, 2013
5. Shigley’s Mechanical Engineering Design, Budynas and Nisbett, 8th
Ed.,McGraw-Hill, 2013.
iii. Online resources
URL 1: http://nptel.ac.in/courses/113106032/16%20-
%20Properties%20and%20Applications%20of%20Materials.pdf
URL 2: http://www.slideshare.net/evansanders25/dual-phase-steels-1?related=4
http://www.slideshare.net/evansanders25/dual-phase-steels-13049343?related=2
URL 3: http://www.slideshare.net/N.Prakasan/hsla-steels?related=1
URL 4: http://www.slideshare.net/AjiBajiSoji/trip-steel?related=3
URL 5: http://www.stainless-steel-world.net/pdf/12007.pdf?resourceId=326
URL 6:
https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&
uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwi9u-
CHuZnKAhWHXSwKHe_MDe4QFggyMAM&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mychhs.
colostate.edu%2FCharles.W.Smith%2FReference%2520materials%2FLecture%25205
%2520Non%2520Ferrous%2520Metals%2520%2520Properties.ppt&usg=AFQjCNEx
kOrvYJwq5uuewy6ZezoVo7wF7w&bvm=bv.110151844,d.bGg
URL 7: http://www.slideshare.net/SREEKRISHNA6/high-temperature-materials-
super-alloys-ppt?related=1
URL 8: http://www.slideshare.net/N.Prakasan/superalloys-22683088
file:///D:/Engineering%20Materials/superalloys.pdf
URL 9: http://www.powershow.com/view/3e3bff-MDRjO/Nickel-
based_Superalloys_powerpoint_ppt_presentation
http://www.slideshare.net/soorajsasthamcotta/nickel-and-titanium-alloys?related=2
URL 10:
https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&
uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiXq6aB1JnKAhXDDywKHeudDgIQFggnMAE&url=http%3
A%2F%2Felse.uctm.edu%2Fusers%2F3200%2FHPA_4_Nickel-
based%2520Superalloys.ppt&usg=AFQjCNHE0wSxhAcVCtJLHruJXJeaMihDKw&b
vm=bv.110151844,d.bGg
URL 11: http://www.steelforge.com/literature/ferrousnon-ferrous-materials-
textbook/ferrous-metals/iron-based-superalloys/
URL 12:
http://web.ornl.gov/sci/physical_sciences_directorate/mst/fusionreactor/pdf/june2004/
3_FERRITIC/Klueh.pdf
URL 13: http://nptel.ac.in/courses/113106032/16%20-
%20Properties%20and%20Applications%20of%20Materials.pdf
URL 14:
https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=7&cad=rja&
uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwi80cXx0JnKAhWF1ywKHX5fCu8QFghAMAY&url=http%3
A%2F%2Fwww.me.utexas.edu%2F~lishi%2FL18.ppt&usg=AFQjCNHz6fvloTQJ35x
w3g_7rYb6JIt84w
URL 15:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nD9y4F-fyXU
URL 16:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2KCs_lBKWU
URL 17:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11PynxAhebs
URL 18:
http://www.nptel.ac.in/courses/118104008/
URL 19:
https://www.ttu.ee/public/m/Mehaanikateaduskond/Instituudid/Materjalitehnika_instit
uut/MTX9100/Lecture9_Nanotubes.pdf
URL 20:
http://nptel.ac.in/courses/104103019/module1/lec5/5.html
URL 21:http://nptel.ac.in/courses/104103019/5
URL 22:http://nptel.ac.in/courses/112104173/
URL 23:http://nptel.ac.in/courses/113105057/22
URL 24:
http://nptel.ac.in/courses/112104040/pdf/lecture34.pdf
URL 25:
http://nptel.ac.in/courses/113106032/16%20-
%20Properties%20and%20Applications%20of%20Materials.pdf
URL 26:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhn188JafbM
URL 27:
https://www.google.co.in/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&
uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjttN_rw5nKAhXEhSwKHQM4AP4QFggzMAM&url=http%3
A%2F%2Fresearch.che.tamu.edu%2Fgroups%2FSeminario%2Fnanotechnology%2Fn
ano_ch18_magnetic.ppt&usg=AFQjCNFfDhpiWcTHex0hjy_ah7FLyIyebA&sig2=jfd
2i93ZFGY8lUFV3OjgKQ&bvm=bv.110151844,d.bGg
URL 28:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtAcrB9JrhA
URL 29:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZKdFVAJcrE
e. Sample assessment questions:
Course Outcome 1 (CO1):
1. Classify the different types of carbon steels (K1)
2. What are the application of HSLA steels? (K1)
3. Distinguish Dual phase steels and Duplex stainless steels (K2)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Explain the benefits of High temperature Materials. (K2)
2. Identify which strengthening mechanisms are associated with Oxide Dispersion
strengthening materials. (K2)
3. What are the advantages of Super alloys? (K1)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Distinguish ceramic materials with cermets (K2)
2. List out the application of Refractory Ceramics. (K1)
3. Explain the MEMS. (K2)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Compare Thermoplastics and Thermosets (K2)
2. Define Polymerization. (K1)
3. Distinguish Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) and Metal Matrix Composites
(MMC). (K2)
Course Outcome 5 (CO5):
1. What are advantages of Nano Materials? (K1)
2. Identify which Shape Memory Alloys will be used for medical applications (K3)
3. List some applications of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNT) (K1)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
PROJECT MANAGEMENT
1150MG101 3 0 0 3
AND FINANCE

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course provides an in-depth insight into the concepts, principles,
formulation of projects and network techniques of project management. The
appraisal Techniques to evaluate the projects which could be successfully used for
improving the quality of managerial decisions. The students will study this course
with a generalist approach.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO (Based on revised
Course Outcomes
Nos. Bloom’s
Taxonomy)
To Explain the project management principles and
CO1 K2
philosophy
To Understand the project environment through
CO2 K2
feasibility study.
To make students familiarize to identify the investment
CO3 K2
opportunities and to formulate the projects.
CO4 To Discuss the development of project network-Time K2
Estimation
Explain the importance of capital budgeting techniques-
CO5 K2
NPV, IRR

c. COURSE SYLLABUS
UNIT I :BASICS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT:
Nature- Need for Project Management-types of projects-Project Management
Knowledge Areas and Processes- project skills-The role of Project Manager -Project
Management Processes- Impact of Delays in Project Completions- Essentials of
Project Management Philosophy-Project Management Principles.
UNIT-II: PROJECT FEASIBILITY STUDIES:
Opportunity studies-General opportunity studies-specific opportunity studies-pre-
feasibility studies-functional studies or support studies-feasibility study – components
of project feasibility studies – Managing Project resources flow– Project Life Cycle –
Project constraints.

Unit III: IDENTIFICATION AND FORMATION


Project environment – Identification of investment opportunities – Projects screening
– Project selection – Project formulation – Stages in project formulation – Project
report preparation.

Unit IV:PURCHASING, CONTRACTING, NETWORK MODELS


Introduction-Purchase Cycle-Contract Management-Procurement Process-
Development of Project Network-Time Estimation, Determination of the Critical Path-
PERT Model-Measures of variability-CPM Model-Network Cost System.

Unit V: PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER CERTAINTY


Objectives, essentials of a project methodology – Market appraisal – Technical
appraisal – Financial appraisal –capital budgeting-Capital budgeting process-
Techniques of project Appraisal and their applications- NPV-IRR-Pay Back period-
Make or buy decisions-Lease or buy decisions-socio-economic appraisal-Management
appraisal.

d. Learning Resources

i. Recommended Text book


1) PK. Joy “Total Project Management The Indian context”, Mac Milan India Ltd.,
2) R. Panneerselvam and P. Senthil Kumar “Project Management” PHI learning
India PVT Ltd.,
3) Bhavesh .M Patel, “Project Management” Vikas Publishing Hous PVT Ltd.,
4) S. Choudhury “Project Management” Tata McGraw Hill Co.
5) CIDO I Clements “Project Management India” Cengage learning.
6) Prasanna Chandra “Projects, Planning, analysis, selection financing,
Implementation and Review” Tata McGraw Hill Co.

ii. Suggested Readings


1) CCI P for D.F. Gray and Erik .w Carson “Project Management” Tata McGraw
Hill Co.
2) Project Management – Management extra series – ANE books
3) P. Gopalakrishnan& VE. Ramamoorthy “Project Management” Macmillan
India Ltd.
4) Erik W Larson and Clifford F Gray “Project Management – The Managerial
Process” Mc Graw Hill/Irwin Series, Fifth Edition.

e. Sample assessment questions:


(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Explain the Project Management Principles. (K2)
2. Write a Short notes on Project Management Philosophy. (K1)
3. Explain the role of project manager. (K2)
Course Outcome 2 (CO2):
1. Define Feasibility study. (K1)
2. Briefly explain the components of project feasibility study. (K2)
3. Discuss the stages of project lifecycle. (K2)
Course Outcome 3 (CO3):
1. Mention the sources of investment opportunities. (K2)
2. Write a note on project environment. (K2)
3. Explain the stages in project formulation. (K1)
Course Outcome 4 (CO4):
1. Discuss about the development of project network techniques. (K2)
2. Write a short note on procurement process. (K2)
3. Write in detail about the measures of variability in project management. (K1)
Course Outcome 5 (CO5):
1. Write short notes on IRR. (K1)
2. Discuss about the Capital Budgeting process.(K2)
3. What is meant by make or buy decisions. Explain (K1)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
BIOLOGY FOR
1150GE101 2 0 0 2
ENGINEERS

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: To provide the Basic Organization of Organisms and Knowledge about


Biological Science for Engineers to understand biology for Engineering problems.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Explain the Morphology and chemical composition of
CO1 the cell and function of each organelle present in the K2
cell with the help of microscope.
Explain the process of human physiological system
CO2 K2
and its cell functioning.
Explain the importance of microbiology and
CO3 immunological science to know the reactions of our K2
body.
Discuss the biological science related to the different
CO4 K2
disciplinary areas.
Explain the importance of genetics and how
CO5 K2
bioscience is related to other technical areas.
c. Course Syllabus :

UNIT I – CELL BIOLOGY 6


Introduction to the cell biology – Cell size and shape - Chemical composition -
Classification of cell and its properties; Cell membrane- Nucleus –Mitochondria-
Endoplasmic Reticulum – Lysosome and Peroxisome; Microscopy and its types.

UNIT II – CELL PHYSIOLOGY 6


Cell cycle; Cell signaling, Transport across cell membrane; Introduction to Human
physiology – Circulatory system - Respiratory system - Excretory system - Nervous
system.

UNIT III – IMMUNOLOGICAL SCIENCE 6


Immune system and its types; Functional properties of antibodies; Helper T cells and
T cell activation; Importance of Microbiology.

UNIT IV – IMPLEMENTATION OF BIO-NANO SCIENCE 6


NanoBiomolecules and its various types; Principles and Application of Biosensor;
Basics of Biochips – Bio fertilizer – Bioinformatics – Bio fuel.

UNIT V – ADVANCES IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 6


Fundamentals of Bio mechanics - Neural Network - Stem Cell; Introduction to
Genetics; Genetic Engineering and its Application, Safety Hazardous Effect.

d. Learning Resource:

i. Text Book
1. Dr. Sohini Singh and Dr. Tanu Allen, “Biology for Engineers”, Vayu Education
Of India, New Delhi, 2014.

ii. References
1. Arthur T. Johnson, “Biology for Engineers” CRC Press, 2011.
2. Goldsby RA, Kindt TK, Osborne BA and Kuby J (2003) Immunology, 5th
Edition, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York.

iii. Online resources


i) www.bio12.com/ch3/RaycroftNotes.pdf
ii) www.engineering.uiowa.edu/bme050/cvb-solids.pdf
iii) www.biologyjunction.com/mendelian_genetics.html
e. Sample assessment questions:
(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)
Course Outcome 1 (CO1):
1. Explain the structure of a prokaryotic cell with diagrammatic representations. (K2)
2. Write a Short note on Mitochondria? (K1)
3. Explain the Principles and Application of SEM? (K2)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Define Action Potential? (K1)
2. Briefly explain the process of circulatory system. (K2)
3. Discuss about the human central nervous system? (K2)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Mention the functional properties of Antibodies. (K2)
2. Write a note on immune system and its types? (K2)
3. Explain the benefits of Bacteria and its applications. (K1)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Discuss about the various types of Nanomolecules in Biomedical science. (K2)
2. Write a short note on first generation of Biofuel. (K2)
3. Write in detail about the components of Bioinformatics. (K1)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. Write a short notes on Radiation safety hazards? (K1)
2. Discuss about the concepts in Biomechanics.(K2)
3. What are Stem cells? Write their characteristics and applications.(K1)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150GE102 DESIGN THINKING 3 0 0 3

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and


techniques of engineering and reverse engineering, process of design, analytical
thinking and ideas, basics and development of engineering drawing, application of
engineering drawing with computer aide.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Appreciate various design process procedure K2
Generate and develop design ideas through different
CO2 K2
technique
Identify the significance of reverse Engineering to
CO3 K2
Understand products
CO4 Draw technical drawing for design ideas K3

c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT I PROCESS OF DESIGN 9
Introduction – Product Life Cycle - Design Ethics - Design Process - Four Step - Five
Step - Twelve Step - Creativity and Innovation in Design Process - Design limitation.

UNIT II GENERATING AND DEVELOPING IDEAS 9


Introduction - Create Thinking - Generating Design Ideas - Lateral Thinking –
Anologies – Brainstorming - Mind mapping - National Group Technique – Synectics -
Development of work - Analytical Thinking - Group Activities Recommended.

UNIT III REVERSE ENGINEERING 9


Introduction - Reverse Engineering Leads to New Understanding about Products -
Reasons for Reverse Engineering - Reverse Engineering Process - Step by Step - Case
Study.
UNIT IV BASICS OF DRAWING TO DEVELOP DESIGN IDEAS 9
Introduction - Many Uses of Drawing - Communication through Drawing - Drawing
Basis – Line - Shape/ Form – Value – Colour – Texture - Practice using Auto CAD
recommended.

UNIT V TECHNICAL DRAWING TO DEVELOP DESIGN 9


Introduction - Perspective Drawing - One Point Perspective - Two Point Perspective -
Isometric Drawing - Orthographic Drawing - Sectional Views - Practice using Auto
CAD recommended.

d. Learning Resources
i.Text Books :
John.R.Karsnitz, Stephen O’Brien and John P. Hutchinson, “Engineering Design”,
Cengage learning (International edition) Second Edition, 2013.

ii. References:
Yousef Haik and Tamer M.Shahin, “Engineering Design Process”, Cengage
Learning, Second Edition, 2011.

iii. Online resources


www.tutor2u.net/business/presentations/.../productlifecycle/default.html
https://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11108_02/otn/pdf/.../E11087_01.pdf
www.bizfilings.com › Home › Marketing › Product Developmen
https://www.mindtools.com/brainstm.html
https://www.quicksprout.com/.../how-to-reverse-engineer-your-competit
www.vertabelo.com/blog/documentation/reverse-engineering
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/273814
https://support.google.com/docs/answer/179740?hl=en
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mjSDIBaUlM
thevirtualinstructor.com/foreshortening.html
e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. List the steps in the design process. (K1)
2. Describe in detail the various types of design. (K2)
3. List the design limitations. (K1)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. What are the steps of generation of ideas? (K1)
2. What is creativity thinking? (K1)
3. Describe the development work ideas. (K2)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Describe Reverse Engineering concepts step by step. (K2)
2. Explain Reverse Engineering leads to a new understanding about products. (K2)
3. What are all the case study in Reverse Engineering Process? (K1)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Explain about the communication through Drawing. (K2)
2. Explain with practice using Auto CAD recommended. (K2)
3. Describe with detail about the Technical drawing to develop design ideas. (K2)
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
INTRODUCTION TO
1150GE205 1 0 4 3
ENGINEERING

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course enables students to understand and appreciate the evolution
of engineering and the role of engineers in the society. This course introduces the
basic process of conceive, design, implementation and operation of prototype projects.
The prototypes are simple, yet enable students to go through the process from
identifying user needs to building and testing their designs. The design might include
analysis based on fundamentals learned. The cost of required materials and equipment
is kept minimum through proper design of the task. Students typically work in groups
of three to six practicing communication and teamwork skills.

b. Course Outcomes
Upon the successful completion of the course, learners will be able to
Level of learning
CO
Course Outcomes domain (Based on
Nos.
revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Appreciate the evolution of Engineering K2
CO2 Appreciate the professional roles and responsibilities K2
of engineers
CO3 Identify simple problems related to a given theme and K3
provide engineering solution/innovative solution
using the process of engineering design.
CO4 Handle basic engineering hand / power tools vis-à-vis S3
carpentry, sheet metal working, welding, machining
and fabricate the simple models.
CO5 Work in small groups and fabricate the S4
prototypes/product/system/working model
CO6 Prepare a detailed project report to exhibit the work S3
done
CO7 Communicate effectively through presentation. S3
CO8 Identify the sensors and drive systems for a particular K3
application.
K2 – Understand K3 – Apply S3 – Skill level, Precision, S4- Skill level, Articulation
c. Correlation of CO’s with Programme Outcomes:
Cos PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H
CO2 H
CO3 H
CO4 H
CO5 L H H L L
CO6 H
CO7 H
CO8 H

d. Course Content

Unit I EVOLUTION OF ENGINEERING L-2


Evolution of Engineering: Description of Engineering, Early stages of Engineering,
Outline of Ancient Engineering, Case studies of historic engineers. Introduction to
Engineering Career: Engineering as a career and common qualities of employable
engineers – History of Engineering domains – Impact of engineering on society.Roles
of Engineers and Career Paths

UNIT II DRIVE SYSTEMS AND SENSING DEVICES L-6


System of Units - Measurement of mass, length, time, Area, volume, force,
temperature, electric current. Simple drive systems - electrical, mechanical,
pneumatic, hydraulic. Applications of the different types of sensors, transducers –
Position sensors (Piezo Electric Sensor, LVDT, Resolvers, Optical Encoders,
Pneumatic Position Sensors), Range Sensors , Laser Range Meters), Proximity
Sensors ,Touch Sensors.

UNIT III ENGINEERING DESIGN PROCESS L-7


Problem definition - Generation of Alternative concepts. Review of Twelve steps
design process. Free hand sketching - Conversion of Isometric drawing of simple
objects into orthographic drawing.

UNIT IV DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF SIMPLE MODELS P-24


Design and fabrication of simple models using Plumbing, Carpentry, Welding, Basic
Machining, Sheet Metal Work. Printed circuit board making, soldering of electronic
components, simple electrical wiring.

List of Simple models:


1. Wooden window
2. Sliding door
3. Wheel chair
4. Machine Vice
5. Crank and slotted link
6. Power supply board
7. Emergency light
8. Bolt and nut assembly
9. Simple and compound Gear train
10.Sheet metal tray
Any three models have to be fabricated to attain the respective outcomes.

UNIT V DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF PROTOTYPES


P-36
Design - designing a prototype project for a specified application – the plans,
drawings, and algorithms that describe the system to be implemented.
Implement and Operate - Transforming the design into a
product/prototype/system/project including hardware, software coding, testing and
validation.Communicate - Report – Presentation.
Total : 75 periods
Reference Books:
1. Paul H. Wright, “Introduction to Engineering”, School of Civil and
Environmental Engineering, 3rd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc,
2. Natarajan K.V, “A text book of Engineering Graphics”,Dhanalakshmi
Publishers, Chennai, 2009.
3. Edward F.Crawley “Rethinking Engineering Education The CDIO
approach” 2nd edition,2014

ONLINE RESOURCES
1. www.ieagreements.org/IEA-Grad-Attr-Prof-Competencies.pdf
2. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/107108010/
3. http://nptel.ac.in/courses/107103012/
4. www.cdio.org

e. Continuous Assessment and Evaluation

Revised Bloom’s based Assessment Pattern: Practical dominated integrated course


The continuous evaluation shall be for a maximum of 40 marks consisting of student’s
performance in the fabrication of simple models. For each model, maximum of 15
marks shall be awarded as per the rubrics shown in the Table.1 . The student will
fabricate three different models of his choice. The average of all the marks for three
models shall be considered for continuous assessment. The rubric shall be informed to
the students well in advance before the evaluation.

For the remaining 25 marks, the students will design , fabricate, implement and
operate a project/prototype and the continuous assessment will be done by the rubrics
shown in the Table.2,3,&4. The rubric shall be informed to the students well in
advance before the evaluation.
1. Continuous Assessment (15 marks) (Unit IV)
Table.1 Rubrics for evaluation of simple models
Likert Scale Excellent (3) Good (2) Satisfactory(1)
Performance
Indicator
Completion of the Fully completed Partially Not completed
model the model completed the the model
model
Dimensional High Medium low
accuracy
Surface finish and High Medium low
appearance
Record of work Neat & relevant Partially neat & Poor & irrelevant
done relevant
Viva voce Answered all the Not answered few Not answer for
queries queries any of the queries

2. Continuous Assessment (25 marks) ( Unit V)


The 25 marks will be awarded based on the Two Reviews and Two Assignments. The
rubrics are given below.

Table.2. Rubrics for Review I of continuous assessment (5 marks)


Likert Scale Excellent (1) Good (0.6) Satisfactory(0.2)
Performance
Indicator
Clarity in the Well understood and Partially understood Poorly understood
project objectives well explained the and explained the and not explained
chosen engineering chosen engineering the chosen
problem problem engineering problem
Adherence to the Explicitly Takes little lengthy Poor addressing of
Theme addressing the route to address the the theme
theme theme
Extent of Fabrication started Fabrication just Fabrication not yet
Implementation and completed started started
halfway
Presentation More relevant More relevant Less relevant
content, good content, moderate content, poor
coherence with coherence with less coherence with
adequate illustrations. inadequate
illustrations. illustrations.
Viva voce Answered for all the Not answered for Not answered for
queries few queries any of the queries

Table.3. Rubrics for Review II of continuous assessment (15 marks)


Likert Scale Excellent (3) Good (2) Satisfactory(1)
Performance
Indicator
Clarity in the Well understood and Partially understood Poorly understood
project well explained the and explained the and not explained
objectives chosen engineering chosen engineering the chosen
problem problem engineering problem
Adherence to Explicitly addressing Takes little lengthy Poor addressing of
the Theme the theme route to address the the theme
theme
Extent of Fabrication Fabrication partially Fabrication not yet
Implementation completed competed started
Presentation More relevant More relevant Less relevant
content, good content, moderate content, poor
coherence with coherence with less coherence with
adequate illustrations. inadequate
illustrations. illustrations.
Viva voce Answered for all the Not answered for Not answered for
queries few queries any of the queries
Table.4. Rubrics for Assignment of continuous assessment (5 marks) (Unit
I,II,&III)
Revised Bloom’s Assignments
Category 1 2
(Unit I & II) (Unit III)
( %) ( %)

Remember 20 10
Understand 20 80
Apply 60
Analyse
Evaluate
Create

g. Semester End / University Examination


The semester end examination shall be conducted for a maximum of 60 marks as per
the rubrics shown in the Table.5. . The rubric shall be informed to the students well in
advance before the evaluation.

Table.5. Rubrics for Semester end / University Examination (60 marks)


Performance
Excellent (10) Good (6) Poor (2)
Indicator
Well understood Partially
Poorly understood
and well understood and
and not explained
Clarity in the explained the explained the
the chosen
project objectives chosen chosen
engineering
engineering engineering
problem
problem problem
Explicitly Takes little
Adherence to the Poor addressing
addressing the lengthy route to
Theme of the theme
theme address the theme
Fabricated Fabricated
Extent of completely with completely but Fabrication not
Implementation good finish as finishing is not completed
product good like product
Tested completely
Tested completely
and working good Tested but not
Extent of Operation and working to
with expected working
some extent
performance
More relevant Less relevant
More relevant
content, good content, poor
content, moderate
coherence with coherence with
Presentation and coherence with
adequate inadequate
viva voce less illustrations
illustrations and illustrations and
and not answered
answered for all not answered for
for few queries
the queries any queries
Well documented Well documented
as per the as per the
guidelines with guidelines but Poorly
Project Report
necessary with lack of documented
illustrations and illustrations and
references references
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150EN201 TECHNICAL ENGLISH 2 0 2 3

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble:This course expands students’ practical language, ability to


communicate effectively in oral and written English in a variety of situations
with the help of vocabulary, grammar and sentence structure. It further
improves students’ ability in the aspects of Listening, Speaking, Reading and
Writing.

b. Course Outcomes :
After the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Write with correct spelling, punctuation and
CO1 K2
grammar
Use appropriate structure and relationship
CO2 K3
amongst ideas
Write precisely and maintain clarity of thought
CO3 K3
concerning with logical and rhetorical factors
Compose e-mail and voice mail using
CO4 electronic/multimedia communication and draft K3
letters.
Develop the process and the elements of
CO5 K3
effective speaking
CO6 Develop Professional and Leadership skills K3
CO7 Prepare presentations with appropriate language,
K3
style, timing and flow
CO8 Evaluate information through listening and
K3
reading comprehension
CO9 Use appropriate nonverbal communications and
K3
answer questions effectively.
CO10 Develop interpersonal skills through group
K3
discussion.

c. Course Syllabus :

63
UNIT-I 6
Lexical Competencies (Vocabulary, Synonyms, Antonyms) - Parts of Speech
Word formation - Tenses - Editing: Language Gaffe

UNIT- II 6
Change of Voice - Concord - Sentence Structure- Conditional Clauses – Cause
and Effect

UNIT- III 6
Idioms - Figures of Speech – Skimming and Scanning- Reading comprehension
-
Note Making - Hints Development

UNIT –IV 6

E-mail - Blogs and Tweets – SMS - Letter writing (formal and Informal) -
Dialogue writing - Question Tag

UNIT- V 6
Process of Communication and factors - Verbal and Non-verbal
Communication - Barriers to Communication - Public speaking- Persuasive
Speech
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS (30)
1. Soft skills
2. Presentation skills
3. Listening and Reading comprehension
4. Interview skills
5. Group discussion
TOTAL = 60 periods

64
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
1. Dr. M. Sambaiah, Technical English, Wiley.

ii. References:
1. Prakash, P R, Verbal and Non-Verbal Reasoning, Macmillan India Ltd.,
Third Edition, New Delhi, 2010.
2. John, Seely. The Oxford Guide to Writing and Speaking, Oxford
University Press, New Delhi2011
3. Murthy, Sudha. Wise & Otherwise. New Delhi: Penguin Books India,
2006.
4. Gates, Bill and Collins Hemingway. Business @ the Speed of Thought:
Succeeding in the Digital Economy. New York: Warner Business
Books, 2000.
5. Meenakshi Raman and Sangeeta Sharma, ‘Technical Communication
English skills for Engineers’, Oxford University Press, 2008.
6. Bailey, Stephen. Academic Writing: A Practical Guide for Students. New
York: Rutledge, 2011.
7. Morgan, David and Nicholas Regan. Take-Off: Technical English for
Engineering. Garnet Publishing Limited. New York: Longman, 2008.
8. Ganesan. S, Persis Mary T &Subhashini.B. Communication in English,
Himalaya Publishing House, Mumbai, 2009.
9. Pickett, Nell Ann, Ann A.Laster and Katherine E.Staples. Technical
English: Writing, Reading and Speaking. New York: Longman, 2009.

iii. Web Resources


http://www.lonestar.edu/useful-websites-for-students.htm
www.english-for-students.com/
www.britishcouncil.org
www.sfsu.edu/~puboff/onestop.htm
www.uefap.com
www.eslcafe.com
www.listen-to-english.com
www.owl.english.purdue.edu

65
Software installed in the lab
1. GLOBARENA

e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Fill in the blank spaces below with the appropriate forms of the word:
NOUN ADJECTIVE VERB
Pollution Polluted
Occupational Occupy
Imagination Imagine
Movement Move
2. Write ten Collective Nouns.
3. Directions: What part of speech is each word in the following sentence?
The tall man was very quiet.

The - _________________________ tall -


_________________________
man - _________________________ was -
_________________________
very - _________________________ quiet -
_________________________

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. Change from Passive into Active Voice:
a. It was answered when I was out.
b. All these letters must be signed.
c. He must have been terribly disappointed.
d. She was brought up by an old lady.

2. Circle the correct verb in each of the sentences below.


a. Margo and her parents (visit-visits) each other often.
b. Either the cups or the glasses (are-is) in the dishwasher.
c. Vern and Fred (need-needs) a ride to work.
d. There (is-are) a dog, a cat, and a bird in the garage.

3. Complete the following sentences:


a.If I were a king, ____________________
b.____________ , he would have won the prize.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


66
1. Define Oxymoron with an example
2. Read the following passage and answer the questions below:
There was a farmer in a village. He had three sons. They always
quarrelled with one another. The father was not happy about their
behaviour. He tried hard to bring them into union. All his efforts ended in
vain. The father was getting old also. He was worried and he called his
sons. He begged them to stop fighting but his sons did not listen to him.
They continued their quarrel. One day, the father fell ill. He called his
sons, “My dear sons, I have nothing to leave behind you except this piece
of field. If you work together in the garden, you will make your living.”
Even that did not stop them from quarrelling with each other. The father
was depressed. 39 Suddenly, the farmer got an idea. He called out his
sons and asked each of them to bring two sticks of same height and
thickness. When they returned with the sticks, the farmer took one stick
from each of them and tied the three sticks together. Then he asked them
to break the single stick with their hands. The brothers broke their sticks
very easily. Then, the farmer gave the bundle of sticks to the first son. He
asked him to break the bundle. He tried to break it but could not. The
second and the third sons too tried it. They also could not break the
bundle. Thus, the father made his sons realise the importance of
“UNITY”.
Questions:
a. How many sons did the farmer have?
b. What did the farmer ask his sons to bring?
c. Why was it difficult for them to break the bundle?
d. Did the father succeed in his effort?
e. Complete: Unity..............................
3. Develop the hints into a readable passage:
A bee – falls into a tank – a dove flies past – drops a large leaf into the water
– the bee climbs on the leaf – flies away – a boy takes aim at the dove – the
bee stings – the dove is saved.

67
Course Outcome 4 (CO4):
1. Write ten dialogue exchanges between a customer and a shop keeper on
purchasing a book that is in demand.
2. Write a letter to your friend congratulating him for getting through IAS
examination.
3. Explain in details the objectives to be followed while writing
memorandum and minutes.
Course Outcome 5 (CO5):
1. Explain the difference between verbal and nonverbal communication.
2. Imagine you will have to persuade a client into buying an electronic
gadget designed by your company. Draft a persuasive speech for the
situation. Invent necessary details.
3. What are the main components of communication process?

68
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150MA201 APPLIED STATISTICS 2 0 2 3

Course Category: Foundation.

a. Preamble: This course is an introductory to applied statistics for


undergraduate students in engineering sciences. Statistical methods are
important tools which provide the engineer with both descriptive and
analytical methods for dealing with the variability in observed data. It
introduces students to cognitive learning in statistics; and develops skills on
analyzing the data by using different tests and designing the experiments
with several factors.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Identify the role that statistics can play in the
engineering problem-solving process, discuss the
K3
different methods that engineers use to collect data
and, construct and interpret visual data displays
CO2 Compute and interpret the descriptive statistics,
correlation coefficient and rank correlation
K3
coefficient, use simple linear regression model to
engineering data.
CO3 Explain various sampling methods, compute and
explain point estimators and interval estimators for K3
mean, variance and proportion
CO4 Structure engineering decision-making problems as
hypothesis tests, use z-test, t-test, chi-square and F-
test to test the statistical hypotheses, p-value
K3
approach for making decisions in hypothesis tests,
explain and use the relationship between
confidence interval and hypothesis tests.
CO5 How the analysis of variance (one-way and two-
way) is used to analyze the data from engineering
K3
experiments and apply CRD, RBD and CSD in
Engineering problems.

69
c. Course Syllabus : L- 30 + P-20 = 50
hrs

UNIT-I L- 6 + P-
4
The Role of Statistics in Engineering : The Engineering Method and
Statistical Thinking - Collecting Engineering Data - Basic Principles -
Retrospective Study - Observational Study - Designed Experiments -Observing
Processes Over Time - Mechanistic and Empirical Models
Data Description and Representation: Collection of data- Classification and
Tabulation of data - Stem-and-Leaf Diagrams - Frequency Distributions and
Histograms - Box Plots - Time Sequence Plots - Probability Plots .

UNIT-II L- 6 + P-
4
Descriptive Statistics: Measures of central Tendency-Measures of Dispersion-
Skewness and Kurtosis. Correlation and Regression: Scatter Diagram –
Types of Correlation – Karl Pearsons Coefficient of Correlation and Spearmen’s
Rank Correlations- Method of Least Squares – Linear Regression.

UNIT-III L- 6 + P-
4
Sampling: Different types of sampling - Sampling Distributions - Sampling
Distribution of Mean.
Point Estimation of Parameters: General Concepts of Point Estimation -
Unbiased Estimators -Variance of a Point Estimator - Standard Error- Methods
of Point Estimation (Method of Moments - Method of Maximum Likelihood).
Statistical Intervals for a Single Sample: Confidence Interval on the Mean of
a Normal Distribution with Variance Known - Confidence Interval on the Mean
of a Normal Distribution with Variance Unknown - Confidence Interval on the
Variance and Standard Deviation of a Normal Distribution - A Large-Sample
Confidence Interval for a Population Proportion

UNIT-IV L- 6 + P-
4
Tests of Hypotheses for a Single Sample: Tests of Statistical Hypotheses -
General Procedure for Hypothesis Testing –Tests on the Mean of a Normal
Distribution with Variance Known - Tests on the Mean of a Normal
Distribution with Variance Unknown - Tests on the Variance and Standard
Deviation of a Normal Distribution.
Statistical Inference for Two Samples: Inference For a Difference in Means
of Two Normal Distributions with Variances Known - Inference For a
Difference in Means of Two Normal Distributions with Variances Unknown -

70
Inference on the Variances of Two Normal Distributions – Inference on Two
Population Proportions.

UNIT-V L- 6 + P-
4
The Analysis of Variance: Concept-Assumptions-One way classification and
two-way classifications.
Designing Engineering Experiments –Concept of Randomization, Replication
and local control - Completely Randomized Design -Randomized Block Design
–Latin square Design.

SOFT STATISTICAL COMPUTATIONAL LABORATORY


1. Construction of Univariate and Bivariate frequency tables with samples
of sizes not exceeding 200.
2. Diagrammatic and Graphical representation of data.
3. Computation of Measures of Central tendency, Measures of Dispersion,
Skewness and Kurtosis.
4. Computation of Simple Correlation and Regression Coefficients.
5. Fitting of discrete distributions – Binomial, Poisson,
6. Fitting of continuous distributions – Normal distribution
7. Drawing samples of size not exceeding 25 from normal population with
known mean and variance using random number tables.
8. Problems based on MLE
9. Problems based on t-distribution, chi-square distribution and F-
distribution
10.Test of Independence attributes (m,n≤5)
11.Test for Homogeneity of several population variances.
12.Tests of significance with regard to Single Mean, Two Means,
13.Construction of Confidence intervals for Mean, Variance and Proportion
based on Normal, t, Chi-square and F distributions.
14.Analysis of Variance (One way and two-way classifications)
15.Analysis of CRD, RBD, and LSD.

71
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books
1. Douglas C. Montgomery and George C. Runger. Applied Statistics and
Probability for Engineers, (3rdEdn), John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New
York, 2003.
2. Robert H. Carver and Jane Gradwohl Nash. Doing Data Analysis with
SPSS Version 18.0, (Indian Edition), Cengage Learning, New Delhi, 2012
3. Richard A. Johnson and C.B.Gupta, Probability and Statistics for
Engineers, (7thEdn.), Pearson Education, Indian Impression 2006.

ii. Reference:
1. Mohammed A.Shayib. Applied Statistics, First Edition. eBook,
Bookboon.com 2013.
2. Peter R.Nelson, Marie Coffin, Copeland Kanen, A.F. Introductory
Statistics for Engineering Experimentation, Elsevier Science and
Technology Books, New York, 2003.
3. Sheldon M. Ross, Introduction to Probability and Statistics, (3rdEdn),
Elsevier Science and Technology Books, New York, 2004.
4. T.T.Soong, Fundamentals of Probability and Statistics for Engineers,
John Wiley and Sons, Ltd., New York, 2004.
5. J.P.Marques de Sá , Applied Statistics using SPSS, STATISTICA,
MATLAB and R, (2ndEdn.), Springer Verlag, Heidelberg, 2007.

iii. Online resources


http://apus.libguides.com
www.mii.lt
www.sosmath.com
www.macalester.edu
www.nptel.iitm.ac.in
www.purplemath.com

72
e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 [CO1]


1. [CO1 K1] Distinguish between retrospective study and observational
study.
2. [CO1 K2] What do you understand by Stem-and-Leaf diagram? State the
Steps for constructing a Stem-and-Leaf Diagram
3. [CO1 K3] The pull-off force for a connector is measured in a laboratory
test. Data for 40 test specimens follow (read down, then left to right)
241 255 198 185
245 258 199 187
235 237 183 218
220 210 213 190
249 194 236 175
251 225 245 178
238 248 209 175
210 203 212 190
(a) Construct a time series plot of the data. (b) Construct and interpret a
digidotplot .

Course Outcome 2 [CO2]


1. [CO2 K1] Define skewness and kurtosis.
2. [CO2 K2] The following data are the temperatures of effluent at
discharge from a sewage treatment facility on consecutive days:
43 47 51 48 52 50 46 49
45 52 46 51 44 49 46 51
49 45 44 50 48 50 49 50
Calculate the sample mean and median.
3. [CO2 K3] Regression methods were used to analyze the data from a study
investigating the
relationship between roadway surface temperature (x) and
pavement
deflection(y).
Summary quantities were 𝑛 = 20, ∑ 𝑦𝑖 = 12.75, ∑ 𝑦𝑖2 = 8.86,
∑ 𝑥𝑖 = 1478 , ∑ 𝑥𝑖2 = 1,43,215.8 and ∑ 𝑥𝑖 𝑦𝑖 = 1083.67
(a) Calculate the least squares estimates of the slope and intercept. Graph
the
regression line.
(b) Use the equation of the fitted line to predict what pavement
deflection
would be observed when the Surface temperature is 85℉.
Course Outcome 3 [CO3]
1. [CO3 K1] What are the different types of sampling?

73
2. [CO3 K2] Let X be a Bernoulli random variable. The probability mass
function is
𝑝 𝑥 (1 − 𝑝)1−𝑥 , 𝑥 = 0,1
𝑓(𝑝) = {
0 , otherwise
where p is the parameter to be estimated. Obtain the maximum likelihood
estimator of p.
3. [CO3 K3] A manufacturer produces piston rings for an automobile
engine. It is known that ring diameter is normally distributed with 𝜎 =
0.001 millimeters. A random sample of 15 rings has a mean diameter of
𝑥̅ = 74.036 millimeters.
(a) Construct a 99% two-sided confidence interval on the mean piston
ring diameter.
(b) Construct a 95% lower-confidence bound on the mean piston ring
diameter.

Course Outcome 4 [CO4]


1. [CO4 K1] Define null hypothesis and alternative hypothesis.
2. [CO4 K2] Explain why p-value approach is adopted and how it is used in
testing statistical hypothesis.
3. [CO4 K3] The heat evolved in calories per gram of a cement mixture is
approximatelynormally distributed. The mean is thought to be 100 and
the standard deviation is 2. We wish to test 𝐻0 : 𝜇 = 100 versus 𝐻1 : 𝜇 ≠
100 with a sample of n = 9 specimens.
(a) If the acceptance region is defined as 98.5 ≤ 𝑥̅ ≤ 101.5, find the
type I error probability 𝛼.
(b) Find 𝛽 for the case where the true mean heat evolved is 103.
(c) Find 𝛽 for the case where the true mean heat evolved is 105. This
value of 𝛽 is smaller than the one found in part (b) above. Why?

Course Outcome 5 [CO5]


1. [CO5 K1] State the assumptions for ANOVA one way classification.
2. [CO5 K2] Discuss Randomization, Replication and Local control.
3. [CO5 K3] An experiment was designed to study the performance of 4
different detergents for cleaning fuel injectors. The following “cleanness”
readings were obtained with specially designed equipment for 12 tanks of
gas distributed over 3 different models of engines:

74
Engine 1 Engine 2 Engine 3
Detergent A 45 43 51
Detergent B 47 46 52
Detergent C 48 50 55
Detergent D 42 37 49
Looking on the detergents as treatments and the engines as blocks,
obtain the appropriate analysis of variance and test at the 0.01 level
of significance whether there are differences in the detergents or in
the engines.

75
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
ENGINEERING
1150MA202 2 2 2 4
MATHEMATICS I

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble : This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and


techniques of multivariable calculus, matrices, sequence and series and
ordinary differential equations emphasizing their inter-relations and
applications to design of steel structure engineering, design of automotive
engineering, electromagnetic theory, aerodynamics, electrical circuits and
network engineering.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Employ the knowledge of diagonalization of
CO1 K3
symmetric matrix in the study of quadratic form.
Resolve the question of the convergence or
CO2 divergence of a sequence and a series of positive K3
terms.
Compute the partial and total derivatives, Jacobian
CO3 K3
and optimality of functions of several variables.
Calculate double and triple integrals and apply to
CO4 measure the area of a plane surface and the volume K3
of a solid.
CO5 Demonstrate the different methods of finding the
K3
solutions of linear differential equations.

c. Course Syllabus :
UNIT I MATRICES L- 6 + T-2+P-4
Characteristic equation - Eigen values and Eigen vectors of a real matrix –
Statement of Cayley- Hamilton theorem – Applications of Cayley -Hamilton
theorem in finding the inverse of a non-singular matrix and the power of a
square matrix – Diagonalization of symmetric matrices – Nature of Quadratic
forms.

UNIT II SEQUENCES AND SERIES L- 6 + T-2+P-4

76
Sequences – Convergence of series – Series of positive terms – Tests for
convergence (n-th term, ratio, comparison, root and integral tests) and
divergence - Leibnitz test for alternating series –Series of positive and negative
terms - Absolute and conditional convergence– Power series – Taylor and
Maclaurin series.

UNIT III DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARABLES


L- 6 + T-2+P-4
Limits and continuity- Partial Derivatives – Total derivative – Differentiation of
implicit functions – inverse functions – Jacobian – Maxima and minima of
functions of two variables – Lagrange’s method of undetermined multipliers.

UNIT IV INTEGRAL CALCULUS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES


L- 6 + T-2+P-4
Double integrals- Change of order of integration – Double integrals in polar
coordinates – Triple integrals – Area as a double integral – Volume as a triple
integral

UNIT V ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS L- 6 + T-2+P-4

Higher order linear differential equations with constant coefficients –Method of


undetermined coefficients - Method of variation of parameters – Cauchy’s and
Legendre’s linear equations – Simultaneous first order linear equations with
constant coefficients- Simple Engineering Applications.

77
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
1. Kreyszig E, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 12th edition, John
Wiley and Sons, New York, 2010.
2. Kanti B. Dutta., Mathematical Methods of Science and Engineering –
Aided with MATLAB, Cengage Learning, New Delhi, 2013.

ii. References:
1. Grewal B.S., Higher Engineering Mathematics, Khanna Publishers,
New Delhi, 41st Edition, 2011.
2. Jain R.K andIyengar, S.R.K Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 3rd
edition, Narosa Publishing House, 2009.
3. Peter O’ Neil, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, Cengage
Learning, Boston, USA, 2012.
4. Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright and Michael R.Cullen. Advanced
Engineering Mathematics (4th Edn) Jones & Bartlett Learning,
Canada, 2011.
5. Stroud.K.A.Advanced Engineering Mathematics (4th Edn) Palgrave
Macmillan, New York-2003.
6. Dean G. Duffy. Advanced Engineering Mathematics with MATLAB,
2ndEdn. Chapman & Hall / CRC Press.New York, 2003 (Taylor and
Francis, e-library, 2009).
7. P. Duraipandian, S. Udayabaskaran and T. Karthikeyan, Engineering
Mathematics – II Volume I & II, S. Chand & Company Pvt. Ltd, New
Delhi, 2016.

iii. Online resources


http://www.math.hmc.edu
https://www.khanacademy.org
http://ceee.rice.edu
www.nptel.in
http://ocw.mit.edu
www.mathforum.org

78
e. Sample assessment questions:
( K1 – Remember,K2-Understand,K3-Apply, K4-Analyse,K5-Evaluate,K6-
Create)

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


 1 4
1.[CO1 K1]Find the eigenvalues of the matrix A   .
 2 1
2. .[CO1 K2]Reduce the quadratic form 3x12  3x22  3x32  2 x1 x2  2 x1 x3  2 x2 x3 to a
canonical form by an orthogonal transformation.
−6 14
3. [CO1 K3] Solve for X, if 𝑋 3 = [ ]
−7 15

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. [CO2 K1] State n th term test and Cauchy’s integral test.
2𝑛 +1
2. [CO2 K2]Determine the convergence or divergence of ∑∞ 𝑛=1 𝑛 3 +𝑛
(−1)𝑛
3. [CO2 K3]Test whether the series ∑∞
𝑛=1 √𝑛2 +1 is conditionally convergent.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1.[CO3 K1] State Euler’s Theorem for homogeneous function.
𝑥 𝑑𝑢
2.[CO3 K2]Given 𝑢 = sin ( ) , 𝑥 = 𝑒 𝑡 and𝑦 = 𝑡 2 , find as a function of
𝑦 𝑑𝑡
t.
3.[CO3 K3]If 𝑔(𝑥, 𝑦) = 𝜓(𝑢, 𝑣) where 𝑢 = 𝑥 2 − 𝑦 2 and 𝑣 = 2𝑥𝑦,
𝜕2 𝑔 𝜕2 𝑔 𝜕2 𝜓 𝜕2 𝜓
Prove that 2
+ = 4(𝑥 2 + 𝑦 2 ) [ + ].
𝜕𝑥 𝜕𝑦 2 𝜕𝑢2 𝜕𝑣 2

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1.[CO4 K1]Change the order of integration
𝑎 √𝑎2 −𝑥 2

∫ ∫ √𝑎2 − 𝑥 2 − 𝑦 2 𝑑𝑦𝑑𝑥.
0 0
𝑥2
2.[CO4 K2]Find, by using the triple integral, the volume of the ellipsoid +
𝑎2
𝑦2 𝑧2
2
+ = 1.
𝑏 𝑐2

3.[CO4 K3] A building is 8 meters long. It has flat roof that is 12 meters high
at one corner and 10 meters high at each of the adjacent corners. What is the
volume of the building?

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):

79
1.[CO5 K1] Define order and degree of differential equation.
2.[CO5 K2]Apply the method of undetermined coefficients to solve
(𝐷2 - 3D + 2) y = 𝑥 2 + 𝑒 𝑥

3. [CO5 K3]Model the mechanical system in the following figure and solve the
resulting equation for undamped forced oscillations damped forced oscillations

Soft Computational Practice Exercises

(a). Matrices and Quadratic forms


1. Diagonalization of symmetric matrices.
2. Canonical form of a quadratic form.
3. Classification of quadratic forms.

(b). Infinite Sequences and Series


1. Plotting the terms of a sequence.
2. Plotting the ratio of the successive terms of the Fibonacci sequences.
1 𝑛
3. Plotting the terms of (1 + ) , 𝑛 = 1, 2, 3, …
𝑛
4. Plotting the partial sums of an infinite series of positive terms.
1 (−1)𝑛−1
5. Distinguishing the series∑∞ ∞
𝑛=1 and ∑𝑛=1
𝑛 𝑛
6. Plotting the partial sums of a power series.

(c) Functions of several variables


1. Plotting functions of two variables.
2. Finding extrema of functions of two variables.
3. Exhibiting the transformation of two dimensional regions.
(d). Vector Calculus
1. Plotting scalar and vector fields.
2. Plotting level surfaces.
3. Plotting scalar field and its gradient fields.
4. Plotting a vector field and its divergence and curl field.

(e). Ordinary differential equations

80
1. Symbolically solving linear differential equations.
2. To analyses a damped harmonic oscillator.
3. Controlling 𝜆 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝜔to plot the solution of the equation
𝑦̈ (𝑡) + 𝜆𝑦̇ (𝑡) + 𝜔2 𝑦(𝑡) = cos 𝜔𝑡 with 𝑦(0) = 1 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑦̇ (𝑡) = 1.
4. Controlling 𝑚, 𝑎 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏, to plot the solution of the equation
𝑚 𝑦̈ (𝑡) + 𝑎 𝑦̇ (𝑡) + 𝑏 𝑦(𝑡) = 0
with 𝑦(0) = 1 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑦̇ (𝑡) = 1.
5. Controlling 𝑚, 𝑎 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏, to plot the solution of the equation
𝑚 𝑦̈ (𝑡) + 𝑎 𝑦̇ (𝑡) + 𝑏 𝑦(𝑡) = 𝑐 𝑥̇ (𝑡) + 𝑑 𝑥(𝑡)
with 𝑦(0) = 1 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑦̇ (𝑡) = 1 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑥(𝑡) = 𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑡.

(e). Laplace Transform


1. Plotting a function and its Laplace transform.
2. Plotting a periodic function and its Laplace transform.
3. Exhibiting the initial and final value theorem.

Sample Questions for Soft Computational Practice Exercises


1 𝑛
1. Write MATLAB program for plotting the terms of (1 + ) , 𝑛 =
𝑛
1, 2, 3, … and justify your answer.
2. Write MATLAB program for plotting the ratio of the successive terms of
the Fibonacci sequences. (Seeds- 1, 2).
3. Write MATLAB program for plotting a periodic function and its Laplace
𝑡 0<𝑡<𝑎
transform. when 𝑓(𝑡) = {
2𝑎 − 𝑡 𝑎 ≤ 𝑡 < 2𝑎
4. Write MATLAB program for plotting a vector field and its divergence
and curl field if 𝐹 = grad(𝑥 3 + 𝑦 3 + 𝑧 3 − 3𝑥𝑦𝑧).
5. Verify finial value theorem for f (t )  1  et (sin t  cos t ) using MATLAB.

81
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
PROBLEM SOLVING
1150CS201 1 2 2 3
USING C

Course Category:Foundation

a. Preamble: Modern world aims to replace computer for human works. Each
and every fielduses of computer reduces the work burden. Any real world
problem can be solved using computers most effectively. The areas like
weather forecast, defense, construction, medical, business, marketing,
education, entertainment makes use of the computer for more than two three
decades. To solve the real world problem through programming in an
efficient manner, basic knowledge of computing is required. This course
provides adequate knowledge to solve the problems in respective domains.

b. Course Educational Objectives :


Learners are exposed to
 The fundamentals of Computer
 Various problem solving techniques
 The basics and syntax of C programming
 Array, Structure, Pointer and File concept
 Create the solutions for various Real world Problems

c. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge
Level (Based
CO
Course Outcomes on revised
No’s
Bloom’s
Taxonomy)
Describe the basics of computer and understand the K2
CO1
problem solving aspect.
Demonstrate the algorithm and flow chart for the given K2, S3
CO2
problem.
Design and develop C program to evaluate simple K3, S3
CO3
expressions and logical operations.
Develop & Implement C programs with suitable modules to K3, S3
CO4
solve the given problem.
Demonstrate the concept of pointer and perform I/O K3, S3
CO5
operations in files.
CO6 Design and develop solutions to real world problems using K3, S3

82
C.

d. Course Content:

UNITI INTRODUCTION
3+6
Introduction of computer-Problem solving Techniques-Flow chart-Algorithm-
Development of algorithms for simple problems

UNIT II INTRODUCTION TO C
3+
6
Overview of C – Tokens - Data Types – Managing Input and Output
operations- Operators and Expressions–Decision Making- Branching and
Looping.

UNITIII ARRAY, FUNCTIONS


3+6
Arrays-Strings-Function–Types of Function-Function Prototype-Recursive
function

UNITIV POINTER
3+6
Structures and Unions, Pointers- Pointers to Functions-Pointers to Arrays,
Pointers to Structures

UNIT VFILE HANDLING


3+6
File Management in C – Input / Output Operations on Files -The ‘C’
Preprocessor- Applications in C.

e. Problems for Solving in Tutorials

i) Draw a logical flow chart for :


a. Computing volume of a box.
b. Finding minimum of three integers
UNIT I c. Displaying an integer in the range of 0 and 9 in words
d. Finding the smallest integer n such that 1+2+3+…+n is
equal to or just greater than 100

ii) Develop pseudo code for :


a. Solving a quadratic equation
83
b. Determining whether an integer is prime number or not
c. Generating ‘n’ numbers of Fibonacci series

iii) Draw a logical flow chart for :


a. Computing the dot product of two 3-componet vectors
b. Computing straight line distance from each pair of
vertices in a graph.
c. Finding the respective day of date given dd-mm-yyyy
format
i) Design and develop a program in C for computing binomial
coefficients 𝑥 given 𝑛.
ii) Design and develop a program in C for converting an integer in
UNITII decimal number system to its equivalent number in binary, octal
and hexadecimal number systems
iii) Design and develop a program in C for finding all the perfect
numbers between 1 and 500.
i) Design and develop a program in C for :
a. Reversing the elements of a one-dimensional array of
integer data type
UNIT III b. Finding the minimum and maximum elements of two
dimensional array of integer data type
ii) Design and develop a modular program in C for Computing
sum, difference and product of two matrices.
iii) Design and develop a modular program in C for determining the
union, intersection and set difference two sets of strings.
i) Design and develop a modular program in C for order billing in
a restaurant using an array of structures.
ii) Design and develop a modular program in C for creating a
UNIT IV singly linked list, traversing it in forward order and traversing in
reverse order using a recursive function.
iii) Design and develop a program in C for adding two𝑛𝑡ℎ
polynomials of a single variable.
i) Design and develop a program in C for converting a text file
into binary file. Use an illustrative example of your choice.
ii) Design and develop a program in C for computing Semester
Grade Point Average (SGPA) for first semester B.Tech
students. Use text files.
UNIT V iii) Design and develop a program in C for answering train
enquiries related to scheduled arrivals and departures. Use
binary file.

f. Problems for Solving in Laboratory

84
Note:
1. Program design and development shall be done off-laboratory
2. The students shall come to the laboratory with code and test cases.
3. The laboratory time shall be used for testing the program

i) Draw a logical flow chart for computing mean and range


of a set of numbers
ii) Draw a logical flow chart for computing electricity
UNIT I charges as per the Tamil Nadu Electricity Board (TNEB) 6
Tariff Chart given the units consumed.
iii) Draw a logical flow chart for computing 𝑓(𝑥) =
𝐴𝑖
∑𝑖=𝑛
𝑖=0 𝑖
,.
(1+𝑥)
i) Design and develop programs for evaluating the
𝑎𝑡 2
equations: 𝑣 = 𝑢 + 𝑎𝑡; 𝑠 = 𝑢𝑡 + ; 𝑣 2 − 𝑢2 =
2
2𝐴𝐷
2𝑎𝑠 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑄 = √ .
𝐶𝑖
UNIT II Implement it
ii) Design and develop a program to display a two digit 6
integer in word. Example: 38 → Thirty eight. Implement
it.
iii) Design and develop a program for computing the sum of
three fractions. The fractions and sum shall be read /
displayed in the form of numerators and denominators.
Implement it.
i) Design and develop a program in C for arranging seven
distinct objects colored 6
UNIT III Violet, Indigo, Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange and Red
(VIBGYOR) in all possible orders. Implement it.
ii) Design and develop a program for generating Pascal’s
Triangle using recursive function for evaluating factorial.
Implement it.
iii) Design and develop a modular program for performing 2D
transformations: translation, scaling and rotation.
Implement it. Use an illustrative example of your choice.
i) The records of VTU students comprise the fields: VTU
No, Name, Branch of Study and Gender. Use array of
structures for storing such records randomly. Design and
develop a program for clustering the records based on
branch of study and gender. Implement it. 6
UNIT IV ii) Design and develop a modular program in C for
performing addition, subtraction and multiplication

85
operations on two 𝑛𝑡ℎ degree polynomials in two
variables. Use singly linked lists.
iii) Design and develop a program in C for generating
Fibonacci series consisting of at least n numbers and
sorting them in descending order. Use recursive Fibonacci
function. Implement it.
i) Design and develop a program in C for merging at least 3
text files. Assume that the records of the files are
sequentially ordered based on a primary key. Implement
UNIT V it. 6
ii) Design and develop a modular program in C for filtering
the records of binary file given the range of primary key
values. Implement it.
iii) Design and develop a Checkout Billing System for
Saravana Stores. Use binary file(s). Implement it.

Total: 75
g. Learning Resources

i.Text Books:
1. E. Balagurusamy, - Computing Fundamentals and C Programming‖,
Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008.

ii.Reference Books:
1. R.G.Dromey, How to Solve by Computer, Pearson Education, Inc,
Reprint 2009.
2. ReemaThareja, -Fundamentals of Computing & C Programming‖
Oxford University Press2012.
3. YashavantKanetkar- Let Us C Solutions-12th Edition|| BPB
Publication, 2014
4. Byron Gottfried - Programming with C|| Schaum's Outline,2000
5. Dr.E.Kannan, Prof.E.Kamalanaban, Dr.P.Visu, Dr.S.Koteeswaran-
Computing Fundamentals & Programming in C‖, First Edition,
CENGAGE Learning, 2015.

iii. Online resources


1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1a3R_xdHJ4k
2. http://www.tutorialspoint.com/computer_fundamentals/
3. http://www.indiabix.com/computer-science/computer-fundamentals/
4. NOC online course Introduction to C Programming
https://onlinecourses.nptel.ac.in/iitk_cs_101

h. Sample assessment questions


86
(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)
Course Outcome 1 (CO1)
1. Define computer. K1
2. With a neat block diagram explain the components of a computer. K2
3. Explain the generations of computers. K2
4. Explain the phases in problem solving aspects, K2

Course Outcome 2 (CO2)


1. Define algorithm. K1
2. What is the significance of flowchart in problem solving? K1
3. Draw a flowchart to solve a given quadratic equation. K2
4. Develop an algorithm to check whether a given number is Armstrong
number or not. K2
5. Develop an algorithm and flowchart to generate Fibonacci series of n
numbers. K2

Course Outcome 3 (CO3)


1. Define token. K1
2. Mention the purpose of declaration statement. K1
3. How do you control the execution flow in a program based on decision?
K2
4. Develop a C program to find the factorial of a number with and without
recursion. K3
5. With an example explain the need for bitwise operators. K2

Course Outcome 4 (CO4)


1. Define array. K1
2. Write a C program to search for a pattern in a given text. K3
3. Distinguish between structure and union K1
4. Write a program to create a student data record and given a student id
retrieve the student information. K3

Course Outcome 5 (CO5)


1. Define preprocessor. K1
2. What are the ways you can access the contents of a file? K2
3. Develop a C program to copy the contents of one file to another. K3
4. Define pointer. K1
5. Illustrate call by reference mechanism with a suitable example. K2

87
Course Outcome 6 (CO6)
1. Design and develop a C program to generate payroll for employees. K3
2. Design and develop a C program for student fee management system. K3
3. The Purchasing Department of VTU orders to procure a set of items in
quantities requestioned by the users from a set of vendors. The vendors
quote unit prices for each of the items thay can supply. Design and
develop a program to select a vendor for minimizing the total order cost
K3
4. A bank maintains a binary file of its account holders. The fields of
records are: Account Number, Name, Balance. Design and develop a
program for updating the binary file whenever a deposit/withdrawl
transaction occurs K3

88
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1150ME202 ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 1 2 4 4

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of


engineering drawing and different views of various objects. One of the best
way to communicate one's ideas is through some form of picture or drawing.
Drawing is called as universal language of engineers. The purpose of this
course is to teach the basics of engineering drawing which includes
orthographic, isometric and perspective views of various objects. In normal
industrial and engineering applications, ideas are conveyed and
communicated primarily through drawings because there are no language
barriers. It is possible to communicate the required objects like machine
parts, assembly and other forms through visual means which will be more
convincing and pragmatic.
b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Draw ellipse, parabola, hyperbola and free hand K2,S3
CO1
sketching; orthographic views of pictorial views.
Draworthographic projections of points, straight lines
CO2 K2,S3
and planes.
Drawprojections of simple solids accurately and
CO3 K2,S3
neatly.
Draw true shape of sections and Develop surfaces of
CO4 K3,S3
sectioned solids accurately and neatly.
Construct isometric and perspective projections of
CO5 K3,S3
simple solids accurately and neatly.

c. Course Syllabus :
CONCEPTS AND CONVENTIONS (NOT FOR EXAMINATION) L-
2
Importance of graphics in engineering applications – Use of drafting
instruments – BIS conventions and specifications – Size, layout and folding of
drawing sheets – Lettering and dimensioning. Scales: Construction of Diagonal
and Vernier scales.

UNIT- I CONICSECTIONS ANDFREEHANDSKETCHING


89
L - 7 P -12
Constructionofellipse(concentriccircleandeccentricitymethods),construction of
parabola(rectangleandeccentricity methods), construction of hyperbola
(eccentricity method) Free-hand sketching;orthographic views of pictorial
views.

UNIT-II PROJECTIONS OFPOINTS,STRAIGHT LINES& PLANES


L-9P-12
Orthographic projectionsof points,orthographicprojections ofstraightlines
locatedinthe firstquadrantonly–determination of true lengthsand true
inclinations–orthographic projectionsofpolygonalsurfaceandcircularlamina
inclinedtobothreferenceplanes.

UNIT-III PROJECTIONS OFSOLIDS L-9P-12


Projectionsof simplesolids(prisms,pyramids,cylinder andcone) whenthe axisis
inclinedtoonereferenceplaneby changeofpositionandchangeofreferenceline
methods.

UNIT-IV SECTIONSOFSOLIDS&DEVELOPMENTOFSURFACES
L-9P-12
Sectionsof solids(prisms, pyramids,cylinder andcone) insimple vertical position
by usingcuttingplane inclinedtoonereference planeandperpendicular tothe other–
obtainingtrueshapeof the section. Developmentof lateralsurfacesof simple
andtruncatedsolids– prisms, pyramids, cylinderandcone–
developmentoflateralsurfaces of solidswithcylindrical cut-
outsperpendiculartothe axis.

UNIT-V ISOMETRIC&PERSPECTIVE PROJECTION L-9P-


12
Principlesofisometricprojection -isometricscale–isometricprojectionsof
simplesolids, truncatedprisms,pyramids,cylindersandcones–isometricviewof
combinationoftwosimple solids. Perspective projectionof
prismspyramidsandcylinderby visualraymethodand vanishingpointsmethod.

TOTAL:45+60 = 105
periods
d. Learning Resources
i. Text Books :
1. K.V. Natarajan, A Text Book of Engineering Graphics, Dhanalakshmi
Publisher, Chennai –42, 2016.
2. N.D.Bhatt and V.M.Panchal, “Engineering Drawing”, Charotar
Publishing House, 50th Edition, 2010

90
ii. Reference:
1. B. Bhattacharyya, S.C. Bera, Engineering Graphics , I.K. International
Pvt. Ltd.,2009
2. M.S.Kumar ., EngineeringGraphics., DdPublications, 2014
3. Jeyapoovan.T.,EngineeringGraphicswithusing AutoCAD,
VikasPublishingHouse,2007
4. Warren J. Luzadder and Jon. M. Duff, - Fundamentals ofEngineering
Drawing,Prentice HallofIndia Pvt.,Ltd.,EleventhEdition,2012.
5. VenugopalK.― Engineering Graphics, New Age International (P) Limited,
2014.
6. IS 10711 – 2001: Technical products Documentation – Size and lay out
of drawing sheets
7. IS 9609 (Parts 0 & 1) – 2001: Technical products Documentation –
Lettering.
8. IS 10714 (Part 20) – 2001 & SP 46 – 2003: Lines for technical drawings.
9. IS 11669 – 1986 & SP 46 – 2003: Dimensioning of Technical Drawings.
10. IS 15021 (Parts 1 to 4) – 2001: Technical drawings – Projection Methods

iii. Online resources


1. http://www.slideshare.net/vagallasuresh/Unit-1-engineering-curves-
15901367 (unit 1)
2. http://www.slideshare.net/WalshJnoBaptiste/conic-sections-14243278 (unit 1)
3. http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/akashdjkid-716593-
engineering-drawing-curve-part1/ (unit 1)
4. http://www.slideshare.net/techdesign/lesson-2-orthographic-drawing-
tdj3-m0?next_slideshow=2 (unit 1)
5. http://www.slideshare.net/hareeshang/projection-of-points (unit 2)
6. http://www.slideshare.net/hareeshang/projection-of-lines (unit 2)
7. http://www.slideshare.net/hareeshang/projection-of-planes (unit 2)
8. http://www.slideshare.net/vabajaj/projection-of-planes-13733433 (unit 2)
9. http://www.slideshare.net/VivekSricharan/ist-year-
engineeringgraphicsedforbestudents-1-1 (unit 2)
10.http://www.slideshare.net/kashyapshah11/projection-of-solids-12968437
(unit 3)
11.http://www.slideshare.net/hareeshang/projection-of-solids (unit 3)
12.http://www.slideshare.net/hareeshang/section-of-solids-18171567 (unit 4)
13.http://www.slideshare.net/kashyapshah11/development-of-surfaces-of-
solids (unit 4)
14.http://www.slideshare.net/Akshay_Darji/isometric-projections-for-
engineering-students (unit 5)
15.http://www.slideshare.net/eglive/lesson-13perspectiveprojection(unit5)

91
e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


1. Draw an ellipse having a major axis of 110 mm and minor axis of 70 mm
using the concentric circle method. Draw the tangent and normal at any
point on the ellipse. (K2,S3)
2. The head lamp reflector of a motor has a maximum rim diameter of
130mm and the maximum depth of 100mm. Draw the profile of the
reflector and name it. (K2,S3)
3. Draw the front view & top view of the object shown in figure.

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


1. One end of a line 70mm long, is 20mm above HP and 25mm in front of
VP. The line is inclined at 50° to HP and 30° to VP. Draw the
projections. (K2,S3)
2. Draw the projections of a hexagon of side 30mm having one of its sides
in HP and top view inclined at 65° to VP and surface inclined at 35° to
HP.(K2,S3)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. A hexagonal prism of base side 30mm and axis length 60mm lies on HP
on one of its base edges with its axis inclined at 60° to HP and parallel to
VP. Draw its projections. (K2,S3)
2. A square pyramid of base side 30mm and height 60mm lies on HP on one
of its triangular faces with its axis parallel to VP. Draw its projections.
(K2,S3)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. A cone of diameter 60mm and 80mm long is resting on its base on HP. It
is cut by a section plane that passes through the axis at a point 40mm
above HP and is inclined 30º to HP. Draw its front view and sectional top
view. (K3,S3)
2. A cube of edge 40mm rests on its base on the HP with a vertical face
inclined at 45º to the VP. Draw the development of the lateral surfaces of
the cube. (K3,S3)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. Draw the perspective projection of a cube of 40mm sides lying on one of
its square faces on the ground and another square face on the picture
plane. The station point is 45mm infront of the picture plane, 50mm
above the ground and lies in a plane which is 65mm to the right of the
axes of the cube. Draw only the visible edges of the cube. (K3,S3)

92
2. Draw the perspective projection of a square pyramid of base sides 30mm
and height of apex 45mm. The nearest edge of the base is parallel to and
20mm behind the picture plane. The station point is situated at a distance
of 70mm infront of VP and 40mm to the right of the axis of the pyramid
and 60mm above the ground. (K3,S3)
3. Draw the isometric view of a frustum of a cone of height 30mm, base
diameter 34mm, top diameter 20mm when it is centrally placed over a
square slab of side 50mm and thickness 10mm. (K3,S3)

93
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
1150PH302 0 0 2 1
LABORATORY

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: The course Engineering Physics lab provides knowledge for


conducting experiments to measure properties like moment of inertia, focal
length, wave length, velocity, bending of the beam, E.M.F thermocouple,
Hall Effect, Photovoltaic and Dielectric constant which they can use in day
to day life and other engineering course.

b. Course Outcomes :
After the successful completion of the course in Engineering Physics lab,
students will be able to individually and independently
Level of learning
CO domain (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s
taxonomy)
 CO1 Determine the rigidity modulus of a material K2,S3
Handle the travelling microscope to determine the
CO2 K2,S3
Young’s modulus of the beam
Handle the spectrometer to determine the dispersive
 CO3 K2,S3
power of the material of the prism
Perform the diffraction grating experiment to
determine the wavelength of spectral lines by
 CO4 K2,S3
mercury vapour lamp using normal incidence
method
Handle the travelling microscope to determine the
 C05 K2,S3
focal length of the lens
Conduct experiments independently to determine
 C06 K2,S3
band gap of a semi conductor
Determine the wavelength of the laser grating, size
CO7 of the particle, numerical aperture and acceptance K2,S3
angle.
Analyse magnetic properties of a material by
CO8 K2,S3
studying its hysteresis loop.
CO9 Work effectively in a disciplinary team K3, S4, A3
SoMC – Exclusive for School of Mechanical (Aero, Auto, Civil & Mechanical)
Demonstrate the experiment independently to
 CO10 K2,S3
determine the thermal conductivity of a bad

94
conductor.
 CO11 Determination of emf of thermocouple K2,S3
Determine Curie temperature of ferroelectric
CO12 K2,S3
material
Determining the value of the ratio of two
CO13 K2,S3
fundamental physical constants, h/e.
SoEC – Exclusive for School of Electrical & Communication
(ECE, EEE, Bio-Med & Bio-Tech)
&
SoC - Exclusive for School of Computing (CSE & IT)
Determine the resistivity of semiconductors by Four
 CO10 K2,S3
probe Method
Calculate the Hall coefficient and the carrier
 CO11 K2,S3
concentration of the sample material
Test the IV characteristics of the Photovoltaic
CO12 K2,S3
module
Determine the dielectric properties of an insulating
CO13 K2,S3
material.

c. Course Syllabus:
1. Torsional pendulum – Rigidity modulus
2. Young’s modulus –uniform bending
3. Spectrometer prism
4. Spectrometer grating
5. Newton’s rings
6. Band gap of a semi-conductor
7. Semi-conductor Laser.
8. B-H curve

95
SoMC – Exclusive for School of Mechanical (Aero, Auto, Civil & Mechanical)
9. Lee’s disc
10.Emf of thermocouple – potentiometer
11.Ferroelectric hysteresis tester (Curie-Weiss law)
12.Photoelectric effect / led(Planck’s constant)

SoEC – Exclusive for School of Electrical & Communication


(ECE, EEE, Bio-Med & Bio-Tech)
&
SoC - Exclusive for School of Computing (CSE & IT)
13.Four probe method
14.Hall effect
15.Photovoltaics, (IV-characteristic’s )
16.Dielectric constant

d. Learning Resources:
1. www.amrita.edu/research/project/physics-virtual-labs
2. media.uws.ac.uk/~davison/labpage/leedisk/leedisk.html
3. http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/diffraction/basicdiffraction/index.ht
ml
4. http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2966627536591956617&hl=en#
5. hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/phyopt/grating.html
6. www.tndte.com/TEXT%20BOOKS/Book.../Physics_Sem-I-Practical.pdf

e. Sample assessment questions


1. (CO1)Determine the moment of Inertia and Rigidity Modulus of a given
wire
2. (CO2) Determine Young’s modulus of the material of the beam by
uniform bending method.[Given data b=2.5cm and d=5.5mm]
3. (CO3) Determine the dispersive power of the material of the prism
4. (CO4) Find the wavelengths of the prominent spectral lines in the
mercury (Hg) source.
5. (CO5) Find the radius of curvature and focal length of the given lens
6. (CO6) Determine the energy Gap of the Semiconducting material of the
given thermistor using Post office box
7. (CO7) Find the wavelength of the given laser source and find the size of
the particle

8. (CO8)Analyze the magnetic properties of a material by studying its


hysteresis loop.

96
9. (CO9) Determine the thermal conductivity of the bad conductor by
Lee’s Disc method
10.(CO10) Determine the emf of thermocouple
11.(CO11) Determine curie temperature of ferroelectric material
12.(CO12) Determining the value of the ratio of two fundamental physical
constants, h/c.
13.(CO9)Determine the resistivity of semiconductors by Four probe Method
14.(CO10) Calculate the Hall coefficient and the carrier concentration of the
sample material
15.(CO11) Test the IV characteristics of the Photovoltaic module
16.(CO12) Determine the dielectric properties of an insulating material.

97
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY
1150CH302 0 0 2 1
LABORATORY

Category: Foundation

a. Preamble:This course Engineering Chemistry Laboratory, imparts a sound


knowledge on the principles of chemistry practical’s for better understanding
of various engineering concepts employed to build different applications
such as estimation of metal ions by volumetric analysis and also using
various instruments.

b. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Cycle 1

CO1 Determine the alkalinity of water sample K2


Develop skill to do complexometric titration to
CO2 K2
find the metal ion concentration
Develop skill to use pH meter and can estimate
CO3 K2
the acidity
Estimate the amount of weak acid and strong
CO4 K2
acid using conductometry
Determine the metal ion by redox titration
CO5 K2
using potentiometer.
Determine the amount of dissolved oxygen in
CO6 K2
water sample.
Cycle 2
Estimate the nickel present in the industrial
CO7 K2
effluents
Determine the ferrous ion by using
CO8 K2
spectroscopic technique
Develop skill to use flame photometer and can
CO9 K2
estimate sodium and potassium
Determine the toxic metals from simulated e-
CO10 K2
waste

98
Measure the Viscosity and Molecular weight of
CO11 K2
the polymer
CO12 Synthesize the nanoparticles K2

c. Course Syllabus :

Cycle- 1
1. Determination of alkalinity in water sample.
2. Estimation of copper in samples from plating industry effluents by EDTA
method.
3. Acid-base titration by pH metry (determination of strength of HCl and
NaOH).
4. Conductometric titration (Mixture of acids vs strong base).
5. Estimation of Fe2+ions by potentiometry.
6. Determination of dissolved oxygen in water sample.

Cycle -2
1. Estimation of nickel in an alloy by complexometric titration.
2. Determination of iron content by spectrophotometer.
3. Estimation of sodium and potassium using flame photometry.
4. Determination of toxic metals from simulated E-waste.
5. Measurement of Viscosity and Molecular weight of the given polymer.
6. Preparation of Silver nanoparticles – Demonstration.
d. Learning Resources:

Websites:
1. WWW.chemistry.niser.ac.in/labhandouts.
2. WWW.pubs.acs.org/doi/abs.
3. www.chemicool.com/definition/potentiometry
4. WWW.water.me.vccs.edu
5. WWW.materialseducation.org

99
e. Sample assessment questions:

Course Outcome 1 (CO1):


Determine the alkalinity of the given water sample? (K2)

Course Outcome 2 (CO2):


Estimate the amount of copper present in the given sample? (K2)

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


Determine the strength and amount of given HCl in 1 Litre by pH metry? (K2)

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


Determine the amount of the given hydrochloric acid and acetic acid present
in one litre of the given mixture of acids? (K2)

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


Estimate the amount of ferrous iron present in the whole of the given
solution potentiometrically?

Course Outcome 6 (CO6):


Determine the amount of DO present in the given sample? (K2)

Course Outcome 7 (CO7):


Estimate the amount of Nickel present in the given sample? (K2)

Course Outcome 8(CO8):


Determine the amount of iron by spectrophotometer? (K2)

Course Outcome 9 (CO9):


Estimate the amount of sodium and potassium using flame photometer? (K2)

Course Outcome 10 (CO10):


Determine the amount of toxic metals from the given simulated E-waste? (K2)

Course Outcome 11 (CO11):


Determine the Viscosity of the given polymer? (K2)

100
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
BASIC ELECTRICAL AND
1150EE302 ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING 0 0 2 1
LABORATORY

Course Category: Foundation

a. Preamble: This course is designed to supplement the material of Basic


Electrical and Electronics Engineering and provide a hands-on experience in
assembling and testing electrical and electronic circuits.

b. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Dave’s Taxonomy)
Execute various wiring schemes and demonstrate
CO1 the working of various electrical laws (KCL / S3
KVL / FL)
Formulate the required luminescence and required
CO2 S3
backup for a given space
Demonstrate correctly the measurement of
CO3 electrical quantities, build an earthing prototype S3
and replicate the working of CB
Construct rectifiers and regulators with help of
CO4 S3
diodes
Build adder with digital ICs and build a simple
CO5 S2
switch with solar activation
Demonstrate correctly the measurement of EMI
CO6 S3
and calibrate the amplifier for respective BW
CO7 Work effectively in a disciplinary team K3, S4, A3

101
c. LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
Prior to the conduction of lab familiarization will be necessary for the
following
Resistance, Inductance and Capacitance
(Measurement, types, rating and proto type build of component)
1. Different types of wire based on current rating
2. Types of electrical cables
3. Types of Switches, Contactors and Relays.
4. Identification and testing of diodes, zener diode and transistors
5. To use equipments like CRO, Function Generator, Power supply unit,
LCR meter and Multimeter.

Electrical Experiments
1. Schemes of wiring
2. KCL and KVL verification
3. Measurement of voltage, current, power, power factor and selection of
fuse rating for various load condition
4. Earth resistance measurements, experimental study of grounding and
earthing techniques and functioning of MCBs, ELCB
5. Construction of a simple electromagnet with different magnetic strengths
and determine its polarity
6. Energy efficient & cost effective lighting system
7. Determination of UPS/Stabilizer specifications for various load
conditions

Electronics Experiments
1. Full wave rectifier with and without filter
2. Voltage regulator with zener diode
3. Measurement of EMI
4. Bandwidth study of CE Amplifier
5. Realization of adders
6. Solar light activated switch

d. Sample assessment questions:


(Minimum three sample questions for each course outcome is required)
Course Outcome 1 (CO1):
1. Is there a linear relationship between current and voltage?
2. Draw the circuit diagram of stair case wiring. Perform the experiment and
tabulate the results.
3. Draw a two loop resistive network with a voltage source. Do the KCL
and KVL verification.

102
Course Outcome 2 (CO2):
1. Apply single phase supply to a resistive load. Measure the load current
and power factor.
2. How to measure the earth resistance. Demonstrate the functioning of
MCB?
3. Construct an electromagnet and find its electromagnetic strength.

Course Outcome 3 (CO3):


1. Demonstrate energy efficient and cost efficient lightening system.
2. How will you arrive at the UPS Specification for a given lab? You
assume the loads.

Course Outcome 4 (CO4):


1. Draw the circuit diagram of full wave rectifier with capacitor filter.
Perform the experiment and draw the input, output waveform. Find the
ripple factor.
2. Draw the circuit diagram of zener diode regulator. Perform the
experiment and find load regulation and voltage regulation.

Course Outcome 5 (CO5):


1. Draw the Wheatstone bridge with strain gauge in one arm calibration and
measure the load applied.
2. Design a solar light activated switch. Give a demo by activating a lamp.
When solar light falls on the transducer.

Course Outcome 6 (CO6):


1. Draw the circuit diagram of CE amplifier with voltage divider biasing.
Perform the experiment and draw the frequency response. Find the
bandwidth of the amplifier.
2. Draw the circuit diagram for the measurement of EMI for the respective
Bandwidth

103
Programme core
S.No Course Code Course Name L T P C
Theory courses
1 1151AE101 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering 2 0 0 2
2 1151AE102 Engineering Mechanics 2 2 0 3
3 1151AE103 Strength of Materials 2 2 0 3
4 1151AE104 Fluid Mechanics 2 2 0 3
5 1151AE105 Aero Engineering Thermodynamics 2 2 0 3
6 1151AE106 Linear system Analysis and control 3 0 0 3
7 1151AE107 Incompressible Flow Aerodynamics 3 0 0 3
8 1151AE108 Aircraft Gas Turbine Propulsion 2 2 0 3
9 1151AE109 Airplane Performance 3 0 0 3
10 1151AE110 Compressible flow Aerodynamics 2 2 0 3
11 1151AE111 Rocket and Space Propulsion 3 0 0 3
12 1151AE112 Airplane Stability and control 3 0 0 3
Total 35
Course Code Integrated Courses L T P C
1 1151AE213 Numerical Methods using MATLAB 2 0 2 3
2 1151AE214 Aircraft systems and Instruments 1 0 2 2
3 1151AE215 Aircraft Structural Mechanics 1 2 2 3
4 1151AE216 Aircraft Structural Analysis 1 2 2 3
5 1151AE217 Avionics 2 0 2 3
Computational Methods for Aeronautical
6 1151AE218 Engineering 2 2 2 4
Total 18
Course Code Laboratory courses L T P C
1 1151AE319 Strength of Materials Laboratory 0 0 2 1
2 1151AE320 Thermodynamics Laboratory 0 0 2 1
3 1151AE321 Fluid Mechanics Laboratory 0 0 2 1
4 1151AE322 Aerodynamics Laboratory 0 0 2 1
5 1151AE323 Propulsion Laboratory 0 0 2 1
Aero Engine Maintenance and Structural
6 1151AE324 Repair Laboratory 0 0 2 1
7 1151AE325 Flight Mechanics and control Laboratory 0 0 2 1
Total 7
Total Credits 60

104
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
INTRODUCTION TO AEROSPACE
1151AE101 2 0 0 2
ENGINEERING

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
The course aims at introducing basic knowledge on aerospace vehicles and their
configurations. Thecoursehas its emphasis on presenting thestudents with the concepts
of atmospheric properties, principles of flight, aerodynamics, power plants,
structures& materials, and flight mechanics

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Nil

c. Related Courses:
 Aircraft Systems and Instruments
 Aircraft Rules and Regulations
 Helicopter Theory

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To discuss in general, the aerospace history and to explain the configurations of
aerospace vehicles.
 To provide a broad understanding on the concepts of Flight principles, Aerodynamics,
Propulsive systems, Structures and Materials, and Flight Mechanics

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Tell the evolution of aerospace vehicles and identify the K2
CO1
various components of such vehicles.
Distinguish among various flight vehicle configurations K3
CO2
and describe their features
Describe the properties and structure of atmosphere, and K2
CO3 state the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on
aircraft
Describe the aerodynamics of wings and aerofoils and K2
CO4
express the performance equations
Outline the various aerospace power plants and discuss the K2
CO5 structures and materials of aerospace structures

105
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H
CO2 H H
CO3 H H H M
CO4 H H H M
CO5 H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:
UNIT I - HISTORY AND FLIGHT VEHICLES COMPONENTS L-6
Historical evolution of airplanes - Aircraft axes and attitude definitions - Different types of
flight vehicles, Components and functions of an airplane and space vehicles, components of
rocket and missiles. Parts of helicopter and their functions, Indian aerospace developments.
UNIT II - FLIGHT VEHICLES CONFIGURATIONS L-6
Different types of wing configurations of aircraft, Different types of tail configurations of
aircraft, configurations based on speed and engines.
UNIT III -PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT L-6
Physical properties and structure of the atmosphere, Temperature, Pressure and altitude
relationships, stability of the atmosphere, Evolution of lift, drag and moment. Different types
of drag. Pressure and skin friction coefficients.
UNIT IV - AERODYNAMICS AND PERFORMANCE L-6
Airfoil nomenclature, classification of NACA airfoils, Angle of attack, Mach number,
pressure distribution over different aerodynamic profile, aero foil characteristics- lift, drag
curves - Wing geometry -aspect ratio, wing loading, center of pressure and aerodynamic
center - Aircraft Equation of Motions - Aircraft maneuvers.
UNIT V - PROPULSION AND AIRPLANE STRUCTURES L-6

Basic ideas about piston, turboprop and jet engines, Use of propeller and jets for thrust
production, Principle of operation of rocket, Rocket engines types, General types of
construction, Monocoque, semi-monocoque. Typical wing and fuselage structure. Metallic
and non-metallic materials, Use of aluminum alloy, titanium, stainless steel and composite
materials.
Total periods: 30
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
3. Anderson, J.D., “Introduction to Flight”, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill Higher
Education,2015
4. Steven Brandt, “Introduction to Aeronautics: A Design Perspective” 3rd edition, AIAA
Education series, 2015

ii. References:

106
1. David J.Newman, “Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design,” International
student edition Edition, McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
2. Gregg Angles, “Introduction to Aeronautics”, Random Exports, 2013
3. Richard S. Shevell, “Fundamentals of Flight”, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, 1988
4. A.C. Kermode, “Flight without Formulae”, 5th edition, Pearson Education, 2008
5. A.C. Kermode, R.H.Barnard, D.R. Philpott, “Mechanics of Flight”, 12th Edition,
Pearson,2012
6. LalitGupta, O P Sharma, “Fundamentals of Flight Basic Aerodynamics, Aircraft
Structures, Aircraft Propulsion, Aircraft Systems (Vol 1 to 4), 1st edition, 2006
7. John Cutler, “Understanding Aircraft Structures”, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2014
8. Dorothy Kent, “Aircraft Materials & Processes”, 5th Edition,1998
9. A. Kanni Raj, “Materials: Aircraft & Aerospace”, Create Space Independent Publishing
Platform, 2015
10. S.K. Ojha,” Flight performance of aircraft”, AIAA Education Series,1995
11. E L; Carruthers, N B Houghton, “Aerodynamics for engineering students”, 3rd edition,
Hodder Arnold, 1982

107
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE102 ENGINEERING MECHANICS 2 2 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of forces, inertias,
centroids, and moments of area and techniques of finding their effects on motion. It
introduces the phenomenon of friction and its effects. It introduces students to
cognitive learning in applied mechanics and develops problem-solving skills in both
theoretical and engineering oriented problems.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Introduction to Engineering
 Engineering Mathematics I

c. Related Courses:
 Spaceflight Mechanics

d. Course Educational Objectives :


 To inculcate the basic knowledge in mechanics in the areas of applied engineering.
 To develop the skills in the areas of forces and their effects and in the concept of free
body diagram

e. Course Outcomes :
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Solve engineering problems using the principles of statics
CO1 K2
of particles
Establish the magnitude of forces and moments acting on
CO2 K2
rigid bodies
Define properties and theories related to surfaces and
CO3 K3
solids
Solve engineering problems using the principles of
CO4 K3
dynamics of particles
CO5 Describe the principles of various types of friction K2

108
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H M H L
CO2 H H M H L
CO3 H H M H L
CO4 H H M H L
CO5 H H M H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT I BASICS & STATICS OF PARTICLES L-6 T-6


Introduction – Units and Dimensions – Laws of Mechanics – Lami’s theorem, Parallelogram
and Triangular Law of forces – Vectors – Vectorial representation of forces and couples –
Vector operations: additions, subtraction, dot product, cross product – Coplanar Forces –
Resolution and Composition of forces – Equilibrium of a particle – Forces in space –
Equilibrium of a particle in space – Equivalent systems of forces – Principle of
transmissibility – Single equivalent force.

UNIT II EQUILIBRIUM OF RIGID BODIES L-6 T-6


Free body diagram – Types of supports and their reactions – requirements of stable
equilibrium – Moments and Couples – Moment of a force about a point and about an axis –
Scalar components of a moment – Varignon’s theorem – Equilibrium of Rigid bodies in two
dimensions – Equilibrium of Rigid bodies in three dimensions – Examples

UNIT III PROPERTIES OF SURFACES AND SOLIDS L-6 T-6


Determination of Areas and Volumes – First moment of area and the Centroid of sections –
Second and product moments of plane area – Parallel axis theorem and perpendicular axis
theorem – Polar moment of inertia – Principal moments of inertia of plane areas – Principal
axes of inertia – Mass moment of inertia

UNIT IV DYNAMICS OF PARTICLES L-6 T-6


Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration, their relationship – Relative motion – Curvilinear
motion – Newton’s laws – Work-Energy Equation of particles – Impulse and Momentum –
Impact of elastic bodies.

UNIT V FRICTION L-6 T-6


Frictional force – Laws of Coloumb friction – simple contact friction – Belt friction – Roller
friction. Translation and Rotation of Rigid Bodies – General Plane motion.
Total Periods: 30 + 30 = 60

h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Hibbeller, R.C., Engineering Mechanics, Vol. 1 Statics, Vol. 2 Dynamics, Pearson
Education Asia Pvt. Ltd., 2015.
2. S. Timoshenko, D.H. Young, J.V. Rao, SukumarPati, Engineering Mechanics,
McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited., 2013.

109
ii. References:

1. Palanichamy, M. S., and Nagan, S., Engineering Mechanics (Statics and


Dynamics), Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi 2012.
2. Kumar, K. L., Engineering Mechanics, Tata McGraw- Hill, New Delhi, 2011.
3. Shames, I. H., and Krishna Mohana Rao, G., Engineering Mechanics (Statics and
Dynamics), Dorling Kindersley India) Pvt. Ltd. (Pearson Education), 2011.
4. Beer, F. P., and Johnston, E. R., Vector Mechanics for Engineers – Dynamics and
Statics, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2011.
5. Natarajan, K.V., Engineering Mechanics, Dhanalakshmi Publishers, 2011.
6. Rajasekaran, S. and Sankarasubramanian, G., Engineering Mechanics, Vikas
Publishing House PvtLtd, 2011.

110
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE103 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 2 2 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core
a. Preamble :
The course provides an introductory study on stresses and strainson deformable solids. It
focuses on the analysis of members subjected to axial, bending, and torsional loads. The
course discusses in detail, the shear force and bending moments on beams. It introduces the
concept of principal stresses in the analysis of structural members. In a nutshell, the course
aims at developing the skill to solve engineering problems on strength of materials

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Engineering Mathematics II

c. Related Courses:
 Aircraft structural mechanics
 Approximate Methods in structural Mechanics
 Composite Materials and Structures
 Experimental Stress Analysis
 High Temperature Materials
 Theory of Elasticity

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To develop understanding of the basic concepts related to tensile, compressive and
shear stresses in engineering components.
 To discuss the basic principles of torsion in shafts, shear force and bending moment in
beams, deflection in springs and beams and to analyze the axial stresses of thin
cylinders and spherical shells
e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Quote the stress and strain relationship and also distinguish K2
CO1
the determinate an indeterminate structures.
Determine the shear force and bending moment diagrams K3
CO2
for various beams.
CO3 Solve deflection of beams under various loading conditions K3
CO4 Estimate the torsional load over shaft. K5
Illustrate principle stresses, knowledge of calculating K4
CO5
deformation in thin cylindrical and spherical shells.
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H M H M H L H

111
CO2 H M H M H L H
CO3 H M H M H L H
CO4 H M H M H L H
CO5 H H M H L H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT I - BASICS AND AXIAL LOADING L-6 T-6


Stress and Strain – Hooke’s Law – Elastic constants and their relationship– Statically
determinate cases - statically indeterminate cases –composite bar. Thermal Stresses – stresses
due to freely falling weight.
UNIT II - STRESSES IN BEAMS L-6 T-6
Shear force and bending moment diagrams for simply supported and cantilever Beams-
Bending stresses in straight Beams-Shear stresses in bending of beams with rectangular, I&T,
etc. cross sections-beams of uniform strength
UNIT III - DEFLECTION OF BEAMS L-6 T-6
Double integration method – McCauley’s method - Area moment method – Conjugate beam
Method-Principle of super position-Castigliano’s theorem and its application
UNIT IV –TORSION L-6 T-6
Torsion of circular shafts - shear stresses and twist in solid and hollow circular shafts –
closely coiled helical springs. –
UNIT V - BI AXIAL STRESSES L-6 T-6
Stresses in thin circular cylinder and spherical shell under internal pressure – volumetric
Strain. Combined loading – Principal Stresses and maximum Shear Stresses - Analytical and
Graphical methods. TotalPeriods: 30 + 30 =
60
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. James M. Gere, Timoshenko, “Mechanics of Materials” 2nd edition, CBS
Publisher,2006
2. Timoshenko.S. and Young D.H. – “Elements of strength materials Vol. I and Vol.
II”., T. Van Nostrand Co-Inc Princeton-N.J. 1990.
ii. References:
1. William Nash, “Strength of Materials”, Schaum's Outlines, 4th edition, 1998
2. Irving H. Shames, James M. Pitarresi, “Introduction to Solid Mechanics”, Pearson, 3rd
edition, 1999

112
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE104 FLUID MECHANICS 2 2 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
The course aims at providing the students with a broad understanding of fluid statics
and dynamics. It deals with the dimensional analysis of models and introduces
analysis of flow through pipes. It outlines the elementary concepts of boundary layer
theory.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Engineering Mathematics II

c. Related Courses:
 Incompressible flow aerodynamics
 Boundary layer theory
 Turbomachinery

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To develop a strong foundation in the fundamentals of fluid mechanics.
 To provide understanding of dimensional analysis and its importance in the
experimental study of fluid mechanics
 To have a basic understanding of flow through pipes and boundary layer
theory.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Discuss the basic properties of fluids and solve typical
CO1 K3
fluid statics problems
Develop the governing fluid dynamic equations and solve
CO2 K3
typical fluid dynamic problems
Use dimensional analysis to design physical and numerical
CO3 K3
experiments and to apply dynamic similarity.
Explain the flow through pipes and solve typical numerical
CO4 K3
problems
Describe the boundary layer concepts and solve typical
CO5 K3
numerical problems

113
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H L H L H H L H
CO2 H M H L H H L H
CO3 H H L H H L H
CO4 H M H L H H L H

CO5 H H L H H L H

H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Content:

UNIT-I BASIC CONCEPTS AND FLUID STATICS L-6 T-6


Fluid – definition, distinction between solid and fluid - Units and dimensions - Properties of
fluids - density, specific weight, specific volume, specific gravity, temperature, viscosity,
compressibility, vapour pressure, capillary and surface tension - Fluid statics: concept of fluid
static pressure, absolute and gauge pressures - pressure measurements by manometers and
pressure gauges
UNIT-II FLIUD KINEMATICS AND FLUID DYNAMICS L-6 T-6
Fluid Kinematics - Flow visualization - lines of flow - types of flow - velocity field and
acceleration - continuity equation (one and three dimensional differential forms)- Equation of
streamline - stream function - velocity potential function - circulation - flow net – fluid
dynamics - equations of motion - Euler's equation along a streamline - Bernoulli's equation –
applications - Venturi meter, Orifice meter, Pitot tube
UNIT-III DIMENSIONAL AND MODEL ANALYSIS L-6 T-6
Need for dimensional analysis – Dimensional homogeneity -Methods of dimensional analysis –
Similitude –types of similitude -Dimensionless parameters- application of dimensionless parameters –
Model Analysis-Model laws- classification of models
UNIT-IV FLOW THROUGH PIPES L-6 T-6
Laminar and turbulent flow- Boundary layer flow – Boundary layer thickness - Reynolds number and
its Significance-Laminar fully developed pipe Flow-Hagen-PoiseuilleFlow-Coefficient of Friction-
Head loss – Darcy-WiesbachEquation-Hydraulic gradient- Total EnergyLines-Moody’s Diagram-
Turbulent flow through pipes
UNIT-V BOUNDARY LAYER THEORY L-6 T-6
Introduction, laminar boundary Layer-Turbulent BoundaryLayer-Laminar sublayer-
boundary layer thickness- displacement thickness- momentum thickness- energy thickness-
shape factor -Drag force on a flat plate due to boundary Layer-Separation of boundary layer,
Drag and Lift on immersed bodies, Numerical problems.

Total Periods: 30 + 30 = 60

h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Kumar, K.L., “Engineering Fluid Mechanics”, Eurasia Publishing House (P) Ltd.,
New Delhi (7th edition), 1995.

114
2. Bansal, R.K., “Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics Machines”, (5th edition), Laxmi
publications (P) Ltd., New Delhi, 1995

ii. References:
1. Philip J. Pritchard, “Fox and Mcdonald's Introduction to Fluid Mechanics”, John
Wiley & Sons Inc, 8th edition, 2011
2. YunusCengel, John Cimbala, “Fluid Mechanics in SI Units”, McGraw Hill Education
(India) Private Limited, 3rd edition, 2014
3. Frank White, “Fluid Mechanics”, McGraw-Hill Education, 8th edition, 2015
4. Streeter, V.L., and Wylie, E.B., “Fluid Mechanics”, McGraw-Hill, 1983.
5. White, F.M., “Fluid Mechanics”, Tata McGraw-Hill, 5th Edition, New Delhi, 2003.
6. Ramamirtham, S., “Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics and Fluid Machines”,
DhanpatRai and Sons, Delhi, 1998.
7. Som, S.K., and Biswas, G., “Introduction to fluid mechanics and fluid machines”,
Tata McGraw-Hill, 2nd edition, 2004.

115
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE105 AERO ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS 2 2 0 3
Course Category:
Programme core

f. Preamble :
The course provides an introduction to the elementary concepts of thermodynamics, First law
of thermodynamics and Energy, second law, Entropy and energy, Ideal and real gases and
non-reactive ideal gas mixtures and general thermodynamic property relations. The course
aims at developing the problem solving skills with both theoretical and engineering oriented
problems in basic thermodynamics.

g. Prerequisite Courses:
 Basic Mechanical Engineering

h. Related Courses:
 Aircraft Gas Turbine Propulsion
 Propulsion Lab
 Heat Transfer
 Turbomachinery

i. Course Educational Objectives :


 To develop understanding on the concepts of first and second law of
thermodynamics and their application in designing the engineering systems
 To analyse various air standard cycles and to solve the problems related to that.
 To discuss in detail, the operations of air conditioning and refrigeration systems and
air compressors

j. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Apply first law of thermodynamics to solve typical
CO1 K3
problems
Apply second law of thermodynamics to solve typical
CO2 K3
problems
Perform air standard analyses of internal combustion
CO3 engines by modeling the engines as Otto Cycle, Diesel K3
Cycle, Dual Cycle and Brayton cycle
Apply theoretical and mathematical principles to vapour
CO4 K3
compression and vapour absorption refrigeration systems.
CO5 Estimate the performance of air compressors K2

k. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

116
CO1 H L H L M H L H
CO2 H L H L M H L H
CO3 H L H L M H L H
CO4 H L H L M H L H
CO5 H L H L M H L H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

l. Course Contents:
UNIT-I BASIC CONCEPTS AND FIRST LAW L-6 T-6
Concept of continuum, macroscopic approach, thermodynamic systems – closed, open and isolated.
Property, state, path and process, quasi-static process, work, modes of work, Zeroth law of
thermodynamics- concept of temperature and heat, internal energy, specific heat capacities, enthalpy -
concept of ideal and real gases. First law of thermodynamics - applications to closed and open
systems - steady flow processes with reference to various thermal equipment’s.
UNIT-II SECOND LAW AND ENTROPY L-6T-6
Second law of thermodynamics – kelvin Planck and Clausius statements of second law.
Reversibility and irreversibility - Carnot theorem. Carnot cycle, reversed Carnot cycle,
efficiency, COP - thermodynamic temperature scale - Clausius inequality, concept of entropy,
entropy of ideal gas, principle of increase of entropy.
UNIT III AIR STANDARD CYCLES L-6T-6
Otto, Diesel, Dual combustion and Brayton combustion cycles – Air standard efficiency -
Mean effective pressure – Actual and theoretical PV, TS diagrams of two stroke and four
stroke IC Engines.
UNIT IV REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING L-6T-6
Principles of refrigeration, Air conditioning - Heat pumps - Vapour compression - Vapour
absorption types - Coefficient of performance, Properties of refrigerants.
UNIT V AIR COMPRESSORS L-6T-6
Classification and working principle of compressors (Descriptive Treatment). Isothermal and
Isentropic efficiency of air compressors.
Total Periods: 30 + 30 = 60
m. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Yunus A Cengel / Michael A Boles, “Thermodynamics - An Engineering Approach”,
(SI Units), Tata Mc Graw Hill India, 7th edition, Special Indian Edition 2011.
2. P K Nag, “Engineering Thermodynamics”, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 6th
Edition, 2008.
3. Rathakrishnan E., “Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics”, Prentice-Hall
India, 2005
ii. References:
1. Yadav R., “Thermodynamics and Heat Engines”, Vol 1, Central Publishing House,
2011.
2. Jones J.B and Dugan R.E., “Engineering Thermodynamics”, Prentice Hall of India,
2010.
3. Roy Choudry T., “Basic Engineering Thermodynamics”, Second Edition, Tata
McGraw Hill, 2012.

117
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE106 LINEAR SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND CONTROL 3 0 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
The course aims at developing the concepts of elements of control system, analysis
and design techniques.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Transforms and Partial differential Equations

c. Related Courses:
 Airplane stability and control
 Navigation guidance and control

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To understand the history and elements of control systems
 To familiarize with stability analysis and design of control systems.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Describe fundamentals and Classify control system
CO1
techniques K2
Apply root locus technique to explain the concepts of
CO2 K3
stability in time domain
Analyze the system stability using bode plots and Nyquist
CO3 K4
plot
CO4 Summarize the concepts of control design K5
CO5 Solve control system problems using state space approach K3

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H H H H
CO2 H H H H H H
CO3 H H H H H H
CO4 H H H H H H
CO5 H H H H H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I INTRODUCTION & SYSTEM MODELLING L-9

118
Introduction, History of control systems, Needs and types of Mathematical models, Definitions of
different control techniques - "Robust, Adaptive, Optimal &Intelligent control system", Transfer
function, State variable Modelling, Conversation between state space and transfer function,
Nonlinearities, Linearization.
UNIT-II TIME DOMAIN ANALYSIS L-9
Standard test signals, Time response of first order systems- Characteristic equation of
feedback control systems, Transient response of second order systems - Time domain
specifications - Steady state errors and error constants-effects of PD, PI systems. Concepts of
stability - Routh's stability criterion - Root locus technique.
UNIT-III FREQUENCY RESPONSE ANALYSIS L-9
Introduction, Frequency domain specifications and transfer function from the Bode diagram -
Phase margin and gain margin - Stability analysis from Bode Plots, Nyquist plot stability
analysis.
UNIT-IV CONTROL DESIGN TECHNIQUE L-9
Compensation techniques - Lag, Lead, and Lead-Lag controllers design in time domain, PID
controllers.
UNIT-V STATE SPACE ANALYSIS: L-9
Concepts of state, state variables and state models, derivation of state models from block
diagrams, diagonalization - solving the time invariant state equations - State transition matrix
and its properties - Concepts of controllability and observability, feedback, Pole placement.

Total Periods: 45
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Norman S. Nisei, “Control Systems Engineering”, 7th Edition, John wiley and sons,
2015
2. Katsuhiko Ogata, “Modern Control Engineering”, 5th edition, Pearson, 2009
ii. References:
1. Constantine H. Houpis, Stuart N. Sheldon, “Linear Control System Analysis and
Design with MATLAB”, 6th edition, CRC Press, 2013
2. M. Gopal, “Modern Control System Theory”, 3rd edition, New Age International
Publishers Ltd, 2014

119
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE107 INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW AERODYNAMICS 3 0 0 3
Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
The primary objective of this course is to teach students how to determine
aerodynamic lift and drag over an airfoil and wing at incompressible flow regime by
analytical methods.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Fluid Mechanics

c. Related Courses:
 Airplane Performance
 Compressible flow Aerodynamics
 Aero elasticity
 Flapping wing dynamics
 Industrial aerodynamics
 Transonic Aerodynamics

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To introduce the concepts of mass, momentum and energy conservation relating to
aerodynamics.
 To make the student understand the concept of vorticity, irrotationality, theory of
air foils and wing sections.
 To introduce the basics of viscous flow.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Apply the physical principles to formulate the governing
CO1 K3
aerodynamics equations
Find the solution for two dimensional incompressible inviscid
CO2 K3
flows
Apply conformal transformation to find the solution for flow
CO3 over airfoils and also find the solutions using classical thin K3
airfoil theory
Apply Prandtl’s lifting-line theory to find the aerodynamic
CO4 K3
characteristics of finite wing
Find the solution for incompressible flow over a flat plate using
CO5 K3
viscous flow concepts

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

120
CO1 H L H L M H H
CO2 H L H L M H H
CO3 H L H L M H H
CO4 H L H L M H H
CO5 H L H L M H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO LOW SPEED FLOW L-9


Models of the fluid: control volumes and fluid elements. Continuity, Momentum and energy
equations. Substantial derivative, Vorticity and circulation, stream function, irrotational flow, velocity
potential, Euler equation, incompressible Bernoulli’s equation.
UNIT-IITWO DIMENSIONAL INVISCID INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW L-9
Laplace Equation, Elementary flows and their combinations, Ideal Flow over a circular
cylinder, Alembert’s paradox, Magnus effect, Kuttajoukowski’s theorem, real flow over
smooth and rough cylinder
UNIT-III AIRFOIL THEORY L-9
Cauchy-Riemann relations, complex potential, methodology of conformal transformation,
Kutta-Joukowski transformation and its applications, Kuttacondition, kelvin’scirculation
theorem, starting vortex, thin airfoil theory and its applications.
UNIT-IV WING THEORY L-9
Vortex filament, Biot-savart law, Helmholtz Theorems bound vortex and trailing vortex,
horse shoe vortex, lifting line theory and its limitations.
UNIT-V VISCOUS FLOW L-9
Newton’s law of viscosity, Boundary Layer, Navier-Stokes equation, displacement,
Momentum thickness, Flow over a flat plate, Blasius solution.
Total Periods: 45
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Houghton, E.L., and Carruthers, N.B., "Aerodynamics for Engineering students",
Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd., London, 1989
2. Anderson, J.D., “Fundamentals of Aerodynamics”, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New
York, 2010.
3. Bertin J.J., and Russell M. Cummings., “Aerodynamics for Engineers” 6th edition,
Prentice-Hall,2013
ii. References:
1. Clancy, L.J., “Aerodynamics”, Pitman, 5th Edition.
2. Houghton, E.L., and P. W. Carpenter., “Aerodynamics for Engineering students”, 6th
Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2012.
3. Tapan K. Sengupta, “Theoretical and Computational Aerodynamics”, 1st edition,
Wiley 2014
4. Radhakrishnan.E, “Theoretical Aerodynamics”, John Wiley & Sons, 2013
5. Karamcheti K., (1966), Principles of Ideal-Fluid Aerodynamics, John Wiley & Sons
Inc.
6. Kuethe A. M. and Chow C.-Y., (1986), “Foundations of Aerodynamics: Bases of
Aerodynamic Design” Wiley India, 2009

121
7. Kundu P.K. & Cohen I.M., (2008), Fluid Mechanics, Elsevier Inc.
8. Milne Thomson, L.H., “Theoretical aerodynamics”, Macmillan, 1985.
9. Ion Paraschivoiu, “SubsonicAerodynamics”, Pressesinternationals
Polytechnique,2003

122
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE108 AIRCRAFT GAS TURBINE PROPULSION 2 2 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
This provides the descriptive knowledge towards concept of air breathing engine such
as gas turbine engine and its practical applications. This subject also links with some
of the other basic prerequisite courses such as Aero Engineering Thermodynamics,
Fluid Mechanics and rockets and missiles. This course provides experimental
approach to the students to investigate gas turbines.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Aero Engineering Thermodynamics

c. Related Courses:
 Rocket and space propulsion
 Ramjet and Scramjet Propulsion
 Combustion in Jet and Rocket Engines

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To understand and analyse the gas turbine engine and its components.
 To realize and analyse the thermodynamics of various component of a gas turbine
engine.
 To synthesize and recognize how the engine integrates into an aircraft system and
how to link the engine requirements to an aircraft’s mission requirements.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Explain the working concept of various types of gas K2
CO1
turbine engines
Differentiate between a subsonic and a supersonic inlet and K4
CO2
further relate it to aerospace applications
Analyze the working concept of various types of K4
CO3
compressor
Examine the suitability of the combustion chamber & K4
CO4
nozzle for a given gas turbine engine
Illustrate the operational and designing concepts of gas K4,
CO5 turbine blade and estimate performance of turbines

f. Correlation of COs with POs:

123
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H M H
CO2 H H M H
CO3 H H M H
CO4 H H M H
CO5 H H M H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT I - FUNDAMENTALS OF GAS TURBINE ENGINES L-6T-6


Illustration of working of gas turbine engine – The thrust equation – Factors affecting thrust
– Effect of pressure, velocity and temperature of air entering through gas turbine engines –
Methods of thrust augmentation – Characteristics of turbojet, turboprop, turbofan, turbo
shaft and ramjet – Performance Characteristics-Materials for gas turbine engines.
UNIT II - SUBSONIC AND SUPERSONIC INLETS L-6T-6
Internal flow and Stall in subsonic inlets – Boundary layer separation – Major features of
external flow near a subsonic inlet – Relation between minimum area ratio and external
deceleration ratio – Diffuser performance – Supersonic inlets – Starting problem on
supersonic inlets – Shock swallowing by area variation – External declaration – Models of
inlet operation.
UNIT III – COMPRESSORS L-6T-6
Principle of operation of axial and centrifugal compressor – Work done and pressure rise –
Velocity diagrams – Diffuser vane design considerations – Concept of prewhirl – Rotation
stall – Elementary theory of axial flow compressor – Velocity triangles – degree of reaction
– Three dimensional – Air angle distributions for free vortex and constant reaction designs –
Compressor blade design – Centrifugal and Axial compressor performance characteristics.
UNIT IV - COMBUSTION CHAMBERS AND NOZZLES L-6T-6
Classification of combustion chambers – Important factors affecting combustion chamber
design – Combustion process – Combustion chamber performance – Effect of operating
variables on performance – Flame tube cooling – Flame stabilization – Use of flame holders
– simplex and Duplex type of Burners. Theory of flow in isentropic nozzles – Convergent
nozzles and nozzle choking – Nozzle throat conditions – Nozzle efficiency – Losses in
nozzles – Over expanded and under expanded nozzles – Ejector and variable area nozzles –
Interaction of nozzle flow with adjacent surfaces – Thrust Reversal-Numerical problems
UNIT V - GAS TURBINES L-6T-6
Impulse and reaction blading of gas turbines – Velocity triangles and power output –
Elementary theory – Vortex theory – Choice of blade profile, pitch and chord – Estimation
of stage performance – Limiting factors in gas turbine design- Overall turbine performance –
Methods of blade cooling – Matching of turbine and compressor – Numerical problems.
.
Total Periods: 30+30= 60
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Hill, P.G. & Peterson, C.R., Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Propulsion,
Pearson India, 2nd Edition 2009.
2. Jack Mattingly, Elements of Gas Turbine Propulsion, Tata McGraw Hill
Education (India) Pvt Ltd, 1st Edition, 2005
ii. References:

124
1. Cohen, H. Rogers, G.F.C. and Saravanamuttoo, HIH and Straznicky, Gas Turbine
Theory, Sixth Edition, Pearson Further Education, 2009
2. Ahmed F. El-Sayed, Aircraft Propulsion and Gas Turbine Engines, Taylor &
Francis Group, 1st Edition, CRC press, 2008
3. Ganesan V, Gas Turbines, 3rd Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill Education (India) Pvt
Ltd, Delhi, 2010
4. Saeed Farokhi, Aircraft Propulsion, John Wiley & Sons Inc; 1st edition (2008)
5. Rolls Royce Jet Engine – Technical Publications Department, Rolls-Royce Plc,
Derby, England, Fifth Edition – 1996.

125
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE109 AIRPLANE PERFORMANCE 3 0 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
This course deals with performance of airplanes under various flight conditions like
take off, cruise, landing, climbing, gliding, turning etc.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Incompressible flow Aerodynamics
 Engineering Mechanics

c. Related Courses:
 Airplane stability and control
 Aircraft Design

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To understand basic concepts of ISA and compute various airspeeds
 To familiarize the concepts of drag polar and aircraft flight performance

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Describes the International standard atmosphere and
CO1 fundamentals of airplane performance K2

Examine effects of altitude and Mach number on drag


CO2 K3
polar

CO3 Estimate steady level flight performance K3

CO4 Estimate Gliding and climbing flight performance K3

CO5 Estimate accelerated flight performance K3

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H M H
CO2 H H M H
CO3 H H M H
CO4 H H M H
CO5 H H M H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low
g. Course Contents:

126
UNIT-I GENERAL CONCEPTS: L-9
International Standard atmosphere, IAS, EAS, TAS, Propeller theory- Blade element theory, Propeller
co-efficient, Use of propeller charts, Performance of fixed and variable pitch propellers, Effect of
power plant on aircraft performance - variation of thrust and SFC with altitude, velocity & Mach
number, High lift devices, Thrust augmentation.
UNIT-II DRAG POLAR: L-9
Streamlined and bluff body, Types of drag, Effect of Reynold’s number on skin friction and
pressure drag, Drag reduction of airplanes, Drag polar, Effect of Mach number on drag polar,
NACA Airfoils, Effect of Aspect ratio and sweep angle on lift and drag.
UNIT-III STEADY LEVEL FLIGHT L-9
Steady level flight, thrust required and Power required, thrust available and Power available
for propeller driven and jet powered aircraft, Effect of altitude, maximum level flight speed,
conditions for minimum drag and minimum power required, Effect of drag divergence on
maximum velocity, Range and Endurance of Propeller and Jet airplanes.
UNIT-IV GLIDING AND CLIMBING FLIGHT: L-9
Shallow and steep angles of climb, Rate of climb, Climb hodograph, Maximum Climb angle
and Maximum Rate of climb- Effect of design parameters for propeller and jet aircrafts,
Absolute and service ceiling, Cruise climb, Gliding flight, Glide hodograph.
UNIT-V ACCELERATD FLIGHT: L-9
Estimation of take-off and landing distances, Methods of reducing landing distance, level
turn, minimum turn radius, bank angle and load factor, Constraints on load factor, pull up and
pull down maneuvers, maximum turn rate, V-n diagram.
Total Periods: 45
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Anderson, J.D., Aircraft Performance and Design, Mc Graw-Hill International
Edition 1999
2. Clancy, L.J., Aerodynamics, Pitman, 1986
ii. References:
1. PerPerkins, C.D., and Hage, R.E., Airplane Performance and Stability and
Control, Wiley Toppan, 1974

127
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE110 COMPRESSIBLE FLOW AERODYNAMICS 2 2 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble :
This course provides the student with an introduction to the basic concepts of
compressible flows, where the density variations are important and must be taken into
account. This requires the knowledge on the science of thermodynamics and the basic
laws of fluid mechanics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the physical
mechanisms involved in both compressible external and internal flows.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Incompressible flow Aerodynamics

c. Related Courses:
 Experimental Aerodynamics
 Hypersonic Aerodynamics
 High Temperature Gas Dynamics
 Missile Aerodynamics
 Ramjet and Scramjet propulsion

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To introduce the students how the thermodynamic concepts, apply to
compressible flow aerodynamics and to analyze 1-D and quasi 1-D flows in
typical aerospace applications
 To familiarize the students with the features of inviscid compressible flows,
including shock and expansion waves and the governing differential equation of
motion of steady compressible flows
 To familiarize the students to estimate the lift and drag for basic aerodynamic
shapes in compressible inviscid flows

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
K2
CO1 Discuss the fundamental concepts involved in compressible flow
Solve typical variable area flow, standing& moving normal –
CO2 K3
shock, Fanno& Rayleigh flow problems by use of the appropriate
equations and tables.
Solve typical problems involving oblique shock waves and
CO3 K3
expansion waves (2-D waves) by use of the appropriate equations
and tables.
Apply the compressible equation of motion to calculate lift and
CO4 drag coefficient of airfoil at subsonic and supersonic regimes and K3
also apply Method of characteristics to design a 2-D supersonic

128
nozzle for aerospace applications (Rockets, Wind tunnels, etc.)
CO5 Examine the aerodynamic characteristics over airfoil, wing and K3
aircraft configurations in compressible flow regime

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H M H L
CO2 H H M H L
CO3 H H M H L
CO4 H H M H L
CO5 H H M H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I COMPRESSIBLE FLOW CONCEPTS L-6 T-6


Compressibility -Continuity, Momentum, Energy and state equations, Velocity of sound, realms of
fluid motion, physical differences between incompressible, subsonic and supersonic flow, Karman’s
rules of supersonic flow, Mach number and Mach angle, Classifications of compressible flow,
Characteristic Mach number
UNIT-IIONE DIMENSIONAL FLOW L-6T-6
Isentropic flow, Area-velocity relation, Area -Mach number relation, Flow through convergent-
divergent passage, Performance under various back pressures. Normal shock relations,
Prandtl’s relation, Hugoniot equation, Rayleigh Supersonic Pitot tubeequation,Fanno flow and
Rayleigh flow
UNIT-III TWO - DIMENSIONAL WAVES L-6T-6
Oblique shock relations,     M relation, Shock Polar, Reflection of oblique shocks, left
running and right running waves, Interaction of oblique shock waves, slip line, shock-
boundary layer interaction, transonic lambda shock, compression corner effect, incident
shock interaction Shock Diamonds, Expansion waves, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, Maximum
turning angle, Simple and non-simple regions- Shock-Expansion theory
UNIT-IV DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF MOTION FOR
STEADYCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS L-6T-6
Velocity potential equation-Small perturbation potential theory, Linearized Pressure
Coefficient, Prandtl-Glauert Compressibility correction, Improved compressibility correction,
Linearized two dimensional supersonic flow theory, Method of Characteristics,2-D
supersonic nozzle design

UNIT-V HIGH SPEED FLOW OVER AIRFOILS, WINGS AND AIRPLANE


CONFIGURATIONS L-6T-6
Critical Mach number, Drag divergence Mach number, Shock Stall, Supercritical Airfoil
Sections, Transonic area rule, swept wing, Airfoils for supersonic flows, Lift, drag, pitching
moment and Centre of pressure for supersonic profiles, wave drag, supersonic wings, Design
considerations for supersonic aircraft- aerodynamic heating

129
TotalPeriods:30+30=60
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Anderson, J. D., Modern Compressible Flow with Historical Perspective, 3rd ed.,
McGraw-Hill, 2004
2. Rathakrishnan, E., “Gas Dynamics”, Prentice Hall of India, 2003.

ii. References:
1. Hodge.B.K., “Compressible fluid dynamics”, 1st edition, Pearson education India, 2016
2. Patrick H. Oosthuizen, William E. Carscallen, “Introduction to Compressible fluid
flow”, 2nd edition, CRC press, 2013
3. Michel A Saad, “Compressible Fluid Flow”, 2nd edition, Prentice Hall, 1992.
4. Shapiro, A.H., “Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Compressible Fluid Flow”, Ronold
Press, 1982.
5. Liepmann, H., and A. Roshko, “Elements of Gas Dynamics”, Dover Publications, 2002
6. Zucrow, M.J. and Hoffman, J.D., “Gas dynamics”, Vol 1, John Wiley 1982
7. McCormick. W., “Aerodynamics, Aeronautics and Flight Mechanics”, John Wiley,
New York, 1979.
8. Thompson, P. A. Compressible Fluid Dynamics. Maple Press Company, 1984
9. Zucker, R. D. and Biblarz, O., Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, 2nd ed., John Wiley
(2002).
10. John, J. E. A. and Keith, T., Gas Dynamics, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall (2006).
11. George Emanuel., “Gas dynamics: Theory and Applications”, AIAA Education Series,
1986.
12. Yahya, S. M., Fundamentals of Compressible Flow with Aircraft and Rocket
Propulsion, 3rd ed., New Age International Publishers (2003).

130
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE111 ROCKET AND SPACE PROPULSION 3 0 0 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of chemical, nuclear and
electrical rockets. It introduces students to cognitive learning in Aerospace Propulsion
and develops problem solving skills with both theoretical and engineering oriented
problems.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Aircraft Gas Turbine Propulsion

c. Related Courses:
 Electric Propulsion
 Propellants and Fuel Technology
 Rockets and Missiles

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To teach basic principles of rocket propulsion.
 To teach and apply physical and mathematical methods used in analyzing
engineering applications involving rockets.
 To familiarize the students about the various space propulsion techniques used in
spacecraft applications

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Discuss the basic concepts of chemical rocket propulsion K2
CO2 Explain the concepts involved in solid rocket propulsion K2
CO3 Describe the concepts of liquid rocket propulsion K3
CO4 Explain the concepts involved in hybrid rocket propulsion K3
Select the suitable space propulsion system for a prescribed
CO5 spacecraft mission K2

131
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H H
CO2 H H H H
CO3 H H H H
CO4 H H H H
CO5 H H H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMICAL ROCKET PROPULSION L- 9


Operating principle – specific impulse of a rocket – internal ballistics – performance
considerations of rockets – types of igniters- preliminary concepts in nozzle-less propulsion –
air augmented rockets – pulse rocket motors – static testing of rockets & instrumentation –
safety considerations
UNIT-II SOLID ROCKET PROPULSION L- 9
Salient features of solid propellant rockets – selection criteria of solid propellants – estimation of solid
propellant adiabatic flame temperature - propellant grain design considerations – erosive burning in
solid propellant rockets – combustion instability – strand burner and T-burner – applications and
advantages of solid propellant rockets
UNIT-III LIQUID ROCKET PROPULSION L- 9
Salient features of liquid propellant rockets – selection of liquid propellants – various feed
systems and injectors for liquid propellant rockets -thrust control and cooling in liquid
propellant rockets and the associated heat transfer problems – combustion instability in liquid
propellant rockets – peculiar problems associated with operation of cryogenic engines.
UNIT-IV HYBRID ROCKET PROPULSION L- 9
Introduction to hybrid rocket propulsion – standard and reverse hybrid systems- combustion
mechanism in hybrid propellant rockets – applications and limitations
UNIT-V ADVANCED PROPULSION TECHNIQUES L- 9
Electric rocket propulsion– types of electric propulsion techniques - Ion propulsion – Nuclear
rocket –comparison of performance of these propulsion systems with chemical rocket
propulsion systems –future applications of electric propulsion systems - Solar sail
Total Periods: 45
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Anderson, Sutton, G.P., “Rocket Propulsion Elements”, John Wiley & Sons Inc.,
New York, 5th Edition, 1993.
2. Mathur, M.L., and Sharma, R.P., “Gas Turbine, Jet and Rocket Propulsion”,
Standard Publishers and Distributors, Delhi, 1988
ii. References:
1. Hill, P.G. & Peterson, C.R., Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Propulsion, Pearson
India, 2nd Edition 2009.

132
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE112 AIRPLANE STABILITY AND CONTROL 3 0 0 3
Course Category:
Programme core
a. Preamble:
This course introduces about the stability and control of an aircraft. The stability and
control are the two important pre-requisites of a safe flight. The six-degree-of-
freedom differential equations of motion are introduced. Then the linearized perturbed
state equations of motion are derived. Important topics in this course are:
Longitudinal static and dynamics stability, stick fixed and free neutral points and
static margin, lateral-directional static and dynamic stability, trim condition,
longitudinal-lateral-directional coupling, control and maneuverability, stick fixed and
free maneuverer points, stability and control derivatives and handling qualities and
control response.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Linear system analysis and control
 Airplane performance

c. Related Courses:
 Aircraft Design
 Autopilot Design
 Flight Mechanics and Control Laboratory

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To introduce the concepts of static and dynamic stability of airplanes in stick fixed
and stick free conditions.
 To introduce the concept of control of airplanes under various operating conditions

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Describe the concepts of stability and control and
CO1 Determine static longitudinal stability criteria for a stable K2
airplane
Determine static longitudinal control derivatives, and K3
CO2
Estimate the Maneuvering stability of an aircraft.
Explain the static lateral and directional stability and K3
CO3
control derivatives, and criteria for a stable airplane
Determine the stability and control derivatives of an K3
CO4
airplane
Discuss the various dynamic instabilities of an aircraft K2
CO5
motion
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

133
CO1 H L H H H
CO2 H L H H H
CO3 H L H H H
CO4 H L H H H
CO5 H L H H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I INDRODUCTION TO AIRPLANE STABILITY AND STATIC


LONGITUDINAL STABILITY
L-9
Degree of freedom of a system - Static and dynamic stability - Need for stability in an
airplane - Purpose of controls - Inherently and marginally stable airplanes, Longitudinal
Stability criterion – Contribution of wing and tail (Aft tail- Elevator & Forward tail –Canard)
to pitching moments - Effect of fuselage and nacelles - Power effects - Stabilizer setting and
center of gravity location. Control fixed neutral point. Stability margins.
UNIT-II STATIC LONGITUDINAL CONTROL AND MANAUVERING
STABILITY
L-9
Elevator power– Elevator to trim. Trim gradients. Effects of releasing the elevator. Hinge
moment coefficients – Control forces to trim. Control free neutral point – Trim tabs.
Aerodynamic balancing of control surfaces. Means of augmentation of control. Contribution
of pitch damping to pitching moment of flight vehicle - Effect on trim and stability. Control
deflections and control forces for trim in symmetric maneuvers and coordinated turns.
Control deflection and force gradients. Control fixed and control free maneuver stability.
Maneuver points. Maneuver margins.
UNIT-III STATIC LATERAL - DIRECTIONAL STABILITY AND CONTROL L-9
Dihedral effect - Coupling between rolling and yawing moment - Adverse yaw - Aileron
power - Aileron reversal. Weather cocking effects – Rudder power. Lateral and directional
stability- definition. Control surface deflections in steady sideslips, rolls and turns one engine
inoperative conditions - Rudder lock.
UNIT-IV DYNAMIC EQUATIONS FOR FLIGHT VEHICLE: L-9
Equations of motion of a rigid body, Inertial forces and moments. Equations of motion of
flight vehicles, aerodynamic forces and moments, Decoupling of longitudinal and lateral-
directional equations. Linearization of equations, Aerodynamic stability and control
derivatives, Relation to geometry, flight configuration, Effects of power, compressibility and
flexibility.
UNIT-V DYNAMIC STABILITY ANALYSIS: L-9
Solutions to the stability quartic of the Linearized equations of motion. The principal modes.
Phugoid, Short Period Dutch Roll and Spiral modes - Further approximations. Restricted
degrees of motion. Solutions. Response to controls. Auto rotation and spin.
Total Periods: 45

h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:

134
1. Robert C. Nelson, Flight Stability and Automatic Control, 2nd Edition, McGraw
Hill, 1997
2. Courtland D. Perkins, Robert E. Hage, Airplane Performance, Stability and
Control, 1st Edition, John Wiley, New York 1949

ii. References:
1. Bernard Etkin, Lloyd Duff Reid, Dynamics of Flight: Stability and Control, 3rd
Edition, John Wiley, New York 1995
2. Warren F. Phillips., Mechanics of Flight, Second Edition, Wiley,2009
3. Thomas R. Yacht, Introduction to Aircraft Flight Mechanics: Performance, Static
Stability, Dynamic Stability, Feedback Control and State-Space Foundations,2nd
Revised Edition, AIAA Education Series, 2014
4. Bandu N. Pamadi, Performance, Stability, Dynamics, and Control of Airplanes,
2nd Edition, AIAA Education Series, 2004
5. Louis V. Schmidt, Introduction to Aircraft Flight Dynamics, 1st Edition, AIAA
Education Series, 1998
6. Michael V. Cook., Flight Dynamics Principles: A Linear Systems Approach to
Aircraft Stability and Control, 3rd edition, Butterworth-Heinemann
7. Nandan K. Sinha, N. Ananthkrishnan, Elementary Flight Dynamics with an
Introduction to Bifurcation and Continuation Methods, 1st Edition, CRC Press,
2013
8. Roskam, J., Airplane Flight Dynamics and Automatic Flight Controls part I, DAR
Corporation, 2001.

135
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE213 NUMERICAL METHODS USING MATLAB 2 0 2 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
The course focuses on some of the most important numerical methods to solve
Aerospace engineering. The numerical software package MATLAB is introduced and
used throughout the course.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Transforms and Partial differential equations

c. Related Courses:
 Finite element methods
 Approximate Methods in Structural Mechanics
 Computational fluid dynamics

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To develop the mathematical skills of the students in the area of numerical
methods.
 To teach theory and applications of numerical methods in a large number of
engineering subjects which require solutions of linear systems, finding
eigenvalues, eigenvectors, interpolation and applications, solving ODEs, PDEs
and dealing with statistical problems like testing of hypotheses.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Apply numerical methods to solve algebraic equations K3
using different methods under different conditions, and to
CO1
analyze the numerical solution of system of algebraic
equations.
Apply various interpolation methods and finite difference K3
CO2
concepts.
Work out numerical differentiation and integration K4
CO3 whenever and wherever routine methods are not
applicable.
Work numerically on the ordinary differential equations K3
CO4 using different methods through the theory of finite
differences
Work numerically on the partial differential equations K3
CO5 using different methods through the theory of finite
differences

136
f. Correlation of COs with POs:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H H L M
CO2 H H H H L M
CO3 H H H H L M
CO4 H H H H L M
CO5 H H H H L M
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I SOLUTION OF EQUATIONS AND EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS L-6P-6


Solution of algebraic and transcendental equations - Fixed point iteration method – Newton Raphson
method- Solution of linear system of equations - Gauss elimination method – Pivoting - Gauss Jordan
method – Iterative methods of Gauss Jacobi and Gauss Seidel - Matrix Inversion by Gauss Jordan
method - Eigenvalues of a matrix by Power method. MATLAB based problems
UNIT-II INTERPOLATION AND APPROXIMATION L-6P-6
Interpolation with unequal intervals - Lagrange's interpolation – Newton’s divided difference
interpolation – Cubic Splines - Interpolation with equal intervals - Newton’s forward and
backward difference formulae. MATLAB based problems
UNIT-III NUMERICAL DIFFERENTIATION AND INTEGRATION L-6P-6
Approximation of derivatives using interpolation polynomials - Numerical integration using
Trapezoidal, Simpson’s 1/3 rule – Romberg’s method - Two point and three point Gaussian
quadrature formulae – Evaluation of double integrals by Trapezoidal and Simpson’s 1/3 rules.
MATLAB based problems
UNIT-IV INITIAL VALUE PROBLEMS FOR ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL
EQUATIONS L-6P-6
Single Step methods - Taylor’s series method - Euler’s method - Modified Euler’s method –Fourth
orderRunge-Kutta method for solving first order equations - Multi step methods - Milne’s and
Adams-Bash forth predictor corrector methods for solving first order equations. MATLAB based
problems
UNIT-V BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS IN ORDINARY AND PARTIAL
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS L-6P-6
Finite difference methods for solving two-point linear boundary value problems - Finite difference
techniques for the solution of two dimensional Laplace’s and Poisson’s equations on rectangular
domain – One dimensional heat flow equation by explicit and implicit (Crank Nicholson) methods –
One dimensional wave equation by explicit method. MATLAB based problems
Total Periods: 30 + 30 = 60
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Grewal. B.S., and Grewal. J.S., " Numerical methods in Engineering and
Science", Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 9th Edition, 2007
2. Chapra. S.C., and Canale.R.P., "Numerical Methods for Engineers, 5th Edition,
Tata McGraw - Hill, New Delhi, 2007
ii. Reference Books:

137
1. Brian Bradie. "A friendly introduction to Numerical analysis", Pearson Education,
Asia, New Delhi,2007.
2. Sankara Rao. K., "Numerical methods for Scientists and Engineers", 3rd Edition,
Prentice Hall ofIndia Private Ltd., New Delhi, 2007.

138
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE214 AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS AND INSTRUMENTS 1 0 2 2

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
The course deals with the basic principles and working of various aircraft systems
and instruments. The course aims at enhancing the knowledge of students in aircraft
system’s handling procedures, maintenance practices and technical aspects of various
systems.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Introduction to Aerospace Engineering

c. Related Courses:
 Avionics
 Aircraft general engineering and system maintenance

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To inculcate the basic knowledge and understanding of various aircraft systems,
instruments and their applications.
 To introduce the safety precautions and methodology of handling aircraft
systems

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Summarize the operations of Hydraulic, Pneumatic and
CO1 K2
Landing gear systems
Describe the working principles of control systems in an
CO2 K2
aircraft
Illustrate and demonstrate the concepts of starting, ignition,
CO3 fuel and lubricating systems of typical aircraft power plants K3
and.
Discuss the ideas of air cycle systems along with fire
CO4 K2
protection, deicing and anti-icing systems.
Explain the technical aspects of aircraft instruments and
CO5 their working principle K2

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H M L
CO2 H H M L
CO3 H H L

139
CO4 H M M L
CO5 H H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT I -AIRPLANE CONTROL SYSTEMS L3


Conventional Systems - fully powered flight controls - Power actuated systems – Auto pilot
system - fly by wire systems - Digital Fly by wire system
UNIT II -AIRCRAFT PROTECTION SYSTEMS L3
Fire protection system, Deicing and anti-icing systems - Working principles -Components -
Advantages –Applications.
UNIT III -ENGINE SYSTEMS L3
Lubricating systems for piston and jet engines,starting procedures for reciprocating and gas
turbine engine aircrafts, Ignition system - components– working principle.
UNIT IV -HUMAN COMFORT SYSTEMS L3
Basic Air cycle systems - Vapor compression and absorption cycle systems, Cabin air
pressure system, and Evaporative vapor cycle systems - Evaporative air cycle systems.
UNIT V -AIRCRAFT INSTRUMENTS L3
Flight Instruments and Navigation Instruments – Air speed Indicators: TAS, EAS, IAS, CAS,
Vertical speed indicator- Mach Meters –Variometers- Altimeters - Principles and operation -
Study of various types of engine instruments - Tachometers - Temperature gauges - Pressure
gauges - Operation and Principles- Gyroscope – Accelerometers, ILS.
Total hours: 15+ 15 = 30
LIST OF EXPERIMENTS:

1. Aircraft “Jacking Up” procedure


2. Aircraft “Levelling” procedure
3. Control System “Rigging check” procedure
4. Aircraft “Symmetry Check” procedure
5. Fuel systems for Gas turbine engine and Jet engine – An overview.
6. Study on the methods of Aircraft braking systems and “Brake Torque Load Test” on
wheel brake unit.
7. Study on hydraulic systems and Pneumatic systems - maintenance and rectification of
snags.
8. Study of Landing gear systems, classification and their components.

h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. McKinley, J.L., and Bent, R.D., “Aircraft Maintenance & Repair”, McGraw-Hill,
2013.
2. “General Hand Books of Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics”, U.S. Dept. of
Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, The English Book Store, New Delhi
1995.

ii. References:

140
1. “Airframe and Power Plant Mechanics: Power plant Handbook” by Federal Aviation
Administration, Aircraft Technical Book Company, 2012.
2. Mekinley, J.L. and Bent, R.D., “Aircraft Power Plants”, McGraw-Hill, 1993.
3. Pallet, E.H.J., “Aircraft Instruments & Principles”, Pitman & Co., 1993.
4. Treager, S., “Gas Turbine Technology”, McGraw-Hill, 1997

141
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE215 AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL MECHANICS 1 2 2 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
Aircraft Structural mechanics deals with the linear and static analysis of
determinate and indeterminate aircraft structural components. The course contents
have been designed such that the students get familiar with the fundamental aspects of
different types of beams and columns subjected to various types of loading and
support conditions with particular emphasis on aircraft structural components. Also
provide the design process using different failure theories.
b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Strength of Materials

c. Related Courses:
 Aircraft structural analysis
 Aircraft structures Laboratory
 Finite element Methods
 Theory of elasticity
 Theory of vibrations

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To understand the structural behavior of different types of beams and columns
subjected to various loading conditions with particular emphasis on aircraft
structural components.
 To provide the knowledge of various failure theories

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of this course students will be able to

CO Level of learning domain


Course Outcomes
Nos. (Based on revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Analyze the statically determinate structures. K3, S3
CO2 Analyze the statically indeterminate structures. K3, S3
CO3 Apply strain energy theorems on structural members K3
CO4 Examine the columns with various end conditions. K2, S3
CO5 Explain the design process using various theories of failure. K2

f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H L H L H H L

142
CO2 H L H L H H L
CO3 H L H L H H L
CO4 H L H L H H L
CO5 H L H L H H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:
UNIT I -STATICALLY DETERMINATE STRUCTURES L-6T-6
Review of Basic Strength of materials - Analysis of plane truss – Method of joints – 3 D
Truss -Plane frames - Composite beam

UNIT II STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURES L-6T-6


Propped Cantilevers-- fixed- fixed beam- Clapeyron's Three Moment Equation - Moment
Distribution Method.

UNIT III ENERGY METHODS L-6T-6


Strain Energy due to axial, bending and torsional loads - Castigliano's theorem - Maxwell's
Reciprocal theorem, Unit load method - application to beams, trusses, frames, rings, etc.

UNIT IV COLUMNS L-6T-6


Columns with various end conditions – Euler’s Column curve – Rankine’s formula - Column
with initial curvature - Eccentric loading – South well plot – Beam column.

UNIT V FAILURE THEORY L-6T-6


Ductile and Brittle Materials Maximum Stress theory – Maximum Strain Theory – Maximum
Shear Stress Theory – Distortion Theory – Maximum Strain energy theory and simple
problems of shaft under combined loading.
Total Periods: 45+30=7 5

List of Experiments
1. Determination of Young’s Modulus of steel using mechanical extensometers.
2. Determination of Young’s Modulus of Aluminium using electrical strain gauges.
3. Deflection of beams with various end conditions.
4. Verification of Maxwell’s Reciprocal theorem
5. Verification of principle of superposition.
6. Column – testing.
7. South – well’s plot.

h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. James M. Gere, Timoshenko, “Mechanics of Materials” 2nd edition, CBS
Publisher,2006
2. Timoshenko, S., “Strength of Materials”, Vol. I and II, Princeton D. vonNostrand
Co, 1990.

143
ii. References:
1. Donaldson, B.K., “Analysis of Aircraft Structures – An Introduction”, McGraw-Hill,
1993.
2. Bruhn.E.F.” Analysis and design of flight vehicle structures” Tri set of offset
Company, USA, 1973.
3. Peery, D.J., and Azar, J.J., Aircraft Structures, 2nd edition, McGraw – Hill, N.Y.,
1999.

144
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE216 AIRCRAFT STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 1 2 2 3

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
This course provides an introduction to the basic analysis of aircraft components such
as ribs, bulk heads and stringers. It introduces the phenomenon of analysis of plate
structure

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Aircraft structural mechanics

c. Related Courses:
 Nil

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To develop the analytical knowledge of the students in the area of aircraft
structural components.
 To prepare students for designing structural elements of the wing and fuselage
sections with minimum weight and to know the behaviour of various aircraft
structural components under different types of loads.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
CO Knowledge Level (Based on
Course Outcomes
Nos. revised Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Analyze the bending stress in different section with various
CO1 K4,S3
methods
Understand the importance of shear center and shear flow
CO2 K3,S3
and analyze shear flow of various open section
Develop the concept of torsion and shear flow due to and
CO3 K3,S3
analyze shear flow of various closed section
Analyze plates and sheets under buckling and find out the
CO4 K4,S3
strength of stiffener panel
Analyze the aircraft wing components like ribs and
calculate the properties structural elements of an aircraft
CO5 K5,S3
and derive the effects various loads on the aircraft
structural components

f. Correlation of COs with POs:

145
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H L H H H L
CO2 H L H H H L
CO3 H L H H H L
CO4 H L H H H L
CO5 H L H H H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Contents:

UNIT-I UNSYMMETRICAL BENDING L-6 T-6


Bending of symmetric beams subject to skew loads - bending stresses in beams of
unsymmetrical sections – generalized ‘k’ method, neutral axis method, and principal axis
method.
UNIT-II SHEAR FLOW IN OPEN SECTIONS L-6 T-6
Thin walled beams, Concept of shear flow, shear Centre, Elastic axis. With one axis of
symmetry, with wall effective and ineffective in bending, unsymmetrical beam sections,
structural idealization, Shear flow variation in idealized sections.
UNIT-III SHEAR FLOW IN CLOSED SECTIONS L-6 T-6
Bredth – Batho formula, Single and multi – cell structures. Approximate methods. Shear flow
in single &multicell structures under torsion. Shear flow in single and multicell under
bending with walls effective and ineffective.
UNIT-IV BUCKLING OF PLATES L-6 T-6
Rectangular sheets under compression, Local buckling stress of thin walled sections,
Crippling stresses by Needham’s and Gerard’s methods, thin walled column strength. Sheet
stiffener panels. Effective width, inter rivet and sheet wrinkling failures.
UNIT-V STRESS ANALYSIS IN WING AND FUSELAGE L-6 T-6
Loads on an aircraft – the V-n diagram – shear force and bending moment distribution over
the aircraft wing and fuselage and other types of wings and fuselage, thin webbed beam. With
parallel and non-parallel flanges, monocoque and Semi-monocoque aerospace structures
Shear resistant web beams, Tension field web beams (Wagner’s).
Total Periods: 45+30=7 5

List of Experiments
1. Unsymmetrical bending of beams
2. Shear Centre location for open sections
3. Shear center location for closed sections
4. Constant strength beam
5. Flexibility matrix for cantilever Plate
6. Beam with combined loading
7. Calibration of Photo- elastic materials
8. Stresses in circular discs and beams using photo elastic techniques
9. Wagner beam – Tension field beam

h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. T.H.G. Megson, “Aircraft Structures for Engineering Students”,
th
5 editionButterworth-Heinemann, 2012

146
2. Bruhn.E.F.” Analysis and design of flight vehicle structures” Tri set of offset
Company, USA, 1973.

ii. References:
1. C. T. Sun, “Mechanics of Aircraft Structures”, Wiley, 2nd edition,2006
2. Donaldson, B.K., “Analysis of Aircraft Structures – An Introduction”, McGraw-Hill,
1993.
3. T.H.G. Megson, “Introduction to Aircraft structural analysis”, 2nd edition,
Butterworth-Heinemann, 2013
4. Peery, D.J., and Azar, J.J., Aircraft Structures, 2nd edition, McGraw – Hill, N.Y.,
1999.
5. Howard D Curtis, „Fundamentals of Aircraft Structural Analysis‟, WCB-McGraw-
Hill, 1997
6. David H. Allen, Walter Haisler, “Introduction to Aerospace Structural Analysis”,
John wiley and sons, 1985
7. Rivello, R.M., Theory and Analysis of Flight Structures, McGraw Hill, 1993.

147
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE217 AVIONICS 2 0 2 3

Course Category:
Programme

a. Preamble:
This course Avionics provides an introduction to the basic concepts of electronics, working
of communication and navigation systems in aircraft. It introduces the applications of
digital electronic systems and flight control systems. This subject helps to understand basic
Digital Avionics Architecture, GPS and modern Auto-pilot system. It introduces students to
cognitive learning in applied electronics and develops problem solving skills with both
theoretical and engineering oriented problems.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Aircraft Systems and Instruments
c. Related Courses:
 Navigation guidance and control
d. Course Educational Objectives:
 To introduce the basic concepts of ILS & Autopilot Systems.
 To introduce the basic concepts of cockpit digital instruments, digital avionic
interfaces communication and navigation systems.

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Discuss the basic concepts of Avionics & subsystems. K2
Describe the working principle of ILS & its subsystems
CO2 and Demonstrate the programming skill in microprocessor K2, S3
and micro controller
Describe the principles of Avionics System architecture
CO3 and Demonstrate MIL – STD – 1553 Avionics data buses K2, S3

CO4 Describe the principles of Instruments in flight deck K2


Illustrate the working principle navigation &
CO5 communication systems. K2

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H H
CO2 H H H H H H H

148
CO3 H H H H H H
CO4 H H H
CO5 H H H H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Content:

UNIT-IINTRODUCTION TO AVIONICS L-6


Need for Avionics in civil and military aircraft and space systems – Integrated
Avionics and Weapon system – Typical avionics sub systems – Design and
Technologies.
UNIT-IIDIGITAL, RANGING AND LANDING SYSTEMS L-6
Digital Computers – Microprocessors – Memories – Aircraft communication systems,
VHF Omni range – VOR receiver principles – distance maturity equipment –
principles of operation – Instrument landing system – localizer and glide slope
UNIT-III DIGITAL AVIONICS ARCHITECTURE L-6
Avionics system architecture–Data buses MIL–STD 1553 B–ARINC 429–ARINC
629

UNIT-IV FLIGHT DECK AND COCKPITS L-6


Control and display technologies CRT, LED, LCD, EL and plasma panel - Touch
screen - Direct voice input (DVI) - Civil cockpit and military cockpit: MFDS, HUD,
MFK, HOTAS.
UNIT-VINTRODUCTION TO AVIONICS SYSTEM L-6
Navigation systems - Flight control systems - Radar electronic warfare - Utility
Systems Reliability and maintainability - Certification.

Total: 30 Periods
h. LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Programming in digital electronics training kit
2. Programming in microprocessor and micro controller
3. Simple programs using Arduino microcontroller
4. MIL-Std – 1553 Data Buses Configuration with Message transfer.
5. MIL-Std – 1553 Remote Terminal Configuration.
Total: 30 Periods

i. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Collinson R.P.G. “Introduction to Avionics”, Chapman and Hall, 1996.
2. Malcrno A.P. and Leach, D.P., “Digital Principles and Application”, Tata
McGraw-Hill, 1990.
3. Gaonkar, R.S., “Microprocessors Architecture – Programming and Application”,
Wiley and Sons Ltd., New Delhi, 1990.
ii. Reference:

149
1. Middleton, D.H., Ed., “Avionics Systems, Longman Scientific and Technical”,
Longman Group UK Ltd., England, 1989.
2. Spitzer, C.R., “Digital Avionic Systems”, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,
USA. 1987.
3. Spitzer. C.R. "The Avionics Hand Book", CRC Press, 2000
4. Brain Kendal, “Manual of Avionics”, The English Book House, 3rd Edition, New
Delhi, 1993

150
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR
1151AE218 2 2 2 4
AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
The course introduces to theoretical basics and practical application of the finite element
method as well as to related numerical modeling techniques. It is designed to solve practical
engineering problems related to solid mechanics, heat transfer. It provides necessary tool
for the analysis and solution of practical structures and processes.

b. Prerequisite Courses:
 Numerical Methods using MATLAB
 Compressible flow Aerodynamics
 Aircraft structural Mechanics

c. Related Courses:
 Nil

d. Course Educational Objectives:


 To equip the students with basic methodology of Finite Element Method.
 To formulate the structural analysis using FEM.
 To perform engineering simulations using Finite Element Method software
packages

e. Course Outcomes:
Upon the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
CO1 Describe different types of computational methods K2
Describe computational procedures
CO2 K2, S3
Solve one dimensional problems using numerical
CO3 K4, S3
techniques
CO4 Solve the problems on plane elasticity K4, S3
Solve heat transfer and torsion problems by application of
CO5 K4, S3
FEM and compare with theoretical solutions

f. Correlation of COs with POs:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H H H H
CO2 H H H H H H H

151
CO3 H H H H H H
CO4 H H H H H H
CO5 H H H H H H H
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course Content:

UNIT-I INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL METHODS


Review of fluid mechanics, Types of fluid flow, governing equations of fluid flow-
Continuity, Momentum, energy equations, Boundary conditions, Governing equations for
incompressible and compressible flows-Introduction to FEA- Classical Techniques in FEA -
Finite Element Method-Finite VolumeMethod-Finite difference method.
Experiments:
(i) Overview of computational software-ANSYS
(ii) Introduction to various types of elements used in FEA and CFD
UNIT-II COMPUTATIONAL PROCEDURES
Process in CFD and FEA- preprocessing- mathematical modeling, Geometry and mesh
creation, solver- Discretization method (Basics) and post processing- Contours, vectors, plots,
streamlines, Residuals,
Experiments:
(i) Hands on training on fluid flow over flat plate using commercial software
(ii) Hands on training on fluid flow over cylinder using commercial software
(iii)Hands on training on fluid flow over typical airfoil using commercial software
UNIT III APPLICATIONS OF 1D ELEMENTS
Stiffness matrix formulation of 1D element - Bar, Truss and Beam-Numerical applications of
1D element.
Experiments:
(i) Structural analysis of uniform/stepped bar
(ii) Structural analysis of plane truss
(iii)Structural analysis
UNIT IV PLANE ELASTICITY PROBLEMS
Various types of 2-D-elements Application to plane stress, plane strain and Axisymmetric
analysis.
Experiments:
(i) Stress analysis of a plate with hole using plane stress element.
(ii) Stress analysis of a cylinder subjected to internal pressure using plane strain element.
(iii)Stress analysis of a fin using Axisymmetric element.
UNIT V FIELD PROBLEMS

152
Applications to other field problems like heat transfer and fluid flow.
Experiments:
(i) Thermal analysis of a rod using 1D heat conduction element
(ii) Thermal analysis of a plate using 2D heat transfer element.
h. Learning Resources
i. Text Books:
1. Tirupathi.R. Chandrapatha and Ashok D. Belegundu, “Introduction to Finite
Elements in Engineering”, Third Edition,Prentice Hall India, 2003
2. Rao. S.S., " The Finite Element Methods in Engineering," 5th edition, Butterworth
and Heinemann, 2010
3. Reddy J.N., "An Introduction to Finite Element Method", 3rdedition, McGraw Hill,
2005
ii. Reference:
1. Daryl L. Logan, “A First Course in the Finite Element Method”, 5th edition, Cengage
Learning, 2012
2. Krishnamurthy, C.S., "Finite Element Analysis", 2nd edition, Tata McGraw Hill, 2001.
3. Bathe, K.J. and Wilson, E.L., "Numerical Methods in Finite Elements Analysis",
Prentice Hall of India, 1985.
4. Robert D Cook, David S Malkus, Michael E Plesha, "Concepts and Applications of
Finite Element Analysis", 4th edition, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2003.
5. Larry J Segerlind, "Applied Finite Element Analysis", Second Edition, John Wiley
and Sons, Inc.1984.

153
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE319 Strength of Materials Laboratory 0 0 2 1

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
Strength of Materials Labdemonstratesthe basic principles of strength and
mechanics of materials through a series of experiments using Universal Testing Machines to
calculate tensile strength of steel and aluminum samples and experiments to measure
hardness of steels. Students will also test steel samples in single shear, double shear and
impact loading, followed by experiments on the torsion testing machine to calculate torsional
strength of aluminum samples and the strut apparatus to analyze different modes of buckling
in a slender aluminum column.
b. Pre-requisites:
 Engineering Mathematics II

c. Link to Other Courses


 Nil
d. Course Educational Objectives
Students undergoing this course are expected:
 To enhance knowledge in testing of various structural components using different
structural testing machines.
 To calculate material properties like tensile, compressive, impact and shear strength.

e. Course outcomes:
On successful completion of this course students will be able to
Level of
CO learning domain
Course Outcomes
Nos. (Based on
revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Estimate hardness of various materials using Brinell and K4,S3
Rockwell hardness tests.
CO2 Operate UTM and calculate tensile strength of various K4,S3
materials.
CO3 Estimate the impact strength of materials using Izod and K4,S3
Charpy testing machines.
CO4 Calculate the linear and torsion stiffness of springs. K4,S3
CO5 Calibrate strain gauges. K4,S3

(S1-Factual, S2-Conceptual, S3-Procedural, S4-Metacognitive)

154
f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H L H H H L
CO2 H H H L H H H L
CO3 H H H L H H H L
CO4 H H H L H H H L
CO5 H H H L H H H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. LIST OF EXPERIMENTS
1. Brinell Hardness test
2. Rockwell Hardness test
3. Tension test
4. Torsion test
5. Izod Impact test
6. Charpy Impact test
7. Testing of springs (linear and torsion)
8. Block Compression Test
9. Shear Test
10. Calibration of Strain gauge
Total Periods: 30

155
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE320 THERMODYNAMICS LABORATORY 0 0 2 1

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
This course indulges with experimental techniques for the understanding of basic
thermodynamics concepts.
b. Pre- requisites:
 Basic mechanical engineering
c. Link to Other Courses
 Nil
d. Course Educational Objectives
Students undergoing this course are expected:


To study energy transformations and thermodynamic relationships applied to flow
and non-flow processes in refrigeration cycles using experiments.
 To introduce the concept of IC engines operation and also estimate the heat
transfer properties of solid material.
e. Course outcomes:
On successful completion of this course students will be able to
Level of learning
CO
Course Outcomes domain (Based on
Nos.
revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Estimate performance of IC engines using experiments K2,S3
CO2 Estimate properties of simple heat engines K2,S3
CO3 Estimate flash and power point of the fuel K3,S3
CO4 Understand the thermal conductivity and thermal resistances K2,S3

(S1-Factual, S2-Conceptual, S3-Procedural, S4-Metacognitive)

f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H L H H H L
CO2 H H H L H H H L
CO3 H H H L H H H L
CO4 H H H L H H H L
. H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. List of experiments

1. Performance test on a 4-stroke diesel engine


2. Valve timing of a 4 – stroke diesel engine

156
3. Port timing of a 2-stroke petrol engine
4. Determination of effectiveness of a parallel flow heat exchanger
5. Determination of effectiveness of a counter flow heat exchanger
6. Determination of flash point and fire point of a fuel
7. COP test on a vapour compression refrigeration test rig
8. COP test on a vapour compression air-conditioning test rig
9. Determination of thermal conductivity of solid.
10. Determination of thermal resistance of a composite wall.
11. Determination of emissivity of solid.
12. Determination of viscosity of a fuel.
Total Periods: 30

157
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE321 FLUID MECHANICS LABORATORY 0 0 2 1

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
The lab is designed to provide the student with a physical understanding of the
fundamental principles and basic equations of fluid mechanics. This understanding is
gained through the application of “text book” concepts and equations to real problems
b. Pre- Requisites
 Engineering Mathematics II

c. Link To Other Courses


 Nil
d. Course Educational Objectives
Students undergoing this course are expected:
 To manipulate the pressure gauges and pressure measurements in fluid
systems.
 To calibrate the basic instruments in fluid mechanics.

e. Course outcomes:
On successful completion of this course students will be able to
Level of learning
CO
Course Outcomes domain (Based on
Nos.
revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Demonstrate the calibration of various fluid mechanics K2,S3
instruments.
CO2 Carry out an experiment to show the effect of Bernoulli’s K2,S3
principle using a Venturi tube.
CO3 Measure the pressure using Pitot static tube K3,S3
CO4 Demonstrate practical understanding of friction losses in internal K2,S3
flows

(S1-Factual, S2-Conceptual, S3-Procedural, S4-Metacognitive)

f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12

CO1 H H H L H H H L

CO2 H H H L H H H L

158
CO3 H H H L H H H L

CO4 H H H L H H H L

. H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g). LIST OF EXPERIMENTS


1. Verification of Bernoulli’s theorem
2. Pressure measurement with pitot static tube
3. Calibration of venturimeter
4. Calibration of Orifice meter
5. Determination of pipe flow major losses.
6. Determination of pipe flow minor losses.
Total Periods: 30

159
COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE L T P C
1151AE322 AERODYNAMICS LABORATORY 0 0 2 1

Course Category:
Programme core

a. Preamble:
This lab aids the students to learn about the requirement of wind tunnel in the field of
Aeronautical Engineering. Students get hands on experience about speed calibration Flow
visualization, Force and pressure measurements over slender and bluff bodies.

b. Pre- Requisites:
 Fluid Mechanics
c. Link to Other Courses:
 Nil
d. COURSE EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES:
Students undergoing this course are expected:
 To understand the flow pattern over different aerodynamic profiles.
 To have hands on experience on pressure and force measurement over
aerodynamic profiles.
 To estimate aerodynamic response of different objects

e. COURSE OUTCOMES:
On successful completion of this course students will be able to
Level of
CO learning domain
Course Outcomes
Nos. (Based on
revised Bloom’s)
CO1 Describe the different types of wind tunnel K2,S3
CO2 Calibrate the test section speed of the wind tunnel K3,S3
CO3 Illustrate the stream patterns over bluff and slender bodies. K2,S3
CO4 Investigate the variation of surface pressure over bluff and K4,S3
slender bodies
CO5 Compute the lift and drag co efficient over an airplane model K3,S3

(S1-Factual, S2-Conceptual, S3-Procedural, S4-Metacognitive)

f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:


COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H H H H L

160
CO2 H H H H H H L
CO3 H H H H H H L
CO4 H H H H H H L
CO5 H H H H H H L
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. List of Experiments:
1. Introduction to wind tunnel layout.
2. Flow visualization over different profile in water flow channel.
3. Flow visualization over wing using oil flow/ribbon method.
4. Smoke Flow visualization over streamline and bluff bodies.
5. Subsonic wind tunnel test section speed calibration using Pitot static tube.
6. Pressure distribution over cylinder.
7. Pressure distribution over roughcylinder.
8. Pressure distribution over aerodynamics profiles.
9. Estimation of aerodynamic forces and moments of aerodynamic profiles
10. Calibration of Wind tunnel in vertical/horizontal direction.
Total Periods: 30

161
COURSE
COURSE TITLE L T P C
CODE
1151AE323 PROPULSION LABORATORY 0 0 2 1

Course Category:
Programmed core

a. Preamble:
This course Propulsion Lab provides an introduction to the basic concepts of assembly and
dismantling of piston and gas turbine engines, heat transfer, evaluation of Calorific value of
fuels and Velocity evaluation for free and wall jet setup.

b. Prerequisites:
 Thermodynamics Laboratory
c. Links to other courses:
 Nil
d. Course educational objectives:
Students undergoing this course are expected:
 To develop the basic knowledge of the students in gas turbine engine and its assembly
and dismantling.
 To develop the basic knowledge of the students in piston engine and its assembly and
dismantling.
 To evaluate calorific value of the fuels.
 To characterize the fixed pitch propeller.
e. Course outcomes:
On the successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
Knowledge Level
CO
Course Outcomes (Based on revised
Nos.
Bloom’s Taxonomy)
Illustrate the concept of piston engine and gas turbine K3,S3
C01 engine.

Exhibit the concept of jet characteristics. K4,S3


C02
Estimate heat transfer coefficient the free and forced K4,S3
C03 convection heat transfer.

Perceive the calorific value of a various fuels. K4,S3


C04
Manipulate the performance of propeller. K4,S3
C05

(S1-Factual, S2-Conceptual, S3-Procedural, S4-Metacognitive)

f. Correlation of COs with POs:

162
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H L L M M M
CO2 H L L M L M M
CO3 H L L M L M M
CO4 H L L M M M
CO5 H L L M L M M
H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. Course contents:

1. Study of an aircraft piston engine (includes study of assembly of sub systems,


various components, their functions and operating principles).
2. Study of an aircraft jet engine (includes study of assembly of sub systems, various
components, their functions and operating principles).
3. Forced convective heat transfer over a flat plate.
4. Free convective heat transfers over a flat plate
5. Cascade testing of a model of axial compressor blade row.
6. Study of performance of a propeller.
7. Determination of heat of combustion of aviation fuel.
8. Combustion performance studies in a jet engine combustion chamber.
9. Study of free jet.
10. Study of wall jet.
Total Periods: 30

163
COURSE
COURSE TITLE L T P C
CODE
1151AE324 Aero Engine Maintenance and Structures 0 0 2 1
Repair Laboratory
Course Category:
Programmed core
a. Preamble:
This course engages the students towards the inspection and repair works in piston and jet
engines using modern methods like NDT, preparation of manuals. The course introduces the
fundamental skills on engine stripping and assembly. This also explains about the advanced
knowledge on aircraft structural components and its repair techniques. It gives Hands on
experience with experiments of the on wood gluing, welding, riveting, sheet metal forming
and also do repair on composites, sandwich panels etc.
b. Prerequisites:
 Aircraft Structural Mechanics

c. Links to other courses:


 Nil

d. Course educational objectives:


Students undergoing this course are expected:
 To experimentally study the repair techniques on Aircraft structural and engine
components.
 To experimentally know the various repair techniques like welding, gluing, etc.,
 To experimentally study the control cable inspection and sheet metal forming.
 To experimentally study the NDT and other inspection techniques.
 To prepare the troubleshoot manuals.

e. Course outcomes:
On successful completion of this course students will be able to
CO Course Outcomes Level of learning
Nos. domain (Based
on revised
Bloom’s)
Identify the parts of the engine and airframe K3,S3
C01

C02 Demonstrate the NDT and fuel pipe line repair works. K4,S3

C03 Demonstrate the Welding techniques K4,S3


Understand troubleshoot and prepare the manuals for engine K4,S3
C04
maintenance.

C05 Demonstrate panel patch works. K4,S3

(S1-Factual, S2-Conceptual, S3-Procedural, S4-Metacognitive)

f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:

164
COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H L L M M M H L
CO2 H L L M L M M H L
CO3 H L L M L M M H L
CO4 H L L M M M H L
CO5 H L L M L M M H L

H- High; M-Medium; L-Low

g. List of experiments:

1. Welded patch repair by TIG, MIG, PLASMA ARC.


2. Riveted patch repairs.
3. Preparation and repair of Sandwich panels.
4. Sheet metal forming.
5. Control cable inspection and repair.
6. Stripping and Reassembly of a piston engine and Jet engine
7. Engine (Piston Engine) - cleaning, visual inspection, NDT checks.
8. Piston Engine Components - dimensional checks.
9. Engine (Jet Engine) - cleaning, visual inspection, NDT checks.
10. Fuel lines inspection and repair.
11. Engine starting procedures and Troubleshooting - Jet and Piston Engine.
12. Study of
 Stripping, Assembly and Dimensional Check of Jet Engine
 Trouble shoot and Maintenance manual of Jet Engine
 ECS of Jet engine
 Engine testing and High speed bearing testing methods
13. Lab Project – Preparation of Maintenance Manual for Jet/Piston Engine

Total Periods: 30

165
COURSE
COURSE TITLE L T P C
CODE
1151AE325 FLIGHT MECHANICS AND CONTROL 0 0 2 1
LABORATORY

Course Category:
Programme core
a. Preamble:
This course teaches the student about how a system behaves for an external input and how the
system could be controlled to obtain a desired response. This course also gives the students to
understand the how the Aircraft behaviour changes depending on change in the aircraft’s
derivatives. Students get a chance to learn about and design flight control system and get
hands on experience of the hardware used in flight testing.

b. Pre-requisites:
 Linear system Analysis and Control
 Airplane Performance

c. Links to other courses:


 Nil

d. Course educational Objectives:


Students undergoing this course are expected:
 To understand the system behaviour and the control techniques
 To familiarize aircraft behaviour with respect to the aerodynamic control and
stability derivatives

e. Course Outcomes:
On successful completion of this course students will be able to
CO Course Outcomes Level of learning
Nos. domain (Based
on revised
Bloom’s)
CO1 Estimate the system response K4,S3
CO2 Forecast the actual flight behavior from the numerical K4,S3
parameters
CO3 Estimate the flight parameters K4,S3
CO4 Design flight control law K4,S3
CO5 Calibrate and read sensor data K3,S3

(S1-Factual,S2-Conceptual,S3-Procedural,S4-Metacognitive)

166
f. CORRELATION OF COS WITH PROGRAMME OUTCOMES:

COs PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PO8 PO9 PO10 PO11 PO12
CO1 H H H L H H H L H
CO2 H H H L H H H L H
CO3 H H H L H H H L H
CO4 H H H L H H H L H
CO5 H H H L H H H L H

H- High; M-Medium; L-Low


g. List of experiments:

1. Determine the Closed loop time response for the given transfer function by Root locus
technique using Matlab.
2. Design a PID control for the given transfer function and performance requirements
using SISO tool in Matlab.
3. Simulate the longitudinal flight dynamics for the given Aircraft parameters using
Matlab.
4. Estimate the Aerodynamic & Stability derivatives from the given simulated flight data
using Matlab.
5. Design a Simple Altitude-hold Autopilot system for the given flight model using
Simulink.
6. Calibrate the given Load cell.
7. Determine the mathematical model of a given Propeller-motor setup.
8. Aircraft performance evaluation for a given flight model by flight test.

Total Periods: 30

167