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8600 Smart Routers

ATM and TDM Configuration Guide

76.8600-50110F
12.05.2015
Document Information

Revision History

Document No. Date Description of Changes

76.8600-50110F 12.05.2015 Reworked 1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3) and


2 Pseudowire Redundancy. Ethernet PWE3 related content moved
to 8600 Smart Routers Ethernet Configuration Guide.
Added 1.2 Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification Overview and
2.4.6 PWE3 Redundancy Counters.
Changes applied in: 1.3 PWE3 Types, 5 PWE3 Redundancy
Configuration Examples.
Additions and changes in 6.9 Limitations and Restrictions.
Updates in 4 MS-PWE3 Configuration Examples and
8.2.2 CESoPSN.
76.8600-50110E 29.10.2014 Added 8602 Smart Router and 8615 Smart Router functionality in
1.3 PWE3 Types.
Added 8602 Smart Router functionality in 2 Pseudowire
Redundancy.
Added clarification of PWE3 redundancy being not supported in
ANSI mode, LAG and QinQ AC points in 2.3 Limitations and
Restrictions.
Changes and updates applied in 6 ATM Overview.
Added clarification of VCG configuration in ATM and MS IFMs in
6.9 Limitations and Restrictions.
Changes applied in 5.1 Redundancy Group.
76.8600-50110D 19.12.2013 Renewed related documentation table in 8600 Smart Routers
Technical Documentation.
Changes and updates applied in 1.3 PWE3 Types.
Added support of PWE3 redundancy in 8605 Smart Router, 8609
Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router. Corresponding updates
made in:
• 2.2 Supported Functionality
• 5.2 T-PE Nodes Configuration
Added single-homed and dual-homed PWE3 redundancy scenarios
in 2.1 Overview.
Added Ethernet PWE3 redundancy support in 2 Pseudowire
Redundancy.
Added support of PWE3 redundancy for Ethernet over
(ML)PPP sub-port on the 24xchE1/chT1 MS IFM in ETSI mode
2.2 Supported Functionality.
Added Ethernet PWE3 redundancy restrictions in 2.3 Limitations
and Restrictions.
Renewed 3 Single-Segment PWE3 Configuration Examples and
added 3.5 SS-PWE3 Provisioning Status.
Renewed 4 MS-PWE3 Configuration Examples and added
4.5 MS-PWE3 Provisioning Status.
Added PWE3 redundancy configuration options and basic settings
of the trunk interfaces per each node in 5 PWE3 Redundancy
Configuration Examples. Added Ethernet PWE3 redundancy
group syntax in 5.1 Redundancy Group.
Updated and clarified ATM circuits scalability in Circuit
Scalability.

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This revision of the manual documents the following network elements and the corresponding
feature packs or higher.

8605 Smart Router FP1.6


8607 Smart Router FP1.1
8609 Smart Router, 8611 Smart Router FP7.0
8620 Smart Router FP4.1
8630 Smart Router, 8660 Smart Router FP7.0

If a different feature pack of 8600 Smart Routers is in use, please refer to the relevant product
document program on the Coriant Portal by navigating to www.portal.tellabs.com > Product
Documentation > Data Networking > 8600 Smart Routers > Technical Documentation.

© 2015 Coriant. All rights reserved.

This manual is protected by U.S. and international copyright laws, conventions and treaties. Your right to use this manual is
subject to limitations and restrictions imposed by applicable licenses and copyright laws. Unauthorized reproduction, modification,
distribution, display or other use of this manual may result in criminal and civil penalties.

The specifications and information regarding the products in this manual are subject to change without notice. All statements,
information, and recommendations in this manual are believed to be accurate but are presented without warranty of any kind,
express or implied. Users must take full responsibility for their application of any products.

Adobe ® Reader ® are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries.

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8600 Smart Routers 76.8600-50110F
ATM and TDM Configuration Guide © 2015 Coriant.

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Document Information

Terms and Abbreviations

Term Explanation
AAL ATM Adaptation Layer
AC Attachment Circuit
ADSL Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line
AIS Alarm Indication Signal
AJB Adaptive Jitter Buffer
APS Automatic Protection Switching
ATM Asynchronous Transfer Mode
BFD Bidirectional Forwarding Detection
BRAS Broadband Remote Access Server
CAC Connection Admission Control
CAS Channel Associated Signalling
CBR Constant Bit Rate
CC Control Channel
CDV Cell Delay Variation
CDVT Cell Delay Variation Tolerance
CE Customer Equipment
CESoPSN Circuit Emulation Service over Packet-Switched Network
CLI Command Line Interface
CLP Cell Loss Priority
CLR Cell Loss Rate
CTC Common Transmit Clock
CTD Cell Transfer Delay
DCN Data Communication Network
DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
DiffServ Differentiated Services
DS1 Digital Signal level 1 (T1)
DS3 Digital Signal level 3 (T3)
DSL Digital Subscriber Line
DSLAM Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer
EMS Element Management System
FEC Forwarding Equivalence Class
FM Fault Management
FR Frame Relay

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Document Information

FRR Fast-Reroute
GFC Guaranteed Frame Control
GFR Guaranteed Frame Rate
HEC Header Error Control
HSDPA High-Speed Downlink Packet Access
ICP IMA link Control Protocol
IETF Internet Engineering Task Force
IFC Interface Module Concentrator is the line card baseboard
IFC line card The IFC line card in 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router and consists of an
IFC and up to two IFMs. There are two types of IFC line cards: IFC1 and IFC2
IFM Interface Module, specific term of the module which can be placed on the line card
and which consists of the physical interfaces
ILMI Interim Local Management Interface
IMA Inverse Multiplexing for ATM
IP Internet Protocol
IPCP IP Control Protocol
IPoATM IP over ATM
ISP Internet Service Provider
ITC Independent Transmit Clock
IWF Interworking Function
LAG Ethernet Link Aggregation
L2TP Layer 2 Tunnelling Protocol
LDP Label Distribution Protocol
LLC Logical Link Control
LNS L2TP Network Server
LOPS Loss of Packet State
LSP Label Switched Path
MBS Maximum Burst Size
MC-APS Multi-Chassis APS
MCR Minimum Cell Rate
MPLS Multiprotocol Label Switching
MSP Multiplexer Section Protection
MS-PWE3 Multi-Segment PWE3
MTU Maximum Transmission Unit
NE Network Element
NNI Network to Network Interface
NSP Native Service Processing

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Document Information

OAM Operation, Administration and Maintenance


OCD Out of Cell Delineation
OSPF Open Shortest Path First
P12s Framed G.704 signal
PCR Peak Cell Rate
PDH Plesiochronous Digital Hierarchy
PE Provider Edge
PM Performance Monitoring
PNNI Private Network to Network Interface
PPP Point-to-Point Protocol
PPPoATM PPP over ATM
PPPoETH PPP over Ethernet
PPPoET- PPP over Ethernet over ATM
HoATM
PSN Packet-Switched Network
PTI Payload Type Identifier
PWE3 Pseudowire Emulation Edge to Edge
QoS Quality of Service
RNC Radio Network Controller
RSVP Resource Reservation Protocol
RTP Real-Time Transport Protocol
SAToP Structure-Agnostic Time Division Multiplexing over Packet
SCR Sustainable Cell Rate
SDH Synchronous Digital Hierarchy
SDU Service Data Unit
SNAP Subnetwork Access Protocol
SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol
SONET Synchronous Optical Network
S-PE Switching PE
SS-PWE3 Single-Segment PWE3
TDM Time Division Multiplexing
TLV Type Length Value
T-PE Terminating PE
TS0 Timeslot zero
UBR Unspecified Bit Rate
UDP User Datagram Protocol
UMTS Universal Mobile Telecommunications System

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Document Information

UNI User Network Interface


VBR Variable Bit Rate
VC Virtual Circuit
VCC Virtual Channel Connection
VCCV Virtual Channel Connection and Verification
VCG Virtual Circuit Group
VCI Virtual Channel Identifier
VCL Virtual Channel Link
VP Virtual Path
VPC Virtual Path Connection
VPI Virtual Path Identifier
VPL Virtual Path Link
VPN Virtual Private Network
VRF VPN Routing and Forwarding

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

About This Manual ............................................................................................................ 14

Objectives....................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Audience......................................................................................................................................................................... 14
8600 Smart Routers Technical Documentation.............................................................................................................. 14
Interface Numbering Conventions ................................................................................................................................. 18
Document Conventions .................................................................................................................................................. 18
Documentation Feedback............................................................................................................................................... 18

8600 Smart Routers Discontinued Products .................................................................. 19

1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3).......................................................... 20

1.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................................................. 20


1.1.1 Terminating Provider Edge (T-PE)...................................................................................................... 21
1.1.2 Switching Provider Edge (S-PE) ......................................................................................................... 21
1.2 Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification Overview............................................................................................ 22
1.2.1 Control Channel Methods.................................................................................................................... 22
1.2.2 Connectivity Verification..................................................................................................................... 24
1.2.3 Multi-Segment PWE3 VCCV LSP Ping and Traceroute ................................................................... 25
1.3 PWE3 Types ........................................................................................................................................................ 26
1.3.1 ATM PWE3 Support............................................................................................................................ 27
1.3.2 Frame Relay PWE3 Support................................................................................................................ 28
1.3.3 HDLC PWE3 Support ......................................................................................................................... 28
1.3.4 TDM PWE3 Support ........................................................................................................................... 29
1.4 PWE3 Counters ................................................................................................................................................... 30
1.5 References ........................................................................................................................................................... 31

2 Pseudowire Redundancy............................................................................................ 32

2.1 Overview ............................................................................................................................................................. 32


2.2 Supported Functionality ...................................................................................................................................... 33
2.3 Limitations and Restrictions................................................................................................................................ 35
2.4 Operation ............................................................................................................................................................. 35
2.4.1 Provisioning Redundancy Group......................................................................................................... 35
2.4.2 Switching Operation ............................................................................................................................ 35
2.4.3 Dynamically Provisioned PWE3 Redundancy .................................................................................... 36
2.4.4 Statically Provisioned PWE3 Redundancy.......................................................................................... 36

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2.4.5 VCCV BFD ........................................................................................................................................ 37


2.4.6 PWE3 Redundancy Counters .............................................................................................................. 37
2.5 PWE3 Redundancy Considerations..................................................................................................................... 37
2.5.1 Specific PWE3 Types .......................................................................................................................... 37
2.5.2 Multi-Layer Protection ........................................................................................................................ 38
2.5.3 Configuration Checklist....................................................................................................................... 38
2.6 References ........................................................................................................................................................... 39

3 Single-Segment PWE3 Configuration Examples...................................................... 40

3.1 Node Basic Settings............................................................................................................................................. 41


3.1.1 Node T-PE223 ..................................................................................................................................... 41
3.1.2 Node T-PE123 ..................................................................................................................................... 41
3.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration............................................................................................................................ 42
3.2.1 Node T-PE223 ..................................................................................................................................... 42
3.2.2 Node T-PE123 ..................................................................................................................................... 43
3.3 Static Provisioning............................................................................................................................................... 43
3.3.1 Node T-PE223 Configuration.............................................................................................................. 43
3.3.2 Node T-PE123 Configuration.............................................................................................................. 44
3.4 Dynamic Provisioning ......................................................................................................................................... 44
3.4.1 Node T-PE223 Configuration.............................................................................................................. 45
3.4.2 Node T-PE123 Configuration.............................................................................................................. 45
3.5 SS-PWE3 Provisioning Status............................................................................................................................. 45

4 MS-PWE3 Configuration Examples ........................................................................... 47

4.1 Node Basic Settings............................................................................................................................................. 47


4.1.1 Node T-PE194 ..................................................................................................................................... 48
4.1.2 Node T-PE116 ..................................................................................................................................... 48
4.1.3 Node S-PE135 ..................................................................................................................................... 49
4.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration............................................................................................................................ 49
4.2.1 Node T-PE194 .................................................................................................................................... 49
4.2.2 Node T-PE116 ..................................................................................................................................... 50
4.2.3 Node S-PE135 ..................................................................................................................................... 50
4.2.4 Transit Node P150 ............................................................................................................................... 51
4.3 MS-PWE3 Static Provisioning ............................................................................................................................ 52
4.3.1 Node T-PE194 Configuration.............................................................................................................. 52
4.3.2 Node T-PE116 Configuration .............................................................................................................. 53
4.3.3 Node S-PE135 Configuration .............................................................................................................. 53
4.4 MS-PWE3 Dynamic Provisioning....................................................................................................................... 54
4.4.1 Node T-PE194 Configuration.............................................................................................................. 54
4.4.2 Node T-PE116 Configuration .............................................................................................................. 55
4.4.3 Node S-PE135 Configuration .............................................................................................................. 55
4.5 MS-PWE3 Provisioning Status ........................................................................................................................... 56

5 PWE3 Redundancy Configuration Examples ........................................................... 58

5.1 Redundancy Group .............................................................................................................................................. 60

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5.2 T-PE Nodes Configuration .................................................................................................................................. 62


5.2.1 Node T-PE90 ....................................................................................................................................... 62
5.2.2 Node T-PE80 ....................................................................................................................................... 66
5.3 S-PE Nodes Configuration................................................................................................................................... 69
5.3.1 Node S-PE76 ....................................................................................................................................... 69
5.3.2 Node S-PE79 ....................................................................................................................................... 71
5.4 Transit Nodes Configuration................................................................................................................................ 73
5.4.1 NODE77 .............................................................................................................................................. 73
5.4.2 NODE78 .............................................................................................................................................. 73
5.5 Configuration Verification and Diagnostics......................................................................................................... 74

6 ATM Overview.............................................................................................................. 78

6.1 Network Applications.......................................................................................................................................... 78


6.1.1 Native ATM Switching Application .................................................................................................... 79
6.1.2 ATM PWE3 over MPLS Application ................................................................................................. 79
6.1.3 ADSL Application............................................................................................................................... 80
6.1.4 SHDSL Application............................................................................................................................. 85
6.1.5 ATM Aggregation to IP VPN Applications......................................................................................... 86
6.2 IFM ATM Interfaces............................................................................................................................................ 88
6.3 ATM Interfaces ................................................................................................................................................... 88
6.4 Generic ATM Functionality................................................................................................................................. 89
6.4.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 89
6.4.2 Mapping ATM to Framed Signals ....................................................................................................... 90
6.4.3 ATM Transmission Convergence Layer .............................................................................................. 91
6.4.4 UNI and NNI Interfaces ...................................................................................................................... 91
6.4.5 ATM Switching.................................................................................................................................... 96
6.4.6 Traffic Management............................................................................................................................. 97
6.4.7 IMA Functionality ............................................................................................................................. 102
6.4.8 IMA Split........................................................................................................................................... 105
6.4.9 ATM OAM Loopback ....................................................................................................................... 106
6.4.10 Preserving ATM QoS over MPLS ..................................................................................................... 108
6.4.11 ATM Statistics Counters ................................................................................................................... 108
6.5 ATM PWE3 Tunnelling..................................................................................................................................... 108
6.5.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................... 108
6.5.2 N-to-1 PWE3 Mode over MPLS ....................................................................................................... 109
6.5.3 N-to-1 PWE3 Mode over IP Connection............................................................................................110
6.5.4 N-to-1 PWE3 and Address Translation ..............................................................................................112
6.5.5 N-to-1 PWE3 with Cell Concatenation ..............................................................................................114
6.5.6 1-to-1 PWE3 Mode ............................................................................................................................114
6.5.7 AAL5 SDU PWE3 Mode over MPLS................................................................................................117
6.5.8 AAL5 SDU PWE3 Mode over IP Connection ...................................................................................119
6.6 Cell Concatenation Strategies............................................................................................................................ 120
6.7 ATM Fault Management OAM (FM OAM)...................................................................................................... 121
6.7.1 ATM AIS ........................................................................................................................................... 121
6.7.2 Inband ATM PWE3 OAM Message Mapping .................................................................................. 121
6.7.3 Outband ATM PWE3 OAM Message Mapping................................................................................ 121
6.8 Protection Functionality .................................................................................................................................... 122
6.9 Limitations and Restrictions.............................................................................................................................. 122
6.10 References ......................................................................................................................................................... 123

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Table of Contents

7 ATM Layer Configuration Examples........................................................................ 124

7.1 Configuring ATM Interface Layer (Transmission Convergence Layer) ........................................................... 124
7.2 Configuring ATM Interface Level Connection and Admission Control ........................................................... 125
7.3 Configuring NE-Level CAC.............................................................................................................................. 125
7.4 Configuring IMA Group in SDH/SONET MS IFM.......................................................................................... 126
7.5 Configuring IMA Split....................................................................................................................................... 127
7.6 Configuring IMA Group in PDH MS Interfaces ............................................................................................... 128
7.7 Configuring IMA Loopback .............................................................................................................................. 129
7.8 Configuring VP Cross-Connection in ATM IFM .............................................................................................. 129
7.9 Deleting VP Cross-Connection in ATM IFM.................................................................................................... 131
7.10 Configuring VC Cross-Connection in ATM IFM.............................................................................................. 132
7.11 Configuring VP Cross-Connection in SDH/SONET MS IFM.......................................................................... 134
7.12 Configuring VC Cross-Connection in SDH/SONET MS IFM ......................................................................... 135
7.13 Configuring VP Cross-Connection in PDH MS Interfaces ............................................................................... 135
7.14 Configuring VC Cross-Connection in PDH MS Interfaces............................................................................... 135
7.15 Configuring IP over AAL5 Interface for Routing ............................................................................................. 135
7.16 Configuring ATM Circuit Using N-to-1 PWE3 over MPLS Network .............................................................. 136
7.17 Configuring ATM Circuit Using AAL5 SDU PWE3 over MPLS Network...................................................... 138
7.18 Configuring ATM Cell Concatenation............................................................................................................... 140
7.19 Configuring ATM Egress Buffer Size ............................................................................................................... 140
7.20 Configuring N-to-1 (N>1) ATM PWE3 and Address Translation..................................................................... 140

8 TDM Overview............................................................................................................ 143

8.1 Network Applications........................................................................................................................................ 143


8.1.1 Local TDM Cross-Connections......................................................................................................... 143
8.1.2 Mobile Access Backhaul ................................................................................................................... 143
8.2 PWE3 Tunnelling .............................................................................................................................................. 144
8.2.1 SAToP ................................................................................................................................................ 144
8.2.2 CESoPSN........................................................................................................................................... 145
8.2.3 Packetization and Jitter Buffering ..................................................................................................... 145
8.2.4 IP/UDP Encapsulation....................................................................................................................... 147
8.2.5 Adaptive Jitter Buffering ................................................................................................................... 147
8.2.6 Limitations and Restrictions.............................................................................................................. 149
8.3 Pseudowire Synchronization ............................................................................................................................. 149
8.4 TDM Pseudowire OAM (L, M, R) .................................................................................................................... 150
8.5 References ......................................................................................................................................................... 150

9 TDM Cross-Connection and Tunnelling Configuration Examples........................ 151

9.1 Configuring Local T1 Cross-Connections......................................................................................................... 151


9.2 Configuring E1 SAToP Tunnelling over Wide Area IP/MPLS Network .......................................................... 153
9.3 Configuring NxDS0 CESoPSN Mobile Backhaul over Metro Ethernet with Adaptive Timing....................... 155
9.4 Adaptive Jitter Buffer Configuration Examples ................................................................................................ 158
9.4.1 CESoPSN........................................................................................................................................... 158
9.4.2 SAToP ................................................................................................................................................ 158
9.4.3 AJB Monitoring................................................................................................................................. 159
9.5 Configuring TDM PWE3 over IP...................................................................................................................... 161
9.6 TDM PWE3 OAM (L, M, R) Configuration ..................................................................................................... 162

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9.6.1 TDM PWE3 Defect Forwarding........................................................................................................ 162


9.6.2 TDM PWE3 Replacement Data ........................................................................................................ 162
9.6.3 TDM PWE3 Report ........................................................................................................................... 163

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About This Manual

About This Manual


This chapter discusses the objectives and intended audience of this manual, 8600 Smart Routers
ATM and TDM Configuration Guide and consists of the following sections:

• Objectives
• Audience
• Related Documentation
• Interface Numbering Conventions
• Document Conventions
• Documentation Feedback

Objectives

This manual provides an overview of the 8600 Smart Routers ATM and TDM applications and
instructions on how to configure them with a command-line interface (CLI) using a router’s console
or remote terminal (telnet).

Audience

This manual is designed for administration personnel for configuring 8600 Smart Routers functions
with CLI. On the other hand, 8000 Intelligent Network Manager provides access to equal
functionality for administration personnel with a graphical user interface.

It is assumed that the readers have a basic understanding of Ethernet, POS, IP, MPLS, IP VPN. This
manual also assumes that readers are familiar with the following protocols:

• IP routing
• UDP
• TCP
• Differentiated Services

8600 Smart Routers Technical Documentation

The document numbering scheme consists of the document ID, indicated by numbers, and the
document revision, indicated by a letter. The references in the Related Documentation table below
are generic and include only the document ID. To make sure the references point to the latest
available document versions, please refer to the relevant product document program on the Tellabs
and Coriant Portal by navigating to www.portal.tellabs.com > Product Documentation & Software
> Data Networking > 8600 Smart Routers > Technical Documentation.

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About This Manual

Document Title Description


8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 NEs PWE3 applications,
ATM and TDM Configuration Guide including types, Single-Segment and Multi-Segment; PWE3
(76.8600-50110) Redundancy; ATM applications, including PWE3 tunnelling,
Traffic Management, Fault Management OAM, protection and
TDM applications as well as instructions on how to configure
them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides information related to the boot and mini-applications
Boot and Mini-Applications software of 8605 Smart Router, 8607 Smart Router, 8609
Embedded Software Release Notes Smart Router, 8611 Smart Router, 8620 Smart Router, 8630
(76.8600-50108) Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router as well as the installation
instructions.
8600 Smart Routers Provides commands available to configure, monitor and maintain
CLI Commands Manual 8600 system with CLI.
(76.8600-50117)
8600 Smart Routers 8600 Smart Routers SR7.0 Embedded Software Release Notes
Embedded Software Release Notes (76.8670-50177) for the following products:
• 8602 Smart Router FP7.0
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router FP7.0
• 8615 Smart Router FP7.0
• 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router FP7.0
• 8665 Smart Router FP7.0
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system HW inventory, software
Equipment Management management, equipment protection 1+1 (CDC and SCM) as well
Configuration Guide as instructions on how to configure them with CLI.
(76.8600-50118)
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system Ethernet applications,
Ethernet Configuration Guide (76. including interfaces; Ethernet forwarding (MAC Switching,
8600-50133) Ethernet PWE3, IRB, VLAN, VPLS); Ethernet OAM; LAG;
ELP as well as instructions on how to configure them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system fault management,
Fault Management Configuration including fault source, types and status as well as instructions on
Guide (76.8600-50115) how to configure it with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system Frame Relay applications,
Frame Relay Configuration Guide including interfaces; Performance Monitoring; protection; Traffic
(76.8600-50120) Management as well as instructions on how to configure them
with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides guidance on mechanical installation, cooling,
Hardware Installation Guide grounding, powering, cabling, maintenance, commissioning and
(76.8600-40039) ESW downloading.

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About This Manual

Document Title Description


8600 Smart Routers The Interface Configuration Guides provides an overview of the
Interface Configuration Guides 8600 NEs interface functions, including NE supported interface
types and equipping; interface features; configuration options and
operating modes; fault management; performance monitoring;
interface configuration layers and port protocols as well as
instructions on how to configure them with CLI. The following
interface configuration guides are available:
• 8600 Smart Routers Network Interfaces Configuration
Guide (76.8600-50161) (for 8602 Smart Router, 8615 Smart
Router and 8665 Smart Router)
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router FP7.0 Interface
Configuration Guide (76.8670-50179)
• 8600 Smart Routers FP7.0 Interface Configuration Guide
(76.8670-50180) (for 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart
Router)
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 NEs IP, forwarding and traffic
IP Forwarding and Traffic management functionality, including: IP addressing; IP hosting
Management Configuration Guide (ARP, DHCP); IP routing (static); ACL; Differentiated Services
(76.8600-50122) (Policing, Queue Management, Shaping) as well as instructions
on how to configure them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system management
Management Communications communications functions, including communication protocols:
Configuration Guide BMP; FTP; RADIUS; SNMP; SSH; TELNET as well as
(76.8600-50125) instructions for configuring them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system Mobile Optimization
Mobile Optimization Configuration applications as well as instructions on how to configure them
Guide (76.8600-50100) with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 NEs MPLS applications (including
MPLS Applications Configuration FRR (one-to-one and facility backup); LDP; protection and
Guide (76.8600-50123) Traffic Engineering), MPLS-TP applications (including OAM,
linear protection), S-MPLS applications as well as instructions
on how to configure them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system supported performance
Performance Counters Reference counters.
Guide (76.8600-50143)

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About This Manual

Document Title Description


8600 Smart Routers The reference manuals describe the 8600 network element
Reference Manuals features including:
• NE enclosure, baseboard, power supply modules, and
interfaces in 8602 Smart Router FP7.0 Reference Manual
(76.8670-40130)
• NE enclosure, baseboard, power supply modules, interfaces
and physical LM types in 8609 Smart Router FP7.0 Refer-
ence Manual
• NE enclosure, baseboard, power supply modules, SCMs, HM
and LM types in 8611 Smart Router FP7.0 Reference Manual
• NE enclosure, baseboard, power supply modules, and in-
terfaces in 8615 Smart Router FP7.0 Reference Manual
(76.8670-40132)
• NE subrack, fan modules, CDCs, line cards and IFMs in 8630
Smart Router FP7.0 Reference Manual
• NE subrack, fan modules, CDCs, line cards and IFMs in 8660
Smart Router FP7.0 Reference Manual
• NE subrack, fan modules, line unit and switch unit in 8665
Smart Router FP7.0 Reference Manual (76.8670-40128)
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 NEs routing protocols, including
Routing Protocols Configuration BFD; BGP; BGP MP; ECMP; IS-IS; OSPF and VRRP as well as
Guide (76.8600-50121) instructions on how to configure them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provide a summary of tested scalability limits of the 8600 Smart
Scalability Reference Manual Routers.
(76.8600-50160)
8600 Smart Routers Describes SNMP MIB support by the 8600 NEs and provides
SNMP MIB Support information on the supported objects and traps. For further
(76.8600-50116) information on SNMP MIBs, see the related RFCs.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system supported statistic counters.
Statistic Counters Reference Guide
(76.8600-50142)
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 NEs synchronization functionality,
Synchronization Configuration including physical layer Frequency Synchronization (SEC, EEC);
Guide (76.8600-50114) PTP Frequency Synchronization; Phase-Time Synchronization
(L2 and L3 applications) as well as instructions on how to
configure them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 NEs measurement and connectivity
Test and Measurement Configuration verification tools, including Ethernet loopback; IP ping and
Guide (76.8600-50124) traceroute; MAC swap loopback; MPLS ping and traceroute;
PLT; PWE3 loopback; VCCV (BFD, LSP ping) as well as
instructions on how to configure them with CLI.
8600 Smart Routers Provides an overview of 8600 system virtual private network
VPNs Configuration Guide (VPN) layer 3 applications as well as instructions on how to
(76.8600-50128) configure them with CLI.
8000 Intelligent Network Manager Provides instructions on how different operations are performed
Online Help with the 8000 Intelligent Network Manager. Describes also
different parameters and controls of the 8000 Intelligent Network
Manager dialogs and windows.
Note that the Online Help is not available on the Portal but it is
incorporated in the 8000 Intelligent Network Manager.

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17
About This Manual

Interface Numbering Conventions

To be able to follow more easily the feature descriptions and configuration examples given in this
document, see also the 8600 system interface numbering and related figures described in 8600
Smart Routers CLI Commands Manual.

Document Conventions

This is a note symbol. It emphasizes or supplements information in the document.

This is a caution symbol. It indicates that damage to equipment is possible if the instructions
are not followed.

This is a warning symbol. It indicates that bodily injury is possible if the instructions are not
followed.

Documentation Feedback

Please contact us to suggest improvements or to report errors in our documentation:

Email: fi-documentation@tellabs.com

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18
8600 Smart Routers Discontinued Products

8600 Smart Routers Discontinued Products


8600 Smart Routers Manufacture Discontinued (MD) notifications are available on the Tellabs
and Coriant Portal, www.portal.tellabs.com > Product Documentation & Software > Data
Networking > [8600 Smart Router product name] > Product Notifications.

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

1.1 Overview

Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3) is a technology defined in [RFC3985] that provides


mechanisms to emulate network services such as ATM, TDM, Ethernet over a Packet-Switched
Network (PSN). A PWE3 emulates a point-to-point and provides a single service over an underlying
IP/MPLS core network. The ability of providing a single service over a PSN is the main advantage
of PWE3 technology and the key point for services convergence in an MPLS network.

From connectivity stand point PWE3 can be classified as follows:

• Single-Segment PWE3 (SS-PWE3)


• Multi-Segment PWE3 (MS-PWE3)
SS-PWE3 spans a single PSN, e.g. RSVP-TE tunnel and provides point-to-point connectivity
between PWE3 end points, i.e. the originating and Terminating Provider Edges (T-PE) in the same
PSN domain or PWE3 control plane domain as illustrated in the following figure.

Fig. 1 SS-PWE3

MS-PWE3 defined in [RFC6073] spans through multiple PSN tunnels (also known as domains), i.e.
it consists of two or more segments that are interconnected via Switching Provider Edge (S-PE)
between two PWE3 T-PEs in the different packet switched network domains or PWE3 control plane
domains as illustrated in the following figure.

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

Fig. 2 MS-PWE3

1.1.1 Terminating Provider Edge (T-PE)

The 8600 NEs support both static and dynamic provisioning of PWE3 in T-PE. Static provisioned
pseudowires do not have any control plane protocol and are manually configured, whereas dynamic
provisioned pseudowires utilize LDP for signaling as defined in [RFC4447].

VCCV BFD can be used to provide continuos fault detection and propagation. In this case, PWE3
failure is detected by loss of specified number of consecutive BFD packets. These protocols may
be used to test and monitor the actual data path of the PWE3. They can be used for both statically
configured and signalled pseudowires, as well as MS-PWE3.

PWE3 setup and maintenance using the Label Distribution Protocol LDP [RFC4447] defines two
methods for signaling of PWE3 status and both methods are supported by the 8600 NEs:

• Use of label withdraw messages (a.k.a. label withdraw pseudowire status method)
• Use of PWE3 status TLV

1.1.2 Switching Provider Edge (S-PE)

In 8600 NEs, the following S-PE features are supported:

• Allows merging of PSN tunnels regardless of their type, which increases network scalability due
to reduced number of RSVP-TE tunnels
• PWE3 manual switching between two static control planes
• PWE3 switching between two dynamic (LDP) control planes
• VCCV control channel methods:
• Type 1: PWE3 control word with 0001b as the first nibble
• Type 3 (MPLS PWE3 Label with TTL = = 1) Control Channel (CC)
• VCCV protocols:
• end-to-end VCCV LSP traceroute reports switching points
PWE3 status signaling methods:

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

• Label withdraw messages


• PWE3 status TLV
MS-PWE3 signaling between the end points is provided in the context of both T-PEs (edge-to-edge)
and S-PEs (hop-by-hop), and includes the coordination of parameters related to each S-PE, as
well as the T-PE. The PWE3 segments at S-PEs may be statically provisioned or they may be
signalled dynamically using LDP protocol, but both segments must use the same method, i.e.
static-dynamic conversion is not supported for PWE3 control plane. From T-PE point of view there
is not a significant difference between SS-PWE3 and MS-PWE3 as S-PE acts transparently and
mostly, just relays on control plane messages between the segments.

In addition to PWE3 segment signaling, a switching function is required to interconnect the


segments at S-PEs. Typically data packets contain two labels, both of which are changed at S-PE.
The outer label belongs to the PSN tunnel that the segment utilizes, and the inner label is specific to
the PWE3 itself. In this case the switching operation is characterized as “outer label pop, inner label
swap and outer label push”.

In 8600 NEs, MS-PWE3 connectivity verification of the data path is supported at S-PE using VCCV
type 1 and type 3 control channels.

1.2 Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification Overview

Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification (VCCV) is the IETF Operation, Administration and
Maintenance (OAM) method for Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3) circuits and is
specified in [draft-ietf-pwe3-vccv], [RFC5085] and [draft-ietf-pwe3-oam-msg-map]. VCCV is
a method for providing control channel that is associated with a pseudowire, as well as a way
to inject OAM packets within PWE3 data stream so that these control packets can be captured
at PWE3 egress.

1.2.1 Control Channel Methods

There are four possible Control Channel (CC) types defined for MPLS PWE3:

• Type 1: PWE3 control word with 0001b as first nibble (PW-ACH, see [RFC4385]) [draft-ietf-
pwe3-vccv]
• Type 2: MPLS Router Alert Label [draft-ietf-pwe3-vccv]
• Type 3: MPLS pseudowire Label with TTL = 1 [draft-ietf-pwe3-vccv]
• Type 4: MH-VCCV Control Word [RFC6073]
Control channel support in 8600 NEs, varies depending on the interface types. In general, a Type 1
control channel is supported in multiservice interfaces, while a Type 3 is predominantly supported
on Ethernet interfaces. The following table provides an outline of the supported functionality.

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

CC Types Support in the 8600 NEs


NE Interface CC Type 1 CC Type 3
Type
LSP Ping & BFD LSP Ping & BFD
Traceroute Traceroute
8602 Smart Ethernet — — Yes Yes
Router
8605 Smart Multiservice Yes Yes Yes Yes
Router (PDH)
Ethernet — — Yes Yes
8607 Smart Multiservice Yes Yes Yes Yes
Router (PDH)
Ethernet — — Yes Yes
8609 Smart Multiservice Yes Yes Yes Yes
Router (PDH)
Ethernet — — Yes Yes
8611 Smart Multiservice Yes Yes Yes Yes
Router (PDH)
Ethernet — — Yes Yes
8615 Smart Ethernet — — Yes —
Router
8620 Smart Multiservice Yes Yes — —
Router (IFMs)
Ethernet — — Yes —
(IFMs)
8630 Smart Multiservice Yes Yes — —
Router (IFC line card
8660 Smart IFMs)1
Router
Ethernet — — Yes —
(IFC1 line
card IFMs)
Ethernet — — Yes —
(IFC2 line
card IFMs)
Ethernet — — Yes —
(ELC1)
8665 Smart Ethernet — — Yes —
Router (LU1)

1In IFC line card with the 24xchE1/chT1 MS IFM, ETHo(ML)PPP PWE3 does not support CC type 3.

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1.2.2 Connectivity Verification

A Connectivity Verification (CV) protocol can be run over VCCV to provide OAM functionality.
The following connectivity verification protocols have been defined:

• ICMP Ping.
• LSP Ping.
• BFD for pseudowire fault detection only.
• BFD for pseudowire fault detection and Attachment Circuit (AC) or pseudowire Fault Status
Signaling.
• BFD for pseudowire fault detection only. Carrying BFD payload without IP headers.
• BFD for pseudowire fault detection and AC or pseudowire Fault Status Signaling. Carrying BFD
payload without IP headers.
The 8600 NEs support LSP ping and all BFD variants.

VCCV BFD

VCCV BFD works by sending continuously packets over PWE3 circuit. PWE3 or Packet Switched
Network (PSN) tunnel failure is detected by loss of specified number of consecutive BFD packets.
VCCV BFD can also transmit status code indicating status of AC associated with PWE3 circuit.

VCCV BFD is suitable for continuous connectivity verification of pseudowires. But note that BFD
is not suitable for ad-hoc testing. BFD monitoring is enabled for lifetime of the PWE3 circuit
and enabling or disabling BFD involves re-signaling PWE3 circuit that can cause sub-second
interruption to the services.

The implementation of VCCV BFD is network processor based, and BFD can be used with small
failure detection time-outs without adverse effect to CPU load.

The usage of BFD ensures that PWE3 can forward data end-to-end and if such is not the case, a
fault is raised. If the AC technology supports widely implemented OAM, native fault indication
is generated. The 8600 NEs support generation of ATM AIS/RDI when VCCV detects PWE3
failure or remote AC error.

BFD variants without status signaling should be used with LDP provisioned pseudowires, as AC
status signaling is provided by LDP. With statically provisioned pseudowires BFD variants with
fault signaling capability should be used, as VCCV BFD will then signal remote AC status for
static pseudowires.

Using IPv4 header containing BFD variant adds 28 bytes of overhead for each BFD packet and
roughly doubles the bandwidth usage.

BFD variants without IPv4 header can be used only when control-word is used for PWE3.

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

VCCV BFD failure detection timers should be selected in such manner that the underlying
protection mechanisms have sufficient time to function, otherwise VCCV BFD is able to detect
failures handled by MSP, ELP and LSP 1:1 protection mechanisms, which would simultaneously
cause multi-layers detection triggering. The following are some recommendations of possible
failure detection timers for different protection scenarios:

• The default detection timer of 900 ms (with 300 ms transmission interval) should be able to sur-
vive most reroutes and protection mechanisms.
• If only MSP protection is used (and <50 ms reroute is guaranteed), PWE3 layer failure detection
could be reasonably configured to use 100 ms detection interval with 33 ms hellos.
• If no protection mechanisms are used, even a 1 ms transmission interval with 3 ms failure detec-
tion could be utilized.
• If low bandwidth PWE3 circuit monitoring is desired (and VCCV BFD is not used as a trigger
of PWE3 layer protection mechanisms), once a second or once in 10 seconds are reasonable
intervals.
Whenever possible, VCCV should be used. Using VCCV ensures with a high degree of confidence
that any PWE3 circuit that does not have faults is fully operational and can forward data. Without
VCCV, PWE3 status is purely based on signaling information.

In 8611 Smart Router when PWE3 are provisioned with VCCV BFD, packet loss can be
observed during SCM switchover due to BFD states that are not synchronized between the
active and passive SCMs.

VCCV LSP Ping

VCCV LSP ping can be used to verify PWE3 circuit connectivity on-demand. Although VCCV
LSP ping packets are generated by the control processor plane, they are inserted to a PWE3 circuit
very near of the actual attachment circuit and removed from data stream just before they would be
transmitted towards to the other attachment circuit. This guarantees extensive coverage for PWE3
testing (as good as VCCV BFD).

Unlike VCCV BFD packets, VCCV LSP ping packets carry PWE3 identification that allows a
detection of misconnections between PWE3 circuits. Usually, PWE3 circuit name is used for LSP
ping. However, if the PWE3 circuit is a local cross-connection with two interfaces, also an interface
name can be used for LSP ping allowing bidirectional testing.

1.2.3 Multi-Segment PWE3 VCCV LSP Ping and Traceroute

The 8600 NEs support Multi-Segment Pseudowire (MS-PWE3) as defined in [RFC6073]. A


MS-PWE3 consists of two or more segments that are interconnected via a Switching Provider Edge
(S-PE) between two PWE3 Terminating Provider Edge (T-PE).

VCCV LSP ping or traceroute for MS-PWE3 can be originated only from PWE3 T-PE. VCCV
LSP ping or traceroute for MS-PWE3 originated from S-PE is not supported.

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

MS-PWE3 VCCV LSP Ping

If a PWE3 is segmented, VCCV LSP ping sending node must be aware of the attributes of the last
segment prior to the target node. The default values of these attributes correspond to the segment
that is closest to the remote T-PE. The 8600 NEs communicate these attributes via the LDP protocol.
In a case the S-PE does not support communication of the segment attributes via LDP, or LDP is not
used, or if there is a need to override the default values, the attributes can be configured manually.

MS-PWE3 VCCV Traceroute

VCCV LSP traceroute can be used to verify connectivity over one or more PWE3 switching points
(S-PE). The sending node tests each switching point along the data path by sending MPLS echo
requests iteratively until the endpoint is reached. This allows the sending node to automatically
learn the next target Forwarding Equivalence Class (FEC) stack from each MPLS echo reply.

1.3 PWE3 Types

The 8600 NEs support the following PWE3 types:

1. ATM PWE3
• ATM N-to-1 (N=1)
• ATM N-to-1 (N>=1)
• ATM 1-to-1
• ATM AAL5 PDU
• ATM AAL5 SDU
2. Ethernet PWE3 [RFC4448] (please refer to 8600 Smart Routers Ethernet Configuration Guide)
• Raw mode
• Tagged mode
3. Frame Relay (FR) PWE3
• One-to-one mode
• Port mode
4. HDLC PWE3
5. TDM PWE3
• SAToP
• CESoPSN
In the following chapters, it is presented the transport options supported per NE for each PWE3
technology. The detailed options of each PWE3 technology are not covered in these chapters, please
follow the corresponding references provided.

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1.3.1 ATM PWE3 Support

NE Attachment Circuit Physical Trunk Interface


Interface Tunnelling Type Encapsulation
8605 Smart chE1/chT1 ATM All interfaces ATM PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces ATM PWE3 over
IP
8607 Smart chE1/chT1 ATM All interfaces ATM PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces ATM PWE3 over
only IP
8609 Smart chE1/chT1 ATM All interfaces ATM PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces ATM PWE3 over
only IP
8611 Smart chE1/chT1 ATM All interfaces ATM PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces ATM PWE3 over
only IP
8620 Smart 1xchSTM- ATM All MS, POS & ATM PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS Ethernet IFMs MPLS
IFM
All Ethernet ATM PWE3 over
4xchSTM-
IFMs except the IP
1/chOC-3 MS
2x1000BASE-X
IFM
IFM
24xchE1/chT1
MS IFM
4xSTM-
1/OC-3 ATM
IFM
8630 Smart 1xchSTM- ATM All MS, POS & ATM PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS Ethernet IFMs and MPLS
8660 Smart IFM ELC1 interfaces
Router 4xchSTM-
All Ethernet ATM PWE3 over
1/chOC-3 MS
IFMs except the IP
IFM
2x1000BASE-X
24xchE1/chT1
IFM and ELC1
MS IFM
interfaces
4xSTM-
1/OC-3 ATM
IFM

ATM PWE3 and the options supported are detailed covered in 6.5 ATM PWE3 Tunnelling.

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1.3.2 Frame Relay PWE3 Support

NE Attachment Circuit Physical Trunk Interface


Interface Tunnelling Type Encapsulation
8620 Smart 1xchSTM- Frame Relay All MS, POS & FR PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS Ethernet IFMs MPLS
IFM
4xchSTM-
1/chOC-3 MS
IFM
24xchE1/chT1
MS IFM
8630 Smart 1xchSTM- Frame Relay All MS, POS & FR PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS Ethernet IFMs and MPLS
8660 Smart IFM ELC1 interfaces
Router 4xchSTM-
1/chOC-3 MS
IFM
24xchE1/chT1
MS IFM

Frame Relay PWE3 and the options supported are covered in 8600 Smart Routers Frame Relay
Configuration Guide.

1.3.3 HDLC PWE3 Support

NE Attachment Circuit Physical Trunk Interface


Interface Tunnelling Type Encapsulation
8605 Smart chE1/chT1 HDLC All interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
only IP
8607 Smart chE1/chT1 HDLC All interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
only IP
8609 Smart chE1/chT1 HDLC All interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
only IP
8611 Smart chE1/chT1 HDLC All interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
Router MPLS
Ethernet interfaces HDLC PWE3 over
only IP

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

NE Attachment Circuit Physical Trunk Interface


Interface Tunnelling Type Encapsulation
8620 Smart 1xchSTM- HDLC All MS, POS & HDLC PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS Ethernet IFMs MPLS
IFM
All Ethernet HDLC PWE3 over
4xchSTM-
IFMs except IP
1/chOC-3 MS
2x1000BASE-X
IFM
IFM
24xchE1/chT1
MS IFM
8630 Smart 1xchSTM- HDLC All MS, POS & HDLC PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS Ethernet IFMs and MPLS
8660 Smart IFM ELC1 interfaces
Router 4xchSTM-
All Ethernet HDLC PWE3 over
1/chOC-3 MS
IFMs except IP
IFM
2x1000BASE-X
24xchE1/chT1
MS IFM IFM

1.3.4 TDM PWE3 Support

NE Attachment Circuit Physical Trunk Interface


Interface Tunnelling Interface Encapsulation
8605 Smart chE1/chT1 SAToP All interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
Router CESoPSN MPLS
CESoPSN PWE3
over MPLS
Ethernet interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
only IP
CESoPSN PWE3
over IP
8607 Smart chE1/chT1 SAToP All interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
Router CESoPSN MPLS
CESoPSN PWE3
over MPLS
Ethernet interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
only IP
CESoPSN PWE3
over IP
8609 Smart chE1/chT1 SAToP All interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
Router CESoPSN MPLS
CESoPSN PWE3
over MPLS
Ethernet interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
only IP
CESoPSN PWE3
over IP

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1 Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)

NE Attachment Circuit Physical Trunk Interface


Interface Tunnelling Interface Encapsulation
8611 Smart chE1/chT1 SAToP All interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
Router CESoPSN MPLS
CESoPSN PWE3
over MPLS
Ethernet interfaces SAToP PWE3 over
only IP
CESoPSN PWE3
over IP
8620 Smart 1xchSTM- SAToP All MS, POS & SAToP PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS CESoPSN Ethernet IFMs MPLS
IFM CESoPSN PWE3
4xchSTM- over MPLS
1/chOC-3 MS
All Ethernet SAToP PWE3 over
IFM
IFMs except IP
24xchE1/chT1
2x1000BASE-X CESoPSN PWE3
MS IFM
IFM over IP
CESoPSN over All Ethernet CESoPSN PWE3
UDP over IP IFMs except over IP
2x1000BASE-X
IFM
8630 Smart 1xchSTM- SAToP All MS, POS & SAToP PWE3 over
Router 1/chOC-3 MS CESoPSN Ethernet IFMs and MPLS
8660 Smart IFM ELC1 interfaces CESoPSN PWE3
Router 4xchSTM- over MPLS
1/chOC-3 MS
All Ethernet SAToP PWE3 over
IFM
IFMs except IP
24xchE1/chT1
2x1000BASE-X CESoPSN PWE3
MS IFM
IFM over IP
CESoPSN over All Ethernet CESoPSN PWE3
UDP over IP IFMs except over IP
2x1000BASE-X
IFM

TDM PWE3 and the options supported are detailed covered in 8 TDM Overview.

1.4 PWE3 Counters

The 8600 NEs support PWE3 statistics, performance and Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) counters. The counters are available via CLI or 8000 Intelligent Network Manager and the
user has the option to reset the counters, e.g. before starting the tests.

Please refer to 8600 Smart Routers Statistics Counters Reference Guide and 8600 Smart Routers
Performance Counters Reference Guide for a detailed list of supported counters. Also refer to
8600 Smart Routers SNMP MIB Support for a complete list of PWE3 counters available via the
SNMP management interface.

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1.5 References

[draft-ietf-pwe3-oam- draft-ietf-pwe3-oam-msg-map-8.txt (2008–11) Pseudowire OAM Message


msg-map] Mapping
[draft-ietf-pwe3-vccv] draft-ietf-pwe3-vccv-bfd-07.txt (2009–07) Bidirectional Forwarding
Detection (BFD) for the Pseudowire Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification
(VCCV)
[RFC3985] RFC3985 ( 2005–03), Pseudo Wire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3)
Architecture
[RFC4379] RFC4379 (2006-02), Detecting Multi-Protocol Label Switched (MPLS) Data
Plane Failures
[RFC4385] RFC4385 (2006–02) Pseudowire Emulation Edge-to-Edge (PWE3) Control
Word for Use over an MPLS PSN
[RFC4447] RFC4447 (2006–04), Pseudowire Setup and Maintenance Using the Label
Distribution Protocol (LDP)
[RFC4448] RFC4448.txt (2006-04), Encapsulation Methods for Transport of Ethernet
over MPLS networks
[RFC5085] RFC5085 (2007–12) Pseudowire Virtual Circuit Connectivity Verification
(VCCV): A Control Channel for Pseudowires
[RFC6073] RFC6073 (2011–01), Segmented Pseudowire

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2 Pseudowire Redundancy

2 Pseudowire Redundancy

2.1 Overview

This chapter provides a generic functionality description of pseudowire redundancy (also referred as
PWE3 redundancy) in the 8600 NEs. The supported functionality is highlighted in 2.2 Supported
Functionality.While the specific deviations per module type and PWE3 technology types are listed
in 2.3 Limitations and Restrictions.

The 8600 NEs support pseudowire redundancy to provide resiliency for Single-Segment and
Multi-Segment pseudowire services against PSN failures. This feature is especially targeted for
single-homed Customer Equipment (CE) with MS-PWE3 redundancy topology option defined in
[draft-ietf-pwe3-redundancy]. Typically, protection for single-segment pseudowires is provided at
the PSN tunnel layer (e.g. RSVP-TE path protection). However, in multi-AS networks MS-PWE3
have one or more S-PEs that must be traversed. The S-PEs for a given FEC128 based MS-PWE3
are selected at provisioning phase and hence form a single point of failure. If any of the S-PEs
transited by the MS-PWE3 goes down, so does the MS-PWE3. Therefore, the PSN tunnel protection
mechanisms are unable to provide protection against S-PE failure. PWE3 redundancy solves this
problem by allowing several PWE3 layer paths to be provisioned end-to-end and hence removing a
single point of failure in the intervening network.

PWE3 redundancy can also be used without the PSN layer protection (even for protecting
single-segment pseudowires) and with VCCV BFD end-to-end OAM protection times, it can be
much faster than with the PSN layer protection. However, as OAM flows are per PWE3, it is more
economical to utilize PSN layer protection mechanisms for link and LSR and PWE3 redundancy for
S-PE protection. In this scenario VCCV BFD should be configured to such a rate and timeout that
PSN layer protection is fast enough not to trigger PWE3 layer protection.

In PWE3 redundancy, a redundancy group is formed by one primary PWE3 and up to three
protecting pseudowires. The redundancy group is associated to one attachment circuit. If the
primary PWE3 fails, the system will select one of the active protecting pseudowires. Only one
pseudowire is forwarding user traffic at a time, but OAM traffic is allowed to be forwarded over the
standby pseudowires.

The following terminology is used in this section:

Term Description
Primary PWE3 The main PWE3 that can either be protected using PWE3 redundancy or
operates as unprotected.
Alias PWE3 A PWE3 that protects the primary PWE3 in the case of failure. Alias may also
be referred as a sibling.

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PWE3 State Description


Active PWE3 The PWE3 forwarding traffic. An active PWE3 can be the primary or one of
the aliases.
Standby PWE3 An alias PWE3 that is operational and ready to forward traffic in case the active
PWE3 fails.
Down A state of the primary or alias PWE3 when there is a severe PWE3 failure.
Up A state of the primary or alias PWE3 when it is operational ready to forward
data.

Fig. 3 PWE3 Redundancy Application

2.2 Supported Functionality

This chapter provides a generic overview of PWE3 redundancy supported functionality:

• Single-segment and multi-segment PWE3. However, for SS-PWE3, redundancy is not recom-
mended because LSP protection provides, e.g. better scalability.
• Dynamically (LDP) and statically provisioned pseudowires.
• Up to 3 alias pseudowires. A selection of the active PWE3 is made, if several aliases are available.
• Independent path selection mode and Preferential Forwarding Status bit (LDP) [draft-ietf-pwe3-
redundancy-bit].
• BFD over VCCV type 1 monitoring for fast failure detection per primary and alias pseudowires
for ATM and TDM pseudowires.
• BFD over VCCV type 3 monitoring for fast failure detection per primary and alias pseudowires
for Ethernet PWE3.

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• 8600 NEs proprietary prefer-all mode, which does not signal LDP bit to accelerate the
switchover.
• Statistics and performance counters for the active PWE3.
• PWE3 loopback is supported per primary and alias pseudowires when VCCV BFD is not config-
ured.
The following tables provide a detailed support of PWE3 redundancy in 8600 NEs. The notation
“—” used below stands for not supported.

ATM and TDM PWE3 Redundancy Support in 8620 Smart Router, 8630 Smart Router and
8660 Smart Router
PWE3 Types ATM and MS IFMs
4xSTM-1/OC-3 4xchSTM- 24xchE1/chT1
ATM 1/chOC-3 MS MS
ATM ATM N-to-1 Yes Yes Yes
(N=1)
ATM N-to-1 — — —
(N>=1)
ATM 1-to-1 Yes Yes Yes
ATM AAL5 PDU — — —
ATM AAL5 SDU — — —
Frame Relay One-to-one mode — — —
Port mode — — —
HDLC — — —
TDM SAToP Yes Yes Yes
CESoPSN Yes Yes Yes

ATM and TDM PWE3 Redundancy Support in 8605 Smart Router, 8609 Smart Router and
8611 Smart Router
PWE3 Types 8605 Smart Router 8609 Smart Router &
8611 Smart Router
16xchE1/chT1 8xchE1/chT1 LM
ATM ATM N-to-1 (N=1) — —
ATM N-to-1 (N>=1) — —
ATM 1-to-1 — —
ATM AAL5 PDU — —
ATM AAL5 SDU — —
Frame Relay One-to-one mode — —
Port mode — —
HDLC — —
TDM SAToP Yes Yes
CESoPSN Yes Yes

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2.3 Limitations and Restrictions

This chapter provides an outline of the following limitations and restrictions with PWE3 redundancy.

• PWE3 redundancy is not available in 8607 Smart Router.


• For all PWE3 types the following functionality is not supported:
• MPLS over IP encapsulation
• Multi-homed CE topology for protected ATM or TDM attachment circuit
• Manual switchover and non-revertive mode
• Master/slave mode
• Remote switchover and PWE3 Request Switchover Status code
• Hold-time timer to provide hysteresis
• For ATM and TDM PWE3 redundancy, the following functionality is not supported:
• Local dual-homing
• ANSI mode

2.4 Operation

2.4.1 Provisioning Redundancy Group

A pseudowire redundancy group consists of one primary PWE3 and up to three alias (protecting)
pseudowires. A redundancy group is set up automatically when the first alias PWE3 is associated to
the primary PWE3 and the group will be removed after the last alias is removed. When a redundancy
group is created, it is operational immediately and no explicit redundancy operation enabling is
required. The primary PWE3 must be configured before aliases and the configuration order of
the three aliases is irrelevant. From the MPLS point of view aliases are standard pseudowires
with their own signaling and state mechanisms. Each redundancy group operates independently
of the other groups.

2.4.2 Switching Operation

PWE3 redundancy operates in 1:1 or 1:N fashion. At the MPLS ingress direction traffic is forwarded
only via one active pseudowire while the other pseudowires are on standby state. If several standby
aliases are available, the selection of the active path is done in the priority order described below
separately for dynamically and statically provisioned pseudowires. The switchover is revertive, i.e.
immediately and the traffic is switched back to the primary PWE3 when it is up again. There is no
hold-time timer to delay the switching back.

At the MPLS egress direction traffic is summed from all pseudowires and sent to the Native Service
Processing (NSP) to regenerate the native signal to the attachment circuit.

A source trigger for switchover can be:

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• Locally detected PSN link layer failure,


• PSN connectivity (LSP) failure,
• VCCV BFD connectivity failure,
• Any failure reported by LDP.
The switchover is executed group by group, thus the switchover time grows linearly as proportion of
the number of redundancy groups.

2.4.3 Dynamically Provisioned PWE3 Redundancy

Dynamically provisioned PWE3 redundancy utilizes LDP to inform the remote-end T-PE, which
PWE3 is currently selected as active and is forwarding user traffic. This state information is known
as preferential forwarding state. The 8600 NEs also support a proprietary option (prefer-all) to
advertise the preferential state for all standby pseudowires to speed up the switchover.

When the option prefer-all is set, each end of the PWE3 in the T-PE selects a fault-free PWE3
as the forwarding PWE3. In case of multiple fault-free pseudowires, the order of selection goes as
follows: primary, alias 1, alias 2, alias 3. As both T-PEs should have an identical view of PWE3
faults, priority should be configured identically in both T-PEs, otherwise PWE3 redundancy will
not operate properly.

When the option prefer-all is not used, each T-PE performs two slightly different processes:

Step 1 Selecting the PWE3 that is advertised as active, while the other pseudowires remain in standby
state. This selection is made purely on the basis of known faults. The standby information from
a remote T-PE is ignored.
Step 2 Selecting an active PWE3. All fault information, including remote standby (preferential forwarding
status) is used. The standby bit advertised by the local node is not used directly. However, if the
selected PWE3 is not the one selected as the active in step 1, then in effect no PWE3 is active.
The remote standby bit does not affect local standby bit advertisement, as otherwise signaling
oscillations could occur. In the case of single-homed MS-PWE3, the only advantage of using
standby bit is that LDP is able to tell that the remote T-PE has correctly selected the active PWE3.
This advantage is however offset by increased protection switch time, as the standby bit has to be
propagated over TCP connection between non-real time processes. In the prefer-all mode,
VCCV triggered protection can be performed with real time processes and hence the protection
switch is faster.

The standby bit offers additional functionality on multi-homed applications, such as Multi-Chassis
APS (MC-APS). Interworking with multi-homing remote T-PE (other than the 8600 NE) is fully
supported. In such cases, the standard behavior of single-homed T-PE advertising active status on
all pseudowires can be accomplished by configuring the prefer-all option. While the 8600
NEs do not currently support MC-APS or full-blown multi-homed end of protected PWE3, they can
fully participate in such role as a single-homed end. In this case, MC-APS (or other multi-homing
protocol) drives the active PWE3 selection on the 8600 NE and the standby bit plays a significant
role in it.

2.4.4 Statically Provisioned PWE3 Redundancy

The operation of statically provisioned PWE3 redundancy is identical to the dynamically


provisioned PWE3 redundancy (see 2.4.3 Dynamically Provisioned PWE3 Redundancy), with the
only exception that the preferential forwarding state is not signalled.

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2.4.5 VCCV BFD

VCCV BFD can be used to monitor the health of the primary and of each alias PWE3 between the
T-PEs for both SS-PWE3 and MS-PWE3. If faster switchover time is required, the PSN can detect
failures. VCCV BFD is essential for MS-PWE3 to protect it against PSN failures. If an S-PE acting
as a stitching node between two segments totally fails, then the T-PEs and their redundancy groups
may not be informed immediately of the failure in the S-PE node.

In the case of dynamically provisioned PWE3, a failure is recognized later as loss of the target LDP
peer or loss of LSP connectivity, which may take up to tenth of seconds to recover. In the case of
static provisioned PWE3, a failure is recognized as loss of LSP connectivity.

2.4.6 PWE3 Redundancy Counters

PWE3 redundancy supports the same statistics, performance and SNMP counters that are available
for not protected pseudowires (see 1.4 PWE3 Counters). PWE3 circuit counters are supported for
the primary and all alias pseudowires separately. The attachment circuit counters are available only
for the redundancy group and are derived from the current active PWE3.

2.5 PWE3 Redundancy Considerations

2.5.1 Specific PWE3 Types

The 8600 system implementation follows the PWE3 redundancy group architecture defined in
[draft-ietf-pwe3-redundancy]. A PWE3 instance is multiplied according to the number of aliases.
There is only one NSP instance per redundancy group, which is associated only to the active PWE3.
The following PWE3 technology specific items are highlighted:

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• CESoPSN and SAToP PWE3:


• Attachment circuit side failures are not used as a switchover trigger.
• Inband TDM OAM signaling (AIS and RDI):
• AIS in TDM ingress interface is connected only to the active PWE3. AIS (all ones)
packets received only from an active PWE3 will force AIS insertion to the TDM egress
interface.
• L-bit and R-bit insertion is performed only to an active PWE3. L-bit and R-bit re-
ceived only from an active PWE3 (not from the standby pseudowires) forces AIS and
RDI insertion to the TDM egress interface.
• Outband Pseudowire Status Signaling:
• Attachment Circuit Forward defect; near-end physical interface defect (LOS, AIS,
LOF) state of the attachment circuit is mapped to the active and standby pseudowires
to be signalled via LDP to the remote end. Respectively the received forward defect
message only in the active PWE3 forces AIS insertion to the TDM egress interface.
• Attachment Circuit Reverse defect; far-end physical interface defect (RDI) of the at-
tachment circuit is mapped to the active and standby pseudowires to be signalled via
LDP to the remote end. Analogously, the received reverse defect message only in ac-
tive PWE3 forces RDI insertion to the TDM egress interface.
• There is only one logical jitter buffer per redundancy group.
• ATM PWE3:
• Attachment circuit side failures are not used as a switchover trigger.
• Inband TDM OAM signaling:
• Local physical interface failure (LOS, AIS, LOF) forces an active and standby pseu-
dowires to be pulled down.
• If all pseudowires are down the AIS is generated to TDM egress interface.
• Outband Pseudowire Status Signaling:
• Attachment Circuit Forward defect; near-end physical interface defect (LOS, AIS,
LOF) state of the attachment circuit is mapped to the active and standby pseudowires
to be signalled via LDP to remote end. Analogously the received forward defect mes-
sage only in active PWE3 forces AIS insertion to the ATM attachment circuit.
• ATM ping can be send only to the active PWE3 and not to the standby pseudowires. Only
the active PWE3 replies to ping request (loopback reply).

2.5.2 Multi-Layer Protection

PWE3 redundancy creates an additional protection layer on top of the LSP protection layer. An
operator needs to carefully design the coordination between LDP and RSVP trunk protection or
restoration and PWE3 redundancy to achieve an optimum switchover time and to avoid unnecessary
flapping of the different protection schemes.

2.5.3 Configuration Checklist

To avoid most potential pitfalls in the PWE3 redundancy configuration, below is a list of the items
to check and consider during the planning and configuration of the network:

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• If several protection mechanisms like RSVP path protection or Fast Reroute (FRR) are used con-
currently, check in which order the layers should trigger to a failure and configure the timers
accordingly.
• Check that forcing PWE3 to working and protecting MPLS trunks operates as planned.

2.6 References

[draft-ietf-pwe3- draft-ietf-pwe3-redundancy-08.txt (2012–05), Pseudowire Redundancy


redundancy]
[draft-ietf-pwe3- draft-ietf-pwe3-redundancy-bit-05.txt (2011–09), Pseudowire Preferential
redundancy-bit] Forwarding Status Bit

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3 Single-Segment PWE3 Configuration


Examples
In the 8600 system, PWE3 circuit can be signalled as follows:

• Static inner label / static outer label


• Static inner label / dynamic outer label (RSVP)
• Static inner label / dynamic outer label (LDP)
• Dynamic inner label (LDP) / dynamic outer label (RSVP)
• Dynamic inner label (LDP) / dynamic outer label (LDP)

Fig. 4 SS-PWE3 Configuration Topology

The main focus in this section is on the CLI commands required for establishing PWE3 connectivity.
Therefore, it is worth to be noted that a configuration of the MPLS and related routing protocols is
not completely covered in this example. For additional details refer to 8600 Smart Routers MPLS
Applications Configuration Guide and 8600 Smart Routers Routing Protocols Configuration Guide.
For a complete range of options available within PWE3 commands refer to 8600 Smart Routers CLI
Commands Manual. The details of the interface physical layer configuration are covered in the 8600
Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guides.

To set up PWE3 services, at least the following tasks are required:

• Node basic settings


• Trunk interfaces configuration
• Provisioning PWE3 services

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3.1 Node Basic Settings

This chapter provides an example of basic node level settings required for a PWE3 circuit
provisioning. The example will cover the following tasks:

• Setting the loopback interface


• Enable LDP and set up an OSPF routing process

Class types and TE (Traffic Engineering) class mapping to the class types are set according
to the network application requirements or to provide interoperability between network
equipment providers. Please refer to 8600 Smart Routers CLI Commands Manual for the
command syntax if different mappings are needed.

3.1.1 Node T-PE223

Step 1 Set the loopback interface.


router-223(config)# interface lo0
router-223(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 10.123.100.223/32
router-223(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-223(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set targeted LDP session.
router-223(config)# router ldp
router-223(cfg-ldp)# target-peer 10.123.100.123
router-223(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF routing process.
router-223(config)# router ospf 10
router-223(cfg-ospf[10])# ospf router-id 10.123.100.223
router-223(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.123.100.223/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-223(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.111.0.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-223(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

3.1.2 Node T-PE123

Step 1 Set the loopback interface.


router-123(config)# interface lo0
router-123(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 10.123.100.123/32
router-123(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-123(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set targeted LDP session.
router-123(config)# router ldp
router-123(cfg-ldp)# target-peer 10.123.100.223
router-123(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF routing process.

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router-123(config)# router ospf 10


router-123(cfg-ospf[10])# ospf router-id 10.123.100.123
router-123(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.123.100.123/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-123(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.111.0.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-123(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

3.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration

This chapter provides an example of how to configure the trunk interfaces for PWE3 circuit
provisioning. The example will cover the following tasks:

• Set an IP address
• Optionally set a description
• Enable LDP and RSVP
• Enable label switching
• Set the maximum reservable bandwidth and bandwidth constraints
• Setting of the PSN tunnel (RSVP path and trunk)

3.2.1 Node T-PE223

Step 1 Set up the trunk interface.


router-223(config)# interface ge 10/1/0
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# description Trunk
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# label-switching
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# ip address 10.111.0.223/24
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# no shutdown
router-223(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# exit
Step 2 Set RSVP path.
router-223(config)# rsvp-path path1
router-223(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# 10.111.0.123 strict
router-223(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# exit
Step 3 Set RSVP trunk.
router-223(config)# rsvp-trunk trunk1
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# primary path path1
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# primary label record
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# from 10.123.100.223
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# map-route 10.123.100.123/32
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# to 10.123.100.123
router-223(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# exit

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3.2.2 Node T-PE123

Step 1 Set up the trunk interface.


router-123(config)# interface ge 0/1
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# description Trunk
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# label-switching
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# ip address 10.111.0.123/24
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# no shutdown
router-123(cfg-if[ge0/1])# exit
Step 2 Set RSVP path.
router-123(config)# rsvp-path path1
router-123(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# 10.111.0.223 strict
router-123(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# exit
Step 3 Set RSVP trunk.
router-123(config)# rsvp-trunk trunk1
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# primary path path1
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# primary label record
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# from 10.123.100.123
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# map-route 10.123.100.223/32
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# to 10.123.100.223
router-123(cfg-rsvp-trunk[trunk1])# exit

3.3 Static Provisioning

This chapter provides an example of end-to-end static PWE3 provisioning. The example will
cover the following configuration steps:

• Node settings, covered in 3.1 Node Basic Settings


• Configuration of the trunk interfaces, covered in 3.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration
• PWE3 circuit configuration
• PWE3 circuit binding to an AC
• Set up a route (static or OSPF) to target T-PE
• Set up of the MPLS trunk and switching

3.3.1 Node T-PE223 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit with name and ID. Note that the PWE3 circuit name is unique in the scope of
a single T-PE, but the ID must be identical at both ends of the PWE3 circuit.

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router-223(config)# pwe3 circuit sspwe_223 200 mpls manual


Step 2 Bind a PWE3 circuit to the AC interface.

router-223(config)# interface so 8/0/1:1:1:1


router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit sspwe_223
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# exit
Step 3 Set up a static route to the T-PE123 loopback IP address. Also OSPF can be used.

router-223(config)# ip route 10.123.100.123/32 10.111.0.123


Step 4 Set up a static trunk switching association and PWE3 forwarding.

router-223(config)# mpls static-ftn push-and-lookup-for-vc sspwe_223 vc-qos ef


200 10.123.100.123
router-223(config)# mpls static-ilm pop-for-vc sspwe_223 100

3.3.2 Node T-PE123 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit with unique name and ID.

router-123(config)# pwe3 circuit sspwe_123 200 mpls manual


Step 2 Bind a PWE3 circuit to the AC interface.

router-123(config)# interface pdh 3/1


router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pdh usage connected
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pwe3 circuit sspwe_123
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# no shutdown
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# exit
Step 3 Set up a static route to the T-PE223 loopback IP address. Also OSPF can be used.

router-123(config)# ip route 10.123.100.223/32 10.111.0.223


Step 4 Set up a static trunk switching association and PWE3 forwarding.

router-123(config)# mpls static-ftn push-and-lookup-for-vc sspwe_123 vc-qos ef


200 10.123.100.223
router-123(config)# mpls static-ilm pop-for-vc sspwe_123 100

3.4 Dynamic Provisioning

This chapter provides an example of end-to-end PWE3 configuration using LDP for PWE3
signalling. When LDP is used for signalling, the PWE3 circuit and MPLS trunk have to be
configured accordingly. On the other hand, LDP also requires a route to the peer's loopback
interface. Thus in this example, OSPF is configured to include the loopback interface. When a trunk
becomes available, PWE3 will be automatically signalled by LDP. The example will cover the
following configuration steps:

• Node settings, covered in 3.1 Node Basic Settings


• Configuration of the trunk interfaces, covered in 3.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration
• PWE3 circuit configuration

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• Enable VCCV (if required)


• PWE3 circuit binding to AC

3.4.1 Node T-PE223 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit with name and ID. Use LDP for setting up the required pseudowire label
bindings to the destination T-PE123.
router-223(config)# pwe3 circuit sspwe_223 200 control-word ordered mpls ldp
10.123.100.123 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD.


router-223(config)# pwe3 circuit sspwe_223 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers
100 3

Step 3 Bind a PWE3 circuit to the AC interface and activate the interface. After the no shutdown
command the PWE3 is signalled to the destination.
router-223(config)# interface so 8/0/1:1:1:1
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit sspwe_223
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router-223(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# exit

3.4.2 Node T-PE123 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit with name and ID. Use LDP for setting up the required pseudowire label
bindings to the destination T-PE223.
router-123(config)# pwe3 circuit sspwe_123 200 control-word ordered mpls ldp
10.123.100.223 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD.


router-123(config)# pwe3 circuit sspwe_123 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers
100 3

Step 3 Bind a PWE3 circuit to the AC interface and activate the interface. After the no shutdown
command the PWE3 is signalled to the destination.
router-123(config)# interface pdh 3/1
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pdh usage connected
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pwe3 circuit sspwe_123
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# no shutdown
router-123(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# exit

3.5 SS-PWE3 Provisioning Status

This chapter provides an illustration of SS-PWE3 provisioning status.

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Fig. 5 Statically Provisioned SS-PWE3

Fig. 6 Dynamically Provisioned SS-PWE3

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4 MS-PWE3 Configuration Examples

4 MS-PWE3 Configuration Examples


This section provides configuration examples of MS-PWE3. The examples are based on the
topology depicted in Fig. 7 and focus only in MS-PWE3 configuration. The underlying PSN tunnels
must be configured separately. Please refer to 8600 Smart Routers MPLS Applications Configuration
Guide for the details of the RSVP-TE trunk configuration.

Fig. 7 MS-PWE3 Configuration Network Topology

To set up MS-PWE3 services, at least the following tasks are required:

• Node basic settings


• Trunk interfaces configuration
• Provisioning PWE3 services

4.1 Node Basic Settings

This chapter provides an example of basic node level settings required for a PWE3 circuit
provisioning. The example will cover the following tasks:

• Setting the loopback interface


• Enable LDP and set up an OSPF routing process

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Class types and TE (Traffic Engineering) class mapping to the class types are set according
to the network application requirements or to provide interoperability between network
equipment providers. Please refer to 8600 Smart Routers CLI Commands Manual for the
command syntax if different mappings are needed.

4.1.1 Node T-PE194

Step 1 Set the loopback interface.


router-194(config)# interface lo0
router-194(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 10.144.100.194/32
router-194(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-194(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set targeted LDP session.
router-194(config)# router ldp
router-194(cfg-ldp)# target-peer 10.144.100.116
router-194(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF routing process.
router-194(config)# router ospf 10
router-194(cfg-ospf[10])# ospf router-id 10.144.100.194
router-194(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.144.100.194/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-194(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.125.10.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-194(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

4.1.2 Node T-PE116

Step 1 Set the loopback interface.


router-116(config)# interface lo0
router-116(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 10.144.100.116/32
router-116(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-116(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set targeted LDP session.
router-116(config)# router ldp
router-116(cfg-ldp)# target-peer 10.144.100.194
router-116(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF routing process.
router-116(config)# router ospf 10
router-116(cfg-ospf[10])# ospf router-id 10.144.100.116
router-116(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.144.100.116/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-116(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.141.1.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-116(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

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4.1.3 Node S-PE135

Step 1 Set the loopback interface.


router-135(config)# interface lo0
router-135(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 10.144.100.135/32
router-135(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-135(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Create an OSPF routing process.
router-135(config)# router ospf 10
router-135(cfg-ospf[10])# ospf router-id 10.144.100.135
router-135(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.144.100.135/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-135(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.130.20.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-135(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.141.1.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-135(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

4.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration

This chapter provides an example of how to configure the trunk interfaces for PWE3 circuit
provisioning. The example will cover the following tasks:

• Set an IP address
• Optionally set a description
• Enable LDP and RSVP
• Enable label switching
• Set the maximum reservable bandwidth and bandwidth constraints

4.2.1 Node T-PE194

Step 1 Set up the trunk interface.


router-194(config)# interface ge 10/1/0
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# ip address 10.125.10.194/24
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# label-switching
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# no shutdown
router-194(cfg-if[ge10/1/0])# exit
Step 2 Set RSVP path.
router-194(config)# rsvp-path path1
router-194(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# 10.125.10.150 strict
router-194(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# 10.130.20.135 strict
router-194(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# exit

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Step 3 Set RSVP trunk.


router-194(config)# rsvp-trunk 194_trunk1
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# primary path path1
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# primary label record
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# from 10.144.100.194
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# map-route 10.144.100.135/32
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# to 10.144.100.135
router-194(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# exit

4.2.2 Node T-PE116

Step 1 Set up the trunk interface.


router-116(config)# interface ge 0/1
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# ip address 10.141.1.116/24
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# label-switching
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# no shutdown
router-116(cfg-if[ge0/1])# exit
Step 2 Set RSVP path.
router-116(config)# rsvp-path path2
router-116(cfg-rsvp-path[path2])# 10.141.1.135 strict
router-116(cfg-rsvp-path[path2])# exit
Step 3 Set RSVP trunk.
router-116(config)# rsvp-trunk 116_trunk2
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# primary path path2
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# primary label record
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# from 10.144.100.116
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# map-route 10.144.100.135/32
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# to 10.144.100.135
router-116(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# exit

4.2.3 Node S-PE135

Step 1 Set up the trunk interface ge11/1/0.


router-135(config)# interface ge 11/1/0
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# ip address 10.130.20.135/24
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# label-switching
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# mpls label protocol ldp

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router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# mpls label protocol rsvp


router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# no shutdown
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/0])# exit
Step 2 Set up the trunk interface ge11/1/1.
router-135(config)# interface ge 11/1/1
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# ip address 10.141.1.135/24
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# label-switching
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# no shutdown
router-135(cfg-if[ge11/1/1])# exit
Step 3 Set RSVP path towards node T-PE194.
router-135(config)# rsvp-path path1
router-135(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# 10.130.20.150 strict
router-135(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# 10.125.10.194 strict
router-135(cfg-rsvp-path[path1])# exit
Step 4 Set RSVP path towards node T-PE116.
router-135(config)# rsvp-path path2
router-135(cfg-rsvp-path[path2])# 10.141.1.116 strict
router-135(cfg-rsvp-path[path2])# exit
Step 5 Set RSVP trunk towards T-PE194.
router-135(config)# rsvp-trunk 194_trunk1
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# primary path path1
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# primary label record
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# from 10.144.100.135
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# map-route 10.144.100.194/32
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# to 10.144.100.194
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[194_trunk1])# exit

Step 6 Set RSVP trunk towards T-PE116.


router-135(config)# rsvp-trunk 116_trunk2
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# primary path path2
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# primary label record
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# from 10.144.100.135
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# map-route 10.144.100.116/32
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# to 10.144.100.116
router-135(cfg-rsvp-trunk[116_trunk2])# exit

4.2.4 Transit Node P150

Step 1 Set up the trunk interface ge9/1/0.


router-150(config)# interface ge 9/1/0
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# ip address 10.125.10.150/24

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router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# label-switching
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# no shutdown
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/0])# exit

Step 2 Set up the trunk interface ge9/1/1.


router-150(config)# interface ge 9/1/1
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# ip address 10.130.20.150/24
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# label-switching
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# no shutdown
router-150(cfg-if[ge9/1/1])# exit

4.3 MS-PWE3 Static Provisioning

This chapter provides examples on how to provision MS-PWE3 manually. In the case of MS-PWE3,
the steps required to set up the segments are:

• Node settings, covered in 4.1 Node Basic Settings


• Trunk interfaces configuration, covered in 4.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration
• Defining PWE3 segments and enable VCCV BFD
• PWE3 segments binding
• Configuration of the last segments
• MPLS trunk and switching configuration
• S-PE configuration

4.3.1 Node T-PE194 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit with name and ID.


router-194(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 100 control-word ordered mpls manual

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD.


router-194(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Bind a PWE3 circuit segment to the AC interface.


router-194(config)# interface so 8/0/1:1:1:1
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit msPWE1
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# no shutdown

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router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# exit
Step 4 Configure the last segment in T-PE.
router-194(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 ms-pw last-segment from 10.144.100.135 to
10.144.100.116 vc-id 200

Step 5 Set up a static trunk switching association and PWE3 forwarding.


router-194(config)# mpls static-ftn push-and-lookup-for-vc msPWE1 vc-qos ef 15001
10.144.100.116
router-194(config)# mpls static-ilm pop-for-vc msPWE1 15002

4.3.2 Node T-PE116 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit with name and ID.


router-116(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 200 control-word ordered mpls manual

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD.


router-116(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Bind a PWE3 circuit segment to the AC interface.


router-116(config)# interface pdh 3/1
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pdh usage connected
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pwe3 circuit msPWE2
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# no shutdwon
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# exit
Step 4 Configure the last segment in T-PE.
router-116(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 ms-pw last-segment from 10.144.100.135 to
10.144.100.194 vc-id 100

Step 5 Set up a static trunk switching association and PWE3 forwarding.


router-116(config)# mpls static-ftn push-and-lookup-for-vc msPWE2 vc-qos ef 15002
10.144.100.194
router-116(config)# mpls static-ilm pop-for-vc msPWE2 15001

4.3.3 Node S-PE135 Configuration

The following example shows how to configure a S-PE node for static MS-PWE3 provisioning of
the network shown in Fig. 7. The following steps will be covered in this configuration:

• Node settings, covered in 4.1 Node Basic Settings


• Segments interconnection:
• Static segments
• Static segments with Type 3 CC

Switching Static PWE3

Static PWE3 switching at S-PE requires two configuration commands, one per direction for
describing the nature of the desired label switching operation.

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Check the 8600 Smart Routers CLI Commands Manual, for the full syntax and options of the
switching command.

The S-PE must not have any existing PWE3 circuit configuration command (neither manual
nor LDP) for the two vc-ids, which are included in the static S-PE configuration command in
the example below.

The following example shows how to configure a static PWE3 switching point at S-PE135 for the
PWE3 segments in the network shown in Fig. 7.

Step 1 Insert the switching rules for interconnecting the PWE3 segments. The resulting connectivity from
an individual command is unidirectional, therefore a command pair is always required to obtain
bidirectional connectivity.
router-135(config)# mpls static-ilm swap-and-lookup 100 200 10.144.100.116
pwe3-swp from 10.125.10.194 100 to 200
router-135(config)# mpls static-ilm swap-and-lookup 300 400 10.144.100.194
pwe3-swp from 10.141.1.116 200 to 100

Switching Static PWE3 with Type 3 CC

This example shows how to configure static PWE3 switching using type 3 CC.

Step 1 Insert the switching rules for interconnecting the PWE3 segments using Type 3 CC. Note that the
hop-count specifies how many hops (TTL) are required to reach T-PE at the downstream from local
S-PE (default is 1), i.e. Type 3 CC.
router-135(config)# mpls static-ilm swap-and-lookup 100 200 10.144.100.116
pwe3-swp from 10.125.10.194 100 to 200 hop-count 1
router-135(config)# mpls static-ilm swap-and-lookup 300 400 10.144.100.194
pwe3-swp from 10.141.1.116 200 to 100 hop-count 2

4.4 MS-PWE3 Dynamic Provisioning

This chapter provides examples on how to provision MS-PWE3 dynamically. In the case of
MS-PWE3, the steps required to set up the segments are:

• Node settings, covered in 4.1 Node Basic Settings


• Trunk interfaces configuration, covered in 4.2 Trunk Interfaces Configuration
• PWE3 circuit configuration
• PWE3 circuit binding to AC
• S-PE configuration

4.4.1 Node T-PE194 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit.


router-194(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 100 control-word ordered mpls ldp
10.144.100.135 vc-qos ef

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Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD.


router-194(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Set the last segment in T-PE.


router-194(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 ms-pw last-segment from 10.144.100.135
to 10.144.100.116 vc-id 200 hop-count 2

Step 4 Bind a PWE3 segment to the AC interface.


router-194(config)# interface so 8/0/1:1:1:1
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit msPWE1
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router-194(cfg-if[so8/0/1:1:1:1])# exit

4.4.2 Node T-PE116 Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 circuit.


router-116(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 200 control-word ordered mpls ldp
10.144.100.135 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD.


router-116(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Set the last segment in T-PE.


router-116(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 ms-pw last-segment from 10.144.100.135
to 10.144.100.194 vc-id 100 hop-count 2

Step 4 Bind a PWE3 segment to the AC interface.


router-116(config)# interface pdh 3/1
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pdh usage connected
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# pwe3 circuit msPWE2
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# no shutdown
router-116(cfg-if[pdh3/1])# exit

4.4.3 Node S-PE135 Configuration

The following example shows how to configure PWE3 switching point of the network shown in
Fig. 7. The following steps will be covered in this configuration:

• PWE3 segments configuration


• S-PE node basic settings, covered in 4.1 Node Basic Settings
• PWE3 segments interconnection
Step 1 Configure the PWE3 segments at S-PE.
router-135(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE2 200 mpls ldp 10.144.100.116
router-135(config)# pwe3 circuit msPWE1 100 mpls ldp 10.144.100.194
Step 2 Interconnect the PWE3 segments.
router-135(config)# pwe3 switching-point swp left msPWE1 right msPWE2

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4.5 MS-PWE3 Provisioning Status

This chapter provides an illustration of MS-PWE3 provisioning status.

Fig. 8 Statically Provisioned MS-PWE3

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Fig. 9 Dynamically Provisioned MS-PWE3

Fig. 10 MS-PWE3 Provisioning Status at S-PE

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5 PWE3 Redundancy Configuration Examples

5 PWE3 Redundancy Configuration Examples


S-PE is a potential single point of failure in MS-PWE3 applications. When an S-PE fails the
MS-PWE3 will remain down either until the S-PE is recovered, or another S-PE is set up by the
operator. PWE3 redundancy can be used to provide protection by setting up a protecting PWE3
that can use another S-PE, thus removing a single point of failure. The overview functionality of
PWE3 redundancy is provided in 2 Pseudowire Redundancy.

The following tables provide description of PWE3 redundancy terminology and PWE3 states.

Terminology Definition
Term Description
Redundancy group A group that is formed by one primary PWE3 and up to three protecting
pseudowires. A redundancy group is associated to one AC.
Primary PWE3 The main PWE3 that can either be protected using PWE3 redundancy or
operates as unprotected.
Alias PWE3 A PWE3 that protects the primary PWE3 in the case of failure. Alias may also
be referred as a sibling.

PWE3 State Description


Active PWE3 The PWE3 forwarding traffic. An active PWE3 can be the primary or one of
the aliases.
Standby PWE3 An alias PWE3 that is operational and ready to forward traffic in case the active
PWE3 fails.
Down A state of the primary or alias PWE3 when there is a severe PWE3 failure.
Up A state of the primary or alias PWE3 when it is operational and ready to forward
data.

The examples provided in this section show how to configure PWE3 redundancy in MS-PWE3
applications. The illustrations provided are based on TDM SAToP PWE3. However, the same
configuration flow can be applied also to create PWE3 redundancy for other PWE3 types, e.g. ATM,
TDM CESoPSN pseudowires. The following table provides a summary outline of the configuration
options applicable per each PWE3 type. More detailed description of PWE3 redundancy including
the supported and not supported functionality is provided in 2 Pseudowire Redundancy.

PWE3 Redundancy Configuration Options


Parameter PWE3 Types
ATM TDM
# of aliases 1..3 1..3
BFD over VCCV type 1 CC Yes Yes
BFD over VCCV type 3 CC No No
MPLS ping Yes Yes

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Parameter PWE3 Types


ATM TDM
MPLS traceroute Yes Yes
prefer-all mode Yes Yes
PWE3 loopback Yes Yes

The example in this section will focus on PWE3 redundancy configuration for MS-PWE3, with one
the being primary and another being alias as illustrated in the topology below.

Fig. 11 PWE3 Redundancy Configuration Topology

PWE3 redundancy configuration in this example will use LDP for signalling, standby PWE3
selection mode with prefer-all option (see details in 2.4.3 Dynamically Provisioned PWE3
Redundancy) and VCCV BFD for connectivity verification. The following basic configuration
tasks are covered:

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1. T-PE nodes configuration tasks:


• Configure redundancy group for the AC interface
• Primary interface
• Alias interfaces
• Trunk interfaces configuration (enabling LDP, RSVP)
• Setting targeted LDP session
• RSVP trunks configuration
• Configure PWE3 segments (primary and alias)
• Enable VCCV BFD
• Optionally enable LSP ping and traceroute to verify connectivity of the provisioned
services
• Bind PWE3 segments (primary and alias) to the AC interface
2. S-PE nodes configuration tasks:
• Trunk interfaces configuration (enabling LDP, RSVP)
• RSVP trunks configuration
• Configure PWE3 segment end points
• Enable VCCV BFD
• Interconnect PWE3 segments at switching point
3. Transit nodes configuration - enabling LDP, RSVP on trunk interfaces
4. Configuration verification and diagnostics

5.1 Redundancy Group

To enable PWE3 redundancy operation, a redundancy group associated to an AC interface must be


configured. Note however that the AC interface needs to be configured separately, and it is not fully
covered in the PWE3 redundancy configuration examples. For specific details of AC interface type
configuration, please refer to 8600 Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guides. The following
tables present examples of the interface syntax used in setting up a redundancy group.

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ATM and MS Interfaces Group Redundancy Syntax


AC Interface Type Redundancy Group
Primary Interface Alias Interface
ATM pdh (VC) pdh9/0/0#atm#100.50 pdh9/0/0#atm#100.50;1
pdh9/0/0#atm#100.50;2
pdh9/0/0#atm#100.50;3
pdh (VP) pdh9/0/0#atm#100 pdh9/0/0#atm#100;1
pdh9/0/0#atm#100;2
pdh9/0/0#atm#100;3
so (VC) so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100.50 so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100.50;1
so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100.50;2
so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100.50;3
so (VP) so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100 so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100;1
so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100;2
so11/1/0:1:1:1#atm#100;3
CESoPSN pdh pdh9/0/0:0 pdh9/0/0:0;1
pdh9/0/0:0;2
pdh9/0/0:0;3
so so11/1/0:1:1:1:0 so11/1/0:1:1:1:0;1
so11/1/0:1:1:1:0;2
so11/1/0:1:1:1:0;3
IMA VC ima7/1.100.50 ima7/1.100.50;1
ima7/1.100.50;2
ima7/1.100.50;3
VP ima7/1.100 ima7/1.100;1
ima7/1.100;2
ima7/1.100;3
SAToP pdh pdh9/0/0 pdh9/0/0;1
pdh9/0/0;2
pdh9/0/0;3
so so11/1/0:1:1:1 so11/1/0:1:1:1;1
so11/1/0:1:1:1;2
so11/1/0:1:1:1;3

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5.2 T-PE Nodes Configuration

The following chapters provide examples of end-to-end PWE3 redundancy basic configuration
tasks for T-PE nodes.

Class types and TE (Traffic Engineering) class mapping to the class types are set according
to the network application requirements or to provide interoperability between network
equipment providers. Please refer to 8600 Smart Routers CLI Commands Manual for the
command syntax if different mappings are needed.

5.2.1 Node T-PE90

Redundancy Group Configuration

At least two steps are required to set up a redundancy group: creating the primary interface and
creating the alias interfaces (up to three alias interfaces can be configured).

Primary Interface

The primary interface has to be created first, i.e. all interface parameters (usage, timeslots,
encapsulations) set and preferable also the PWE3 circuit binding before an alias interface is
configured. Alias interfaces are dependent of the primary interface parametric settings. That is, if
certain encapsulation related parameters on the primary interface are changed, an alias interface
may be removed by the system to preserve consistency. The primary interface is instantiated as
follows (for more details on how the interface parameters are set, please refer to 8600 Smart Routers
Interface Configuration Guides).

Step 1 This creates a SAToP primary interface instance and the interface parameters. Note that the interface
parameters and port protocol are set in the primary interface only.
router-90(config)# interface so 1/1:1:1:1
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1])# exit

Alias Interface

An alias interface for the redundancy group is created as shown in the following step. An alias
interface can be instantiated only after the primary interface has been set up.

Step 1 This creates the first alias interface (;1) to the redundancy group.
router-90(config)# interface so 1/1:1:1:1;1
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1;1])# exit

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Node and Trunk Interfaces Configuration

This chapter provides the basic configuration of T-PE90 node namely: targeted LDP session
session, OSPF routing process and trunk interfaces (enabling LDP, RSVP and label switching
on the interface).

Step 1 Set the loopback interface for T-PE90 node.


router-90(config)# interface lo0
router-90(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 172.25.31.90/32
router-90(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-90(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Configure targeted LDP session.
router-90(config)# router ldp
router-90(cfg-ldp)# target-peer 172.25.31.80
router-90(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Set an OSPF routing process.
router-90(config)# router ospf 10
router-90(cfg-ospf[10])# network 172.25.31.90/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-90(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.76.90.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-90(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.75.79.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-90(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

Step 4 Trunk interface ge0/3 configuration.


router-90(config)# interface ge 0/3
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# label-switching
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# ip address 10.76.90.90/24
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# no shutdown
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/3])# exit
Step 5 Trunk interface ge0/7 configuration.
router-90(config)# interface ge 0/7
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# label-switching
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# ip address 10.75.79.1/24
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# no shutdown
router-90(cfg-if[ge0/7])# exit

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RSVP Trunks Configuration

In the following example, it is shown how to set up RSVP trunks for the PWE3 redundancy. In this
example, LSPs are set with strict paths. Without strict paths LSP rerouting would reactivate the
primary PWE3 in case of link failure and multiple protection switchover would occur for single
failure. Note however that not all RSVP trunk attributes are covered in this example. For more
details, please refer to 8600 Smart Routers MPLS Applications Configuration Guide.

Step 1 Specify an explicit route for path 10. This path will be used to carry the primary PWE3 segment.
router-90(config)# rsvp-path path_10
router-90(cfg-rsvp-path[path_10])# 10.76.90.76 strict
router-90(cfg-rsvp-path[path_10])# exit
Step 2 Specify an explicit route for path 11. This path will be used to carry the alias PWE3 segment.
router-90(config)# rsvp-path path_11
router-90(cfg-rsvp-path[path_11])# 10.75.79.2 strict
router-90(cfg-rsvp-path[path_11])# exit
Step 3 Configure RSVP trunk for the primary PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto
the trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over
the LSP created for the trunk.
router-90(config)# rsvp-trunk 90_76_Red_RSVP_10
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_76_Red_RSVP_10])# primary path Path_10
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_76_Red_RSVP_10])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_76_Red_RSVP_10])# from 172.25.31.90
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_76_Red_RSVP_10])# map-route 172.25.31.76/32
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_76_Red_RSVP_10])# to 172.25.31.76
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_76_Red_RSVP_10])# exit

Step 4 Configure RSVP trunk for the alias PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto the
trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over the
LSP created for the trunk.
router-90(config)# rsvp-trunk 90_79_Blue_RSVP_11
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_79_Blue_RSVP_11])# primary path Path_11
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_79_Blue_RSVP_11])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_79_Blue_RSVP_11])# from 172.25.31.90
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_79_Blue_RSVP_11])# map-route 172.25.31.79/32
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_79_Blue_RSVP_11])# to 172.25.31.79
router-90(cfg-rsvp-trunk[90_79_Blue_RSVP_11])# exit

Primary PWE3 Configuration

In the following example, it is illustrated how to set up a primary PWE3, where VCCV BFD is
enabled and optionally LSP ping to allow verification of the provisioned primary PWE3.

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MS-PWE3 routing only specifies which S-PEs must be transited, but not how they are
transited in an optimal order. Therefore, in case of link failure, it is assumed that the PSN
layer protection will provide failure recovery.
PWE3 layer failure detection timers, i.e. VCCV BFD timers must be set to be slower than
the PSN layer worst case protection switchover time to avoid unnecessary switchover of
PWE3 redundancy.
PWE3 redundancy is recommended only for node protection and the user must always take
into account the PSN protection mechanisms and adjust VCCV BFD timers accordingly.

Step 1 Define the primary PWE3 segment. Use LDP for setting up the required PWE3 label bindings.
router-90(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_201 201 control-word ordered mpls
ldp 172.25.31.76 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD on the primary PWE3 segment. Optionally in this example, LSP ping is enabled
to verify provisioned connectivity.
router-90(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_201 vccv cc-cw lsp-ping
bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Set the standby PWE3 selection option prefer-all to allow advertisement of the preferential
state for all standby pseudowires in order to speedup the switchover. Bind the primary PWE3
segment to the primary AC interface.
router-90(config)# interface so 1/1:1:1:1
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1])# pwe3 redundancy prefer-all
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_201
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1])# exit

Alias PWE3 Configuration

In the following example it is shown how to set up an alias PWE3, where VCCV BFD is enabled
and optionally LSP ping is enabled to allow verification of the provisioned alias PWE3.

Step 1 Define alias PWE3 segment. Use LDP for setting up the required PWE3 label bindings.
router-90(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_101 101 control-word ordered mpls
ldp 172.25.31.79 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD on the alias PWE3 segment. Optionally in this example, LSP ping is enabled
to verify provisioned connectivity.
router-90(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_101 vccv cc-cw lsp-ping
bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Bind the alias PWE3 segment to the alias AC interface.


router-90(config)# interface so 1/1:1:1:1;1
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1;1])# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_101
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1;1])# no shutdown
router-90(cfg-if[so1/1:1:1:1;1])# exit

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5.2.2 Node T-PE80

Redundancy Group Configuration

At least two steps are required to set up a redundancy group: creating the primary interface and
creating the alias interfaces (up to three alias interfaces can be configured).

Primary Interface

The primary interface has to be created first, i.e. all interface parameters (usage, timeslots,
encapsulations) set and preferable also PWE3 circuit binding before an alias interface is configured.
Alias interfaces are dependent of the primary interface parametric settings. That is, if certain
encapsulation related parameters on the primary interface are changed, alias interface may be
removed by the system to preserve consistency. The primary interface is instantiated as follows (for
more details on how the interface parameters are set, please refer to 8600 Smart Routers Interface
Configuration Guides).

Step 1 This creates a SAToP primary interface instance and the interface parameters. Note that the interface
parameters and port protocol are set in the primary interface only.
router-80(config)# interface so 9/0/0:1:1:1
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1])# exit

Alias Interface

An alias interface for the redundancy group is created as shown in the following step. It should
be note however, that an alias interface can be instantiated only after the primary interface has
been set up.

Step 1 This creates the first alias interface (;1) to the redundancy group.
router-80(config)# interface so 9/0/0:1:1:1;1
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1;1])# exit

Trunk Interfaces Configuration

This chapter provides the basic configuration in T-PE80 node namely: targeted LDP session, OSPF
routing process and trunk interfaces (enabling LDP, RSVP and label switching on the interface).

Step 1 Set the loopback interface for T-PE80 node.


router-80(config)# interface lo0
router-80(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 172.25.31.80/32
router-80(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-80(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Configure targeted LDP session.
router-80(config)# router ldp
router-80(cfg-ldp)# target-peer 172.25.31.90
router-80(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Set an OSPF routing process.

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router-80(config)# router ospf 10


router-80(cfg-ospf[10])# network 172.25.31.80/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-80(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.69.69.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-80(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.69.71.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-80(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

Step 4 Trunk interface ge7/0/6 configuration.


router-80(config)# interface ge 7/0/6
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# label-switching
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# ip address 10.69.69.9/24
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# no shutdown
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/6])# exit

Step 5 Trunk interface ge7/0/7 configuration.


router-80(config)# interface ge 7/0/7
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# label-switching
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# ip address 10.69.71.2/24
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# no shutdown
router-80(cfg-if[ge7/0/7])# exit

RSVP Trunks Configuration

Step 1 Specify an explicit route for path 12. This path will be used to carry the primary PWE3 segment.
router-80(config)# rsvp-path path_12
router-80(cfg-rsvp-path[path_12])# 10.69.69.10 strict
router-80(cfg-rsvp-path[path_12])# 10.82.31.10 strict
router-80(cfg-rsvp-path[path_12])# exit
Step 2 Specify an explicit route for path 13. This path will be used to carry the alias PWE3 segment.
router-80(config)# rsvp-path path_13
router-80(cfg-rsvp-path[path_13])# 10.69.71.1 strict
router-80(cfg-rsvp-path[path_13])# 10.82.31.45 strict
router-80(cfg-rsvp-path[path_13])# exit
Step 3 Configure RSVP trunk for the primary PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto
the trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over
the LSP created for the trunk.
router-80(config)# rsvp-trunk 80_76_Red_RSVP_12
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_76_Red_RSVP_12])# primary path Path_12
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_76_Red_RSVP_12])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_76_Red_RSVP_12])# from 172.25.31.80
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_76_Red_RSVP_12])# map-route 172.25.31.76/32

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router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_76_Red_RSVP_12])# to 172.25.31.76
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_76_Red_RSVP_12])# exit
Step 4 Configure RSVP trunk for the alias PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto the
trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over the
LSP created for the trunk.
router-80(config)# rsvp-trunk 80_79_Blue_RSVP_13
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_79_Blue_RSVP_13])# primary path Path_13
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_79_Blue_RSVP_13])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_79_Blue_RSVP_13])# from 172.25.31.80
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_79_Blue_RSVP_13])# map-route 172.25.31.79/32
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_79_Blue_RSVP_13])# to 172.25.31.79
router-80(cfg-rsvp-trunk[80_79_Blue_RSVP_13])# exit

Primary PWE3 Configuration

Step 1 Define the primary PWE3 segment. Use LDP for setting up the required PWE3 label bindings.
router-80(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_203 203 control-word ordered mpls
ldp 172.25.31.76 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD on the primary PWE3 segment. Optionally in this example, LSP ping is enabled
to verify provisioned connectivity.
router-80(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_203 vccv cc-cw lsp-ping
bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Set the standby PWE3 selection option prefer-all to allow advertisement of the preferential
state for all standby pseudowires in order to speedup the switchover. Bind the primary PWE3
segment to the primary AC interface.
router-80(config)# interface so 9/0/0:1:1:1
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1])# pwe3 redundancy prefer-all
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_203
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1])# exit

Alias PWE3 Configuration

Step 1 Define alias PWE3 segment. Use LDP for setting up the required PWE3 label bindings.
router-80(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_103 103 control-word ordered mpls
ldp 172.25.31.79 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD on the alias PWE3 segment. Optionally in this example, LSP ping is enabled
to verify provisioned connectivity.
router-80(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_103 vccv cc-cw lsp-ping
bfd-flt-ipv4 bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Bind the alias PWE3 segment to the alias AC interface.


router-80(config)# interface so 9/0/0:1:1:1;1
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1;1])# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_103
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1;1])# no shutdown
router-80(cfg-if[so9/0/0:1:1:1;1])# exit

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5.3 S-PE Nodes Configuration

This chapter provides examples of PWE3 redundancy basic configuration tasks for the S-PE nodes.

5.3.1 Node S-PE76

Node and Trunk Interfaces Configuration

This chapter provides the basic configuration in S-PE76 node namely: targeted LDP session, OSPF
routing process and trunk interfaces (enabling LDP, RSVP and label switching on the interface).

Step 1 Set the loopback interface for T-PE76 node.


router-76(config)# interface lo0
router-76(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 172.25.31.76/32
router-76(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-76(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set an OSPF routing process.
router-76(config)# router ospf 10
router-76(cfg-ospf[10])# network 172.25.31.76/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-76(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.76.90.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-76(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.82.31.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-76(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

Step 3 Trunk interface ge8/1/2 configuration.


router-76(config)# interface ge 8/1/2
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# label-switching
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# ip address 10.76.90.76/24
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# no shutdown
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# exit

Step 4 Trunk interface ge8/1/7 configuration.


router-76(config)# interface ge 8/1/7
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# label-switching
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# ip address 10.82.31.10/24
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# no shutdown
router-76(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# exit

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RSVP Trunks Configuration

Step 1 Specify an explicit route for path 10.


router-76(config)# rsvp-path path_10
router-76(cfg-rsvp-path[path_10])# 10.76.90.90 strict
router-76(cfg-rsvp-path[path_10])# exit
Step 2 Specify an explicit route for path 12.
router-76(config)# rsvp-path path_12
router-76(cfg-rsvp-path[path_12])# 10.82.31.9 strict
router-76(cfg-rsvp-path[path_12])# 10.69.69.9 strict
router-76(cfg-rsvp-path[path_12])# exit
Step 3 Configure RSVP trunk for the left primary PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route
onto the trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched
over the LSP created for the trunk.
router-76(config)# rsvp-trunk 76_90_Red_RSVP_10
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_90_Red_RSVP_10])# primary path Path_10
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_90_Red_RSVP_10])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_90_Red_RSVP_10])# from 172.25.31.76
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_90_Red_RSVP_10])# map-route 172.25.31.90/32
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_90_Red_RSVP_10])# to 172.25.31.90
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_90_Red_RSVP_10])# exit

Step 4 Configure RSVP trunk for the right PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto the
trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over the
LSP created for the trunk.
router-76(config)# rsvp-trunk 76_80_Red_RSVP_12
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_80_Red_RSVP_12])# primary path Path_12
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_80_Red_RSVP_12])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_80_Red_RSVP_12])# from 172.25.31.76
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_80_Red_RSVP_12])# map-route 172.25.31.80/32
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_80_Red_RSVP_12])# to 172.25.31.80
router-76(cfg-rsvp-trunk[76_80_Red_RSVP_12])# exit

Primary PWE3 Segments Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 segment between S-PE76 and T-PE90.


router-76(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_201 201 control-word mpls ldp
172.25.31.90 vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD for the PWE3 segment between S-PE76 and T-PE90.
router-76(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_201 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4
bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Define a PWE3 segment between S-PE76 and T-PE80.


router-76(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_203 203 control-word mpls ldp
172.25.31.80 vc-qos ef

Step 4 Enable VCCV BFD for the PWE3 segment between S-PE76 and T-PE80.
router-76(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Red_203 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4
bfd-timers 100 3

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Step 5 Interconnect the two PWE3 segments at S-PE76 node.


router-76(config)# pwe3 switching-point swp left 90_80_TDM_Red_201 right
90_80_TDM_Red_203

5.3.2 Node S-PE79

Trunk Interfaces Configuration

This chapter provides the basic configuration in S-PE79 node namely: targeted LDP session, OSPF
routing process and trunk interfaces (enabling LDP, RSVP and label switching on the interface).

Step 1 Set the loopback interface for T-PE79 node.


router-79(config)# interface lo0
router-79(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 172.25.31.79/32
router-79(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-79(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set an OSPF routing process.
router-79(config)# router ospf 10
router-79(cfg-ospf[10])# network 172.25.31.79/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-79(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.75.79.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-79(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.82.31.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-79(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

Step 3 Trunk interface ge8/1/2 configuration.


router-79(config)# interface ge 8/1/2
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# label-switching
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# ip address 10.75.79.2/24
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# no shutdown
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/2])# exit

Step 4 Trunk interface ge8/1/7 configuration.


router-79(config)# interface ge 8/1/7
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# label-switching
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# ip address 10.82.31.45/24
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# no shutdown
router-79(cfg-if[ge8/1/7])# exit

RSVP Trunks Configuration

Step 1 Specify an explicit route for path 11.

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router-79(config)# rsvp-path path_11


router-79(cfg-rsvp-path[path_11])# 10.75.79.1 strict
router-79(cfg-rsvp-path[path_11])# exit
Step 2 Specify an explicit route for path 13.
router-79(config)# rsvp-path path_13
router-79(cfg-rsvp-path[path_13])# 10.82.31.46 strict
router-79(cfg-rsvp-path[path_13])# 10.69.71.2 strict
router-79(cfg-rsvp-path[path_13])# exit
Step 3 Configure RSVP trunk for the left PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto the
trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over the
LSP created for the trunk.
router-79(config)# rsvp-trunk 79_90_Blue_RSVP_11
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_90_Blue_RSVP_11])# primary path Path_11
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_90_Blue_RSVP_11])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_90_Blue_RSVP_11])# from 172.25.31.79
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_90_Blue_RSVP_11])# map-route 172.25.31.90/32
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_90_Blue_RSVP_11])# to 172.25.31.90
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_90_Blue_RSVP_11])# exit

Step 4 Configure RSVP trunk for the right PWE3 segment and trunk attributes. Map an IP route onto the
trunk to allow all traffic with the specified destination address to be labeled and switched over the
LSP created for the trunk.
router-79(config)# rsvp-trunk 79_80_Blue_RSVP_13
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_80_Blue_RSVP_13])# primary path Path_13
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_80_Blue_RSVP_13])# primary elsp-preconfigured
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_80_Blue_RSVP_13])# from 172.25.31.79
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_80_Blue_RSVP_13])# map-route 172.25.31.80/32
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_80_Blue_RSVP_13])# to 172.25.31.80
router-79(cfg-rsvp-trunk[79_80_Blue_RSVP_13])# exit

Alias PWE3 Segments Configuration

Step 1 Define a PWE3 segment between S-PE79 and T-PE90.


router-79(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_101 101 mpls ldp 172.25.31.90
vc-qos ef

Step 2 Enable VCCV BFD for the PWE3 segment between S-PE79 and T-PE90.
router-79(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_101 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4
bfd-timers 100 3

Step 3 Define an PWE3 segment between S-PE79 and T-PE80.


router-79(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_103 103 mpls ldp 172.25.31.80
vc-qos ef

Step 4 Enable VCCV BFD for the alias PWE3 segment between S-PE79 and T-PE80.
router-79(config)# pwe3 circuit 90_80_TDM_Blue_103 vccv cc-cw bfd-flt-ipv4
bfd-timers 100 3

Step 5 Interconnect the PWE3 segments at S-PE79 node.


router-79(config)# pwe3 switching-point swp left 90_80_TDM_Blue_101 right
90_80_TDM_Blue_103

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5.4 Transit Nodes Configuration

This chapter provides the basic configuration in transit nodes (NODE77 and NODE78): OSPF
routing process and trunk interfaces (enabling LDP, RSVP and label switching on the interfaces).

5.4.1 NODE77

Step 1 Set the loopback interface for NODE77.


router-77(config)# interface lo0
router-77(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 172.25.31.77/32
router-77(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-77(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set an OSPF routing process.
router-77(config)# router ospf 10
router-77(cfg-ospf[10])# network 172.25.31.77/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-77(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.82.31.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-77(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.69.69.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-77(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

Step 3 Trunk interface ge12/0/7 configuration.


router-77(config)# interface ge 12/0/7
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# label-switching
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# ip address 10.82.31.9/24
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-79(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# no shutdown
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/7])# exit
Step 4 Trunk interface ge12/0/6 configuration.
router-77(config)# interface ge 12/0/6
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# label-switching
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# ip address 10.69.69.10/24
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# no shutdown
router-77(cfg-if[ge12/0/6])# exit

5.4.2 NODE78

Step 1 Set the loopback interface for NODE78.


router-78(config)# interface lo0

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router-78(cfg-if[lo0])# ip address 172.25.31.78/32


router-78(cfg-if[lo0])# no shutdown
router-78(cfg-if[lo0])# exit
Step 2 Set an OSPF routing process.
router-78(config)# router ospf 10
router-78(cfg-ospf[10])# network 172.25.31.78/32 area 0.0.0.0
router-78(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.82.31.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-78(cfg-ospf[10])# network 10.69.71.0/24 area 0.0.0.0
router-78(cfg-ospf[10])# exit

Step 3 Trunk interface ge2/1/7 configuration.


router-78(config)# interface ge 2/1/7
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# label-switching
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# ip address 10.82.31.46/24
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# no shutdown
router-78(cfg-if[ge2/1/7])# exit

Step 4 Trunk interface ge9/0/7 configuration.


router-78(config)# interface ge 9/0/7
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# label-switching
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# reservable-bandwidth 930M
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct0 930M
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct1 620M
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# bandwidth-constraint ct2 310M
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# ip address 10.69.71.1/24
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# mpls label protocol ldp
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# mpls label protocol rsvp
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# no shutdown
router-78(cfg-if[ge9/0/7])# exit

5.5 Configuration Verification and Diagnostics

In the 8600 system, there are several options available to verify the status of PWE3 redundancy. For
more details please refer to 8600 Smart Routers CLI Commands Manual. The following figures
show some examples of PWE3 redundancy group status.

Fig. 12 PWE3 Redundancy Group Status

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Fig. 13 Primary PWE3 Status

Fig. 14 Primary PWE3 Segment Status

The following figures illustrate examples of connectivity verification and testing of PWE3
redundancy configured above.

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Fig. 15 VCCV BFD Status

Fig. 16 Primary PWE3 MPLS Ping

Fig. 17 Primary PWE3 MPLS Traceroute

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Fig. 18 Alias PWE3 MPLS Ping

Fig. 19 Alias PWE3 MPLS Traceroute

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6 ATM Overview
This section gives an overview of the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) features supported in the
8600 system. The emphasis is on the ATM network applications and ATM specific functions which
are common for all types of ATM interfaces in the 8600 system. Please refer to:

• 8600 Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guide for the IFMs specific transmission adjacent
ATM functionality;
• 8605 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for the interfaces specific transmission adjacent
ATM functionality;
• 8607 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for the interfaces specific transmission adjacent
ATM functionality;
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for the interfaces spe-
cific transmission adjacent ATM functionality.

6.1 Network Applications

A versatile set of ATM-capable interface modules expands the possibilities of an operator to use
the system in many different network applications such as in wireline and wireless networks. The
following chapters describe some typical applications where the needed service is based on a native
ATM protocol and requires a corresponding ATM functionality in the 8600 system. It is possible to
provide all of these applications simultaneously in the same 8600 Network Element (NE) e.g. in the
case of a converged multiservice network. In practice, this means that some of the ATM Virtual
Channel Connections (VCCs) entering the 8600 NE via the same ATM interface can be switched
through an ATM layer, some can be terminated to Internet Protocol (IP) routing in IP Virtual Private
Network (VPN) service, some can be terminated to IP Data Communication Network (DCN) routing
and some can be tunnelled over MPLS or IP packet switched network using ATM pseudowires.

The most typical network services that run on top of ATM protocol in networks are UMTS Release
99 based mobile networks, broadband ATM services provided by ATM Digital Subscriber Line
Access Multiplexers (DSLAMs) and ATM-based access networks. Additionally, some operators
have ATM-based backbone networks delivering connectivity services for varied access and
end-service technologies.

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6.1.1 Native ATM Switching Application

The 8600 system supports ATM switching of ATM Virtual Path Connections (VPCs), i.e. Virtual
Path Circuits and Virtual Channel Connections (VCCs), i.e. Virtual Connection Circuits. The
circuits to be switched are statically provisioned (permanent) using 8000 Intelligent Network
Manager or CLI. In a typical switching application a number of VPCs and VCCs are groomed
from several low speed ATM interfaces e.g. E1/T1 or P12s/DS1 in chSTM-1/chOC-3 to one
high capacity uplink ATM interface such as STM-1/VC-4/ATM or OC-3/STS-3c SPE/ATM. The
switching application can also segregate the traffic from a number of low speed interfaces to two
uplink ATM interfaces going to a different service, e.g. mobile traffic to Radio Network Controller
(RNC) and traffic from ATM DSLAMs to an Internet Service Provider (ISP) Broadband Remote
Access Server (BRAS) device. In the switching applications the 8600 system is equipped with a
standard ATM switch feature set such as ATM traffic management.

Fig. 20 Native ATM Switching Application

6.1.2 ATM PWE3 over MPLS Application

The 8600 system supports interconnection service of native ATM connections over an MPLS-based
network. It is possible to expand the connectivity over a third party MPLS core network between
two 8600 NEs.

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Fig. 21 ATM PWE3 Application

The application takes advantage of the ATM pseudowires which create circuit-switched LSPs over
the MPLS network. Native ATM VCCs or VPCs can be inserted to LSP of an MPLS network at
ingress when an ATM interface is used. This takes place also vice versa, i.e. VCCs and VPCs
are extracted from LSP at egress. LSP can be provisioned using RSVP or LDP or they can be
statically provisioned. Pseudowire encapsulation uses pseudowire labels to distinguish different
PWE3 inside a single LSP. Pseudowire labels needed for PWE3 circuits may be statically or LDP
provisioned. MPLS network may dynamically change the route of the LSP based on its internal
routing decisions. Depending on the used ATM PWE3 mode one or several VPCs and VCCs
can be associated to a single PWE3.

In a pseudowire application the 8600 system is equipped with a standard ATM switch feature set
such as ATM traffic management towards external ATM devices. The ATM Quality of Service
(QoS) is preserved over the MPLS network using Differentiated Services (DiffServ) queuing
mechanism and MPLS traffic engineering.

6.1.3 ADSL Application

The 8600 system can utilize existing ADSL access networks for low cost and wide bandwidth
connectivity between the 8600 NEs. ADSL technology provides versatile ways for operator
to establish the networking infrastructure. The main categories are bridged and routed ADSL
infrastructures.

The 8600 system can setup an ATM pseudowire over ATM ADSL infrastructure. This allows
UMTS Mobile operator to hire profitable networking capacity from local ADSL whole sale operator
and off-load the HSPA data traffic from TDM transport network to ADSL network. R99 Iub voice
circuits are carried over TDM transport to the 8660 Smart Router which switches the circuits via
ATM switch to RNC. The TDM infrastructure is used for voice traffic to guarantee tight delay and
delay variation requirements.

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Bridged Infrastructure (PWE3 over MPLS)

In bridged infrastructure Ethernet connectivity is extended from customer premises ADSL


termination to hub site e.g. 8660 Smart Router. There are two separate ATM layers, first ATM
attachment circuit to be carried over ATM PWE3 and the second ADSL ATM layer providing
ATM connectivity from ADSL termination to DSLAM. In the ADSL whole sale operator model
this ATM layer is extended up to hub site 8660 Smart Router. Due to the end-to-end L2 Ethernet
connectivity regular PWE3oMPLSoETH stack can be used and ADSL infrastructure is transparent
to the IP/MPLS control plane protocols. If VLANs are used in the 8660 Smart Router, ADSL
infrastructure is transparent for these VLANs.

When 8605 Smart Router is used as cell cite node an external third party ADSL Modem is needed.
The 8605 Smart Router is connected via Ethernet interface to the third party Modem operating in
bridged mode. The ADSL Modem provides ADSL termination.

From 8600 product mix point of view the application in Fig. 22 can be supported by other NEs
as well

• Hub site
• 8630 Smart Router
• 8660 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• Cell (Remote) site
• 8605 Smart Router
• 8607 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• 8620 Smart Router

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Fig. 22 ATM PWE3 over Bridged ADSL Infrastructure Using External Modem.

When the 8607 Smart Router is used as cell site node, ADSL termination is provided by 8607
Smart Router itself using the 2xADSL LM. The 8607 Smart Router can be directly connected to
ADSL2/ADSL2+ DSLAM via copper network. Bridged connectivity (with or without VLANs) is
extended over ADSL ATM layer from the cell site 8607 Smart Router to the hub site 8660 Smart
Router.

From 8600 product mix point of view the application in Fig. 23 can be supported by other NEs as
well:

• Hub site
• 8630 Smart Router
• 8660 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• Cell (Remote) site
• 8607 Smart Router

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Fig. 23 ATM PWE3 over Bridged ADSL Infrastructure Using ADSL integrated 8607 Smart
Router

Routed Infrastructure (PWE3 over IP)

In routed architecture the ADSL ATM layer is extended from cell site to dedicated L2 TP Network
Server (LNS/BRAS) and there is no ATM connectivity between the cell site and hub site nodes.
Instead, only L3 service is available and the packets are routed in LNS/BRAS and optionally in
DSLAM. PWE3 encapsulated attachment circuit packets shall be encapsulated with IP [RFC4023]
instead of MPLS in order to enable them to be routed to the destination address. Routed ADSL
infrastructure is not transparent for all IP/MPLS control protocols and therefore pseudowires shall
be configured statically.

When the 8605 Smart Router is used in the cell cite an external third party ADSL Modem is needed.
The 8605 Smart Router is connected via Ethernet interface to the third party Modem operating in
routed mode. The ADSL Modem provides ADSL termination. Depending on the operator ADSL
infrastructure PPPoETHoATM, PPPoATM or IPoATM encapsulation is terminated in Modem and
packets are routed to the 8605 Smart Router.

In DSL access, the Modem IP address is typically distributed either by Point-to-Point Protocol
over Ethernet (PPPoETH) or by Point-to-Point Protocol over ATM (PPPoATM) session with IP
Control Protocol (IPCP). A fixed IP address can be provided, i.e. the given user always gets the
same address. In this scenario, a PPP session is terminated in the ADSL Modem that terminates
the ADSL line. Thus, the PPP session is between the L2TP Network Server (LNS) and the ADSL
Modem. Since it is necessary to have IP connectivity to the 8600 system at cell site, IP address
is manually pre-configured. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) can be used between
the ADSL Modem and the 8600 NE. However address auto configuration in 8600 NE do not take
place even it can act like DHCP client. Manual IP address configuration is required. This same IP
address can be used to manage the 8600 NEs.

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From 8600 product mix point of view the application in Fig. 24 can be supported by other NEs
as well

• Hub site
• 8630 Smart Router
• 8660 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• Cell (Remote) site
• 8605 Smart Router
• 8607 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• 8620 Smart Router

Fig. 24 ATM PWE3 over Routed ADSL Infrastructure using External Modem.

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6.1.4 SHDSL Application

The 8607 Smart Router can be used in cell site together with G.SHDSL DSLAM providing a high
capacity connection over copper lines. The 4xSHDSL LM supports two main encapsulation modes:
Ethernet over G.SHDSL for Ethernet switched access networks and ATM over G.SHDSL for ATM
switched access networks. In ATM mode up to 4 G.SHDSL interfaces can be bonded using ATM
IMA to get a single high capacity logical link.

Bridged Infrastructure (PWE3 over MPLS)

In bridged infrastructure Ethernet connectivity is extended from cell site 8607 Smart Router
G.SHDSL termination to hub site e.g. 8660 Smart Router. There are two separate ATM layers, first
ATM attachment circuit to be carried over ATM PWE3 and the second G.SHDSL ATM layer
providing ATM connectivity from 8607 Smart Router SHDSL interface to SHDSL DSLAM. In
the SHDSL whole sale operator model this ATM layer may be extended up to hub site 8660
Smart Router. Due to the end-to-end L2 Ethernet connectivity regular PWE3 over MPLS over
Ethernet stack can be used and G.SHDSL infrastructure is transparent to the IP/MPLS control plane
protocols. If VLANs are used in the 8660 Smart Router, G.SHDSL infrastructure is transparent
for these VLANs.

When the 8607 Smart Router is used as cell site node, G.SHDSL termination is provided by the
8607 Smart Router using the 4xSHDSL LM. The 8607 Smart Router is directly connected to
G.SHDSL DSLAM via copper network. Bridged connectivity (with or without VLANs) is extended
over SHDSL ATM layer from the cell site 8607 Smart Router to the hub site 8660 Smart Router.

From 8600 product mix point of view the application in Fig. 25 can be supported by other NEs
as well

• Hub site
• 8630 Smart Router
• 8660 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• Cell (Remote) site
• 8607 Smart Router

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Fig. 25 ATM PWE3 over Bridged SHDSL Infrastructure Using SHDSL integrated 8607 Smart
Router .

6.1.5 ATM Aggregation to IP VPN Applications

The 8620 Smart Router, 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router support an IP VPN application
in which the routing is made using the customer-dedicated VPN Routing and Forwarding (VRF).
The ATM-capable IFMs enable the operator to connect customers via the ATM connections coming
from the ATM DSLAM-based system or via an ATM-switched access network. One or several
VCCs are dedicated to one customer depending on the needed number of IP traffic classes. VCCs
are associated to the customer VRF in 8620 Smart Router, 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart
Router NE. The QoS of the packet traffic is guaranteed in the MPLS network using the MPLS
DiffServ principles. The QoS of cell traffic towards the ATM network is guaranteed by using the
standard ATM traffic management principles.

Parallel to VPN-based routing, the 8620 Smart Router, 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router
also support default routing where a global IP address space is used.

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From 8600 product mix point of view the application in Fig. 26 can be supported by other NEs
as well

• Hub site
• 8630 Smart Router
• 8660 Smart Router
• 8620 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• Cell (Remote) site
• 8605 Smart Router
• 8607 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
• 8620 Smart Router

Fig. 26 ATM Aggregation in IP VPN Wireline Application

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6.2 IFM ATM Interfaces

The following 8600 NEs offers a wide range of ATM-capable interface modules which the operator
can flexibly equip to provide the needed site configurations.

• 8620 Smart Router


• 8630 Smart Router
• 8660 Smart Router
The ATM IFMs allow the operator to use the 8600 system also as a native ATM switch and build up
networks to provide pure ATM services that are interoperable with the third party ATM switches in
the network. The following IFMs are available:

• ATM IFM
• 4xSTM-1/OC-3 ATM
• SDH/SONET Multiservice IFMs
• 1xchSTM-1/chOC-3
• 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3
• PDH Multiservice IFM
• 24xchE1/chT1
The ATM IFMs are multipurpose and they can be configured to operate in SDH or SONET mode.

They can also be used flexibly and simultaneously in the above mentioned ATM cross-connect and
ATM PWE3 MPLS network applications. Even the ATM circuits associated with a single ATM
interface can be segregated to an ATM cross-connection and ATM PWE3 MPLS services or to
VRF. The 1xchSTM-1/chOC-3, 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 and 24xchE1/chT1 Multiservice IFMs also
support IMA functionality.

All STM-1/OC-3 ATM interfaces can be protected using Multiplex Section Trail Protection 1+1
(MSP1+1) / Automatic Protection Switching (APS).

6.3 ATM Interfaces

The following 8600 NEs offer ATM-capable interfaces which the operator can flexibly use to
provide the required site configurations:

• 8605 Smart Router


• 8607 Smart Router
• 8609 Smart Router
• 8611 Smart Router
The ATM interfaces allow the operator to use the 8600 system also as a native ATM switch and
build up networks to provide pure ATM services that are interoperable with the third party ATM
switches in the network.

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They can also be used flexibly and simultaneously in the above mentioned ATM cross-connect and
ATM PWE3 MPLS network applications. Even the ATM circuits associated with a single ATM
interface can be segregated to an ATM cross-connection and ATM PWE3 MPLS services. The
chE1/chT1 interfaces support IMA functionality.

The following ATM interfaces are available:

• 8605 Smart Router


• 16xchE1/chT1
• 2xDS3 (8605-D)
• 8607 Smart Router
• 8xchE1/chT1 line module
• 4xSHDSL line module
The ATM functionality of the Line Module (LM) is optimized for DSL purposes compared
to regular 8600 ATM interfaces with following limitations:
• Bandwidth of the ATM interface is configurable via G.SHDSL span configuration pro-
file.
• no ATM CAC
• no ATM VP/VC XC and attachment circuits for ATM PWE3
• 2xADSL line module
ATM functionality of the LM is optimized for DSL purposes compared to regular 8600
ATM interfaces with following limitations:
• Bandwidth of the ATM interface is dynamic and depends on the used ADSL modula-
tion and line training conditions
• no ATM CAC
• no ATM VP/VC XC and attachment circuits for ATM PWE3
• no ATM IMA, G.998.1. ATM based multi-pairing bonding used instead
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router
• 8xchE1/chT1 line module

6.4 Generic ATM Functionality

6.4.1 Introduction

ATM belongs to the category of circuit-switched technology which means that the routing across the
network is always static. When a route of the connection is once selected, the route will remain until
the connection is deleted or rerouted. ATM uses a fixed 53-octet cell as a transport unit for a user
datagram. The service access point is responsible for adapting the datagram to the ATM cells using
the ATM adaptation layer functions such as AAL5 (ATM Adaptation Layer), AAL2 or AAL1.

ATM supports two hierarchy levels for the connections, Virtual Paths (VPs) on a higher layer of
connectivity and bearer for lower layer Virtual Circuits (VCs). The concept of VPs significantly
reduces the provisioning work in a large network since thousands of VC connections can be
switched by switching a single VP connection. The 8600 system uses a centralized network
management system to provision the circuits.

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ATM has originally been planned to provide transport services having explicitly defined demanding
QoS end-to-end requirements. ATM service categories Constant Bit Rate (CBR), Variable Bit Rate
(VBR) and Unspecified Bit Rate (UBR) enable the same network to provide end-services with
varying QoS requirements.

ATM cell traffic can be transported over various legacy physical interfaces such as channelized and
unchannelized STM-1/OC-3, STM-4/OC-12, E3/T3 and E1/T1.

In principle, the 8600 system treats ATM as its own native switching layer using native ATM
switching or as a client layer to be connected across the network using MPLS switching layer. The
system does not map any end-to-end client services such as Ethernet or Frame Relay to ATM to
be switched across the ATM switching layer.

Fig. 27 Native ATM Cell

6.4.2 Mapping ATM to Framed Signals

The ATM IFM maps an ATM cell stream to a VC-4/STS-3c SPE/ container without any additional
encapsulation. To guarantee a reliable cell delineation in the ATM receiver, the cell stream is
scrambled. This provides a capacity of 353207 cells/second (149.760 Mbps) available for the
ATM payload including a five-octet cell header.

The SDH/SONET MS IFMs in SDH mode maps an ATM cell stream to 63 framed P12s signal
(2.048 Mbps G.704 frame) signal without any additional encapsulation. To guarantee a reliable cell
delineation in the ATM receiver, the cell stream is scrambled. In a G.704 signal TS0 is reserved
for frame alignment and additionally TS16 is unused. This leaves 30 free timeslots which provide
4528 cells/second (1920 kbps) available for the ATM payload including a five-octet cell header. See
chapter 6.4.7 IMA Functionality for IMA capacities.

The SDH/SONET MS IFMs in SONET mode maps an ATM cell stream to 84 framed DS1 signal
(1544 Mbps T1.403) signal without any additional encapsulation. Note that the cell stream is not
scrambled. 24 timeslots of the DS1 signal provide 3623 cells/second (1536 kbps) both in super
frame and extended super frame mode available for the ATM payload including a five-octet cell
header. See chapter 6.4.7 IMA Functionality for IMA capacities.

The PDH MS Interfaces map an ATM cell stream to a framed P12s/DS1 signal identical with
the SDH/SONET MS IFMs described above.

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DS3 interface provides a single logical ATM interface and uses ATM direct mapping as defined
in G.804,

6.4.3 ATM Transmission Convergence Layer

ATM cells are mapped to the VC-4/STS-3c SPE, DS3 and P12s/DS1 frame octet synchronously, but
the ATM cells can float over the Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) frame boundaries freely. The
ATM convergence layer of the ATM receiver decouples the ATM layer from the frame-based TDM
layer. It uses cell delineation algorithm to search for cell boundaries from the octet stream coming
from the VC-4/STS-3c SPE, DS3 and P12/DS1 demapper. The cell delineation state machine
utilizes the Header Error Control (HEC) check sum which is calculated over the cell header to verify
the correct cell boundary locking. HEC is calculated only over the header of the cell and, if the
received HEC does not match the cell content, the cell is dropped. The cell delineation process is
robust against single bit errors in a cell and such cells are not dropped.

Due to the bursty nature of ATM traffic, the ATM transmitter does not continuously have a user
payload in the transmission buffers. To keep the cell delineation process continuously locked in
the ATM receiver, the transmitter sends idle/unassigned cells (VPI=0, VCI=0) if there is no user
payload to be sent. The ATM transmission convergence also acts as a timing boundary between the
TDM transmission line clock and the time base of an ATM scheduler. The time base of an ATM
scheduler operates totally independently from the transmission line clock.

6.4.4 UNI and NNI Interfaces

VPI Range

The 8600 system supports both User Network Interface (UNI) and Network-to-Network (NNI) type
of ATM interfaces. As the 8600 system does not support ATM signalling such as Private Network to
Network Interface (PNNI) nor Guaranteed Frame Rate (GFR) service category, the significance
of the interface type reduces the available Virtual Path Identifier (VPI) range. The following table
shows the available number of VPI bits and available VCI range in both modes for each module.
All VPI values are available for operator provisioned circuits.

Module/Inter- ATM IFM SDH/SONET MS IFMs PDH MS IFM and


face Type Interfaces
UNI 8 [0...255] 8 [0...255] 8 [0...255]
NNI 12 [0...4095] 9 [0...511] 9 [0...511]

VCI Range

In a typical ATM switch, the VCI values 1...31 are reserved for the internal use of the ATM system.
The reserved VCI allocations done in [I.361] are shown in the table below. For the interoperability
reasons, the 8600 system allows an operator to configure the VC circuits using the reserved VCI
values 2, 5...31. This may be necessary e.g. when the 8600 system operates as an ATM pseudowire
gateway between two ATM switches using e.g. PNNI signalling. VCI values 3 and 4 are not
available for provisioned circuits because they are used by ATM VP Operation, Administration
and Maintenance (OAM) cells such as VP/VC loopback. If otherwise not explicitly required,
the operator should not use VCI values 1...31 for provisioned circuits to avoid potential conflicts
with ATM control plane connections.

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Standard VCI range [32..65535] is supported by all interfaces except bonded ADSL interface where
VCI range is limited to [32..255] according G.998.1.

VCI Value Use


0 Unassigned/Idle cell
1 Meta-signaling
2 General broadcast signaling

3 Segment OAM F4 flow cell


4 End-to-end OAM F4 flow cell
5 Point-to-point signalling
6 VP resource management cell
7 Reserved for future VP functions
8...15 Reserved for future functions
16...21 Reserved for private network use
22...31 Reserved for future functions

Circuit Scalability

The following tables show the maximum number of configurable VPCs and VCCs end-points and
internal circuit cross-connections in the 8600 NEs. A PWE3 end-point reserves one end-point
resource per NE, while an internal cross-connection reserves two end-points.

In 8620 Smart Router, 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router when considering the MS IFM,
the total number of switched VPCs, switched VCCs and terminated VCCs is limited to 4096. It is
possible to create, e.g. one terminated VPC and 4095 VCCs or 4096 switched VPCs. If two MS
IFMs are configured on an IFC line card, there is an IFC line card specific limit of 8192 instances.
In addition to VP/VC specific instances, also the number of configured ATM interfaces in an IFC
line card need to be summed together with circuit figures, which cannot exceed 8192 instances.

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76.8600-50110F 24xchE1/chT1 MS IFM
VCC/VPC Circuits XCs Circuit End-Points
Type
8630 Smart 8660 Smart 8630 Smart 8660 Smart IFC Line IFM Interface
Router Router Router Router Card 2
non-IMA IMA
Switched 8192 16K 8192 16K 2048 1024 256 256
VPCs @NNI
Switched 8192 16K 8192 16K 2048 1024 256 256
VPCs @UNI
Switched or 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 4096 4096
terminated
VCCs
Total number 16K 16K 16K 16K 4096 4096 4096 4096
of switched
VPCs and
VCCs
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93

2 Also applicable to Tellabs 8620 Smart Router


94

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6 ATM Overview
4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM
VCC/VPC Circuits XCs Circuit End-Points
Type
8630 Smart 8660 Smart 8630 Smart 8660 Smart IFC Line IFM Interface
Router Router Router Router Card 2
non-IMA IMA
Switched 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 256 256
VPCs @NNI
Switched 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 256 256
VPCs @UNI
Switched or 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 4096 4096
terminated
VCCs
Total number 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 4096 4096
of switched
VPCs and
VCCs
76.8600-50110F
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© 2015 Coriant.
76.8600-50110F 4xSTM-1/OC-3 ATM IFM
VCC/VPC Circuits XCs Circuit End-Points
Type
8630 Smart 8660 Smart 8630 Smart 8660 Smart IFC Line Card IFM Interface
Router Router Router Router 2

Switched VPCs 8192 16K 8192 16K 2048 1024 256


@NNI
Switched VPCs 8192 16K 8192 16K 2048 1024 256
@UNI
Switched or 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 4096
terminated
VCCs
Total number of 16K 16K 16K 16K 8192 4096 4096
switched VPCs
and VCCs
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8605 Smart Router and 8607 Smart Router


E1/DS1 Interface
VCC/VPC Type NE Interface
non-IMA IMA Group
Switched VPCs @NNI 128 128 128
Switched VPCs @UNI 128 128 128
Switched or terminated VCCs 128 128 128
Total number of switched VPCs and VCCs 256

8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router


E1/DS1 Interface
VCC/VPC Type NE Interface
non-IMA IMA Group
Switched VPCs @NNI 256 256 256
Switched VPCs @UNI 256 256 256
Switched or terminated VCCs 256 256 256
Total number of switched VPCs and VCCs 512

The following table shows circuit scalability for ATM PWE3 N-to-1 (N>1). In 8600 system a
virtual group (VCG) is configured when several VPCs or VCCs are aggregated to one N-to-1
type of ATM PWE3.

N-to-1 Virtual Circuit Group


Network Element Number of virtual circuit Number of VCCs or VPCs
groups (VCG) per VCG
8605 Smart Router 32 per NE 128
8607 Smart Router
8609 Smart Router 32 per NE 128
8611 Smart Router
8620 Smart Router 256 per IFC 128
8630 Smart Router
8660 Smart Router

IMA Scalability

For IMA Group scalability refer to 8600 Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guide.

6.4.5 ATM Switching

A VP cross-connection can be directly created between two ATM interfaces which can be located in
any ATM-capable interface module in the NE. The ATM interface can be e.g. a physical interface
in the ATM IFM or a logical P12s/DS1 interface in the SDH/SONET MS IFMs. An ATM egress
interface always recalculates the HEC field.

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The VP cross-connection remains the VCI , PTI and ATM payload fields intact and updates the VPI
field if address translation is necessary. A VP circuit can also be terminated in an ATM interface for
the VCC cross-connection purposes.

The VC cross-connection can be created between two terminated VPCs. The terminated VP circuits
can be located in any ATM physical interface in the NE. VC cross-connection remains the ATM
payload fields intact and updates the VCI field if address translation is necessary. It is possible
to create switched VP connections and terminated VP connections to the same ATM interface
simultaneously.

A service category such as CBR, UBR etc. is assigned to each VP and VC circuit when a circuit
is created. Service category reflects QoS properties of the connection and scheduling priority i.e.
forwarding order to the line. For a terminated VPC supported service category can be created, it
defines what service categories are supported in the underlying VCC. The service category of
a VP connection is at least as good as the service category of the carried VC connection. There
are also other bandwidth-related rules to successfully create VP and VC connections described in
chapter Connection Admission Control.

VP and VC connections can be created statically using CLI or in 8000 Intelligent Network Manager.

The cell concatenation feature described in the PWE3 section can also be activated for the internally
switched circuits even though the assembly/reassembly process is invisible for the traffic except
for the additional latency.

6.4.6 Traffic Management

ATM QoS Principles

An ATM network provides varying QoS requirements depending on the selected ATM service
category. Selected ATM service category matches the connection QoS requirement. On a high level,
the service category itself defines the priorities between the circuits sharing the same egress ATM
interface. CBR has the highest and UBR the lowest priority in the case of congestion.

• CBR constant bit rate


The CBR service category is dedicated to the end-user services which require constant
guaranteed bandwidth and small cell delay variation (jitter). The service rather drops the
cells than processes them as delayed. The CBR service reserves bandwidth constantly up to
the Peak Cell Rate (PCR) value.
• rt-VBR Variable Bit Rate
The rt-VBR service category is dedicated to the end-user services which have a nature of bursty
traffic and require guaranteed bandwidth and small cell delay variation. The service rather drops
the cells than processes them as delayed in the case of congestion. The rt-VBR service reserves
bandwidth constantly up to the Sustainable Cell Rate (SCR) value and can send additional
bursts with the PCR speed until the Maximum Burst Size (MBS) is achieved.
• nrt-VBR Variable Bit Rate
The nrt-VBR service category is dedicated to the end-user services which have a nature of very
bursty traffic and require guaranteed bandwidth but which can tolerate very high cell delay
variation. The service rather delays the cells than drops them in the case of congestion. The
nrt-VBR service reserves bandwidth constantly up to the SCR value and can send additional
bursts with the PCR speed until the MBS is achieved.

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• UBR+ unspecified minimum bit rate


The UBR+ service category is dedicated to the end-user services which have a nature of very
bursty traffic and require a minimum guaranteed bandwidth but which can tolerate large cell
delay variation. The service rather delays the cells than drops them in the case of congestion.
The UBR+ service has always Minimum Cell Rate (MCR) bandwidth available and can send
bursts without any upper limit.
• UBR unspecified bit rate
The UBR service category is dedicated to the end-user services which have a nature of very
bursty traffic and do not require any guaranteed bandwidth and can tolerate large cell delay
variation. Typically the UBR service requires a low cell loss rate. The service rather delays the
cells than drops them in the case of congestion. The UBR service has no reserved bandwidth
available and can send bursts without any upper limit.
ATM forum [af-tm-0121.000] has divided the QoS related parameters in two classes: traffic
parameters and QoS parameters. The table below lists the relevant traffic parameters for each
ATM service category.

ATM enables the setting of the explicit quality of service objectives for the end-to-end ATM
connection over the network. The QoS can be characterized using peak-to-peak Cell Delay Variation
(CDV), maximum Cell Transfer Delay (CTD) and Cell Loss Rate (CLR). The ATM network
should guarantee this QoS behaviour when a connection with a specific bandwidth defined by
PCR/SCR/MCR/MBS parameters is established. To achieve the set QoS objectives the intermediate
ATM switches need the information how to treat the cells belonging to a specific ATM circuit. This
is done by provisioning the ATM connection dedicated traffic parameters PCR/SCR/MCR/MBS
and Cell Delay Variation Tolerance (CDVT) to each node along the path. The bandwidth traffic
parameters (PCR/SCR/MCR/MBS) are used to control the resources of the ATM switch to avoid the
congestion. The CDVT parameter of the ATM connection indicates the maximum allowed variation
in the ATM cell stream. If the ATM switch detects a cell with higher variation, it can either declare
the cell as non-confirming and drop (or tag) the cell or it can take corrective action and shape the
cell stream with a buffering to confirm the CDVT gain. This of course produces additional delay.
The dropping (or tagging) of the non-confirmed cells is referred to as policing and it is based on an
assumption that the non-confirming cells have lost their importance for the client using the ATM
service and, thus, can be dropped. For example, in the case of real time services such as video and
voice services there is a clear limit after which the decoder cannot any more use the delayed cell.
Shaping the non-confirmed cells again to confirm the connection-specific CDVT is based on the
assumption that the client using the ATM service is sensitive to delay variation and cell losses but
can tolerate additional delay caused by shaping.

Hierarchical VP/VC connectivity of ATM is controlled by a service category. For a terminated VP


circuit it is possible to define the allowed service categories of carried VC circuits. This can be used
to ensure the correct QoS treatment in the network. The 8600 system uses fixed CBR.1, VBR.1 and
UBR.1 conformance definitions due to the fact that CLP-based congestion dropping is not supported.

CBR rt-VBR nrt-VBR UBR+ UBR


Traffic
Parameters
PCR specified specified specified specified specified
SCR, MBS N/A specified specified N/A N/A
CDVT specified specified specified specified N/A
MCR N/A N/A N/A specified N/A
QoS
Parameters

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CBR rt-VBR nrt-VBR UBR+ UBR


peak-to-peak specified specified unspecified unspecified unspecified
CDV
Max CTD specified specified unspecified unspecified unspecified
CLR specified specified specified unspecified unspecified

Cell Delay Variation in the 8600 System

In the 8600 system the CDVT can be set for the ATM VP and VC connection. IngressCDVT is set
for the ATM connection at ingress ATM interface and egressCDVT is set at egress ATM interface.
The system does not support native ATM policing and therefore the ingressCDVT parameter is just
administrative. In the 8600 system the effect of egressCDVT parameter depends on the shaping
activation of the VP and VC connection. When the shaper is disabled, the egressCDVT parameter is
just administrative. When the shaper is activated, it forces the cell stream of the ATM connections
to behave according to its traffic parameters (PCR/SCR/MCR/MBS and CDVT). The operation
of the shaper in the 8600 system can be modelled using a calendar wheel which calculates the
opportunity slot to send a cell for the particular ATM connection if such a cell is available in the
buffer. The calendar wheel is programmed using a PCR value of the connection so that the wheel
provides a tick every 1/PCR. In practice, the ATM cells always have some jitter due to the statistical
nature of ATM switching and the simplified scheduler implementations. As a result, the calendar
wheel using only the PCR value is very strict and delays without exception the cell to the next
opportunity slot if there is any delay variation. By adding the CDVT parameter to the calculation of
the opportunity slot, the system allows the reading of the cell from the buffer immediately after it
has arrived even if it had arrived in advance or delayed compared to the nominal moment. If an
attempt is made for the connection to be shaped according to the average PCR but the detailed
delay variation performance is not important, the effect of the CDVT parameters can be disabled
by choosing a big enough CDVT value. As a rule of thumb, CDVT > 1/ PCR provides reasonably
liberal shaping from a CDVT point of view.

Egress Buffer Size

In the 8600 system the CDVT parameter is not linked to the buffer size reserved for the circuit in the
system in a similar manner to some ATM switches on the market. The CDVT parameter is only
used to relax the impact of the shaper to the lightly jittered signal.

In the 8600 system the egress buffer size of the scheduled VC and VP circuit is adjusted system
internally on the basis of the service category and PCR. The default values are shown in the table
below. An operator has an option to configure the buffer size on VP/VC circuit basis if necessary.
Careless adjusting of the buffer size may lead to dropped traffic if the buffers are set too short or
to increased delay or packet memory exhausting problems when the buffers are set too long. For
non-concatenated circuits the size is given in terms of cells, for concatenated circuits in terms of
concatenated blocks and for AAL5 terminated VCCs in terms of AAL5 packets.

Service Category Egress Buffer Size


CBR max { (PCR / 1000) , 64}
rt-VBR, nrt-VBR max { (PCR / 1000), 64, MBS} but not more than 256
UBR, UBR+ max { (PCR / 100) , 128} but not more than 256

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ATM Scheduling

Each ATM egress interface has an ATM scheduler which is responsible for scheduling thousands of
VP and VC circuits to the ATM interface according to their traffic parameters. As long as there
is no congestion in the egress port, the scheduler transmits all the cells it receives from the ATM
ingress ports. In the case of congestion the circuits are served in a strict priority order based on
the service category: CBR, rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR+ UBR. Even if an unshaped circuit overran
its PCR/SCR bandwidth, it would be served unless the egress port is not congested. If the port is
congested, only the connections belonging to the highest service category are to be served. If all the
connections belong to the same service category, the capacity is shared equally between the all the
connections. The consequence is that the high capacity connections suffer more compared to the
low capacity connections.

In the case of a shaped circuit the scheduler forces the cell stream to behave according to its traffic
parameters. The 8600 system uses non-hierarchical scheduling with per VPC/VCC queuing where
the cells bypass the scheduler only once. Each switched VPC and VCC has its own egress queue.
The cells of the switched VPCs are placed in the same four (service category assigned) port queues
as the cells of the switched or terminated VCCs.

Internally the scheduler uses four port queues and dedicates one queue for each service category. The
exception is UBR+ traffic which is placed to two queues. The portion below the MCR is placed to
the same queue as rt-VBR traffic and the portion which exceeds the MCR is placed to the same queue
as UBR traffic. Regardless of this internal processing cell integrity is guaranteed for UBR+ traffic.

Summary of the mapping between four ATM queues and ATM service categories is:

• Queue1 – CBR traffic (highest priority)


• Queue2 – rt-VBR traffic and portion of UBR+ traffic not exceeding MCR
• Queue3 – nrt-VBR traffic
• Queue4 – UBR and portion of UBR+ traffic exceeding MCR (lowest priority)

The capacity of a single switched VPC or VCC cannot exceed 80 Mbps in the ATM IFM.

ATM Packet scheduling

The 8600 NEs use a single packet queue per egress VCC to schedule packet traffic. Packets are
send out to the VCC in the order they arrive to VCC queue in egress scheduler independent of their
internal (packet) traffic class. An exception of the above is 8607 Smart Router with 4xSHDSL LM
where four packet queues are supported on top of a single VCC.

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ATM Ingress policing

The 8600 NEs do not support native ATM ingress policing. However, in the 8620 Smart Router,
8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router packet policer can be configured for each switched VPC
and all VCCs. Packet policer is configured using PIR and CIR in terms of kbps and CBS and PBS in
terms of bytes. Typically, ATM policer is configured using SCR and PCR in terms of cell/s and
MBS in terms of cells. An approximation between packet policer parameters (CIR,CBS) and
ATM policer (SCR,MBS) can be made. In the case of ATM N-to-1 PWE3 packet policer sees
concatenated N-to-1 PWE3 payload (Nx52 bytes), PWE3 label (4 bytes), optional control word (4
bytes) and system internal tag (4 bytes):

PIR= (N*52+PW label+ CW+TAG)/ (N*53) * SCR *53*8 bps]

PBS= (N*52+PW label+ CW+TAG)/ (N*53) * MBS *53*8 bps]

It shall be noted that potential elapsing of concatenation timeout causes error to the approximation
because it changes PWE3 header / payload relation arbitrary. In practices, the distortion shall be
considered when a concatenation size is smaller than 4 cells, especially it shall be considered in the
case of ATM cross-connections when concatenation is typically not used.

Shaping

Shaping is used when the delay variation of the circuit is a critical factor. The reason can be e.g. that
an end equipment has only a limited size of data buffers or a service provider demarcation point
where a service level agreement takes place. Each service category is shaped using the traffic
parameters defined for the particular service category. Shaping always adds additional delay to the
traffic and should not be used without a specific reason. The 8600 system uses non-hierarchical
shaping where the cells bypass the shaper only once. Shaping takes place in the egress interface
providing the following shaping characteristics:

• Switched VC circuit
Shaping takes place on a VC level for all cells belonging to that VC circuit. The circuit is
shaped using the VC traffic parameters. VC shaping is configurable and disabled by default.

• Terminated VC circuit
Shaping takes place on a VC level for all cells belonging to that VC circuit. The circuit is
shaped using the VC traffic parameters. VC shaping is configurable and disabled by default.
This is relevant e.g. in the VRF case where a packet burst arrives from the MPLS network and
it is not allowed to forward the burst to the ATM network.

• Switched VP circuit
Shaping takes place on a VP level for all cells belonging to that VP circuit. The circuit is shaped
using the VP traffic parameters. VP shaping is configurable and disabled by default.

• Terminated VP circuit
Shaping is not possible but the individual VC circuits carried by the terminated VPC can be
either shaped or not shaped as explained above.

The PCR of the shaped VPC or VCC can be configured from 1 cell/s onwards. The lowest effective
shaping rate of the egress shaper is limited to 25 cells/s. This means that the VPCs/VCCs configured
using PCRs 1..24 cells/s are in practice shaped using 25 cells/s. The higher PCRs are shaped exactly
using the configured PCR values. The minimum shaping rate limit of the ATM interface is visible
via CLI as the minimum shaping rate parameter.

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Connection Admission Control

Connection Admission Control (CAC) is used to control the bandwidth usage of the VP and ATM
interface bearer layers. Without any control it would be possible to freely provision as many ATM
circuits as VPI/VCI ranges allow which would result in unpredictable congestion situations. In such
a case it would be impossible to give any guarantees about the end-to-end QoS of the circuits. To
avoid these problems the circuits are created in a controlled manner in the network. Generally,
it is assumed that network elements themselves have a non-blocking switching matrix and the
bandwidth reservations are needed only in the ATM interfaces. The ingress and egress reservations
are calculated separately because the ATM circuits may be asymmetrical. CAC function has a
specific CAC algorithm which utilizes traffic parameters (PCR, SCR, MCR and MBS) as a basis for
the bandwidth reservation. The 8600 system reserves the bandwidth from a single capacity pool per
ATM interface for all service categories. Therefore, the reservations can be calculated exactly only
for pure CBR traffic and the reservations for VBR, UBR+ and UBR have a statistical nature.

The 8600 system uses the following CAC algorithms to calculate the equivalent bandwidth for each
VP circuit to make the bandwidth reservation. CAC function checks that the sum of the equivalent
bandwidth of VP circuits does not exceed the bandwidth of an ATM interface when the circuit is
created. Reservations for VC circuits are not checked and it is possible to configure unlimited
amount of VC capacity to a single VP interface.

BW CBR = PCR

BW rt-VBR = (1+p1/100 )*SCR + p2/100*{PCR-(1+p1/100)*SCR} + p3/100*MBS

BW nrt-VBR = (1+p4/100)*SCR + p5/100*{PCR-(1+p4/100)*SCR} + p6/100*MBS

BW UBR+ = (1+p7/100)*MCR + p8/100*{PCR-(1+p7/100)*MCR}

BW UBR = p9/100*PCR+p10

The parameters are common for the whole NE. An operator should very carefully define the new
parameters if the default values are not used. Per default the parameters p1...p10 are set to zero.

CAC parameters can be changed only if there are no provisioned VP connections in the NE.

CAC function can be enabled or disabled for each ATM interface individually. It is possible to
over-provisioning a single ATM interface to have administratively more bandwidth than the interface
physically has. The overbooking factor is given as a percentage using the following formula:

overbooking factor (%) = (new overbooked bandwidth - nominal bandwidth) / (nominal


bandwidth) * 100. Factor 0 % provides nominal bandwidth.

6.4.7 IMA Functionality

The 8600 system supports generic IMA version 1.0 and 1.1 functionality specified by ATM Forum
[af-phy-0086.000] [af-phy-0086.001].

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The activity of the group is controlled by the minimum number of link parameters. It defines how
many links must be active to have the whole group operable. If the number of active links is lower
than the parameter, the group is neither operable nor capable of forwarding traffic. If the number of
active links is higher than the parameter, some links may go down and the group is still operable. In
this case, the group may become overbooked and the traffic is handled like in any other congestion
situation in the ATM egress interface. Thus, the IMA function can be used to provide redundancy if
links are routed over diverse routes over the SDH/SONET/PDH transmission network. The capacity
of an IMA group is defined by the number of the configured links and IMA frame length:

BW= N* TRLCR * (M-1)/M * (2048/2049)

Where:

N= number of configured IMA links

TRLCR= bandwidth of one IMA link (4528/3623 cells/s)

M= IMA frame length (32/64/128/256).

The IMA group capacity for different IMA link configurations with different IMA frame length
options are shown in the tables below. Dedicated tables for E1/P12s and DS1 type of IMA groups
are shown.

The 8600 system supports differential delay between the IMA links of up to 25 ms. Both an
Independent Transmit Clock (ITC) and a Common Transmit Clock (CTC) are supported. However,
only symmetrical operation is supported.

To make the diagnostics of the IMA connections using loops all IMA links shall be activated
simultaneously. This can be done using a single IMA loopback command. The command controls
the same physical line loopback resources as the PDH loopback commands. The timeout can be
changed via PDH loopback commands.

It is recommended that when loops are to be used for testing purposes, all links in the IMA
group are looped simultaneously. If an individual link is to be tested with a loop, it should
be removed from an IMA group beforehand. If only a single link in the group is looped the
receive IMA ID of the looped IMA link may be different than the receive IMA ID of the rest of
the links causing disturbances to the operation of the IMA group.

When the IMA group is created via CLI, it is always empty. P12s/DS1 cannot be associated to
the IMA group if VP or VC circuits are created. If you suspect that there is a need to change a
single P12s/DS1 ATM interface to an IMA grouped interface later, it is practical to start with
an IMA group having only one member. In this way it is easy to increase the links without
first deleting the existing circuits.

Capacity of E1/P12s Type of IMA Group as a Function of Configured Links and IMA Frame
Length
IMA Frame Length IMA Frame Length
N 32 64 128 256 N 32 64 128 256
1 4384 4455 4490 4508 17 74539 75741 76342 76643
2 8769 8910 8981 9016 18 78923 80196 80833 81151

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IMA Frame Length IMA Frame Length


N 32 64 128 256 N 32 64 128 256
3 13153 13366 13472 13525 19 83308 84652 85323 85659
4 17538 17821 17962 18033 20 87693 89107 89814 90168
5 21923 22276 22453 22542 21 92077 93562 94305 94676
6 26307 26732 26944 27050 22 96462 98018 98796 99185
7 30692 31187 31435 31558 23 100846 102473 103286 103693
8 35077 35642 35925 36067 24 105231 106928 107777 108201
9 39461 40098 40416 40575 25 109616 111384 112268 112710
10 43846 44553 44907 45084 26 114000 115839 116759 117218
11 48231 49009 49398 49592 27 118385 120295 121249 121727
12 52615 53464 53888 54100 28 122770 124750 125740 126235
13 57000 57919 58379 58609 29 127154 129205 130231 130743
14 61385 62375 62870 63117 30 131539 133661 134721 135252
15 65769 66830 67360 67626 31 135924 138116 139212 139760
16 70154 71285 71851 72134 32 140308 142571 143703 144269

Capacity of DS1 Type of IMA Group as a Function of Configured Links and IMA Frame Length
IMA Frame Length IMA Frame Length
N 32 64 128 256 N 32 64 128 256
1 3507 3564 3592 3606 17 59631 60593 61073 61314
2 7015 7128 7185 7213 18 63138 64157 64666 64921
3 10523 10692 10777 10820 19 66646 67721 68259 68527
4 14030 14257 14370 14426 20 70154 71285 71851 72134
5 17538 17821 17962 18033 21 73662 74850 75444 75741
6 21046 21385 21555 21640 22 77169 78414 79036 79348
7 24554 24950 25148 25247 23 80677 81978 82629 82954
8 28061 28514 28740 28853 24 84185 85543 86222 86561
9 31569 32078 32333 32460 25 87693 89107 89814 90168
10 35077 35642 35925 36067 26 91200 92671 93407 93774
11 38584 39207 39518 39674 27 94708 96236 96999 97381
12 42092 42771 43111 43280 28 98216 99800 100592 100988
13 45600 46335 46703 46887 29 101723 103364 104184 104595
14 49108 49900 50296 50494 30 105231 106928 107777 108201
15 52615 53464 53888 54100 31 108739 110493 111370 111808
16 56123 57028 57481 57707 32 112247 114057 114962 115415

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6.4.8 IMA Split

When IMA links are configured to IMA groups in the 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM a special
attention shall be paid on how links are related to the four physical STM-1/OC-3 MS interfaces.
In a typical application all IMA links in an IMA group originate from the same STM-1/OC-3 MS
interface.

The 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM supports also so-called IMA split mode, which allows the user to
configure IMA links to an IMA group regardless from which of the four STM-1/OC-3 MS interface
they originate. IMA split mode is configured using ifm-mode module command on the IFM level.
This may be needed by the network planning and topology constrains when in SDH/SONET
network individual IMA links of a single IMA group have been routed via different STM-1/OC-3
MS interfaces to 8600 NE. Using IMA split the operator can also by design provide redundancy
over the SDH/SONET network utilizing native link recovery mechanism of IMA technology. IMA
split allows protection of the whole physical path and is able to utilize in normal state the whole
bandwidth of working and protection paths.

When IMA split is not used each physical STM-1/OC-3 MS interface uses its own system internal
virtual interface to route traffic to the core of the NE. Exceptionally, the IMA split capability allows
the user to groom all the supported 168 IMA links to IMA groups, which are configured to a single
virtual interface. If more than 128 links are configured the user needs to increase the bandwidth of
the virtual interface by re-configuring manually the port bandwidth using bandwidth-if command in
the general limits of the IFM forwarding capabilities.

The system associates the IMA group to one of the four virtual interfaces based on the origin of the
first configured IMA link. When the group is removed the first member added to the group shall be
removed as the last link. The user can distinguish the first added link as the first member on the IMA
member list or first member of the group listed after show run command.

IMA split configuration in the 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM has the following limitations:

• All IMA links in an IMA group shall originate from the same 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM.
• When IMA split configuration is used it is not possible to activated MSP/APS protection. When
protection is activated in one or more STM-1/OC-3 MS interfaces it is not possible to configure
IMA split mode.
• All the configured VCCs/VPCs in ATM PWE3 N-to-1 PWE3 shall originate from the same phys-
ical STM-1/OC-3 MS interface.
• When IMA split is used all 4 STM-1/OC-3 MS interfaces inherit the QoS mapping rules from
interface #0.
• Special care must be taken if more than 126 IMA links are configured to the same virtual interface
of a single STM-1/OC-3 MS interface to avoid congestion in virtual interface.
• Issuing ‘shutdown-if’ command to a physical STM-1/OC-3 MS interface will stop all traffic
going through that particular physical interface as well as in the internal virtual interface. There-
fore all IMA split data traffic going through the internal virtual interface will be stopped including
those IMA links which originate from other STM-1/OC-3 MS interfaces that are not in shutdown
state.

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6.4.9 ATM OAM Loopback

8600 system supports ATM loopback test functions for VP/VC circuits (F4 OAM) with end-to-end
and segment options. The loopback function uses a standard loopback cell format defined in [I.610]
and therefore provides a powerful diagnostics feature to test ATM connections in a multi-vendor
environment. A loopback test is targeted to diagnostics used when a specific connection is tested
over a limited time to ensure the connectivity and the transmitting of accurate quality information.
The test can be executed for the provisioned circuits without disturbing the user traffic. The ATM
loopback functionality is also called ATM ping. The loopback is supported in the ATM interface
towards the ATM network or ATM PWE3.

In the end-to-end test the loopback cells are inserted in the endpoint of the circuit and they are looped
back towards the source in the other endpoint of the circuit. The loopback location information is
not needed because the loopback cells always traverse to the end of the circuit and the return cell is
detected in the source using the correlation tag field.

In the segment test the operator divides the path of the circuit to the segments in the desired
points e.g. in the operators demarcation point for leased line connection. In the 8600 system the
segment endpoint is configurable in each ATM interface and it is enabled as a default. Note that in
the ATM switch application the segment configuration is executed as two separate configuration
actions in both VP/VC connection points. In the ATM PWE3 application the segment configuration
takes place in the ATM interfaces where the PWE3 is connected. In the scope of one segment the
operation is analogous to the end-to-end testing. The segment loopback cells are inserted in the
endpoint of the segment and they are looped back towards the source in the other endpoint of the
segment. The loopback location information is not needed because the loopback cells always
traverse to the end of the segment.

The 8600 system has a powerful OAM loopback test application, in which an operator can define the
number of loopback cells (1...25) to be sent and the interval (5...255 seconds) of the loopback cells
before starting the test. When the test is completed, the element can report the success of the test and
the number of looped cells. Only one test application can be launched simultaneously for one circuit
in one ATM interface. The minimum interval between the generated loopback cells is five seconds
which is specified in [I.610]. In the case of a PWE3 tunnelled ATM circuit the loopback function is
available only for the cell entering the element from a native ATM interface. The cells entering the
element from a PWE3 tunnel cannot be looped back to the tunnel.

The ATM loopback test application has an additional feature to measure the time it takes between a
sent loopback cell (request) and received cell (looped back). After the loopback test is completed
the test reports the minimum, maximum and average round trip delay values. The round trip
measurement utilizes the correlation tag field of the loopback cell. The 8600 system adds its
own time stamp to the correlation tag field and the looping NE copies the correlation tag intact
when the loop is performed. Round trip delay can be calculated from the difference between the
time indicating the received correlation tag and the current time. The round trip measurement
interoperates with the third party equipment because the intact copying of the correlation tag is
required by [I.610] for any equipment supporting ATM loopback.

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Fig. 28 Loopback Test Example for PWE3-Tunneled VP/VC Circuit

Fig. 29 Loopback Test Example for Switched VP/VC Circuit

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6.4.10 Preserving ATM QoS over MPLS

ATM technology enables an operator to provide end-to-end services with high quality of service
guarantees explicitly defined for each VPC/VCC. The traffic characteristics of each ATM circuit
have been defined individually using a set of traffic parameters that have also been referred to
as a traffic descriptor. A descriptor, typically defines the bandwidth (peak cell rate, sustainable
cell rate, minimum cell rate), queuing priority (service category UBR, CBR etc.), cell delay
variation tolerance and drop precedence (conformance definition). In the ATM pseudowire service
application, the ATM circuits are forwarded over the MPLS network via ATM PWE3 tunnels and
the ATM circuit specific (per flow) QoS characteristics are mapped to the MPLS DiffServ QoS
definitions. The most important way to guarantee the desired end-to-end QoS over the two different
switching technologies is to define the MPLS traffic class where the ATM PWE3 packets traverse
across the MPLS network for each ATM circuit individually. In the 8600 system an operator can
freely associate an ATM circuit of any ATM service category to any MPLS traffic class. When this
association is done, ATM cells encapsulated to ATM PWE3 packets use the same traffic class
along the path to the egress node. In the MPLS network an operator ensures that by using MPLS
traffic engineering all MPLS traffic classes get such queuing treatment as defined for each traffic
class. Refer to 8600 Smart Routers MPLS Applications Configuration Guide for more detailed
information about MPLS traffic engineering. In the 8600 system the bandwidth reservations are
kept separately for the ATM (ATM CAC) and MPLS (RSVP-TE) layers. In the egress node the
cells are scheduled using a native ATM scheduler according to the configured traffic parameters.
The ATM CLP information is not used in the MPLS network portion to drop the PWE3 packets in
the case of congestion.

6.4.11 ATM Statistics Counters

The 8600 system supports cumulative ATM cell counters for ATM interfaces, VP circuits and VC
circuits. The counters are available via CLI and 8000 Intelligent Network Manager and an user
has the option to reset the counters e.g. before starting the testing. Refer to 8600 Smart Routers
Statistics Counters Reference Guide to see detailed ATM counter support. Refer to 8600 Smart
Routers SNMP MIB Support for the ATM counters available via the Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP) management interface.

6.5 ATM PWE3 Tunnelling

6.5.1 Introduction

The 8600 NEs support PWE3 tunnelling for VP and VC circuits as specified by Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF) [RFC4717]. The [RFC4717] specifies various methods for carrying ATM VP/VC
over the PWE3 circuit. The 8600 system supports N-to-1, 1-to-1 and AAL5 SDU mode types of
encapsulations. PWE3 circuits can be statically provisioned or signalled using Label Distribution
Protocol (LDP). The bidirectional nature of ATM requires that two unidirectional tunnels are created
for one ATM circuit. A sequence number insertion and monitoring is supported.

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6.5.2 N-to-1 PWE3 Mode over MPLS

In N-to-1 mode the cells are tunnelled intactly with their original cell header including VPI,
VCI, CLP and PTI fields and a 48-octet cell payload except the HEC octet which is dropped. An
additional 4-octet pseudowire label and 4-octet Packet-Switched Network (PSN) label are added. A
pseudowire label identifies the individual pseudowire inside an MPLS (outer label) tunnel whereas a
PSN label is the MPLS label used to switch the packet along the label-switched path in the MPLS
network. The intermediate LSRs may update only the PSN field. If an ATM address translation is
necessary, it is performed at egress of the tunnel which can also be referred to as the ATM egress
interface. Address translation is provisioned locally, i.e. is not signalled by LDP.

The 8600 system supports the following N-to-1 type of ATM PWE3 provisioning options:

• N=1, this option associates the VP or VC connection point directly to the PWE3. Only one circuit
per PWE3 is possible. Address translation is supported both on VPI and VCI level in the ATM
egress interface.
• N≥1, this option uses Virtual Circuit Group (VCG) which groups the VP or VC connection points
first to a group and the group is separately associated to a PWE3. Up to 128 circuits per group
are possible. Address translation is supported both on VPI and VCI level. Additionally address
translation is supported in the ATM ingress and egress interfaces. The default operation mode is
to provide address translation in the ATM egress interface. If address translation is required in
the ATM PWE3 ingress point, this mode shall be used even if there would be only one circuit per
PWE3. This option supports also provisioning of VPCs and VCCs simultaneously in the same
N-to-1 ATM PWE3. The user must make sure that the VP and VC indexes of different ATM
circuits inside a PWE3 tunnel do not conflict. If necessary address translation shall be used.

If address translation is used in the ATM PWE3 interoperability cases, verify that both end
points of the ATM PWE3 perform address translation in a consistent manner. Especially when
a virtual circuit group is used, the bidirectional address translation shall be configured with
great care to avoid misconnections.

Fig. 30 ATM PWE3 N-to-1 Encapsulation over MPLS without Concatenation

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Fig. 31 ATM PWE3 N-to-1 Encapsulation over MPLS with Concatenation

6.5.3 N-to-1 PWE3 Mode over IP Connection

The 8600 NEs also support PWE3 over the IP stack for the ATM pseudowires. The MPLS label
is replaced with an IP address and the IP address is used to reach the targeted 8600 NE. The used
frame format for MPLS-in-IP is specified in [RFC4023]. Packet format without and with cell
concatenation are shown in Fig. 32 and Fig. 33. The IPv4 Protocol Number field value of 137 refers
to the MPLS Unicast packets. Packet fragmentation does not support MPLS-in-IP packets, and thus
it is recommended to configure the Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) to be large enough to
avoid fragmentation.

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Fig. 32 ATM PWE3 N-to-1 Encapsulation over IP without Concatenation

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Fig. 33 ATM PWE3 N-to-1 Encapsulation over IP with Concatenation

6.5.4 N-to-1 PWE3 and Address Translation

In order to emulate ATM switching and enable easy interworking between ATM nodes, the 8600
system provides an address translation capability. Fig. 34 shows two typical network applications
where address translation is needed.

• Cell site device operates as an end point of the ATM PWE3 and has native ATM interface towards
Node B. The 8600 system can provide the necessary VPI/VCI address translation to change the
VPI/VCI values between Node B and RNC. It is a general operator and UMTS vendor practice
to use identical configuration templates including VPI/VCI values for each Node B. In this ap-
plication, address translation is made in the way how IETF has defined the ATM PWE3 address
translation. The ATM cells inside ATM N-to-1 PWE3 carry different VPI/VCI values in different
forwarding directions.
• When Node B supports PWE3 capabilities and terminates the ATM N-to-1 PWE3, the template
based Node B configuration described above requires that the hub node (the 8630 Smart Router
in this example) shall provide extended address translation functions. Address translation takes
place in the ATM interface of the 8600 NE facing the RNC. The VPI/VCI address is translated
in both directions of the interface.

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The 8600 NE allows to configure several VPCs/VCCs from several ATM interfaces to a single
N-to-1 ATM PWE3. In this case, it may happen that several ATM circuits with identical VPI/VCI
identifier enter to the node from different ATM interfaces. To avoid VPI/VCI conflict inside a PWE3
tunnel, address translation must be configured in ATM PEW3 ingress points.

Fig. 34 Applications for ATM PWE3 N-to-1 Address Translation

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6.5.5 N-to-1 PWE3 with Cell Concatenation

The 8600 system supports ATM cell concatenation, which concatenates a number of ATM cells to
a single PWE3 packet. This makes transporting ATM traffic over the packet network much more
effective since the ATM PWE3 and the packet network header is shared with several ATM cells.
Moreover, the dropping of a HEC byte from each concatenated cell compensates the encapsulation
tax and finally provides a tiny negative encapsulation tax. Cell delay variation can be controlled by
concatenation timeout. It sets the ultimate timer for sending a partially filled concatenated frame.
An operator can configure the desired number of the concatenated cells on a VP/VC-circuit basis
in the transmit direction (in the MPLS ingress node). In the case of static PWE3, an operator is
responsible for ensuring that the receiver is capable of reassembling the concatenated PWE3 packet
size. When LDP is used to signal a ATM PWE3 connection, the LDP ensures that the transmitter
does not use bigger concatenation size than the receiver (far-end) is capable of reassembling. In the
8600 system the selected transmit concatenation size is reflected to the receiver side of the PWE3
endpoint in the same node. When concatenation is set to 1...3 in the transmit side, the reassembly
capability of the receivers is up to 3 cells. When the transmit concatenation is set to 4...32 cells, the
capability of the receivers is always 32 cells.

The latency caused by the concatenation can be controlled using a concatenation timeout timer.
When a concatenated circuit is provisioned, it is possible to set a circuit-specific timer value. By
setting the timer value the element guarantees the maximum time the cells may wait in the transmit
concatenation buffer. If the timer elapses before the number of concatenated cells have arrived, the
PWE3 packet is sent with the cells currently available in the buffer. The practical delay may be
slightly shorter due to the accuracy of the timer. The timer is aimed for very bursty connections or
for the connections which are used by a delay-critical application. The starting moment of the timer
is not synchronized to the arrival of the first cell of the same PWE3 packet and therefore a 100 µs
variation can be observed between the first cell and the elapsing of the timer. Consequently, the
smallest configurable timer value of 100 µs guarantees a latency between 100...200 µs.

6.5.6 1-to-1 PWE3 Mode

The 8600 NEs support 1-to-1 ATM cell concatenation with VP and VC service options. Both
options support also cell concatenation. The same cell concatenation operation described in
section6.5.5 N-to-1 PWE3 with Cell Concatenation also applies in case of 1-to-1 mode.

VP Service

In 1-to-1 VP service mode, one ATM VPC is associated to one PWE3 to be tunnelled across the
packet network. VP service maps the important ATM cell header information to ATM specific
control word to enable the relaying of these bits over PWE3 connection. VCI field is also tunnelled
intact. When several ATM cells are concatenated to into a single PWE3 packet normal PWE3
control word is used and additional 1 byte ATM specific control word is repeated before the payload
of each cell. This is required because the ATM cell header information may vary from cell to cell.

In VP service mode a new user configurable VPI value is generated in the egress node.

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Fig. 35 ATM 1-to-1 VP Service Without Concatenation

Fig. 36 ATM 1-to-1 VP Service With Concatenation

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VC Service

In 1-to-1 VC service mode, one ATM VCC is associated to one PWE3 to be tunnelled across the
PSN. VC service maps the important ATM cell header information to ATM specific control word to
enable the relaying of these bits over PWE3 connection. VCI field is not tunnelled at all. When
several ATM cells are concatenated to into a single PWE3 packet, normal PWE3 control word is
used and additional 1 byte ATM specific control word is repeated before the payload of each cell.
This is required because the ATM cell header information may vary from cell to cell.

In VC service mode a new user configurable VPI and VCI values are generated in the egress node.

Fig. 37 ATM 1-to-1 VC Service With Concatenation

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Fig. 38 ATM 1-to-1 VC Service Without Concatenation

6.5.7 AAL5 SDU PWE3 Mode over MPLS

The AAL5 Service Data Unit (SDU) mode is used to tunnel VC circuits carrying AAL5 frames over
the MPLS network. This mode is not supported for VP circuits. The mode terminates the VC cell
stream and performs reassembly where the AAL5 frames are constructed. The AAL5 frames are also
terminated and the packet payload, e.g. an IP packet, is inserted to the PWE3 frame equipped with
the MPLS control word. Finally an additional 4-octet pseudowire label and 4-octet Packet-Switched
Network (PSN) label are added. A pseudowire label identifies the individual pseudowire inside an
MPLS (outer label) tunnel whereas a PSN label is the MPLS label used to switch a packet along the
label-switched path in the MPLS network. The intermediate LSRs may update only the PSN field.

The AAL5 SDU mode always requires an ATM address translation because neither the VPI field nor
VCI field is sent over the PWE3 and it is performed at egress of the tunnel, which can also be referred
to as the ATM egress interface. Address translation is provisioned locally, but not signalled by LDP.

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Fig. 39 ATM AAL5 Segmentation and Reassembly

Fig. 40 ATM AAL5 SDU PWE3 Encapsulation over MPLS

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6.5.8 AAL5 SDU PWE3 Mode over IP Connection

The 8600 NE supports PWE3 over the IP stack for the ATM pseudowires. The MPLS label is
replaced with an IP address and IP address is used to reach the targeted 8600 NE. The used frame
format for MPLS-in-IP is specified in [RFC4023] and shown in Fig. 41. The IPv4 Protocol Number
field value of 137 refers to the MPLS Unicast packets. Packet fragmentation does not support
MPLS-in-IP packets, and thus it is recommended to configure the MTU to be large enough to
avoid fragmentation.

Fig. 41 AAL5 SDU PWE3 Encapsulation over IP

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6.6 Cell Concatenation Strategies

By provisioning ATM services over ATM N-to-1 PWE3, the operator is facing two contradictory
dimensioning: minimizing the packet network uplink bandwidth usage due to the ATM PWE3
encapsulation tax, and keeping the latency and cell delay variation in tolerable conditions. The
figure below shows how much ATM PWE3 encapsulation (including MPLS/IP header) adds
overhead compared to the native 53 byte ATM transport. A L2 overhead is not included in the
calculations. E.g. even if an encapsulation ATM protocol to SDH/SONET frames does not provide
any additional overhead, the interface itself in SDH/SONET MS IFMs adds about 4% TDM
overhead before the 155 Mbps line rate is achieved. Similarly, the MPLS/IP-encapsulated PWE3
packet is further encapsulated with the L2/L1 header of MPLS/IP uplink such as SDH/SONET MS
IFMs PPP or Ethernet. The following figure shows that in a case of MPLS uplink the concatenation
value 4 provides all the bandwidth savings in practice. Therefore, there is no reason to use a bigger
concatenation size. In a case of an IP uplink, the concatenation value 7...10 provides all bandwidth
savings in practice.

Fig. 42 Encapsulation Efficiency of ATM PWE3 N-to-1 Cell Concatenation

If MPLS/IP uplink saving is required, e.g. due to the leased line cost reasons, the operator should
analyze which part of the traffic is delay-critical and which part of the traffic is not critical. If most
of the traffic volume is not delay-sensitive, the objective can be achieved easily by concatenating
the high volume part. Respectively, the uplink alternatives should be investigated. There may
be a chance to have expensive high QoS leased line service and cheaper low QoS leased line
services at the same time. If low QoS leased lines are used already due to the cost reasons, the cell
concatenation can be used additionally without any visible impact. If the ATM end system requires,
the burst generated by concatenation can be smoothed using a shaper in the MPLS egress node.

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If traffic of a particular VCC/VPC is very bursty but delay-critical, it is still possible to use the cell
concatenation thanks to the cell concatenation timer. The timer guarantees the latency the cell
concatenation causes for a single ATM cell. It shall be noted that the latency depends both on the
number of concatenated cells and on the PCR/SCR of the VCC/VPC. The ATM interface capacity
or IMA group size is irrelevant. The timer can be set individually for each ATM PWE3. It is
recommended to use the timer only for the ATM pseudowires which really are delay-critical. It is
not recommended to set the concatenation value to maximum (32) for all ATM pseudowires and
tune the effective concatenation size using the timer.

6.7 ATM Fault Management OAM (FM OAM)

6.7.1 ATM AIS

The ATM OAM Fault Management (FM) concept enables the operator to monitor the VPC/VCC
connectivity and helps to sectionalize the faults. In [I.610] OAM monitoring is specified in parallel
for segments and end-to-end connections. If the intermediate ATM node detects a fault which has an
impact on a specific VPC/VCC, the signal is replaced with an AIS signal to inform down stream
nodes about the fault detected already in upstream. When the endpoint of the connection/segment
detects a local failure or AIS failure, it generates a RDI indication to notify the far-end that it
has detected a fault.

The 8600 system supports the generation of VP/VC AIS in a native ATM egress interface towards
an ATM network when a LDP provisioned ATM PWE3 circuit is down on the basis of the LDP
status signalling. VP/VC AIS is generated to a native ATM interface when VPC/VCC is temporarily
provisioned to an ATM interface without associating it to the ATM PWE3 or ATM cross-connection.
The 8600 system is able to notify the far-end node using LDP status signalling (AC forward
defect) about the fault state of the VPC/VCC in the native ingress ATM port if a L1 or L2 defect
is detected in the ingress ATM port.

6.7.2 Inband ATM PWE3 OAM Message Mapping

The 8600 system supports the inband message mapping mode defined in [draft-ietf-pwe3-oam-msg-
map] for ATM PWE3. The ATM VP/VC Fault Management (FM) OAM end-to-end cells are
switched intactly between an ATM VP/VC circuit and a PWE3 tunnel. This method can be used if
the equipment at both ends of the PWE3 is able to switch FM OAM cells. The 8600 system does not
generate the FM OAM cells towards PWE3 in the case of a locally detected failure.

6.7.3 Outband ATM PWE3 OAM Message Mapping

If PE is not able to switch FM OAM cells, an outband method defined in [draft-ietf-pwe3-oam-


msg-map] can be used. The 8600 system supports LDP status signalling to monitor the connectivity
over MPLS network. However, LDP status signalling only monitors the control plane connectivity,
which may differ from the user plane path.

When VCCV BFD is activated for the ATM PWE3, it is possible to monitor the connectivity of
the PWE3 over the PSN. VCCV BFD provides much faster defect propagation from the ingress
node to the egress node and defect detection between the ingress and egress nodes than LDP.
Additionally, VCCV BFD monitors exactly the same path that the actual user plane traffic is
forwarded. When VCCV BFD detects that the connectivity is lost, it inserts AIS in the egress node
of the corresponding ATM circuit(s).

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6.8 Protection Functionality

The 8600 system supports two ways of protecting ATM traffic in the network, MSP1+1/APS1+1
and IMA protection. Both protection mechanisms work on a link layer and do not require any
configuration on an ATM switching layer. The MSP1+1/APS1+1 protection can be used with the
ATM IFM and the SDH/SONET MS IFMs when ATM circuits are configured to the interfaces.
The MSP1+1/APS1+1 protection is described in more detail in 8600 Smart Routers Interface
Configuration Guide.

An IMA group can provide link layer resiliency against failures on E1/P12s/DS1 trails, if the
individual IMA links are routed via diverse paths. The IMA link recovery mechanism takes care of
removing faulted links from a group and adding recovered links back to the group automatically.
When the minimum number of link parameters is configured to be lower than the number of IMA
links, the resiliency is provided. If the minimum number of IMA links is not available, then the
whole group is declared inoperable.

6.9 Limitations and Restrictions

This chapter provides an outline of the following limitations and restrictions with ATM and ATM
PWE3 tunneling.

• IMA group having 5 or more IMA links on 8605 Smart Router, 8607 Smart Router, 8609 Smart
Router and 8611 Smart Router may end up to “insufficient links state” and stop forward traffic
maximum for 20 seconds. This has been observed only in network applications where IMA links
are MSP/APS protected in remote 8800 NE against SDH/SONET multiplexer and IMA links are
unprotected on local 8600 NE end. The issue may occur during IMA group initialization event as
consequence of MSP/APS protection switching, if the value of SSCI (Status and Control Change
Indication field) field received by 8600 NE ATM IMA has decreased with a specific step. The
probability of this rare issue increases slightly when the number of IMA links increases. The
issue has been observed with 8800 NE IMA+MSP/APS configuration, but it may also occur with
other ATM IMA equipment.
• In 8630 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router:
• In MSP/APS protected configurations for 4xSTM-1/OC-3 ATM IFM, 4xSTM-1/OC-3 MS
IFM, 1xSTM-1/OC-3 MS IFM, 24xE1/T1 MS IFM, VCG (Virtual Circuit Group) should
not be configured, if the line card (IFC1, IFC2) of the primary interface of VCG is not
present.
• In 8605 Smart Router, 8607 Smart Router, 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router:
• This applies for ATM N-to-1 PWE3 egress frame where Preferred Control Word is present.
The [RFC4717] section 5.1.2 states that the length field of a Control Word must be zero.
However, these NEs will set bits in the length field, if the length of the PWE3 frame is
shorter than 60 bytes. There should not be any interoperability issues because [RFC4717]
also states that the receiver shall ignore the length field.
• In 8611 Smart Router:
• When more than 128 ATM pseudowires are provisioned with VCCV BFD on the 8611 Smart
Router, traffic loss during SCM switchover can exceed 300 ms on those pseudowires.

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6.10 References

[af-phy-0086.000] af-phy-0086.000 (1997–07), Inverse multiplexing for ATM (IMA)


specification version 1.0
[af-phy-0086.001] af-phy-0086.001 (1999–09), Inverse multiplexing for ATM (IMA)
specification version 1.1
[af-tm-0121.000] af-tm-0121.000 (1999–03), Traffic management specification version 4.1
[af-uni-0010.002] af-uni-0010.002 (1999–03), ATM User-Network Interface Specification
Version 3.1
[draft-ietf-pwe3-oam-msg- draft-ietf-pwe3-oam-msg-map-14.txt (2010–10), Pseudowire (PW) OAM
map] Message Mapping
[G.707] ITU-T G.707/Y.1322 (2003–12), Network node interface for the
synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH)
[G.783] ITU-T G.783 (2003–06), Characteristics of synchronous digital hierarchy
(SDH) equipment functional blocks
[G.804] ITU-T G.804 (2006–06), ATM cell mapping into plesiochronous digital
hierarchy (PDH)
[I.361] ITU-T Recommendation I.361 (1999–02), B-ISDN ATM layer
specification
[I.371] ITU-T Recommendation I.371 (2000–03), Traffic control and congestion
control in B-ISDN
[I.432.1] ITU-T Recommendation I.432.1 (1999–02), B-ISDN user-network
interface – Physical layer specification: General characteristics
[I.432.2] B-ISDN user-network interface (1999–02) , Physical layer specification:
155 520 Kbps and 622 080 Kbps operation
[I.432.3] B-ISDN user-network interface (1999–02), Physical layer specification:
1544 Kbps and 2048 Kbps operation
[I.610] ITU-T Recommendation I.610 (1999–02) , B-ISDN operation and
maintenance principles and functions
[I.732] ITU-T Recommendation I.732 (2000–10), Functional characteristics of
ATM equipment
[RFC4023] RFC4023 (2005–03), Encapsulating MPLS in IP or Generic Routing
Encapsulation (GRE)
[RFC4717] RFC4717 (2006–12), Encapsulation methods for transport of ATM over
MPLS networks
[T1.403] ANSI T1.403 (1999), Network and customer Installation interfaces - DS1
electrical interface. It defines the electrical characteristics of the physical
DS1 signal, connectors and additionally the DS1 framing format.

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7 ATM Layer Configuration Examples


It is advisable to simultaneously refer to:

• 8600 Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guide for more information on the interface config-
uration such as SDH and PDH layers;
• 8605 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for more information on the NE PDH layer
interface configuration;
• 8607 Smart RouterInterface Configuration Guide for more information on the NE PDH layer
interface configuration;
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for more information
on the NE PDH layer interface configuration.
Moreover, to avoid unnecessary configuration, see the default values in 8600 Smart Routers CLI
Commands Manual.

7.1 Configuring ATM Interface Layer (Transmission Convergence


Layer)

This example shows how to configure an ATM interface type (UNI/NNI).

Step 1 Enter the Interface Configuration mode. If the specified interface is valid for the IFM in use, the
command prompt will indicate that the Interface Configuration mode is active.
router> enable
router# config terminal
router(config)# interface so 3/0/1
Step 2 Give the interface type UNI or NNI as a parameter. NNI is used as a default.
router(cfg-if[so3/0/1])# atm if-type uni

For PDH ATM interfaces it is possible to disable ATM cell scrambler (by default ATM cell
scrambler is enabled for both E1 and T1 modes). The following command example shows how to
disable ATM scrambling. The example assumes that Time Slots Group (TSG) are already created
and port protocol set to ATM.

Step 1 Disable ATM cell scrambler to interface pdh 4/1/0 timeslot 0.


Note that if PDH ATM interface is configured to operate with IMA the command applies to all
IMA links too.
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# no atm scrambler
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# exit

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7.2 Configuring ATM Interface Level Connection and Admission


Control

This example shows how interface-specific connection and the admission control related parameters
are configured. The interface-specific configuration applies to all ATM interfaces.

Step 1 Enter the Interface Configuration mode. If the specified interface is valid for the IFM in use, the
command prompt will indicate that the Interface Configuration mode is active.
router> enable
router# config terminal
Step 2 The overbooking factor can be configured individually for each interface. Give the overbooking
factor in percentage between 0...1000. Factor 0 provides nominal bandwidth and is used as a default.
This bandwidth is used by CAC calculation while new VP connections are established.
The overbooking factor is given by following equation:
OverbookingFactor (%) = ((OverbookedBandwidth - NominalBandwidth) /
NominalBandwidth) x 100.
The Factor 1000 provides nominal bandwidth multiplied by 11, i.e.
1000 = ((11*NominalBandwidth - NominalBandwidth) / NominalBandwidth) x 100.
CAC reserves capacity from a single interface-specific bandwidth pool using equivalent bandwidth
defined for each service category.
router(config)# interface so 3/0/1
router(cfg-if[so3/0/1])# atm if-overbooking 100
Step 3 The CAC function can be disabled in each interface if needed. Disabling allows an operator
to overbook the interface infinitely.
router(cfg-if[so3/0/1])# no atm cac administration
Step 4 The CAC function is enabled again. Enabling the CAC again requires that the VP circuit reservation
conditions can be met.
router(cfg-if[so3/0/1])# atm cac administration

7.3 Configuring NE-Level CAC

This example shows how an NE-specific connection and the admission control related parameters
are configured. This applies to a CAC calculation in all interfaces in the NE.

Step 1 Give the parameters for each service category (rt-VBR, nrt-VBR, UBR+, UBR) to define equivalent
bandwidth calculation for the service categories. The setting applies to the whole NE. The default
values are recommended to be used and an operator should change the values only after careful
analysis. When using the default values, the capacity is not reserved for the UBR connections and
not for the UBR+ connections for the portion which exceeds MCR.
router(config)# atm cac p1 0 p2 0 p3 0 p4 0 p5 0 p6 0 p7 0 p8 0 p9 0 p10 0

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Values can be changed only if there are no VP terminations in the NE.


This command changes the policy how ATM circuits reserve capacity in the ATM interfaces. An
identical policy should be used in all NEs in the network to enable robust traffic management.
Careless usage of this command may lead to too conservative reservations which prevents
the circuits from being created even if there is capacity in the network or to too liberal
reservations which overbooks the network by accident. The default values are recommended.

7.4 Configuring IMA Group in SDH/SONET MS IFM

This example shows how an IMA group is created, parameters are set, and how IMA links are
added to the group in SDH/SONET MS IFM.

Step 1 Create an IMA group Nr. 0 to slot 8. The IMA group is now floating and it is not yet possible to
configure VP circuits.
router> enable
router# config terminal
router(config)# interface ima 8/0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])#
Step 2 Set the IMA frame length parameter. Set the minimum number of components in both directions.
Set the IMA version to 1.0. Set the maximum allowed differential delay to 20 ms between IMA
links. Set the IMA clock mode to ITC mode.
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima frame-length 32
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima min-links 5 5
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima version 1.0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima diff-delay 20
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima clock itc

Step 3 Configure IMA links first to be regular ATM interfaces.


router(config)# interface so 8/0/0:1:1:1
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:1:1:1])# pdh framed
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:1:1:1])# interface so 8/0/0:1:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:1:1:1:0])# pdh timeslots all
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:1:1:1:0])# port-protocol atm
Step 4 Repeat the IMA link configuration for the interfaces so 8/0/0:2:2:2 and so 8/0/0:3:3:3 as shown
in the previous step.
router(config)# interface so 8/0/0:2:2:2
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:2:2:2])# ...
Step 5 Add IMA links to the group. When the first member is added, it is possible to configure VP
connections to the group.
Note that all IMA links associated with the same IMA group shall locate in the same IFM. The IMA
links may not have configured VPCs when added to the group.
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:1:2:3])# interface ima 8/0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima member so 8/0/0:1:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima member so 8/0/0:2:2:2:0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima member so 8/0/0:3:3:3:0

Step 6 When the first member is added to the group, it is possible to configure VP connections to the group.

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router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# interface ima 8/0.400


router(cfg-if[ima8/0.400])# ...

7.5 Configuring IMA Split

This chapter shows how to configure IMA Split feature in the 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM. IMA
Split allows insertion of IMA members from different ports (0–3) on the same 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3
MS IFM. Any combination of ports or members is allowed from two up to four ports and up to 31
IMA members per group are supported.

The following configuration example will use all four ports and two VC12 (2:1:1 and 2:1:2).

The first added IMA link “primary link” has special significance in IMA Split mode. It defines
in the system the internal physical port to which all IMA data traffic is forwarded to. Therefore
when deleting the IMA group, the primary link first added to the group must be the last being
removed from the IMA group.

Step 1 This command enables the 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM in slot 7 module 0 to operate in IMA Split.
Note! By default the 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM operates in normal IMA mode. Therefore it
must be configured to operate in IMA Split mode.
router> enable
router# ifm-mode module 7/0 ima-split
Step 2 Create an IMA group 20 to slot 7.
router# config terminal
router(config)# interface ima 7/20
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])#
Step 3 Set the IMA group frame length parameter. Set the IMA version to 1.0. Set the maximum allowed
differential delay to 20 ms between IMA links. Set the IMA clock mode to ITC mode.
Note! In IMA Split mode it is not required to set the minimum number of links.
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima frame-length 32
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima version 1.0
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima diff-delay 20
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima clock itc
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# exit

Step 4 Configure IMA link in port 0 to be regular ATM interfaces using VC12 (2:1:1).
router(config)# interface so 7/0/0:2:1:1
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:1])# pdh framed
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:1])# interface so 7/0/0:2:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:1:0])# pdh timeslots all
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:1:0])# port-protocol atm
Step 5 Configure IMA link in port 0 to be regular ATM interfaces using VC12 (2:1:2).
router(config)# interface so 7/0/0:2:1:2
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:2])# pdh framed
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:2])# interface so 7/0/0:2:1:2:1
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:2:1])# pdh timeslots all
router(cfg-if[so7/0/0:2:1:2:1])# port-protocol atm

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Step 6 Repeat the configuration of IMA links for the rest of desired interfaces (so7/0/1 ... so7/0/3) as
shown in the previous two steps for both VC12.
router(config)# interface so 7/0/1:2:1:1
router(cfg-if[so7/0/1:2:1:1])#
Step 7 Add IMA links to IMA group 20. After the members are added it is now possible to make ATM
configuration within IMA group interface.
router(config)# interface ima 7/20
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/0:2:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/1:2:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/2:2:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/3:2:1:1:0
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/0:2:1:2:1
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/1:2:1:2:1
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/2:2:1:2:1
router(cfg-if[ima7/20])# atm ima member so 7/0/3:2:1:2:1

7.6 Configuring IMA Group in PDH MS Interfaces

This example shows how an IMA group is created and how IMA links are added to the group in
the PDH MS interfaces. See chapter 7.4 Configuring IMA Group in SDH/SONET MS IFM for a
detailed configuration settings of the IMA group parameters.

Step 1 Create an IMA group Nr. 0 to slot 8. The IMA group is now floating and it is not yet possible to
configure VP circuits.
router> enable
router# config terminal
router(config)# interface ima 8/0
Step 2 Set the minimum number of components in both directions. Continue to configure other IMA group
parameters if necessary as shown in 7.4 Configuring IMA Group in SDH/SONET MS IFM.
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima min-links 2 2
Step 3 Configure IMA links first to be regular ATM interfaces.
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/1
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/1])# pdh framed
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/1])# interface pdh 4/1/1:0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/1:0])# pdh timeslots all
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/1:0])# port-protocol atm
Step 4 Repeat the IMA link configuration for the interfaces pdh4/1/2 and pdh4/1/3 as shown in the previous
step.
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/2
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/2])# ...
Step 5 Add IMA links to the group. When the first member is added, it is possible to configure VP
connections to the group.
Note that all IMA links associated to the same IMA group shall locate in the same IFM. The IMA
links may not have configured VPCs when added to the group.
router(config)# interface ima 8/0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima member pdh 4/1/1:0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima member pdh 4/1/2:0
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# atm ima member pdh 4/1/3:0

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Step 6 When the first member is added to the group, it is possible to configure VP connections to the group.
router(cfg-if[ima8/0])# interface ima 8/0.400
router(cfg-if[ima8/0.400])# ...

7.7 Configuring IMA Loopback

This example shows how an IMA loopback an be activated and deactivated in the existing IMA
group in PDH MS interfaces and SDH/SONET MS IFMs.

Step 1 Activate line loop in each IMA link associated to this group.
router> enable
router# config terminal
router(config)# atm ima loopback to-line ima 3/5
Step 2 Deactivate line loop in each IMA link associated to this group. The loop is automatically deactivated
after a timeout given for the PDH interface.
router(config)# no atm ima loopback to-line ima 3/5
Step 3 Configure the timeout in minutes for the members in the group for the next loop activation.
router(config)# interface pdh 3/1/0
router(cfg-if[pdh3/1/0])# )# loopback timeout 1440
router(config)# interface pdh 3/1/1
router(cfg-if[pdh3/1/1])# )# loopback timeout 1440

7.8 Configuring VP Cross-Connection in ATM IFM

VP cross-connections are created in the 8600 system using a specific sequence of CLI commands.
The sequence consists of the following steps:

1. Identify the PWE3 circuit with a unique name (string) and system internal instance ID (integer).

2. Create VP connection points to both ATM interfaces with the desired VPI value.

3a. Set traffic parameters such as service category, PCR and CDVT for both connection points.

3b. Set both connection points to be in cross-connected mode (switched).

3c. Associate both VP connection points to the PWE3 circuit.

3d. Activate both VP connection points.

4. Set a bridge between the VP connection points, both directions separately.

The following example shows how a VP cross-connection is created between two unchannelized
interfaces located in the ATM IFM.

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Fig. 43 Example of Configuring VP Cross-Connection with CLI

Step 1 First define to the system the cross-connection entity called PWE3 circuit. This entity represents
the VP cross-connection inside the 8600 system with a unique name (vp_circuit_45) and a unique
system internal instance ID (22) number. If the name or ID is not unique in the command, the
system denies the creating of the PWE3 circuit.
Note that the circuit name is case-sensitive, the circuit is global in the NE level and it is therefore
given under Tellabs 8660 (config)# prompt.
router> enable
router# config terminal
router(config)# pwe3 circuit vp_circuit_45 22 mpls manual
Step 2 Give the first ATM interface (so12/0/3) where the VP circuit to be cross-connected is located.
Give the interface a command with a VPI (VPI=200) value to create the first new VP connection
point for the VP circuit to be cross-connected.
router(config)# interface so 12/0/3
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3])# interface so 12/0/3#atm#200
Step 3 Set the traffic parameters for the first VP connection point. Set the first VP connection point to be
cross-connected on VP level. The VP connection point is terminated as a default for VC level
cross-connection. Associate the first VP connection point to PWE3 circuit (vp_circuit_45) created
in the first set of steps. Activate the first VP connection point using the no shutdown command.

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router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm traffic-params servcat cbr confdef cbr.1


pcr 1200 1200 cdvt 1000 1000
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm usage switched
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm vp-shaping
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# pwe3 circuit vp_circuit_45
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# no shutdown

Step 4 Give the second ATM interface (so10/0/2) where the VP circuit to be cross-connected is located.
Give the interface a command with VPI (VPI= 100) value to create the second new VP connection
point for the VP circuit to be cross-connected.
router(config)# interface so 10/0/2
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2])# interface so 10/0/2#atm#100
Step 5 Set the traffic parameters for the second VP connection point. Set the second VP connection point
to be cross-connected on the VP level. The VP connection point is terminated as a default for
the VC level cross-connection. Associate the second VP connection point to the PWE3 circuit
(vp_circuit_45) created initially. Activate the second VP connection point.
Note that the VP connection point is bidirectional and contains separate parameters for both
transmit directions. The traffic parameters in two VP connection points to be cross-connected
should be identical. The circuits with asymmetric bandwidth can be configured using different
traffic parameters in different directions.
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# atm traffic-params servcat cbr confdef cbr.1
pcr 1200 1200 cdvt 1000 1000
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# atm usage switched
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# atm vp-shaping
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# pwe3 circuit vp_circuit_45
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# exit

Step 6 Set a bridge between two VP connection points in both directions to the PWE3 circuit created in
the first set of steps. The VP circuit is ready to forward traffic.
Note the configuration mode for mpls static-ftn command.
router(config)# mpls static-ftn bridge vp_circuit_45 so12/0/3#atm#200
so10/0/2#atm#100
router(config)# mpls static-ftn bridge vp_circuit_45 so10/0/2#atm#100
so12/0/3#atm#200

7.9 Deleting VP Cross-Connection in ATM IFM

VP cross-connection can be deleted by giving the create command sequence in a reverse order and
using the no option before the command line. Below is an example of how PWE3 to a circuit
association can be deleted.

Step 1 Use the no option to delete the bridge between connection points.
router(config)# no mpls static-ftn bridge vp_circuit_45 so12/0/3#atm#200
so10/0/2#atm#100
router(config)# no mpls static-ftn bridge vp_circuit_45 so10/0/2#atm#100
so12/0/3#atm#200

Step 2 Use the no option to delete the VP connection points.


router(config)# no interface so12/0/3#atm#200
router(config)# no interface so10/0/2#atm#100

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7.10 Configuring VC Cross-Connection in ATM IFM

VC cross-connections are created in the 8600 system using a specific sequence of CLI commands.
The sequence consists of the following steps:

1. Identify the PWE3 circuit with a unique name (string) and system internal instance ID (integer).

2. Create a VP connection point to both ATM interfaces with the desired VPI value, if not already
created.

3. Set the traffic parameters and usage mode for the created VP connection point, if not already
created.

4. Create the VC connection points to both VP connection points with the desired VCI value.

5a. Set the traffic parameters and usage for both VC connection points.

5b. Set both connection points to be in cross-connected mode (switched).

5c. Associate both VC connection points to a PWE3 circuit.

5d. Activate both VC connection points.

6. Set a bridge between the VC connection points, both directions separately.

The following example shows how the VC cross-connection is created between two unchannelized
ATM interfaces. The interfaces may be located anywhere in the NE.

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Fig. 44 Example of Configuring VC Cross-Connection with CLI

Step 1 First define to the system the cross-connection entity called PWE3 circuit. This entity represents
the VC cross-connection inside the 8600 system with a unique name (vp_circuit_46) and a unique
system internal instance ID (23) number. If the name or ID is not unique in the command, the
system denies the creating of the PWE3 circuit.
Note that the circuit name is case-sensitive.
router> enable
router# config terminal
router(config)# pwe3 circuit vc_circuit_46 23 mpls manual
Step 2 Create the first VP connection point (VPI=200) which carries the VC to be cross-connected. Set
traffic parameters for the VP connection points. Set the supported service categories to be UBR and
CBR. Set the mode of the VP connection point, usage=terminated.
router(config)# interface so 12/0/3
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3])# interface so 12/0/3#atm#200
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm traffic-params servcat cbr confdef cbr.1
pcr 1200 1200 cdvt 1000 1000
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm supp-serv-cat ubr
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm supp-serv-cat cbr
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# atm usage terminated

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Step 3 Create the VC connection point (VCI=2000) under the first created VP. Set traffic parameters for
the VC connection point. Set the mode of the VP connection point, usage=switched. Associate the
first VC connection point to the PWE3 circuit (vp_circuit_46) created in the first set of commands.
Activate the first VC connection point.
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200])# interface so 12/0/3#atm#200.2000
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200.2000])# atm traffic-params servcat cbr confdef
cbr.1 pcr 300 300 cdvt 1000 1000
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200.2000])# atm usage switched
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200.2000])# pwe3 circuit vc_circuit_46
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#200.2000])# no shutdown
Step 4 Repeat the second set of steps for the second VP connection point.
router(config)# interface so 10/0/2
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2])# interface so 10/0/2#atm#100
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100])# ...
Step 5 Repeat the third set of steps for the second VC connection point.
Note that the VC connection point is bidirectional and contains separate parameters for both transmit
directions. The traffic parameters in two VC connection points to be cross-connected should be
identical in one transmit direction. Circuits with asymmetric bandwidth can be configured using
different traffic parameters in different directions.
router(config)# interface so 10/0/2
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2])# interface so 10/0/2#atm#100.1000
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100.1000])# ...
Step 6 Set the association between two VP connection points in both directions to the PWE3 circuit created
in the first set of commands. The VP circuit is ready to forward traffic.
Note the configuration mode for mpls static-ftn command.
router(cfg-if[so10/0/2#atm#100.1000])# exit
router(config)# mpls static-ftn bridge vc_circuit_46 so12/0/3#atm#200.2000
so10/0/2#atm#100.1000
router(config)# mpls static-ftn bridge vc_circuit_46 so10/0/2#atm#100.1000
so12/0/3#atm#200.2000

7.11 Configuring VP Cross-Connection in SDH/SONET MS IFM

This example shows how a VP cross-connection is configured to ATM interface in the SDH/SONET
MS IFM. The configuration is identical with the ATM IFM shown in the previous examples except
for the ATM interface notation.

Step 1 Use the shown interface syntax for the chSTM-1 interface and create VPI=400 connection point.
router(config)# interface so 8/0/0:3:3:3:0#atm#400
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:3:3:3:0#atm#400])# ...
Step 2 Continue the configuration using the example for the ATM IFM.
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:3:3:3:0#atm#400])# ...

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7.12 Configuring VC Cross-Connection in SDH/SONET MS IFM

This example shows how a VC cross-connection is configured to a VP connection point in the


SDH/SONET MS IFM. The configuration is identical with the ATM IFM shown in the previous
examples except for the ATM interface notation.

Step 1 Use the shown interface syntax for the chSTM-1 interface and create VCI=100 connection point.
router(config)# interface so 8/0/0:3:3:3:0#atm#400
router(cfg-if[so8/0/0:3:3:3:0#atm#400])# interface so
8/0/0:3:3:3:0#atm#400.100

Step 2 Continue the configuration using the example for the ATM IFM.
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#400.100])# ...

7.13 Configuring VP Cross-Connection in PDH MS Interfaces

This example shows how a VP cross-connection is configured to an ATM interface in the PDH MS
interfaces. The configuration is identical with the ATM IFM shown in the previous examples
except for the ATM interface notation.

Step 1 Give the desired E1 interface and the timeslot group. Then give VPI of the VP circuit to be
cross-connected.
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# interface pdh 4/1/0:0#atm#400
Step 2 Continue the configuration using the example for the ATM IFM.
router(cfg-if[4/1/0:0#atm#400])# ...

7.14 Configuring VC Cross-Connection in PDH MS Interfaces

This example shows how a VC cross-connection is configured to an ATM interface in the PDH MS
interfaces when VP termination exists. The configuration is identical with the ATM IFM shown in
the previous examples except for the ATM interface notation.

Step 1 Give the desired E1 interface and the timeslot group. Then give VPI and VCI of the VC circuit to
be cross-connected.
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# interface pdh 4/1/0:0#atm#400.100
Step 2 Continue the configuration using the example for the ATM IFM.
router(cfg-if[4/1/0:0#atm#400.100])# ...

7.15 Configuring IP over AAL5 Interface for Routing

The 8600 system supports ATM VC circuits to be used as IP interfaces for the IP routing functions.
The following example shows how ATM VC (VCI=59) is configured to terminate AAL5 adaptation
end LLC/SNAP encapsulation.

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Step 1 Create VCI=59 under the VP circuit (VPI=40).

An IP interface with AAL5/LLC/SNAP encapsulation is available for the IP configuration and no


additional steps are needed for the ATM or AAL5 layer.

router(config)# interface so 12/0/3#atm#40.59


router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#40.59])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef
ubr.1 pcr 300 300
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#40.59])# atm usage terminated
Step 2 Use show ip interface command to verify that the created circuit is on the list of IP interfaces.

router(config)# show ip interface

7.16 Configuring ATM Circuit Using N-to-1 PWE3 over MPLS Network

The following example shows how an ATM circuit is configured to be connected over the MPLS
network using PWE3 tunneling. The example focuses on the ATM circuit and the ATM PWE3
configuration. The general configuration of MPLS interfaces and related routing protocols is not
completely covered in this example. Default N-to-1 ATM PWE3 tunneling mode is used. The
pseudowire performs also address-translation VPI 40 <-> 2000 in both NEs in the egress direction as
shown in the figure below. The original VPI value traverses intactly over the PWE3 to the far-end.
To interoperate the MPLS system with other vendors, it is important to check that the address
translation method in both systems works properly.

Fig. 45 ATM VP Service with Address Translation over MPLS Network Using ATM PWE3

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Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit in the NE with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID. Use LDP to signal the
LSP using the best effort traffic class inside an MPLS network to the target node 10.123.100.223.
Note that the circuit name and ID are unique in the scope of a single NE and the ID is identical
at both ends of the PWE3.
router-103(config)# pwe3 circuit my_vp_path_1 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.223 vc-qos
be

Step 2 If there is a label switch router in between the NEs, configure the address of the target peer router
for the LDP process. If NEs are directly connected, this step can be skipped. Note that all detailed
configurations to get LDP running are not shown in this step.
router-103(config)# router ldp
router-103(cfg-ldp)# targeted-peer 10.123.100.223
router-103(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Set a router ID address for the NE. Create an OSPF process and associate at least one uplink
interface to the OSPF process. Set a local router ID address to be advertised by the OSPF routing
process. Note that all detailed configurations to get OSPF running are not shown in this step.
router-103(config)# router-id 10.123.100.103
router-103(config)# router ospf 1
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 10.123.100.103/32 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# exit
Step 4 Create a VP circuit VPI= 40 to the E1 interface pdh3/1/3:0 and configure traffic parameters. Set
a VP connection point to switched mode and associate it to the PWE3 circuit created in the first
set of steps.
After no shutdown the LDP starts to signal LSP to the target node.
router-103(config)# interface pdh 3/1/3:0#atm#40
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef
ubr.1 pcr 300 300
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm usage switched
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm vp-shaping
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# pwe3 circuit my_vp_path_1
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# no shutdown
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# exit

Step 5 Repeat the first four sets of steps for the second NE Node-223.
router–223(config)# pwe3 circuit your_vp_path_2 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.103
vc-qos be
router–223(config)# ...
Step 6 Show the status of the created LSPs and pseudowires at both ends.
router–223(config)# show ldp pwe3
router–103(config)# show ldp pwe3

In 8600 NE continuous connectivity verification of PWE3 is supported by enabling VCCV BFD.


VCCV BFD configuration examples are covered in 8600 Smart Routers Test and Measurement
Configuration Guide.

The following command is used to display information about forwarding entries currently used
by configured PWE3.

Step 1 Use this command to display information on currently used forwarding entries in PWE3.
router–103(config)# show pwe3 forwarding-table

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PWE3 Forwarding Table


PWE3 Name: my_vp_path_1
PWE3 Interface: pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40
PWE3 Type: LDP PWE3
Inner Label: 87254
VC-QoS: be
PWE3 Destination: 10.123.100.103
Outer LSP Type: RSVP E-LSP 51-212 primary
Nexthop address: 192.168.4.212
Outer Label: 87044
Outgoing Interface: so4/1/4

7.17 Configuring ATM Circuit Using AAL5 SDU PWE3 over MPLS
Network

The following example shows how an ATM circuit carrying AAL5 traffic is configured to be
connected over the MPLS network using AAL5 SDU PWE3 tunneling. The example focuses on
the ATM circuit and the ATM PWE3 configuration. The general configuration of MPLS interfaces
and related routing protocols is not completely covered in this example. The pseudowire performs
also address translation VPI 40 <-> 2000 , VCI 400 <-> 4000 in both NEs in the egress direction as
shown in the figure below. The AAL5 SDU PWE3 do not carry VPI/VCI information not at all.

Fig. 46 ATM VC AAL5 Service over MPLS Network Using ATM AAL5 SDU PWE3

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Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit in the NE with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID. Use LDP to signal the
LSP using the best effort traffic class inside an MPLS network to the target node 10.123.100.223.
Note that the circuit name and ID are unique in the scope of a single NE and the ID is identical
at both ends of the PWE3.

router-103(config)# pwe3 circuit my_vc_sdu_1 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.223 vc-qos


be

Step 2 If there is a label switch router in between the NEs, configure the address of the target peer router for
the LDP process. If the NEs are directly connected, this step can be skipped. Note that all detailed
configurations to get LDP running are not shown in this step.

router-103(config)# router ldp


router-103(cfg-ldp)# targeted-peer 10.123.100.223
router-103(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Set a router ID address for the NE. Create an OSPF process and associate at least one uplink
interface to the OSPF process. Set a local router ID address to be advertised by the OSPF routing
process. Note that all detailed configurations to get OSPF running are not shown in this step.

router-103(config)# router-id 10.123.100.103


router-103(config)# router ospf 1
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 10.123.100.103/32 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# exit
Step 4 Create a VP circuit VPI= 40 to the E1 interface pdh3/1/3:0 and configure traffic parameters. Set a
VP connection point to terminated mode.

router-103(config)# interface pdh 3/1/3:0#atm#40


router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef
ubr.1 pcr 300 300
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm usage terminated
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# no shutdown
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# exit
Step 5 Create a VP circuit VCI= 400 to the E1 interface pdh3/1/3:0 and configure traffic parameters. Set
a VC connection point to terminated mode and AAL5 layer to switched mode. Associate the VC
interface to the PWE3 circuit created in the first set of steps.

After no shutdown the LDP starts to signal LSP to the target node.

router-103(config)# interface pdh 3/1/3:0#atm#40.400


router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef
ubr.1 pcr 100 100
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm usage terminated
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# atm usage aal5-sdu switched
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# pwe3 circuit my_vc_sdu_1
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# no shutdown
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/1/3:0#atm#40])# exit

Step 6 Repeat the first four sets of steps for the second NE Node-223.

router–223(config)# pwe3 circuit your_vc_sdu_2 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.103 vc-qos


be
router–223(config)# ...
Step 7 Show the status of the created LSPs and pseudowires at both ends.

router–223(config)# show ldp pwe3


router–103(config)# show ldp pwe3

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In 8600 NE continuous connectivity verification of PWE3 is supported by enabling VCCV BFD.


VCCV BFD configuration examples are covered in 8600 Smart Routers Test and Measurement
Configuration Guide.

7.18 Configuring ATM Cell Concatenation

The 8600 system supports cell concatenation for the ATM PWE3 connections. The following
example shows how concatenation is configured to the end of the PWE3 circuit. The configuration
is done independently for both ends of the PWE3 circuit.

Step 1 Create VCI=59 under the VP circuit (VPI=40).


router(config)# interface so 12/0/3#atm#40.59
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#40.59])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef
ubr.1 pcr 300 300
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#40.59])# atm usage switched
Step 2 Set the maximum number of concatenated cells in one PWE3 packet to 32 and the concatenation
timeout timer to 5000 us. After the configuration maximum 32 cells are packed to one PWE3 frame
in transmit direction while PWE3 packet of 32 cells can be reassembled.
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#40.59])# atm cell-concatenation 32 5000

7.19 Configuring ATM Egress Buffer Size

The 8600 system supports configuring the egress buffer size for the scheduled VP and VC circuits.
The following example shows how the egress buffer size is configured to the existing VP circuit.

Step 1 Set the egress buffer size to 1500 cells.


router(config)# interface so 12/0/3#atm#40
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#40])# atm egress-buffer-size 1500

7.20 Configuring N-to-1 (N>1) ATM PWE3 and Address Translation

This example shows how VPC is associated to an N-to-1 virtual circuit group and how address
translation can be done towards ATM PWE3.

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Fig. 47 Address Translation in N-to-1 (N>1) ATM PWE3 Configuration

Step 1 Create first VP with VPI=20.


router(config)# interface so 12/0/3#atm#20
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#20])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef ubr.1
pcr 300 300
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#20])# atm usage unbound
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#20])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#20])# exit
Step 2 Create second VP with VPI=21.
router(config)# interface so 12/0/3#atm#21
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#21])# atm traffic-params servcat ubr confdef ubr.1
pcr 300 300
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#21])# atm usage unbound
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#21])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[so12/0/3#atm#21])# exit
Step 3 Create a Virtual Circuit Group (VCG) for the circuit to be forwarded over the same ATM PWE3.
router(cfg-if)# interface vcg 12/1
router(cfg-if[vcg12/1])#
Step 4 Add the circuits with address translation options to the created VCG. If more VPCs are to be
configured to the same PWE3, repeat the steps 2 and 4. Note that address translation may never
merge several circuits to a single circuit.
router(cfg-if[vcg12/1])# atm vcg member so12/0/3#atm#20 vp 0 0
Step 5 Associate VCG to PWE3 named as my_vp_vcg_1.
Repeat steps 3, 4 and 5 for the second PWE3 and VPC.
router(cfg-if[vcg12/1])# pwe3 circuit my_vp_vcg_1
router(cfg-if[vcg12/1])# no shutdown

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To configure the VCGs at both ends of the PWE3 circuit see chapter 7.16 Configuring ATM Circuit
Using N-to-1 PWE3 over MPLS Network for LDP and generic PWE3 configuration and setup. The
peer VCGs are associated together with pwe3 circuit command.

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8 TDM Overview
This section gives an overview of the Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) features supported by the
8600 system. The emphasis is on the TDM network applications and the TDM-specific functions
which are common for all types of TDM interfaces in the 8600 NEs. Refer to:

• 8600 Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guide for the Interface Module (IFM) specific func-
tionality;
• 8605 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for the NE interfaces specific functionality;
• 8607 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for the NE interfaces and physical line modules
specific functionality;
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for the NE interfaces
and physical line modules specific functionality.

8.1 Network Applications

Due to the perceived service and network convergence into packet-based technologies, there is
a substantial amount of work in progress in different standards bodies regarding the support of
packet-based voice and Layer 1 circuit emulation applications. Such capabilities are already
needed in many emerging network applications, such as emulation of TDM-based voice trunks in
business services networks, packet network based mobile transport applications, and local TDM
cross-connections between different TDM interfaces of packet-based network elements.

8.1.1 Local TDM Cross-Connections

The 8600 network elements support statically configured, MPLS-based TDM pseudowires between
local TDM ports. Since local TDM pseudowires do not traverse a packet-switched network, which
may often cause unpredictable packet delay variations, their delay characteristics can also be
optimized for enabling as efficient emulation of native TDM cross-connections as possible.

8.1.2 Mobile Access Backhaul

As discussed in the ATM chapters, ATM pseudowires are often used in the UMTS Release 99 based
mobile networks. As 2G and 3G base stations often reside in the same location, it makes sense to
utilize the same transport network also for 2G traffic. Especially the emerging Metro Ethernet
networks and services are currently becoming increasingly popular as the main candidates for the
next generation of mobile backhaul transport infrastructure.

The following figure illustrates a typical 8600 system 3G and 2G mobile backhaul application. A
packet network can be either Ethernet or IP/MPLS network. The same backhaul infrastructure can
often also be used for some fixed network applications, e.g. ATM pseudowire based DSLAM
aggregation.

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Fig. 48 3G and 2G Mobile Backhaul with DSLAM Aggregation

8.2 PWE3 Tunnelling

The IETF has specified the most popular tunnelling protocols for enabling interoperable PDH
and SONET/SDH emulation over packet-based networks. These include two alternative methods
for tunnelling structured (NxDS0) signals, and one method for structure-agnostic (E1/T1/E3/T3)
signals. In the structure agnostic mode, the TDM circuit is regarded as a pure bit stream with no
account taken of any potentially existing framing structures within the signal.

8.2.1 SAToP

From the operational point of view, the most straightforward TDM tunnelling mode supported by
the 8600 system is Structure-Agnostic Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) over Packet (SAToP)
[RFC4553] for T1 and E1 services. It is particularly suitable for such network applications where
the Provider Edge (PE) has no need to participate in the TDM signalling functions.

The configuration range and default TDM payload sizes for SAToP packets are the following:

• E1: 32..1024 bytes in steps of 32 bytes, with a default value of 256 bytes
• T1: 48..1008 bytes in steps of 24 bytes, with a default value of 192 bytes
For SAToP pseudowires, the packetization delay can be calculated by the formula:

Delay (milliseconds) = L/S, where

L = payload size (bits)

S = speed of the emulated service (kbps)

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Thus, the packetization delay with the default SAToP payload sizes is as follows:

• E1 delay = 1 millisecond
• T1 delay = 1 millisecond

8.2.2 CESoPSN

For such cases, where NxDS0 circuit emulation is needed, the 8600 NEs support Structure-aware
TDM Circuit Emulation Service over Packet-Switched Network (CESoPSN) [RFC5086]. In this
mode, a user-defined group of 64k TDM timeslots from physical E1/T1 interfaces, or P12s/DS1
ports within chSTM-1/chOC-3 interfaces, can be selected for pseudowire transport. Only the basic
NxDS0 services are supported, i.e. CESoPSN pseudowires without the optional Channel Associated
Signalling (CAS) extensions.

The TDM payload size configuration range for CESoPSN packets without CAS is 2...1024 bytes
and the maximum supported packetization delay 8 milliseconds. The payload size of a NxDS0
pseudowire is always M*N bytes, where M is the number of consecutive 125 microsecond TDM
frames that the N timeslots will be picked from. As an example, with a packetization delay of 5
milliseconds, the value of M is 40 consecutive 125 microsecond TDM frames.

The default payload sizes and packetization delays for different size NxDS0 TDM circuits are:

• N = 1: 40 bytes with 5 millisecond packetization delay


• 2 <= N <= 4: 32*N bytes with 4 millisecond packetization delay
• N >= 5: 8*N bytes with 1 millisecond packetization delay

Limitations and Restrictions

The following are known restrictions and limitations with CESoPSN.

• In 8605 Smart Router, 8607 Smart Router, 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router, a CE-
SoPSN PWE3 circuit and attachment circuit statistics are not incriminating for a PWE3, which
is first signaled via LDP and then LDP signaling is removed and PWE3 is re-established using
a static PWE3 configuration. Counters will increment again after a shutdown / no shutdown
command is given to the interface. A recommended correct procedure is to delete the timeslot
group and re-create it before configuring static mode PWE3.

8.2.3 Packetization and Jitter Buffering

Once the pseudowire has been set up, the 8600 network elements start encapsulating the TDM
data inside SAToP or CESoPSN packets, which are also marked with the appropriate pseudowire
control word information, including a packet sequence number. The default SAToP and CESoPSN
encapsulation in the 8600 NEs is MPLS based, but also CESoPSN over IP encapsulation is
supported (8.2.4 IP/UDP Encapsulation). This may be needed if the network is not MPLS based, or
in case e.g. the base station equipment itself supports CESoPSN with the IP based encapsulation.

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After the TDM data has been encapsulated, the resulting packet is then transported over the
packet-switched network. In the egress direction, the pseudowire encapsulation is terminated,
and prior to being played out onto the egress attachment circuit, the TDM data first is stored into
a jitter buffer. The jitter buffer is needed for absorbing the packet delay variation caused by the
packet-switched network, and also for minimizing the effects of potential packet losses and/or packet
reordering. The target depth of the jitter buffer can be configured by the user, in order to better match
the expected packet delay variation profile of a particular packet-switched network. The payloads of
any packets lost in the network, arriving too late to make their in-sequence play out slot, or carrying
invalid payload data, are replaced with a corresponding amount of user-selectable replacement data.

The default for the replacement data is a locally generated all-ones bit pattern, which also
corresponds to the TDM Alarm Indication Signal (AIS), but the user can also optionally specify any
other 8-bit idle pattern to be used instead. For SAToP pseudowires, it is also possible to configure
a timeout value, after which the user-configured idle pattern is replaced with the all-ones pattern.
Instead of locally generated replacement data, E1 SAToP pseudowires also support optional use of
previously received TDM frames as the replacement data, thus enabling better preservation of the
basic E1 frame synchronization during short duration anomalies (multi-frame synchronization is
lost).

Network performance-wise, the most important TDM emulation parameters in the 8600 system are
in practise the payload size and the jitter buffer target depth. The bandwidth efficiency of TDM
pseudowire transport highly depends on the emulated service, the chosen payload size, and the
overhead caused by the pseudowire protocol encapsulation. Thus, the 8600 system default is the
most bandwidth-optimized TDM pseudowire type, i.e. MPLS-based TDM pseudowires without
the optional Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header. In general, the bigger the payload size is,
the better is also the bandwidth efficiency. However, another performance parameter affected by
the payload size is the packetization delay, and thus the choice of the payload size is typically a
trade-off between the two performance parameters.

The maximum supported delay of the jitter buffer (for both the target and maximum delay) with all
packet sizes is 32 x packetization latency. With the maximum supported packetization latency of 8
milliseconds, this results in a 256 millisecond maximum JB delay. The minimum allowed target
depth value is equal to the packetization latency. However, note that since the jitter buffer target
actually sets the number of TDM emulation packets that must be received prior starting to play out
the TDM bits to the TDM attachment circuit, the setting always has to be an integer multiple of the
used packetization delay. In fact, from the point of view of individual TDM frames, the jitter buffer
actually also absorbs the delay variation caused by the ingress packetization function, so the jitter
buffer delay is actually the dominating component of the whole end-to-end delay budget.

Also the default values for the jitter buffer target depth depend on the packetization delay, as shown
below.

Packetization Delay (Microseconds) Default Target (Microseconds)


125 – 250 500
375 – 1500 3000
1625 – 8000 2 x Packetization latency

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By default, the total size (and consequently also the maximum delay) of the jitter buffer is two
times the configured target. As an example, for a target setting of 10000 microseconds, the 8600
NE automatically sets the maximum jitter buffering delay to 20000 microseconds. However, if that
happens to be too large a portion of the total end-to-end delay budget in some latency sensitive
network application, it is also possible to configure the maximum delay introduced by the jitter
buffer to a lower value. In the 10000 microsecond target case, the maximum delay could e.g.
be configured to 15000 microseconds, to make sure that the delay introduced by the jitter buffer
always stays within 15000 microsecond bounds.

8.2.4 IP/UDP Encapsulation

In case of an MPLS based network and encapsulation, identification of the packets belonging to
the same connection is based on the pseudowire label and the PSN label information. However, in
case of an IP based network and encapsulation, there are no MPLS shim headers or labels in the
packet. Instead, the connection identifiers are:

• IP destination address
• IP source address
• UDP destination port number, and
• Optionally also UDP source port number.
Both encapsulations operate without the optional Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP) header.

CESoPSN over UDP/IP is supported in the following Multiservice Interface Modules:

• 1xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM
• 4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 MS IFM
• 24xchE1/chT1 MS IFM

8.2.5 Adaptive Jitter Buffering

The 8600 NEs also support an optional jitter buffer mode called Adaptive Jitter Buffering (AJB).
In the adaptive mode, the jitter buffer automatically adapts to any perceived changes in the PSN
latency characteristics. There are three user-configurable delay-thresholds for controlling the AJB
operating range:

• Minimum delay
• Target delay
• Maximum delay

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Fig. 49 Adaptive Jitter Buffer Delay Thresholds

The buffer adjustment decisions are made by observing the current buffer delay and comparing it
against the minimum, target, and maximum delay thresholds. The idea is to keep the buffer delay
between the minimum and target delay thresholds, and each time the delay goes either under the
minimum or above the target, a delay threshold crossing is counted.

Each maximum delay threshold crossing is effectively an overflow, and will thus directly result
in an immediate buffer adjustment, but in the case of the minimum and target delay thresholds,
the number of delay threshold crossings over user-configurable observation period is used as the
decision criteria. If the current delay during the minimum delay observation period too often
goes under the minimum delay threshold, the jitter buffer filling level is deemed insufficient for
preventing underruns from happening, and will thus be automatically increased. Likewise, if the
current delay during the target delay observation period too often goes above the target delay, and
there are also no minimum delay crossings during the same observation period, the jitter buffer delay
is deemed to be unnecessarily high, and will thus be automatically reduced.

The buffer delay and filling level is decreased by skipping some data units in the buffer, resulting
in loss of some data in the client TDM signal, and increased by sending out replacement data
instead of available buffer data while still continuing to receive new data from the PSN, thus
causing the delay and filling level of the buffer to increase. For as-good-as-possible preservation of
TDM framing integrity, the buffer adjustments are always carried out as even multiples of the E1
or T1 frame length.

The following table shows the AJB configurable parameters and their ranges used to control the
AJB operation behavior.

AJB Configurable Parameters and Ranges


Parameter Description Range Default
max-delay Maximum delay 1..20 milliseconds 4 milliseconds
min-delay Minimum delay 0..2000 microseconds 200 microseconds
min-delay- Minimum delay 1..1000 minutes 15 minutes
integration integration time

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Parameter Description Range Default


min-delay- Limit for minimum delay 1..1000 5
threshold threshold crossing events
during integration time
target-delay Target delay 1..20 milliseconds 3 milliseconds
target-delay- Target delay integration 1..1000 minutes 30 minutes
integration time
target-delay- Limit for target delay 1..1000 5
threshold threshold crossing events
during integration time

8.2.6 Limitations and Restrictions

This chapter provides an outline of the following limitations and restrictions with TDMPWE3
tunnelling.

• In 8611 Smart Router and 8660 Smart Router:


• When more than 128 TDM PWE3s are provisioned with VCCV BFD on the Tellabs 8611
smart router, the traffic cut during SCM switch-over can exceed 300ms on those PWE3s.

8.3 Pseudowire Synchronization

In addition to the Synchronous Network Scenarios described in IETF's Requirements for


Edge-to-Edge Emulation of TDM Circuits over Packet Switching Networks [RFC4197], the 8600
NEs also support the required packet-based clock recovery functionality for supporting the Adaptive
Network Scenario. In adaptive clock recovery, the service clock of the TDM attachment circuit is
derived from the arrival rate of the TDM emulation packets, and special filtering algorithms are used
for minimizing the affect of the packet delay variation on the phase stability of the recovered clock.

The higher the packet rate per second is, the better is typically the performance of the adaptive
clock recovery feature, especially during periods of increased network congestion and packet delay
variation. Thus, when choosing the packet size of a TDM pseudowire, there is always also a trade-off
between the bandwidth efficiency and the adaptive clock recovery performance to be considered.

The adaptive clock recovery feature has to be enabled individually for each required TDM interface.
In case several NxDS0 pseudowires terminate on the same interface, one of them has to be also
administratively chosen as the master clock source for that interface. In addition to the interface
terminating the TDM pseudowire itself, it is also possible to synchronize other interfaces within the
same interface module to the same adaptive timing source. This kind of configuration can be used
e.g. for synchronizing interfaces terminating ATM pseudowire traffic at the cell sites, since the ATM
pseudowires themselves do not carry any network synchronization information.

For more information on the operation of adaptive timing, its relationship with jitter buffering, and
on the other 8600 system functionality for synchronizing packet based networks, refer to 8600 Smart
Routers Synchronization Configuration Guide.

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8.4 TDM Pseudowire OAM (L, M, R)

The L, M and R bits (located in pseudowire Control Word) used for TDM PWE3 OAM are specified
in [RFC4553] for SAToP PWE3 and in [RFC5086] for CESoPSN PWE3. The L-bit, if set indicates
that TDM data carried in the payload is invalid. The replacement data used when L bit is received
is user-configurable, but the optional payload suppression feature in the transmitting side is not
supported. The M-bits forming the 2-bit modifier field are used in CESoPSN only for carrying
RDI of the attachment circuit across the PSN. Since only basic NxDS0 Services without CAS
are supported, there is no need for discrimination of signalling packets based on the M-bits. The
R-bit, if set by the PSN-bound Interworking Function (IWF) indicates that its local CE-bound IWF
is in the packet loss state.

8.5 References

[RFC4197] RFC4197 (2005–10), Requirements for Edge-to-Edge Emulation of


Time Division Multiplexed (TDM) Circuits over Packet Switching
Networks
[RFC4553] RFC4553 (2006–06), Structure-Agnostic Time Division Multiplexing
(TDM) over Packet (SAToP)
[RFC5086] RFC5086 (2007–12), Structure-Aware TDM Circuit Emulation Service
over PSN (CESoPSN)

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9 TDM Cross-Connection and Tunnelling


Configuration Examples
It is advisable to simultaneously refer to:

• 8600 Smart Routers Interface Configuration Guide for more information on the interface config-
uration such as SDH and PDH layers;
• 8605 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for more details on the interface configuration
of the PDH layer;
• 8607 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for more details on the interface configuration
of the PDH layer;
• 8609 Smart Router and 8611 Smart Router Interface Configuration Guide for more details on the
interface configuration of the PDH layer.
Moreover, to avoid unnecessary configuration, see the default values in 8600 Smart Routers CLI
Commands Manual.

9.1 Configuring Local T1 Cross-Connections

This example shows how an internal T1 cross-connection is configured between a native T1 PDH
port and a channelized OC-3 SONET port within a single 8600 network element.

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Fig. 50 Local Internal Cross-Connection

Step 1 First define to the system the cross-connection entity called PWE3 circuit. This entity represents the
cross-connection inside the 8600 system with a unique name (t1_circuit_1) and a unique system
internal instance ID (23) number. If the name or ID is not unique in the command, the system
denies the creation of the PWE3 circuit.
router(config)# pwe3 circuit t1_circuit_1 23 mpls manual
Step 2 Configure both T1 connection points. For structure agnostic circuits, the ports are set to connected
mode, i.e. the T1 framing structure is not terminated. Since the PWE3 circuit is used for internal
cross-connection purposes, delays can in practise be optimized by configuring a considerably
smaller payload size and jitter buffer settings than the default values. However, since the minimum
supported T1 SAToP payload size of 48 bytes corresponds to 250 microseconds of TDM data, the
default value for the jitter buffer target is 500 microseconds, and there is no need to explicitly adjust
the target through the CLI.
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh usage connected
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh pwe3 payload-size 48
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pwe3 circuit t1_circuit_1
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# exit
router(config)# interface so 10/0/0:1:1:1
router(cfg-if[so10/0/0:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router(cfg-if[so10/0/0:1:1:1])# pdh pwe3 payload-size 48
router(cfg-if[so10/0/0:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit t1_circuit_1

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router(cfg-if[so10/0/0:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[so10/0/0:1:1:1])# exit
Step 3 Finally, set the association between the two T1 connection points in both directions of the PWE3
circuit created in the first step.
router(config)# mpls static-ftn bridge t1_circuit_1 pdh 4/1/0 so 10/0/0:1:1:1
router(config)# mpls static-ftn bridge t1_circuit_1 so 10/0/0:1:1:1 pdh 4/1/0

9.2 Configuring E1 SAToP Tunnelling over Wide Area IP/MPLS


Network

The following example shows how an E1 circuit is configured to be connected over an IP/MPLS
wide area network using PWE3 SAToP tunnelling, with a focus on the CLI commands needed for
establishing pseudowire connectivity over the packet-switched network. The example uses the
default setting for the E1 SAToP payload size (i.e. 256 bytes), but the jitter buffer target depth is
adjusted to 5000 microseconds in order to better match the latency characteristics of the IP/MPLS
WAN core. Note that the general configuration of the MPLS interfaces and the related routing
protocols is also not completely covered in this example. For additional details refer to 8600 Smart
Routers MPLS Applications Configuration Guide and 8600 Smart Routers Routing Protocols
Configuration Guide.

Fig. 51 E1 SAToP PWE3 over IP/MPLS PSN

Node-103 configuration:

Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit in the Node-103 with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID. Use LDP to
setup the required pseudowire label bindings, and use the expedited forwarding traffic class for
carrying the TDM circuit through the MPLS network to the target node 10.123.100.223.
Note that the PWE3 circuit name and the ID are unique within the scope of a single NE, and that the
ID also has to be identical at both ends of the PWE3.
router-103(config)# pwe3 circuit ldp-satop-1 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.223 vc-qos
ef

Step 2 Configure the address of target peer router for the LDP process.
Note that the required configurations for label switching and LDP running on the PSN trunk
interfaces are not shown in this example.

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router-103(config)# router ldp


router-103(cfg-ldp)# targeted-peer 10.123.100.223
router-103(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF process and associate the PSN trunk interface to the OSPF process.
router-103(config)# router-id 10.123.100.103
router-103(config)# router ospf 1
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 10.123.100.103/32 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 192.168.4.0/24 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# exit
Step 4 For structure agnostic tunnelling, the TDM interface is set to connected mode, i.e. the TDM framing
structure is not terminated.
Note that the jitter buffer target setting always has to be a multiple of the packetization delay, which
for the default E1 payload size of 256 bytes is 1000 microseconds. After no shutdown, LDP starts
the pseudowire setup signalling to the target node.
router-103(config)# interface pdh 3/0/3
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/0/3])# pdh usage connected
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/0/3])# pdh pwe3 jitter-buffer 5000
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/0/3])# pwe3 circuit ldp-satop-1
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/0/3])# no shutdown
router-103(cfg-if[pdh3/0/3])# exit

Node-223 configuration:

Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit in the Node-223 with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID. Use LDP to
setup the required pseudowire label bindings, and use the expedited forwarding traffic class for
carrying the TDM circuit through the MPLS network to the target node 10.123.100.103.
router-223(config)# pwe3 circuit ldp-satop-1 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.103 vc-qos
ef

Step 2 Configure the address of target peer router for the LDP process.
router-223(config)# router ldp
router-223(cfg-ldp)# targeted-peer 10.123.100.103
router-223(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF process and associate the PSN trunk interface to the OSPF process.
router-223(config)# router-id 10.123.100.223
router-223(config)# router ospf 1
router-223(cfg-ospf[1])# network 10.123.100.223/32 area 0
router-223(cfg-ospf[1])# network 192.168.4.0/24 area 0
router-223(cfg-ospf[1])# exit
Step 4 For structure agnostic tunnelling, the TDM interface is set to connected mode, i.e. the TDM framing
structure is not terminated.
After no shutdown, LDP starts the pseudowire setup signalling to the target node.
router-223(config)# interface so 2/0/2:1:1:1
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/2:1:1:1])# pdh usage connected
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/2:1:1:1])# pdh pwe3 jitter-buffer 5000
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/2:1:1:1])# pwe3 circuit ldp-satop-1
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/2:1:1:1])# no shutdown
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/2:1:1:1])# exit

To verify the status of the created LSPs and PWE3, use the show ldp pwe3 command.

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In 8600 NEs continuous connectivity verification of PWE3 is supported by enabling VCCV BFD.
VCCV BFD configuration details are covered in 8600 Smart Routers Test and Measurement
Configuration Guide.

9.3 Configuring NxDS0 CESoPSN Mobile Backhaul over Metro


Ethernet with Adaptive Timing

The following example shows how an NxDS0 circuit is configured to be connected over
an IP/MPLS-enabled Metro Ethernet network, when using PWE3 CESoPSN tunnelling for
latency-sensitive mobile backhaul applications. Again, the focus is on the CLI commands needed
for establishing pseudowire connectivity over the packet-switched network, assuming that basic
connectivity between the 8600 network elements has already been established, so it should be
noted that the general configuration of the MPLS interfaces and the related routing protocols is
not completely covered. For additional details refer to 8600 Smart Routers MPLS Applications
Configuration Guide and 8600 Smart Routers Routing Protocols Configuration Guide.

In order to meet the rather strict end-to-end delay budget requirements associated with some mobile
backhaul scenarios, the example uses rather tightly engineered packetization delay and jitter
buffering settings, i.e. the delay introduced by the jitter buffer is kept within 3000 microsecond
bounds under all network conditions. Furthermore, adaptive timing is used in the BTS facing 8605
Smart Router, both for the physical CESoPSN attachment circuit, and also for a pre-configured ATM
attachment circuit. Thus, the example focuses on the NxDS0 CESoPSN configuration.

Fig. 52 NxDS0 CESoPSN PWE3 over Metro Ethernet with Adaptive Timing

Node-103 configuration:

Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit in the element with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID. Use LDP to setup
the required pseudowire label bindings, and use the expedited forwarding traffic class for carrying
the TDM circuit through the Metro Ethernet network to the target node 10.123.100.223.

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router-103(config)# pwe3 circuit ldp-cesopsn-1 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.223 vc-qos


ef

Step 2 Configure the address of the target peer router for the LDP process. Note that the required
configurations for label switching and LDP running on the PSN trunk interfaces are not shown
in this example.
router-103(config)# router ldp
router-103(cfg-ldp)# targeted-peer 10.123.100.223
router-103(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF process and associate the PSN trunk interface to the OSPF process.
router-103(config)# router-id 10.123.100.103
router-103(config)# router ospf 1
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 10.123.100.103/32 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 192.168.4.0/24 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# exit
Step 4 In the CESoPSN case, the TDM interface is set to framed mode.
router-103(config)# interface pdh 1/0
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh framed
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# exit
Step 5 Timeslot group 0 is created and timeslots 1 to 10 are chosen for pseudowire transport. The default
NxDS0 CESoPSN payload size for N=10 is 8*10 = 80 bytes. Again, the jitter buffer target setting
has to be a multiple of the packetization delay, which in the N=10 case is 1000 microseconds by
default, so a target of 2000 microseconds is chosen. The default maximum delay setting of twice
the target delay is also overridden, in order to keep the jitter buffer delay within 3000 microsecond
bounds under any network conditions. After no shutdown, LDP starts the pseudowire setup
signalling to the target node.
router-103(config)# interface pdh 1/0:0
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pdh timeslots 1 - 10
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pdh usage connected
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pdh pwe3 jitter-buffer 2000 max 3000
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pwe3 circuit ldp-cesopsn-1
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# no shutdown
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# exit
Step 6 The CESoPSN pseudowire carrying timeslot group 0 is chosen as the adaptive timing source for the
interface. If SAToP was used, there would be only one pseudowire terminating on the interface, and
thus there would be no need to indicate any selection of the adaptive timing source.
router-103(config)# interface pdh 1/0
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh adaptive-timing local pdh 1/0:0
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# exit
Step 7 The same adaptive timing source can also be used for synchronizing other physical interfaces, but
only within the same interface module. In this example, interface pdh1/1 used for ATM pseudowire
tunneling will also receive its timing from the created CESoPSN pseudowire. For instructions on
configuring ATM pseudowires, refer to the ATM chapters.
router-103(config)# interface pdh 1/1
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/1])# pdh adaptive-timing local pdh 1/0:0
router-103(cfg-if[pdh1/1])# exit

Node-223 configuration:

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Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit in the Node-223 with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID. Use LDP to
setup the required pseudowire label bindings, and use the expedited forwarding traffic class for
carrying the TDM circuit through the MPLS network to the target node 10.123.100.103.
router-223(config)# pwe3 circuit ldp-cesopsn-1 103 mpls ldp 10.123.100.103 vc-qos
ef

Step 2 Configure the address of target peer router for the LDP process.
router-223(config)# router ldp
router-223(cfg-ldp)# targeted-peer 10.123.100.103
router-223(cfg-ldp)# exit
Step 3 Create an OSPF process and associate the PSN trunk interface to the OSPF process.
router-223(config)# router-id 10.123.100.223
router-223(config)# router ospf 1
router-223(cfg-ospf[1])# network 10.123.100.223/32 area 0
router-103(cfg-ospf[1])# network 192.168.4.0/24 area 0
router-223(cfg-ospf[1])# exit
Step 4 In the case of CESoPSN the TDM interface is set to framed mode.
router-223(config)# interface so 2/0/1:1:1:1
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1])# pdh framed
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1])# exit
Step 5 Timeslot group 0 is created and timeslots 1 to 10 are chosen for pseudowire transport. The default
NxDS0 CESoPSN payload size for N=10 is 8*10 = 80 bytes. The jitter buffer target setting has to
be a multiple of the packetization delay, which in the N=10 case is 1000 microseconds by default, so
a target of 2000 microseconds is chosen. The default maximum delay setting of twice the target
delay is also overridden, in order to keep the jitter buffer delay within 3000 microsecond bounds
under any network conditions. After no shutdown, LDP starts the pseudowire setup signalling to
the target node.
router-223(config)# interface so 2/0/1:1:1:1:0
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1:0])# pdh timeslots 1 – 10
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1:0])# pdh usage connected
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1:0])# pdh pwe3 jitter-buffer 2000 max 3000
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1:0])# pwe3 circuit ldp-cesopsn-1
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1:0])# no shutdown
router-223(cfg-if[so2/0/1:1:1:1:0])# exit

To verify the status of the created LSPs and PWE3, use the show ldp pwe3 command.

In 8600 NE continuous connectivity verification of PWE3 is supported by enabling VCCV BFD.


VCCV BFD configuration examples are covered in 8600 Smart Routers Test and Measurement
Configuration Guide.

The following command is used to display information about forwarding entries currently used
by configured PWE3.

Step 1 Use this command to display information on currently used forwarding entries in PWE3.
router–103(config)# show pwe3 forwarding-table

PWE3 Forwarding Table


PWE3 Name: ldp-cesopsn-1
PWE3 Interface: pdh1/0:0
PWE3 Type: LDP PWE3

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Inner Label: 87680


VC-QoS: ef
PWE3 Destination: 10.123.100.223
Outer LSP Type: RSVP E-LSP 57-212 primary
Nexthop address: 192.168.4.212
Outer Label: 87044
Outgoing Interface: ge0/1

9.4 Adaptive Jitter Buffer Configuration Examples

This section provides AJB configuration examples and status monitoring.

9.4.1 CESoPSN

Step 1 Initialize CESoPSN configuration to the interface pdh1/0.


router(config)# interface pdh 1/0
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh framed
Step 2 Create a timeslot group, enable and set the adaptive jitter buffer parameters. For more details about
the AJB parameters' range, please refer to 8.2.5 Adaptive Jitter Buffering.
router(config)# interface pdh 1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pdh timeslots 1 - 15 17 - 31
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pdh usage connected
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pdh pwe3 jitter-buffer adaptive min-delay 200
target-delay 3 max-delay 6 min-delay-integration 15 target-delay-integration 30
min-delay-threshold 5 target-delay-threshold 5
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# pwe3 circuit cesop-AJB10
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0:0])# exit
Step 3 Define the source carrying the adaptive timing for the interface.
router(config)# interface pdh 1/0
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh adaptive-timing local pdh 1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# exit

9.4.2 SAToP

The following is an example on how to configure AJB for SAToP PWE3.

Step 1 Initialize SAToP configuration to interface pdh1/0. Enable and set the adaptive jitter buffer
parameters. For more details about the AJB parameters' range, please refer to 8.2.5 Adaptive Jitter
Buffering.
router(config)# interface pdh 1/0
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh usage connected
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh pwe3 jitter-buffer adaptive min-delay 200
target-delay 3 max-delay 6 min-delay-integration 15 target-delay-integration 30
min-delay-threshold 5 target-delay-threshold 5
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pwe3 circuit satop-AJB10
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# no shutdown
router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# qos mapping enable

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router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# pdh adaptive-timing local


router(cfg-if[pdh1/0])# exit

SAToP PWE3 monitoring is performed with show command as shown below:

9.4.3 AJB Monitoring

AJB performance monitoring results are shown below.

Fig. 53 AJB Monitoring Results for CESoPSN

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Fig. 54 AJB Monitoring Results for SAToP

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9.5 Configuring TDM PWE3 over IP

The following example shows how to configure CESoPSN PWE3 over an IP network. The focus is
on the CLI commands required from 8600 NE side. The other end side is configured according to
the instructions of the base station. The configuration is based on the following network topology.

CESoPSN PWE3 over IP/UDP is currently supported in the 1xchSTM-1/chOC-3;


4xchSTM-1/chOC-3 and 24xchE1/chT1 MS IFMs.

Fig. 55 TDM PWE3 over IP

Node 223 configuration:

Step 1 Initialize a PWE3 circuit with a circuit name and a pseudowire ID.
router–223(config)# pwe3 circuit CESoUDP_element 200 mpls manual
Step 2 Configure the TDM interface and because of CESoPSN set it to framed mode.
router–223(config)# interface so 6/1/0:1:1:1
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1])# pdh framed
Step 3 Timeslot group 0 is created and all timeslots are added to the group. Finally the PWE3 circuit
is bounded to the interface.
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1])# interface so 6/1/0:1:1:1:0
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1:0])# pdh timeslots 1 - 15 17 - 31
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1:0])# pdh usage connected
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1:0])# pwe3 circuit CESoUDP_element
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1:0])# no shutdown
router–223(cfg-if[so6/1/0:1:1:1:0])# exit
Step 4 Configure static association between the two connection end points of the PWE3. In this example
the UDP port (source and destination) numbers are “10”.
router–223(config)# mpls static-ftn push-ip-udp-for-vc CESoUDP_element src
10.123.100.223 10 dst 10.123.100.140 10
router–223(config)# mpls static-ilm pop-ip-udp-for-vc CESoUDP_element src
10.123.100.140 10 dst 10.123.100.223 10

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9.6 TDM PWE3 OAM (L, M, R) Configuration

This chapter provides CLI configuration examples of TDM PWE3 OAM functionality in the 8600
NEs.

9.6.1 TDM PWE3 Defect Forwarding

CESoPSN PWE3 supports defects forwarding to local AC if enabled, by default defects are not
forwarded.

Step 1 Enable forwarding of PWE3 defect to local AC.


router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# pdh pwe3 forward-pw-flags tdm-failure tdm-rdi pw-rdi
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# exit

The defects forwarded if enabled as shown in the configuration step above are described below:

Parameter Description
tdm-failure Forwards remote AC defect received via PWE3 L-bit to the local AC.

tdm-rdi Forwards remote AC RDI received via PWE3 M-bit to the local AC.

pw-rdi Forwards PSN RDI received via PWE3 R-bit to the local AC.

9.6.2 TDM PWE3 Replacement Data

The following configurations illustrate how to specify type of data used to replace the payload based
on AC TDM PWE3 failure (L-bit) or Loss of Packet State (LOPS).

SAToP

For SAToP PWE3 the following replacement data options are available:

• L-bit replacement data;


• Missing packet replacement data;
• Re-sending frames as replacement data.
L-bit replacement data (AC TDM PWE3 failure) configuration.

Step 1 Enable L-bit replacement data for SAToP PWE3. Replacement data pattern is user configurable
(0x00..0xFF).
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh pwe3 replacement-data ac-tdm-failure 0x55

Missing packet replacement data for R-bit (LOPS state) configuration.

Step 1 Enable missing packet replacement data during the specified timeout.

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router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh pwe3 replacement-data 0x55 1000

Re-sending previously received valid frames as replacement data configuration.

The example below is applicable only in ETSI mode.

Step 1 Enable re-sending previously received valid frames that are transmitted as replacement data during
the specified timeout.
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh pwe3 replacement-data resend-frames timeout 1000
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# exit

CESoPSN

CESoPSN PWE3 only supports L-bit and missing packet replacement data. The following examples
show how to make the setup.

L-bit replacement data (AC TDM PWE3 failure) configuration.

Step 1 Enable L-bit replacement data for CESoPSN PWE3. Replacement data pattern is user configurable
(0x00..0xFF).
router(config)# interface pdh 4/1/0:0
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# pdh pwe3 replacement-data ac-tdm-failure 0x55

Missing packet replacement data for R-bit (LOPS state) configuration.

Step 1 Enable missing packet replacement data for CESoPSN PWE3.


router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# pdh pwe3 replacement-data 0x55
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# exit

9.6.3 TDM PWE3 Report

This example shows how to enable TDM PWE3 fault reporting. The following is the description of
faults reported when enabled (by default, faults are not reported).

Parameter Description

loss-of-packets-state Too many missing packets detected based on control word sequence
number.
remote-defect-indicator-pw The PWE3 remote defect indication received from the far end via
R-bit.
remote-defect-indicator-tdm The AC remote defect indication received from the far end via
M-bit (applicable only for CESoPSN).
tdm-failure The AC fault indication received from the far end via L-bit.

SAToP configuration:

Step 1 Enable TDM PWE3 fault reporting for SAToP.

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router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh pwe3 report tdm-failure loss-of-packets-state


remote-defect-indicator-pw
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# exit

CESoPSN configuration:

Step 1 Enable TDM PWE3 fault reporting for CESoPSN.


router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# pdh pwe3 report tdm-failure loss-of-packets-state
remote-defect-indicator-tdm remote-defect-indicator-pw
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0:0])# exit

In addition, a threshold for declaring loss of packets state fault can be set as following:

Step 1 Set the upper and lower thresholds for declaring loss of packets state fault. The upper threshold is
defined in a range 1..15 packets (default 10), while the lower in a range 1..10 packets (default 2).
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# pdh pwe3 threshold loss-of-packets-state up 13 down 5
router(cfg-if[pdh4/1/0])# exit

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