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P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

Contents section 01 - Main engines

1 Main engines – general particulars

7

1.1 Particulars main engines

7

1.2 Differences between Sulzer RTA 84 and RTA 84C engines

14

2 Control, increase/decrease of power output, after cooling,

temperatures of cooling water, cooling oil, lub. oil and fuel, MFO temperature/viscosity. (Consult also ‘Device’ books)

15

2.1 Overview of power outputs and instructions

15

2.2 Scavenging air temperature after air coolers

17

2.2.1 Air properties

17

2.2.2 Air conditions

17

2.2.3 Draining of condensation water

19

2.3 Pre-heating before departure

21

2.4 Main engine load increase and decrease

21

2.4.1 Load increase to full power (slow running cathedral engines)

21

2.4.2 Load increase in manoeuvring range (slow running cathedral engines)

22

2.4.3 Decreasing from ‘Full power’ to manoeuvring (slow running cathedral engines)

22

2.4.4 Steaming under favourable conditions

23

2.4.5 Steaming for a longer period of time with minimum output

23

2.4.6 Warranty period

24

2.5 Post arrival after-cooling

24

2.6 System temperatures

24

 

2.6.1 General

24

2.6.2 Cylinder cooling water temperature main and auxiliary engines

24

2.6.3 Temperature of piston cooling water main engines

25

2.6.4 Temperature of piston cooling oil main engines

25

2.6.5 Temperature of fuel valve cooling water

25

2.6.6 Temperature of circulation lub. oil main and auxiliary engines (not provided with oil

 

cooled pistons)

26

2.6.7

Fuel temperature at the fuel valve

26

3 Crankshaft alignment, measurement checks, journals

3.1 Crankshaft alignment

3.1.1 General

3.2 Crown thickness, bridge gauge

27

27

27

28

3.2.1 General

28

3.2.2 Measuring with bridge gauge

29

3.3 Crankweb deflections

30

3.3.1 General

30

3.3.2 Check examples of measured deflections (Deflections in 1/100 mm)

30

3.4 Reconstruction crankshaft position from deflection measurements (included

in TAL program)

32

3.5

3.4.1 Deflections (description)

32

3.4.2 Deviation of a bearing

32

3.4.3 Reconstruction crankshaft position

34

3.4.4 Correction of an incorrect shaft position

35

3.4.5 Calculation diagram for deflections

35

3.4.6 Difference in alignment crankshaft and coupled shaft

36

3.4.7 Crank web deflection auxiliary engines

37

Journals

37

3.5.1 Measuring of journals

37

3.5.2 Surface condition of journals

38

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3.5.3 Crankshaft alignment guidelines for ‘P&O Nedlloyd Southampton’ class ships

4 Tie bolts (or rods), foundation, columns, scavenging air spaces, cylinder jackets and covers

4.1

Tie bolts

39

51

51

4.1.1 Check

51

4.1.2 The tightening of tie bolts

51

4.1.3 Anti-vibration bolts/clamp screws

52

4.1.4 Water leakage along tie bolts

52

4.2 Supporting Chocks

4.2.1 Sealing of engine on ship’s foundation

53

55

4.3 Cracks in columns near the thrust bolts of main bearing covers Sulzer RTA

engines

56

4.4 Fire in scavenging air spaces

57

4.4.1 General

57

4.4.2 Detection of scavenge air fire

57

4.4.3 Extinguishing of scavenge air fire

58

4.4.4 Fouling due to partial load

58

4.5 Cylinder covers

59

4.5.1 Cylinder covers Sulzer engines

59

4.5.2 High temperature corrosion and/or erosion with Sulzer RTA 84C cylinder covers

61

4.5.3 Thermal cracks underside cylinder cover RTA 84C

63

4.5.4 Cylinder cover studs

64

4.6 Hydraulic tools

5 Bearings

5.1

General

67

69

69

5.1.1 Construction

69

5.1.2 Dynamic lubrication

69

5.2 Inspection and survey

70

5.2.1 Cracks in white metal

70

5.2.2 Description of cracked running surface

70

5.2.3 Possible truing-up of journals after rejecting of bearings

70

5.2.4 Dummy

71

5.3 Crosshead bearings

71

5.3.1 General

71

5.3.2 Crosshead bearings of Sulzer RTA 84C engines

72

5.4 Crankpin bearings

5.4.1 General

5.5 Main bearings

75

75

76

5.5.1 General

76

5.5.2 Bolts main bearings, Sulzer RN, RL en RT engines

77

5.6 Lubrication crosshead and crankpin bearings

5.6.1 Stop plugs in oil ducts

93

93

6 Pistons, cylinder liners

94

6.1

Pistons

94

6.1.1 Burning-in of pistons

94

6.1.2 Burning-in of piston crowns of the RTA 84C

96

6.1.3 Shaker and jet cooling effect oil-cooled piston crown RTA 84C

97

6.1.4 Obsolete piston crown types of the RTA 84C

99

6.1.5 Hair cracks in piston ring landings

100

6.1.6 Internal fouling of pistons

101

6.1.7 Fretting corrosion at seating of piston - piston rod - piston skirt

102

6.1.8 The loosening of piston nuts and studs of Sulzer main engines

103

6.1.9 Breaking of spray plate fastening bolts on piston rod of the RTA 84C

104

6.1.10 Cracks in piston rod feet B&W GB (E) engines

105

6.1.11 Pistons of the RTA 96C

106

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6.2 Wear cylinder liner, piston and rings

108

6.2.1 General

108

6.2.2 Corrosive wear

108

6.2.3 Abrasive wear

109

6.2.4 Scuffing wear

109

6.2.5 Influencing the wear process

109

6.2.6 Overview of wear causes

111

6.2.7 Flow diagram for wear investigation

112

6.2.8 Wear pattern of cylinder liners for RTA engines

113

6.2.9 Cylinder liner materials

115

6.2.10 Hard phase of cylinder liners

116

6.2.11 Cylinder liners for Sulzer RTA84C engines

117

6.2.12 Bumping ridge and groove in the RTA 84C liners

118

6.2.13 Boring in liners for sensors Cylinder Liner Temperature Measurement RTA 84C

119

6.2.14 Cylinder liners with Teflon insulation tubes

120

6.2.15 Wear liners and piston skirts Sulzer RN- and RL

122

6.3 Liner renewal

125

6.3.1 General

125

6.3.2 Compression pressure/compression ratio/liner wear

125

6.3.3 Time between piston overhauls

126

6.4 Maintenance piston & liner

127

6.4.1 Introduction

127

6.4.2 Example of preliminary work for Sulzer RND90M

128

6.4.3 Work on the piston

129

6.4.4 Work on the cylinder cover

129

6.4.5 Piston ring treatment

129

6.4.6 Work on liner

130

6.4.7 Measuring of cylinder liners

131

6.4.8 Cylinder lubrication check

133

7 Piston rings specification main engines

134

7.1 Piston rings, general

134

7.2 Piston rings of the ‘K’ type and a combination of ‘K’/’P’ type

137

7.2.1 Information concerning K1, KN, KNP piston ring

138

7.2.2 Gas tight top ring for Sulzer RLB 90

138

7.2.3 Condition K-type piston ring during operation

139

7.2.4 Material composition of piston rings

139

7.2.5 Mechanical properties of Daros piston rings

140

7.2.6 Daros type number system

141

7.2.7 Daros mark on piston rings for Sulzer and MAN B&W engines

142

7.3 The filling out of the piston measurement form

142

7.3.1 Wear pattern of piston rings

143

7.3.2 Measuring of piston ring wear via scavenge ports

144

7.4 Piston rings for Sulzer RTA 96C

147

8 Piston rod stuffing boxes, telescopic pipes and water chests

156

8.1

Piston rod stuffing boxes

156

8.1.1 General

156

8.1.2 Oil scraper ring wear

156

8.1.3 The total oil scraper ring gap

156

8.1.4 The spring tension

156

8.1.5 Oil draining capacity

157

8.1.6 Piston rod wear

157

8.1.7 Maintenance in general

158

8.1.8 Peculiarities of Sulzer RL- and RN- stuffing boxes

161

8.1.9 Stuffing boxes Sulzer RTA-84C engines

161

8.1.10 Modifications of RTA 84C stuffing boxes carried out by the engine

162

8.1.11 Possible causes of ingress of used cylinder oil into crankcase lub. oil charge

164

8.1.12 Pending investigation Wärtsilä – New Sulzer Diesel

166

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8.1.13 Investigation with synthetic rings

167

9

Chain and gearwheel drive

170

9.1 Chain drives

170

 

9.1.1 Checks and maintenance

170

9.1.2 Metal fatigue

170

9.1.3 Elongation

171

9.1.4 The tensioning of chains

171

 

9.2 Notes on the maintenance of chains and wheels on Camshaft and Blower

Drives of Marine Diesel Engines (copied from Renold Chains Ltd. (Publication

No. Ref. 916/183))

173

 

9.2.1 Chain

173

9.2.2 Sprocket/chain wheels

173

9.2.3 Alignment

174

9.2.4 Adjustment

174

9.2.5 Lubrication

174

9.2.6 Multi-strand drives

174

9.2.7 Gearwheel drive

175

10

Camshafts, valve gear and adjustment, starting and manoeuvring

gear

176

10.1 Camshaft

 

176

 

10.1.1 Cam damage

176

10.1.2 Lubrication of roller gear

176

10.1.3 Exhaust valve gear

178

 

10.2 Governor drive

180

 

10.2.1

Flexible governor drive Sulzer engines

180

11

Inlet and exhaust valves, relief valves, starting air valves and starting

air pipe lines, crankcase relief valves

184

11.1

Exhaust valves

184

11.1.1 Exhaust valves, material and construction

184

11.1.2 Exhaust valves, burning and fouling

184

11.1.3 Burning-in of exhaust valves

185

11.1.4 High and low temperature corrosion

185

11.1.5 Low temperature corrosion exhaust valve housing RTA 84C

187

11.1.6 Low temperature corrosion exhaust valve housing B&W GBE 90

187

11.1.7 Corrosion exhaust valve housing seat RTA

188

11.1.8 Operational life of exhaust valves

189

11.1.9 Repairs of exhaust valves (general)

190

11.1.10Truing-up of exhaust valve housings and exhaust valves

190

11.1.11Check for cracks

192

11.1.12Exhaust valves Sulzer RTA 84C

192

11.1.13 Check the under side exhaust valve for burning-in RTA engines

193

11.1.14Example of repairs on exhaust valve B&W GBE 90 (by Metalas, Vlaardingen)

194

11.1.15 Scavenge valves and PUP valves Sulzer engines

195

11.1.16 Shut-off valve for starting air on the 10RTA96C

197

11.1.17 Exhaust valve air piston of the Sulzer RTA 96C

199

12

Fuel injection system

201

12.1 Fuel valve design

201

12.2 Fuel valve maintenance

202

12.2.1 Maintenance in general

202

12.2.2 Testing of fuel valves

203

12.2.3 Fuel nozzles and needle guides

205

12.2.4 Contact face between fuel valve housing and needle guide

207

12.2.5 The fitting of fuel valves

207

12.2.6 Preserving spare fuel valves, ready for use

209

12.2.7 Testing oil for fuel valves

209

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12.2.8 Reconditioning of needles and needle guides, time between overhauls

210

12.2.9 ‘Circulation’ fuel valve Sulzer RTA engine

211

12.2.10Atomiser tips Sulzer RTA 84C

211

12.2.11Fuel valves B&W 90 GB (E) and K80/90 MC-C

214

12.3 Fuel pumps

12.3.1 Fuel pumps, general

12.4 Fuel pumps Sulzer engines

217

217

219

12.4.1 Fuel pump rollers and cams

219

12.4.2 Possibilities to adjust fuel pumps for a reduced delivery

220

12.4.3 Adjustment fuel pumps Sulzer engines

221

12.4.4 Fuel control Sulzer engines

224

12.5 Fuel pumps B&W engines

230

12.5.1 Adjustment of fuel pumps with control corresponding to a helix

230

12.5.2 Fuel pumps B&W GB(E) 90 engines

231

12.5.3 Fuel pumps B & W K80/90 MC-C engine

232

12.5.4 VIT - control K -10 vessels

234

13 Cylinder and crankcase lubrication

13.1 Cylinder lubrication

239

239

13.1.1

Cylinder lubrication general

239

13.1.2.Cylinder lub. oil consumption

242

13.1.3 Synchronised cylinder lubrication B&W engines

247

13.1.4 Cylinder lubricating oil system Sulzer engines

252

13.1.5 Regulation of cylinder lub. oil feed rate for Sulzer RTA 84C engines

260

13.1.6 Running in procedure for Sulzer RND-M / RLA / RLB / RTA engines

264

13.1.7 Running in procedure for B&W GB (E) and K MC-C engines

266

13.1.8 Running in procedure for MAN KSZ engines

267

13.2 Crankcase lubrication

268

13.2.1 Quality of lubricating oil

268

13.2.2 Crankcase explosion

270

13.2.3 Crankcase sealing

270

13.2.4 Poor bearing lubrication

270

13.2.5 Fouling in pipelines and safety devices with hardly any or no flow at all

271

13.2.6 Crankcase fouling during maintenance and/or repairs

271

14 Super chargers

272

14.1 Hunting or ‘surging’ of superchargers

272

14.2 Maintenance and planning

278

14.2.1 Maintenance planning turbochargers

278

14.2.2 Cleaning of the rotor

278

14.2.3 Cleaning of sealing air ducts

279

14.2.4 Air filters

281

14.2.5 Silencers of turboblowers

281

14.3. Water washing gear for turbochargers

282

14.3.1 General

282

14.3.2 Water washing on turbine side

283

14.3.3 Dry cleaning

286

14.4

ABB turbochargers

288

14.4.1 Explanation of specification symbols, as used until January 1994

288

14.4.2 recommended time between overhauls of ball bearings and lub. oil pumps

289

14.4.3 Instructions concerning the fitting of bearings and lub. oil pumps in turbochargers

292

14.4.4 Determining distance ‘K’

294

14.4.5 Slide bearings

296

14.4.6 Securing of bearing bolts

297

14.4.7 Hollow shaft pumps (see sketch)

297

14.4.8 Turbine casings of turbochargers – wall thickness

298

14.4.9 Corrosion of exhaust gas inlet and outlet casing

299

14.4.10Air-cooling on turbochargers in case of corroded gas inlet or outlet casings

299

14.4.11Emergency repairs on gas inlet or outlet casings

303

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14.4.12

Lubricating oil for turboblowers

304

14.4.13Repair possibilities parts of ABB turbochargers

305

15 Air coolers, Water mist catchers and Drains

15.1 Pipe plate coolers

306

306

15.1.1 General

15.1.2 Scale development in upper pipes of (sea water cooled) scavenging air coolers for main

306

engines

307

15.1.3 Acid cleaning of air coolers, waterside (also suitable for De Laval plate

308

15.1.4 Cleaning of air coolers, air side

309

15.2 Water mist catchers (water separators)

311

15.1.1 Air receivers and water mist catchers (separators) RTA96C

311

15.2.2 Waterseparators experiences:

312

15.2.3 Waterseparators RTA 96C

312

15.2.4 Water separator and drain modifications of the PONL Tasman (Sept. 2002)

313

15.2.5 Waterseparators on Southhampton-classe ships

313

15.2.6 Damaged waterseparator 10RTA 96C

314

15.2.7 Stiffening grid for PPTV separator on the RTA96C

315

15.3 Water drains

316

15.3.1 Water drain arrangements on Hyundai – Wartsila RTA 96 engines:

316

15.3.2 Water drain arrangement on 10 RTA 96 C engines PONL Drake 27 July 2002

318

15.3.3 12 RTA 96 C on the Whale class:

319

16 Turning gear – control and maintenance (see also fleet instructions

4136/4142.1)

322

16.1

Turning gears

322

16.1.1 Surveillance & check during turning

322

16.1.2 Special precautions with water leakage

322

16.1.3 Turning gear safety device

323

16.1.4 Electric motor bearings

323

16.1.5 Maintenance, lubrication

323

17 Engine emissions

17.1 IMO-2000 regulations

324

324

17.1.1

Establishment of emission limits for

324

17.1.2

Regulation regarding NOx emissions of diesel

324

17.1.3

Date of application of Annex VI

325

17.1.4

Procedure for certification of

325

17.1.5

Extended measures

326

17.1.5

Marking of Identification Number of NOx Relevant

327

P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

1 Main engines – general particulars

1.1 Particulars main engines

Explanation of some values from the lists on pages S1-1-2 up to S1-1-7 included.

Main Engine Manufacturers/Type In general, the type number identifies the number of cylinders, the piston diameter and the stroke. With all types of engines, the stroke is indicated in cm in between brackets ().

NCR Power output is indicated as ‘Normal Continuous Rating’. (Reference is made to the engine graphs). The designation NCR is a maximum stipulated by the Company and should not be confused with the ‘maximum continuous rating’ (M.C.R.) set by the manufacturer, which is higher. The NCR power on the propeller law curve is normally 90% of the M.C.R. for newer vessels or 85% for older vessels, but may also be less, as is the case with a number of ex-P&O vessels. The power output NCR, included in the fleet summary list for main engines on the next 6 pages, corresponds with the intersection of the propeller law curve and the line of the maximum continuous allowable fuel factor.

N max With new vessels it happens that the engine runs very “light” in the "A" domain (see pages S1-2- 1 and -2), so that the maximum allowable revolutions are reached earlier than the maximum allowable power output NCR. In practice the design revolutions, as mentioned in the column

practice the design revolutions, as mentioned in the column MCR/max. revs, may be exceeded by approximately

MCR/max. revs, may be exceeded by approximately 4%, provided that one stays below the

NCR output. When the engine has been adjusted to the optimum for lower revolutions at NCR, this lower number of revolutions count as the minimum at which this NCR output is still allowed. The fuel needs to be reduced if the revolutions decrease more than the 4% below the optimum revolutions.

Fuel factor This is the maximum number of cubic centimetres of fuel (at fuel pump temperature), which is allowed to be injected per revolution, as long as the revolutions do not go below 4% of the optimal revolutions. The minimum number of revolutions, for which the maximum fuel factor is still allowed, is mentioned in the column ‘maximum fuel factor' in between brackets.

Specific fuel consumption In practice this has been determined from, among other things, the performance lists. A good approximation is also the manufacturer’s testbed figure + 10%, since steaming at partial load also occurs, thus giving an unfavourable efficiency.

Minimum cylinder lub. oil consumption at NCR output These values have been determined by practical experience, acquired with various different feed rates and the resulting wear values (depending on operational conditions). For the time being the newer vessels must adhere to the feed rate mentioned in the maiden voyage letter.

P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

Propellers The propeller pitch is stipulated as the average pitch. This is determined by means of a calculation model and is generally to be found in the ‘work-drawing’. Where these particulars are not known, as a rule a pitch is taken at 0.7 R. Sometimes a pitch has been punched in with hand stamps at the identification mark at a matching radius R (to be found in the ‘work-drawing’). This pitch is not necessarily the same as the average pitch (calculation model) or the 0.7R pitch. When propellers are cropped, i.e. reduction of diameter, the pitch will become slightly different. Due to this small deviation, one usually holds on to the original pitch.

P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

P&O Nedlloyd Technical Information fleet overview main engines

 

3 October,

2002

 

Main engine

 

Maximum

Max. fuel consumption at NCR

Min. cyl. oil cons. at NCR

Propeller

fuel specific.

Schip’s name

flag

Make and type

Turbo-

MCR

Max.

NCR

NCR

Visc.

Density

Spec.

Metric

maximum

gram/

Kg cyl.

Diam.

(Previous name)

charger

shaft kW

rpm

shaft kW

% MCR

cSt./

15 °C

gram/

ton/da

fuel

sh.kW

oil/ton

Pitch

Revs/min.

Revs/min.

50 °C

kWh

y

factor

fuel

in mm

ANL Indonesia

NL

Hanjung MAN/B&W

IHI VTR

35500

109

31950

90

700

1010

196

150

1100

1.36

6.8

7800

crew

8

K 90 MC-C (230)

714E-32

104

100.4

(At min.

7549

 

2

x

96

rpm)

5-blades

Nina

NL

Hanjung MAN/B&W

IHI VTR

35500

109

31950

90

700

1010

196

150

1100

1.36

6.8

7800

(APL Germany)

crew

8

K 90 MC-C (230)

714E-32

104

100.4

(At min.

7549

(OOCL Germany)

 

2

x

96

rpm)

5-blades

France

NL

Hanjung MAN/B&W

IHI VTR

35500

109

31950

90

700

1010

196

150

1100

1.36

6.8

7800

(OOCL France)

crew

8

K 90 MC-C (230)

714E-32

104

100.4

(At min.

7549

 

2

x

96

rpm)

5-blades

Nedlloyd Africa

NL

MHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

30600

100

27540

90

700

1010

185

122

950

1.4

7.6

8100

8

RTA 84C (240)

714A-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7860

 

2

x

91.7

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd America

NL

DU Sulzer

IHI-VTR

30600

100

27540

90

700

1010

185

122

950

1.4

7.6

8100

8

RTA 84C (240)

714A-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7860

 

2

x

91.7

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd Asia

NL

DU Sulzer

IHI-VTR

30600

100

27540

90

700

1010

185

122

950

1.4

7.6

8100

8

RTA 84C (240)

714A-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7860

 

2

x

91.7

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd Europa

NL

MHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

30600

100

27540

90

700

1010

185

122

950

1.4

7.6

8100

8

RTA 84C (240)

714A-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7860

 

2

x

91.7

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd Oceania

NL

DU Sulzer

IHI-VTR

30600

100

27540

90

700

1010

185

122

950

1.4

7.6

8100

8

RTA 84C (240)

714A-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7860

 

2

x

91.7

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd Hongkong

NL

DU Sulzer

IHI-VTR

41260

94

37130

90

700

1010

185

165

1440

1.4

7.6

8490

 

12

RT 84C (240)

714A-32

94

87.5

(At min.

8702

 

3

x

84

rpm)

6-blades

Nedlloyd Honshu

NL

MHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

41260

94

37130

90

700

1010

185

165

1440

1.4

7.6

8490

 

12

RTA 84C (240)

714A-32

94

87.5

(At min.

8702

 

3

x

84

rpm)

6-blades

P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

Schip’s name

flag

Make and type

Turbo-

MCR

Max.

NCR

NCR

Visc.

Density

Spec.

Metric

maximum

gram/

Kg cyl.

Diam.

(Previous name)

charger

shaft kW

rpm

shaft kW

%

cSt./

15 °C

gram/

ton/

fuel

sh.kW

oil/ton

Pitch

Revs/min.

Revs/min.

MCR

50 °C

kWh

day

factor

fuel

in mm

Colombo Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

(Tor Bay)

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Jervis Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Newport Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Providence Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Repulse Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Shenzhen Bay (Ishikawa Jima Shita 30)

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

 

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Singapore Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

IHI-VTR

34412

100

30970

90

500

1010

185

138

1070

1.4

7.6

8200

9

RTA 84C (240)

564D-32

100

96.8

(At min.

7730

TCS drive 1200 kW

3

x

92

rpm)

5-blades

Oriental Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

VTR

29412

100

26470

90

500

1010

192

122

980

1.5

8.1

8320

9

RTA 84 (240)

564A-32

89

(At min.

8730

TCS drive 750 kW

3

x

81

rpm)

4-blades

Peninsular Bay

UK

IHI Sulzer

VTR

29412

100

26470

90

500

1010

192

122

980

1.5

8.1

8320

9

RTA 84 (240)

564A-32

89

(At min.

8730

TCS drive 750 kW

3

x

81

rpm)

4-blades

PONL Vera Cruz (Nedlloyd van Diemen)

NL

Schelde Sulzer

VTR

12870

104

10940

85

380

991

198

52

435

1,45

7.3

6800

5

RLB 90 (190)

714-31

94

89.4

(At min.

5723

   

1

x

82

rpm)

4-blades

PONL Houston (Nedlloyd van Neck)

NL

Schelde Sulzer

VTR

12870

104

10940

85

380

991

198

52

435

1,45

7.3

6800

5

RLB 90 (190)

714-31

94

89.4

(At min.

5723

   

1

x

82

rpm)

4-blades

PONL Buenos Aires

NL

Schelde Sulzer

VTR

12870

104

10940

85

380

991

198

52

435

1,45

7.3

6800

P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

(Nedlloyd van Noort)

 

5

RLB 90 (190)

714-31

94

 

89.4

         

(At min.

   

5723

 

1

x

82

rpm)

4-blades

Aramac (Nedlloyd Houtman) (Largs Bay)

NL

Schelde Sulzer

VTR

 

2

x 18706

112

2

x 15880

85

380

991

207

158

572

1.63

7.9

7100

8

RND 90M (155)

631-1P

112

106.4

(At min.

6997

2

x

2

x 2

99

rpm)

3-blades

Heemskerck

NL

MAN

MAN/B&W

2

x 19600

122

2

x 16660

85

380

991

220

174

590

2.7

12.1

7100

K 8 SZ 90/160 B

NA57/T08

122

115

(At min.

6874

2

x

110

rpm)

3-blades

PONL Los Angeles (Nedlloyd Zeelandia) (Java Winds)

NL

Schelde Sulzer

VTR

 

22170

122

18850

85

500

1010

220

99

660

1.6

7.3

6300

9

RND 90M (155)

631-1P

122

(At min.

5745

 

3x

 

110

rpm)

4-blades

PONL Brisbane

NL

Alsthom B&W 7L 90 GB (218)

IHI VTR

23570

97

20040

85

380

991

191

92

770

1.36

7.3

7648

(Nedlloyd Tokyo)

714-31

97

90,2

(At min.

6300

(Raleigh Bay)

 

2

x

87

rpm)

4-blades

(CGM Tokyo)

   

Nedlloyd Clarence

NL

Hyundai B&W 6L 90 GBE (218)

IHI VTR

17500

97

14890

85

500

1010

187

67

555

1.36

7.3

7200

(Algeciras Bay)

564-11

97

92

(At min.

6297

(Ibn Bahjah)

 

2

x

88

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd Clement

NL

Hyundai B&W 6L 90 GBE (218)

IHI VTR

17500

97

14890

85

500

1010

187

67

555

1.36

7.3

7200

564-11

97

92

(At min.

6297

 

2

x

88

rpm)

4-blades

Nedlloyd Colombo

NL

MHI Sulzer

IHI VTR

15000

90

12750

85

380

991

202

62

551

1,5

7.3

7400

6

RLA 90 (190)

564-11

90

85.4

(At min.

7100

 

2

x

78

rpm)

5-blades

PONL Sydney

NL

DMR MAN B&W

2

x

MAN/

28880

104

25990

90

600

1010

192

120

900

1.5

7.8

7220

8

K 80 MC-C (230)

B&W

104

100

(At min.

7577

 

NA70/T09

94

rpm)

6-blades

PONL Jakarta

NL

DMR MAN B&W

2

x

MAN/

28880

104

25990

90

600

1010

192

120

900

1.5

7.8

7220

8

K 80 MC-C (230)

B&W

104

100

(At min.

7577

 

NA70/T09

94

rpm)

6-blades

PONL Auckland

NL

DMR MAN B&W

2

x

MAN/

28880

104

25990

90

600

1010

192

120

900

1.5

7.8

7220

8

K 80 MC-C (230)

B&W

104

100

(At min.

7577

 

NA70/T09

94

rpm)

6-blades

PONL Genoa

UK

DMR MAN B&W

2

x

MAN/

28880

104

25990

90

600

1010

192

120

900

1.5

7.8

7220

8

K 80 MC-C (230)

B&W

104

100

(At min.

7577

 

NA70/T09

94

rpm)

6-blades

PONL Marseille

UK

DMR MAN B&W

2

x

MAN/28880

 

104

25990

90

600

1010

192

120

900

1.5

7.8

7220

P&O Nedlloyd – Technical Information

   

8

K 80 MC-C (230)

B&W

104

 

100

         

(At min.

   

7577

 

NA70/T09

94

rpm)

6-blades

Resolution Bay

UK

MAN K 8 SZ 90/160 A

BBC VTR

2

x 19600

122

2

x 16660

85

380

991

220

174