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CHAMPIONS

CHAMPIONS

CHAMPIONS
3 Teacher’s Book

Level 3
Give your students the winning formula!
Champions 2nd edition has a new look and updated content
to keep your students motivated. A flexible new package
ensures you have all the materials you need.

Teacher’s Book
3
For the student
Student’s Book and Workbook UPDATED
● An emphasis on meaningful communication and skills development
Teacher’s Book
will give your students confidence in real life situations.
● New reading topics and culture sections will help your students learn

about other cultures as well as their own.


● New cross-curricular reading and project lessons link English to other

school subjects.
Now comes with a reader, to add variety to your classes and to
enable your students to develop their reading and language skills.

Student’s Website NEW


● Interactive practice in Vocabulary, Grammar and Communication
● Automatic marking

● Web quest activities

Go to www.oup.com/elt/champions

de la Mare   Dignen
For the teacher
Teacher’s Book UPDATED Audio CDs UPDATED
● Now available online
DVD UPDATED
Online Teacher’s Resources NEW ● Updated material

● Over 40 printable worksheets ● Authentic interviews with

● Now with Reading and Writing practice British teenagers


● Editable course tests with A&B versions ● Worksheets

● Printable practice test for KET and PET

Go to www.oup.com/elt/teacher/champions

3
2

Christina de la Mare
www.oup.com/elt Sheila Dignen © Copyright Oxford University Press
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2nd edition

CHAMPIONS
3 Teacher’s Book

Christina de la Mare
Sheila Dignen

1
© Copyright Oxford University Press

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© Copyright Oxford University Press

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Introduction
Introducing Champions 2nd edition 4
Overview of components 4
Using the Student’s Book 5
Classroom management 8
Suggestions for further reading 8
Games to use in the classroom 9
Common European Framework of Reference 10
Student’s self-assessment checklist 11
Student’s progress record sheet 12
Class Audio CD track list 13
Student’s Book contents 14

Teaching notes
Welcome 16
Unit 1 22
Unit 2 29
Review A 36
Unit 3 38
Unit 4 45
Review B 52
Unit 5 54
Unit 6 61
Review C 68
Curriculum extra 70

Workbook answer key


Answers to Workbook exercises 73
Alphabetical word list 79
Portfolio pages 85

© Copyright Oxford University Press

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Introducing Champions 2nd edition Overview of components
Methodology Student’s Book and Workbook
Champions 2nd edition is a four-level British English course The Student’s Book contains:
written specifically for secondary school students, with • six teaching units
particular emphasis on meaningful communication and • a Welcome unit, reviewing key language from the
skills development. previous level. In the Starter level, the Welcome unit briefly
These are the key features of Champions 2nd edition reviews basic language typically covered at primary level
methodology. • a vocabulary and grammar review after every two units,
Hands-on language presentation Students immediately including ‘can do’ statements correlated to the Common
interact with the dialogue or text that opens each unit, European Framework of Reference to encourage regular
checking their understanding of meaning and context, and self-assessment
giving them the chance to try out new structures. • a Culture club lesson in each Review unit, giving an insight
Guided discovery Students explore the meaning and into life in the UK and other English-speaking countries
usage of new language before they move on to more formal • three Curriculum extra reading and project lessons.
presentation and practice.
The Workbook contains:
Communicative practice Dialogue work and
personalization are emphasized at each level, and pairwork
• additional practice for each unit, covering grammar,
vocabulary, communication, reading, and writing
activities and games are included throughout.
Cultural awareness A focus on the UK and other English-
• detailed grammar notes included at the start of each
Workbook unit for ease of reference.
speaking countries is placed within the context of the wider
world.
Student’s Website
Skills development In every unit students apply and
extend what they have learnt, through targeted skills lessons The Student’s Website includes:
designed to build their competence in each individual skill. • interactive practice for each Vocabulary, Grammar and
Self-assessment Students regularly review and measure Communication lesson from the Student’s Book
their progress against the Common European Framework of • Text builder activities
Reference. • automatic marking
Learning across the curriculum Inter-disciplinary reading • Web quest activities
and project pages link the topics and language content of • Champions 2nd edition e-cards and wallpapers.
the main units to other areas of the school curriculum.
Values The topics in Champions 2nd edition have been Teacher’s Book
carefully chosen to stimulate reflection on a broad range of The Teacher’s Book contains:
issues related to citizenship and the development of socially • teaching notes and answer keys for all the Student’s Book
responsible values. These are highlighted in the teaching material
notes for each unit.
• ideas for warm-ups and extra activities
Flexibility • suggestions for using authentic songs with specific topics
or areas of language
A comprehensive package of components gives the teacher
maximum support and flexibility. Whatever your teaching • background notes and cultural information on people and
style, Champions 2nd edition has everything you could topics mentioned in the Student’s Book
possibly need to match your students’ learning environment. • audio scripts for all listening material
Combined Student’s Book and Workbook available as a • answer keys for all the Workbook material.
combined edition
Student’s Website with many hours of interactive material Class Audio CDs
for home practice, including Web quests Each set of Class Audio CDs contains:
Flexible assessment options Printable, editable tests are • all the listening material for the Student’s Book.
included on the Teacher’s Website, including a KET practice
test and a PET practice test. Further practice tests can be Teacher’s Website
purchased from oxfordenglishtesting.com The Teacher’s Website includes printable tests and worksheets:
Printable worksheets 42 extra worksheets are included on • six unit tests and three review tests per level which are
the Teacher’s Website, including new reading and writing editable and have A and B versions to help prevent cheating
practice, pairwork activities and games, and review and • a KET practice test and a PET practice test
extension worksheets for extra grammar and vocabulary
practice
• 42 worksheets, including new reading and writing
practice
© Copyright Oxford University Press
4 Introduction

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Using the Student’s Book Language focus
The exercises in the Language focus section familiarize
Welcome unit students with the language of the unit, without requiring
them to manipulate it. In Starter and Level 1, students focus
The Welcome unit offers six pages of vocabulary and
on the target language in relation to specific scenes and
grammar practice, covering language students have seen
sections of dialogue from the photostory; in Levels 2 and 3,
in the previous level. In the Starter level, students are given
students find phrases and structures in the presentation text
a brief overview of basic language they may have seen at
and use them to complete sentences or captions about the
primary level, before beginning the main syllabus in Unit 1.
text.
Main units Finally, Focus on you and Pairwork activities give students
the chance to try out the new language in a personalized
Each main unit is divided as follows:
context, following carefully controlled models.
Presentation 2 pages
Vocabulary 1 page Vocabulary
Grammar 1 page This page presents and practices a set of vocabulary
Communication 1 page items associated with the unit topic and previewed in the
Grammar 1 page presentation lesson. Look! boxes contain useful tips and
Skills 2 pages draw attention to potential pitfalls, including spelling rules,
exceptions or irregular forms, collocations, and notes about
Presentation English usage.
The presentation text on the left-hand page exposes Students once again have the opportunity for guided
students to the theme, grammar, vocabulary, and functions speaking practice with a Pairwork activity at the end of the
of the unit. The exercises on the right-hand page allow lesson.
students to interact with the dialogue in more detail, At the foot of the Vocabulary page students are directed
encouraging them to explore, use, and personalize new to the Student’s Website and the Workbook, where there is
language before it is formally presented and practised on further practice of the unit vocabulary.
the Vocabulary and Grammar pages.
In the Starter level and Level 1, the text is a dialogue Grammar
presented in a photostory format. The photostories reflect Underlying the methodology of Champions 2nd edition is the
the aspirations of the students, using familiar contexts to conviction that students understand and remember rules
motivate and engage them. Each unit focuses on a different better if they work them out for themselves. As a result, a
episode in the lives of the central characters. guided discovery approach to teaching grammar is adopted
In the Starter level, the story takes place in a performing throughout the series.
arts school and follows the fortunes of a new student, Holly. Each unit has two Grammar lessons. A grammar chart
Holly is happy to be at her new school and quickly makes models the form of the key structures, using examples taken
friends, but she also finds that she has a rival who wants to from the presentation text that opens the unit. Having
prevent her from achieving her dreams. The story culminates already experimented with the new structures earlier in the
in the production of a school musical, where Holly finally unit, students are then encouraged to reflect on correct
wins the lead role. usage in more detail.
In Level 1, we follow the story of Sam. Sam loves basketball, A cross-reference to Rules directs the students to a grammar
but he is having problems with poor marks in his other reference page in the corresponding Workbook unit, where
school subjects. As he faces a moral dilemma, he is helped detailed explanations and examples are given.
by a friend to make the right choice, and in the end The activities on the page provide thorough and detailed
everything works out for the best. practice of both form and usage, moving from carefully
In Levels 2 and 3, the emphasis is on texts dealing with controlled exercises to more demanding production.
individual topics of a more grown-up nature, in recognition Grammar pages have optional Finished? activities which are
of the fact that students, along with their interests and tastes, designed as a fun way of providing extension work for fast
mature very quickly during the teenage years. A variety of finishers.
formats and genres is used, including dialogues, magazine Grammar pages also often feature a Game that encourages
articles, and web pages. personalized practice in a less formal context.
Following on from the presentation text, students complete At the end of each Grammar page students are directed to
a series of questions to check basic comprehension. The the Student’s Website and the Workbook, where there is
Check it out! feature draws students’ attention to useful further practice.
colloquial expressions in the dialogue.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


Introduction 5

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Communication Most teenagers are curious to know what life is like for their
One page in every unit focuses on everyday English. peers in other parts of the world. Culture club reading
Conversational language is presented in the form of a lessons give a factual account of different aspects of the
dialogue which reviews the vocabulary and grammar from English-speaking world from a young person’s perspective.
the previous lessons. In a similar way to the Language The Focus on you section at the end of the lesson invites
focus lesson on page 2 of the unit, Communication lessons a personal response from students in the form of a piece of
allow students to explore and use a new structure before writing.
they move on to more formal practice on the subsequent
Grammar page. Curriculum extra
The Learn it, use it! feature summarizes the target language There are three cross-curricular reading and project lessons
in the dialogue, while a Pronunciation activity draws in the Student’s Book, providing one page of material for
students’ attention to a specific sound or a relevant aspect each block of two units. The Curriculum extra lessons link to
of intonation. The students then listen to this language in the themes of the corresponding Student’s Book units, as
different contexts before practising it themselves in the well as to subjects that students typically study in their own
Pairwork activity. language, such as geography, science, music, literature, PE,
At the end of each Communication page students are and history.
directed to the Student’s Website and the Workbook, where Each of the lessons concludes with a project that synthesizes
there is further practice. the language focus and the content of the cross-curricular
theme and gives students the opportunity to develop their
Skills creativity. The projects can be done in class or assigned for
homework. Depending on time available and the needs of
The last two pages of the unit contain targeted skills work
the students, the projects can be done in groups, pairs, or
designed to equip students with the necessary strategies to
individually.
build confidence and competence in each individual skill.
Skills lessons also provide a way of consolidating and
recycling the language students have studied throughout Workbook
the unit, whilst exploring different aspects of the unit topic. The Workbook section contains six five-page units of extra
Reading texts deal with the main topic of the unit in practice of the language and skills taught in the Student’s
a factual way using real-life contexts. Comprehension Book. The Workbook exercises can be completed in class or
exercises typically start with a skimming or scanning activity, for homework.
followed by more detailed questions that gradually increase The first page of each Workbook unit summarizes the
in difficulty as the series progresses. grammar structures introduced in the corresponding
Listening activities extend the topic of the text. A variety Student’s Book unit with comprehensive charts and detailed
of activity formats is used to help students develop well- grammar notes.
rounded listening comprehension skills. The following two pages provide extra vocabulary and
The Speaking and Writing sections give students the grammar practice. The last two pages provide additional
opportunity to respond to the unit topic with their own practice to accompany the Student’s Book Communication
ideas. To help students to organize their ideas, both sections lesson, and further reading and writing practice.
usually begin with a written preparation stage. The aim is
to strike a balance between giving clear, guided models on
the page on the one hand, and allowing students freedom Student’s Website
to express themselves and experiment with newly-acquired The Student’s Website includes interactive practice of the
vocabulary and structures on the other. Vocabulary, Grammar and Communication sections, a Text
builder activity, and a fun Web quest for each unit of the
Review units Student’s Book.
After every two main units there is a two-page Review unit For each Student’s Book unit there are eight Grammar
comprising: activities and two Vocabulary activities, and a
Communication exercise with audio. There is also a Text
Vocabulary and Grammar review and My Progress
builder activity for each unit of the Student’s Book which
1 page
requires students to fill in missing words from a reading
Culture club reading 1 page text to rebuild the text. These activities are automatically
The first half of each Review unit covers the main vocabulary marked. A guided Web quest for each Student’s Book unit
and grammar points from the previous two units. The My encourages students to search for information relating to
Progress chart is a self-assessment chart correlated to the topic of the Student’s Book on the Internet using their
the Common European Framework of Reference. It is very English.
motivating for students to reflect on their progress and this Champions 2nd edition e-cards allow students to create
type of activity is also very helpful in encouraging students and send cards to their friends with messages in English
to take responsibility for their own learning. and Champions 2nd edition wallpapers enable students to
personalize their electronic devices.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


6 Introduction

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Teacher’s Book The review tests focus on vocabulary and grammar, and
reading, writing, and listening skills. Each test is scored out of
The Teacher’s Book contains detailed lesson notes and
100 points.
answers for all the Student’s Book and Workbook material.
Regular assessment makes it easier to monitor students’
Each Teacher’s Book unit starts with a summary of the areas
progress. Teachers can keep a record of individual students’
of grammar, vocabulary, communication, skills, and topical
progress using the evaluation chart on page 12.
themes covered in the Student’s Book unit. These themes
relate to values and responsible citizenship, such as: Grammar and vocabulary
• ethics and morals Grammar help and Vocabulary help worksheets for
• society, including the themes of respect, solidarity, and each unit provide additional practice of the Student’s Book
justice material at a basic level, and are ideal for giving weaker
• multiculturalism, including anthropology, human rights, students more practice.
cultural studies, sociology, and historical, geographical, Grammar extension and Vocabulary extension
legal, and ethical perspectives worksheets offer more challenging practice for the more
• the environment, including protecting the environment, able students.
and natural cycles
Reading and writing
• work and consumerism, including mass communication,
advertising, sales, workers’ rights, and consumer rights There is one reading and writing worksheet per unit, helping
students to develop their skills and confidence in these
• health. areas.
The notes include a description of the aim of every exercise
in the Student’s Book, followed by detailed instructions and Pairwork
answers. There is one pairwork worksheet per unit, giving
There are also suggestions for Warm-up activities, and Extra oral practice of the grammar and vocabulary of the
activities that can be used to extend the Student’s Book corresponding unit.
content according to the needs and abilities of each class.
The Student’s Book is full of factual information and Puzzles and games
references to the real world. The teaching notes provide One page of puzzles is included for each unit, and two board
support for this by giving additional notes and cultural facts games for each level of the series. Although these resources
in the Background notes. give practice of the main grammar and vocabulary of the
Teenage students have an insatiable interest in music and unit, the emphasis is on fun activities, such as crosswords,
popular culture, and the use of songs to consolidate the wordsearches, and code breakers.
linguistic and topical content of the Student’s Book can be Practice test for Cambridge ESOL examinations
an effective way of motivating students.
The Teacher’s Website includes a practice test for KET and a
The teaching notes for each Review unit include suggestions practice test for PET.
for suitable songs that can be exploited for this purpose.
The songs have been chosen because of their lexical,
grammatical, or thematic link to the corresponding units.
See page 8 for suggestions on how to exploit songs in class.

Class Audio CD
The Class Audio CD is for classroom use. There is a track list
on page 13.

Extra resources
Alongside the Student’s Book and Workbook, there is a
large amount of extra resource material included on the
Teacher’s Website. The extra resources provide support
material for consolidation, extension, mixed ability classes,
and assessment. All resources are printable, and can also be
projected in class.

Tests
For each level of Champions 2nd edition, there are six unit
tests and three review tests. All tests have A and B versions
to help prevent cheating. The tests can be opened using
Microsoft® Word and edited before printing.
The unit tests include vocabulary and grammar questions,
dialogue work, and a writing task. Each test is scored out of
50 points.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


Introduction 7

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Classroom management • Correct the mistakes Include some incorrect words or
information in the lyrics. Ask students to identify where
the mistakes are and replace them with the correct words,
An English-speaking environment before they listen to the song to check their answers.
• Use English for classroom instructions as often as you
can, and ask students to use English as well. For example:
• Choose the correct alternative At regular points in
the lyrics, students have to choose between two or
Open your books at page 10. Let’s look at exercise 3. Raise your
more alternative words or phrases to complete the lyrics
hand. Work in pairs. Ask your partner, etc.
correctly. Students then listen and check.
• Students should be encouraged to use expressions such
as: How do you say … in English? How do you spell …? I don’t
• Put the verses in the correct order This activity works
especially well with songs that tell a story. Students are
understand. Please can you repeat that? Can you say that
given the verses in the wrong order, and they have to
more slowly, please? Can we listen to that again, please? Can
guess the correct order before listening to the song.
I go to the toilet?
• Match rhyming words Many songs are structured so
that alternating lines end with rhyming words, and this
Managing large classes
provides an excellent opportunity to work on different
Large classes are easier to manage if you establish routines sounds. One useful activity is to give students the lyrics
such as: with the lines of each verse jumbled. Students then
• Write a plan of the day’s activities on the board. attempt to unjumble the lines, according to which lines
• Make sure that everyone understands the task before they rhyme with each other, before listening to the song to
start. Give clear examples and ask students to provide a check their ideas. Another variation is for students to
few as well. choose between two alternatives to end each line. This
• Set time limits for all activities and remind students of could mean choosing the word that provides the best
time limits, for example: You have two minutes left. rhyme, for example, or the word that makes most sense in
• Walk around the class, monitoring while students work. the context.
• Get to know your students’ personalities and learning • Match words to definitions Songs often contain
styles so that you can maximize their potential in class. informal expressions, idioms, and ‘untidy’ grammar. With
stronger groups it can be useful to have students try to
• Allow stronger students to help weaker students while
match difficult words and expressions to definitions or
ensuring that there is always an atmosphere of mutual
explanations. Alternatively, where lyrics feature more
respect and understanding.
standard items of vocabulary, students could work
together in groups to find the words in a dictionary and
Group and pairwork agree on a definition.
The interaction from working in small groups or in pairs is
vital in a language classroom, and students quickly get used Feedback
to what to expect. Here are some tips for organizing group
It is important for students to have a sense of how they
work in large classes:
have performed. Provide feedback while you are monitoring
• Do not have more than five students per group. activities. Alternatively, you can assess an exercise afterwards
• Set up group activities quickly by allocating students with with the whole class: students can put up their hands to
a letter (A, B, C, etc.). Students form groups with other indicate how many answers they shared in pairs or groups,
students who have the same letter. how hard or easy the task was, etc.
• Demonstrate tasks with one pair or group at the front of Encourage students to behave well using a points system.
the class. Award points to pairs or groups that do not make too much
• Set a time limit and keep reminding students of it. noise. Deduct points from pairs or groups that are too noisy
or who are not speaking in English.
Songs
There are many ways in which songs can be exploited in Suggestions for further reading
class, including the following suggestions:
General reference
• Gap-fill There are many variations of this type of activity,
in which students are given the lyrics with certain Oxford Essential Dictionary – New Edition
key words deleted. To make it easier for students, the Practical English Usage – 3rd Edition by Michael Swan
missing words can be grouped together in a wordpool.
As students read the lyrics, they try to fill in the gaps,
Grammar
then they listen and check. If you wish to make the Oxford English Grammar Course (Basic to Intermediate)
activity more challenging, you could add extra words to by Michael Swan and Catherine Walter
the wordpool as distracters, or not provide the missing
Graded readers
words at all. It is important to choose the gapped words
carefully, however, both so that they are audible, and so The Oxford Bookworms Library (Elementary to Pre-
that students can guess from the context which word intermediate) – non-fiction readers that are ideal for
makes most sense in each gap. extended reading, and graded non-fiction readers that are
ideal for cultural and cross-curricular studies.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


8 Introduction

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Exam preparation If students guess the word or phrase before the hangman
KET Practice Tests by Annette Capel and Sue Ireland is drawn completely, they have won. If they do not, you are
the winner. This can be played on the board with the whole
Ideas for supplementary activities and teacher class, in small groups, or in pairs.
development The complete drawing should look like this.
Oxford Basics – a series of short, accessible books for teachers
who are looking for new creative ways of teaching with
limited resources.
Resource Books for Teachers – a popular series that gives
teachers practical advice and guidance, together with
resource ideas and materials for the classroom.

Games to use in the classroom


Kim’s Game
On a tray, place a selection of objects from a vocabulary set,
e.g. classroom objects or food. Alternatively, you can write
the names of the objects on the board and rub them off.
In groups, give students two minutes to memorize what is 20 Questions
on the tray or board. This can be played on the board with the whole class, in small
Remove an object and ask students to write down the groups, or in pairs. One student chooses a secret identity, e.g.
missing object. Continue until the tray or board is empty. that of a celebrity. Other students must guess the identity
Check the answers with the class. The group with all the by asking a maximum of 20 questions. The student may only
objects in the correct order is the winner. answer with short Yes / No answers, e.g. Yes, I am. No, I don’t, etc.
Simon Says The game can be used to practise questions and answers in a
Call out commands to the class. If your command variety of different tenses.
is preceded by ‘Simon says’, students must obey the Chinese Whispers
instruction. If it is not, they must ignore it. For example: This game is excellent for practising pronunciation. It can
Simon says stand up. (students stand up) Sit down. (students be played as a whole class or in small groups of at least six.
remain standing). Students who get it wrong are out of Put students in a line or circle. Write a sentence on a piece
the game. This activity is good primarily for practising of paper and give it to the first student. They should read
imperatives, but is also useful for practising vocabulary. it silently, but not show it to anyone else. The student then
With a strong class, you could let a student call out the whispers the sentence to the person on their left, and so
commands. on. The game continues until the last student whispers the
Bingo sentence in the first student’s ear. The first student then tells
Tell each student to draw a grid of six squares and refer them the whole group / class what he or she heard, and then
to the vocabulary page(s) you have just worked on. Give reads out the original sentence. Is it the same?
them a few moments to memorize the words and pictures
in the vocabulary set.
Books closed, students then draw or write a vocabulary item
in each square. Call out vocabulary items from the set. If the
students have drawn pictures, call out the words in English.
If students have written the English words, you can call
them out in their L1. With a strong class you could read out
definitions and get students to work out the word.
When a student hears a word he or she has drawn or written,
they must cross it out. When all six vocabulary items are
crossed out, the student can call out Bingo. The first to call
out Bingo wins the game.
Hangman
Choose a word or phrase. Write a gap for each letter of the
word on the board. Separate words with a clear space or
slash, e.g. I lived in Paris. _ / _ _ _ _ _ / _ _ / _ _ _ _ _ .
Students guess which letters appear in the words. Each
student can call out just one letter. If the letter is contained
in the word, or phrase, write it in the appropriate place(s),
e.g. for the letter ‘i’: I / _ i _ _ _ / i _ / _ _ _ i _ .
If a student calls out a letter that isn’t in the word or phrase,
write it on the board and draw one line of the hangman.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


Introduction 9

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Common European Framework of B2 Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both
concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions
Reference (CEFR) in his/her field of specialization. Can interact with a degree
The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) was of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction
designed to promote a consistent interpretation of foreign- with native speakers quite possible without strain for either
language competence among the member states of the party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of
European Union. Today, the use of the CEFR has expanded subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving
beyond the boundaries of Europe, and it is used in other the advantages and disadvantages of various options.
regions of the world, including Latin America, Asia, and the
Middle East. Language Portfolio
The CEFR defines linguistic competence in three levels: A, B, The Language Portfolio has been developed in conjunction
and C. Each of these levels is split into two sub-levels: with the CEFR. It is kept by the students and contains details
A Basic User A1 Breakthrough of their experiences of languages and language learning.
A2 Waystage There are three elements to a Language Portfolio: a
B Independent User B1 Threshold Language Biography, which details the day-to-day
B2 Vantage experience of the language; a Language Passport, which
C Proficient User C1 Effectiveness summarizes the experiences; and a Dossier, which is
C2 Mastery evidence of the experience.
The CEFR provides teachers with a structure for assessing Language Biography
their students’ progress as well as monitoring specific
This can consist of the following:
language objectives and achievements. Students respond to
the CEFR statements in the Reviews after Units 2, 4, and 6. • a checklist for students to assess their language skills in
terms of ‘What I can do’
Champions 2nd edition aims to enable students to move
from no English or level A1 and into level B2 at the end of • tools to help students identify their learning style and
the four years of the course. objectives
• a checklist of learning activities outside the classroom.
Descriptions of the CEFR levels covered in The My Progress checklists at the end of each review
Champions 2nd edition section in the Student’s Book together with the Portfolio
photocopiable sheets on pages 85–87 in the Teacher’s Book
Basic User will help students to monitor these points. There is also a
A1 Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions photocopiable Student’s self-assessment checklist on page
and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction and needs 11 in the Teacher’s Book which can be given to students to
of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others complete at the end of each unit.
and can ask and answer questions about personal details
such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows, and things
Language Passport
he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other This can contain:
person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help. • a student’s overall evaluation of their language skills,
A2 Can understand sentences and frequently used using descriptors from the CEFR (see Teacher’s Book
expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance pages 85–87)
(e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, • a summary record of language learning, both inside and
geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and out of school
routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of • certificates.
information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe
in simple terms aspect of his/her background, immediate Dossier
environment, and matters in areas of immediate need. This can be a compilation of samples of the student’s work,
including tests, written work, projects, or other student-
Independent User generated materials.
B1 Can understand the main points of clear standard input
on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school,
leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst
travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can
produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar
or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events,
dreams, hopes and ambitions, and briefly give reasons and
explanations for opinions and plans.

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10 Introduction

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Student’s self-assessment checklist
What I remember
Useful grammar:

Useful vocabulary:

Objectives
One thing I need to improve:

How can I improve this?

What did you do in English outside class?


Do homework
Learn new words
Revise before a test
Listen to music
Read something extra
Watch a TV programme, video, or DVD
Write an email or chat
Look at web pages
Speak to someone
Read a magazine

Other activities

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Student’s progress record sheet
Name

Class / Year

Class work: continuous assessment Test results


Date Grammar Vocabulary Skills
Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Unit 4

Unit 5

Unit 6

Comments
Units 1–2

Units 3–4

Units 5–6

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Class Audio CD track list
Contents
Track Contents
01 Title Unit 4 They can’t be real!
25 Page 36, Exercise 1
Welcome unit
26 Page 38, Exercise 1
02 Page 4, Exercise 3
27 Page 40, Exercise 1
Unit 1 I’ve never had so much fun! 28 Page 40, Exercise 2
03 Page 10, Exercise 1 29 Page 40, Exercise 3
04 Page 11, Exercise 4 30 Page 43, Exercise 3
05 Page 12, Exercise 1 31 Page 43, Exercise 6
06 Page 12, Exercise 2
Unit 5 What were they doing?
07 Page 14, Exercise 1
32 Page 46, Exercise 1
08 Page 14, Exercise 2
33 Page 47, Exercise 4
09 Page 14, Exercise 3
34 Page 48, Exercise 1
10 Page 17, Exercise 3
35 Page 48, Exercise 2
Unit 2 I haven’t finished it yet! 36 Page 50, Exercise 1
11 Page 18, Exercise 1 37 Page 50, Exercise 2
12 Page 20, Exercise 2 38 Page 50, Exercise 3
13 Page 22, Exercise 1 39 Page 53, Exercise 4
14 Page 22, Exercise 2
Unit 6 They’re used for fun!
15 Page 22, Exercise 3
40 Page 54, Exercise 1
16 Page 25, Exercise 3
41 Page 56, Exercise 1
Unit 3 What should I do? 42 Page 56, Exercise 2
17 Page 28, Exercise 1 43 Page 58, Exercise 1
18 Page 30, Exercise 1 44 Page 58, Exercise 2
19 Page 30, Exercise 2 45 Page 58, Exercise 3
20 Page 32, Exercise 1 46 Page 59, Exercise 3
21 Page 32, Exercise 2 47 Page 61, Exercises 3 & 4
22 Page 32, Exercise 3
23 Page 32, Exercise 4
24 Page 35, Exercises 3 & 4

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Welcome
page 4 ● Musical instruments and genres  ● Food and drink

● Ordinal numbers  ● Dates  ● Countable / Uncountable nouns  ● some / any


● Compounds: some / any / no / every  ● have to  ● mustn’t / don’t have to
● will: future  ● will / be going to  ● First conditional

Unit Vocabulary Grammar

1
I’ve never had so Experiences Present perfect (affirmative and negative)
much fun! Past participles
page 10 been / gone
Present perfect (interrogative and short answers)
ever / never
Present perfect / Past simple

2
I haven’t finished it Books Present perfect + yet and already
yet! Present perfect + just
page 18 Present perfect + for / since

Review: page 26  Culture club: Argentina adventure tours page 27 

3
What should I do? Illnesses and should / shouldn’t
page 28 symptoms Second conditional

4
They can’t be real! Investigation Possibility in the present: may / might (not), must, and can’t
page 36 a / an, the, no article

Review: page 44  Culture club: Bullying: let’s stop it now! page 45 

5
What were they Crime Past continuous (affirmative, negative, interrogative, and
doing? short answers)
page 46 while
Past continuous and past simple + when / while

6
They’re used for fun! The computer The passive
page 54 The passive: present simple (affirmative, negative,
interrogative, and short answers)
The passive: past simple (affirmative, negative, interrogative,
and short answers)
by + agent

Review page 62  Culture club: From slavery to presidency page 63 

Workbook: pages 67–97 Irregular verbs: page 98

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● Places around town  ● Personality  ● Weather  ● Housework

y ● a lot / much / many   ● How much …? / How many …?  ● must 


● Gerunds and verb + ing form   ● be going to (1)  ● be going to (2)  ● Present continuous for future 

Communication Skills

Booking an activity Reading: A magazine article about the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award
Pronunciation: Strong and weak forms of have Listening: A teenager talking about his experience of the Award
Speaking: Talking about experiences
Writing: A postcard about your experiences

Buying presents Reading: A short story


Pronunciation: /h/ Listening: A teenager talking about his reading habits
Speaking: Talking about a book you have read recently
Writing: A book review

Curriculum extra: Language page 64 

At the doctor’s Reading: An online problem page


Pronunciation: /ʊ and /uː/ Listening: A parent and a teacher talking about a student
Speaking: Giving advice
Writing: A reply to a message post giving advice
Speculating Reading: A magazine article about urban legends
Pronunciation: must be, might be, and Listening: Two teenagers talking about urban legends
can’t be Speaking: Speculating about urban legends
Writing: Writing an urban legend

Curriculum extra: Life sciences page 65 

Reporting a crime Reading: An extract from a textbook: The founding of modern Australia
Pronunciation: /ə/ Listening: A teenager talking about witnessing a crime
Speaking: Finding out how observant you are
Writing: An online article about a robbery
Asking about a tourist attraction Reading: A magazine article about the positive side of the Internet
nd Pronunciation: Connected speech Listening: A teenager and a senior citizen talk about technology
Speaking: Talking about technological inventions
Writing: A text about technological inventions

Curriculum extra: Environmental science page 66

Word list: page 99

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Welcome

answers
Grammar 1  piano  ​2  guitar  ​3  harp  ​4  violin  ​5  drums  ​
Ordinal numbers 6  saxophone
Dates
Countable / uncountable nouns Extra activity
some / any • Review musician vocabulary by writing the words
a lot of / much / many from exercise 1, except recorder, on the board, and ask
students to come and write the matching musician
How much …? / How many …?
words (pianist, saxophonist, guitarist, trumpeter,
must drummer, and violinist). Review the pronunciation of
Compounds: some / any / no / every the words and make sure students place the stress on
have to the correct syllable, e.g. saxophonist, pianist.
mustn’t / don’t have to
Gerunds and verb + -ing form Exercise 3  $ 02
be going to (1) • Play the CD. Students listen and put the types of music
be going to (2) in the correct order.
Present continuous for future • Check the answers with the class.
will: future ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 02
will / be going to 1  f  ​2  c  ​3  e  ​4  d  ​5  a  ​6  b
First conditional And you?
Vocabulary
• In pairs or small groups, students answer the questions.
Musical instruments and genres
• Ask students to tell the rest of the class about their
partner / another person in their group.
Food and drink
Places around town Extra activity
Personality • Play the CD again and ask students which instruments
Weather they can hear.
Housework
Food and drink    page 4 
Vocabulary Aim
To review words for food and drink
Musical instruments and genres    page 4 
Warm-up
Aim • Tell students what you had for breakfast. Then ask What
To review words for musical instruments and genres did you have for breakfast this morning? Elicit answers.

Warm-up Exercise 4
• Ask students Do you play any musical instruments? If not, • Students match the word parts to make the food words.
which musical instrument would you like to play? • Check the answers with the class.
Exercise 1 ANSWERS
2  biscuits  ​3  milk  ​4  sweets  ​5  bananas  ​6  potatoes  ​
• Students write the names of the instruments.
7  carrots  ​8  chocolate  ​9  water  ​10  yoghurt
• To check, you can write the gapped words on the board
and ask students to come out and complete them. And you?
ANSWERS • In pairs, students answer the questions.
1  piano  ​2  recorder  ​3  saxophone  ​4  guitar  ​ • Ask pairs to tell the rest of the class about their partner.
5  trumpet  ​6  drums  ​7  violin

Exercise 2
• Students look at the picture and match the words in
exercise 1 with the instruments.

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Extra activity Weather    page 5 
• In small groups, students take turns to draw a food item
from exercise 4 for the others to identify. Aim
To review language used to describe the weather

Places around town    page 5  Warm-up


• Ask What’s the weather like today? Elicit adjectives to
Aim describe it.
To review words for places around town
Exercise 7
Warm-up • Students write sentences to describe the pictures. Remind
• Ask students questions to elicit places in town, e.g. I want them that in speech we normally use It’s rather than It is.
to play football. Where do I go? (To the leisure centre.), etc. • Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
Exercise 5
1  It’s windy.   ​2  It’s raining.   ​3  It’s sunny.   4​   It’s foggy.   ​
• Students match the words with the pictures. 5  It’s snowing.
ANSWERS
1  car park   ​2  police station   ​3  bus stop   ​4  chemist  ​ And you?
5  post office • Elicit answers from the class about the weather in January
and August.
And you?
• In pairs or small groups, students tell each other which Extra activity
places they pass on their way to school. • Bring in a recent weather forecast from a newspaper
or find one where there is a variety of different types of
Extra activity weather. Give students copies or draw a larger version
• Play a memory game. A student makes a sentence, e.g. on the board.
I went to the leisure centre. The next student repeats it • In pairs, students prepare a weather report as if they
and adds another place in town. If a student misses a were presenting it on the news for the day ahead.
place, they are out of the game. Students should use going to: Today it’s going to be
windy, etc.
Personality    page 5  • Pairs of students can come to the front of the class to
present their weather report together.
Aim • The class can follow the forecasts by comparing them
to that in the newspaper or on the board and decide
To review adjectives describing people’s personality
how accurate each forecast is.
Warm-up
• Write the six adjectives on the board with the vowels Housework    page 5 
gapped. Ask students to come out and complete the
words. Aim
Exercise 6 To review expressions for housework
• Students complete the sentences with the adjectives. Warm-up
• Check the answers with the class. • Ask students What housework did you do this morning /
ANSWERS yesterday evening? Do you think you are helpful at home?,
1  creative  2  patient  ​3  outgoing  ​4  organized  ​ etc. Elicit responses.
5  shy
Exercise 8
And you? • Students read the sentences and choose the correct words.
• In pairs, students discuss their best friend’s personality. • They can compare answers in pairs.
• Ask some students to describe their friend to the class. • Check the answers with the class.
Extra activity ANSWERS
• On separate pieces of paper write the adjectives from 1  make  ​2  cooking  ​3  takes  ​4  clears  ​5  feeds  ​
exercise 6. 6  doing
• Ask students to come to the front of the class. Tell them And you?
to do a simple action, e.g. hand out some sheets of • In pairs or small groups, students answer the question.
paper, but they must do it in the way described on the
piece of paper.
• Ask some students to report back to the class.
• Students must guess what the adjective is. Extra activity
• Play Hangman to review housework vocabulary.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
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Grammar Exercise 3
• Students look at the fridge and tick or cross the items.
Ordinal numbers Then they write sentences with some or any.
Dates    page 6  • They can compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
Aim ANSWERS
To review ordinal numbers and dates 1 (✗) There isn’t any yoghurt.
2 (✓) There are some eggs.
Warm-up 3 (✓) There’s some cheese.
• Ask students when their birthdays are. 4 (✓) There’s some orange juice.
• On the board write the numbers 1 to 10 and to one side 5 (✗) There aren’t any potatoes.
write st, nd, and rd. Ask students to match the numbers to 6 (✓)There’s some bread.
the endings. 7 (✓)There’s some water.
• As a whole class count from 1 to 10 in ordinal numbers 8 (✗)There isn’t any cola.
practising the pronunciation. 9 (✓) There are some tomatoes.
• Review the use of ordinal numbers (Ordinal numbers 10 (✗) There aren’t any carrots.
are used in dates and to describe the order of things,
Extra activity
e.g. James came second in the race, and the sequence of
events, e.g. I phoned home five times and mum answered • Give students a few minutes to look at the fridge and to
the fifth time!). memorize what is in it.
• Books closed. In pairs or small groups, students write
Exercise 1 down the items they remember. Set a short time limit.
• Students write the numbers in words. The first pair / group to finish with all the correct items
• They can compare answers in pairs. is the winner.
• Check the answers with the class.
Exercise 4
answers
1  ninth  ​2  thirteenth  ​3  twenty-second  ​4  thirty-first  ​ • Students write questions and answers about the food
5  twelfth items.
• They can ask and answer the questions in pairs.
Exercise 2 • Check the answers with the class.
• Students choose the correct words in the sentences. ANSWERS
• They can compare answers in pairs. 1 Are there any biscuits? No, there aren’t.
• Check the answers with the class. 2 Are there any carrots? No, there aren’t.
answers 3 Is there any chocolate? No, there isn’t.
1  second  ​2  thirty-three  ​3  third  ​4  tenth 4 Are there any tomatoes? Yes, there are.
5 Is there any beef? Yes, there is.
Extra activity 6 Are there any onions? Yes, there are.
• Play Bingo with ordinal numbers. Ask students to write 7 Are there any oranges? Yes, there are.
numbers between 1 and 40 on their grids and call out 8 Are there any bananas? Yes, there are.
ordinal numbers between 1 and 40.
Extra activity 1
• Students draw food items in a fridge.
Countable / Uncountable nouns • In pairs, students take turns to ask about what is in each
some / any    page 6  other’s fridge.

Aim Extra activity 2


To review some / any with countable and uncountable • Students sit in a circle. One student makes a sentence
nouns about the contents of an imaginary fridge, e.g. In my
fridge there isn’t any milk. The next student repeats
Warm-up the sentence and adds another – either affirmative or
• Draw a selection of food items on the board and ask negative, e.g. In my fridge there isn’t any milk, but there
students to say if the nouns are countable or uncountable. are some tomatoes. The third student repeats both
• Use these nouns to review some and any. On the board sentences and adds their own. The game continues in
write a few gapped sentences and questions with this way. If a student misses one of the sentences, he /
countable and uncountable nouns, e.g. There is ____ milk. she is out of the game. The last student in the game is
There aren’t ____ tomatoes. Is there ____ orange juice?, etc. the winner.
Ask students to come to the board to complete them
with some / any.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


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a lot of / much / many Warm-up
How much …? / How many …?    page 7  • Write the headings Person, Object, and Place on the board,
and elicit the compounds that go under each heading,
Aim e.g. -one / -body goes under the person heading.
To review a lot of / much / many and How much …? / How • Review the uses of some / any / no and every.
many …? • Some is used in affirmative sentences.
• Any is used in questions and negative sentences.
Warm-up
• No is used in affirmative sentences with a negative meaning.
• Ask students some questions with the target grammar,
e.g. Have you got much homework today? How much free
• Every is used in affirmative sentences to describe all
people, things, and places collectively.
time do you have at the weekend? Do you watch many films
on TV? Elicit answers. Exercise 7
• On the board write the following and ask students to • Students complete the compound words.
draw lines to match the words to when we use them:
• Check the answers with the class.
1 much  ​ 2 many  ​3 a lot of
a  questions / negative sentences + uncountable nouns ANSWERS
b affirmative sentences + countable and uncountable 1  nothing  ​2  anywhere  ​3  someone  ​4  anyone  ​
nouns 5  No one   ​6  somewhere  ​7  anyone  ​8  Everyone
c  questions / negative sentences + countable nouns
have to    page 7 
ANSWERS
1  a  ​2  c  ​3  b
Aim
Exercise 5 To review have to (affirmative and negative)
• Students read the text and choose the correct words. Warm-up
• They can compare answers in pairs. • Ask students What do you have to do for other people this
• Check the answers with the class. week? and elicit responses, e.g. I have to help my mother.
ANSWERS I have to go shopping for my grandmother, etc.
1  a lot of   2​   many  ​3  much  ​4  many  ​5  many  ​ • Remind students that have to describes an obligation to
6  a lot of   7​   a lot of   8​   many  ​9  a lot of do something for another person or to obey rules.

must   ​page 7  Exercise 8


• Students look at the prompts, ticks and crosses, and write
Aim sentences with has to and doesn’t have to.
To review the use of must and mustn’t • Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
Warm-up 1 He has to clean his bedroom.
• Ask What must you do at school every day? Elicit examples 2 He has to feed the rabbit.
of school rules. 3 He doesn’t have to do the ironing.
• Remind students that must is used to describe a necessity 4 He doesn’t have to take out the rubbish.
or obligation to do something. It is also used to describe 5 He has to lay and clear the table.
an obligation that the speaker sees as necessary, e.g.
I must go to bed. I’ve got a test tomorrow. Mustn’t is used mustn’t / don’t have to    page 7 
to describe prohibition.
• Remind students that must is a modal verb and does not Aim
take the third person s. It is followed by the main verb in To review the difference between mustn’t and don’t have to
its infinitive form.
Warm-up
Exercise 6
• Review the use of don’t have to. On the board, write It’s the
• Students complete the rules using must and mustn’t and a summer holidays. I don’t have to go to school. Ask students
verb from the box. what don’t have to means.
• Check the answers with the class. • Ask students to think of a café or restaurant they have all
ANSWERS visited. Ask them to imagine they are waiters / waitresses
1  must bring   2​   mustn’t run   ​3  mustn’t listen   ​ there. Ask them what they mustn’t do and don’t have to
4  must put   ​5  mustn’t use do in their job. Elicit ideas and write them on the board.

Compounds: some / any / no / every    page 7  Exercise 9


• Students read the text and choose the correct words.
Aim • Check the answers with the class.
To review compounds with some, any, no, and every ANSWERS
1  don’t have to   ​2  mustn’t  ​3  don’t have to   4​   mustn’t
© Copyright Oxford University Press
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Gerunds and verb + -ing form    page 8  Extra activity
• In pairs, students ask and answer questions about what
Aims they are going to do this weekend.
To review the use of gerunds as the subject of a sentence; to • Monitor and check that students are taking turns and
review the use of the -ing form after certain verbs make a note of any repeated errors to check at the end
Warm-up of the lesson.
• Write these verbs on the board: fly, get, ride, win, play, • Ask students to report back to the class with their
take and ask students to spell the -ing form of the verbs. partner’s plans.
Review the spelling rules if necessary.
• On the board, write I llike swimming. Below write be going to (2)    page 8 
__________ is fun. Ask the students to complete it so
that it means the same as the first sentence (Swimming is Aim
fun.). Repeat the process with a few more sentences, e.g.
To review be going to for predictions based on present
Doing the washing-up is boring. I don’t like __________ the
evidence
washing-up.
Warm-up
Exercise 10
• On the board, write Maria isn’t listening to her teacher. Her
• Students use the prompts to write sentences. teacher is going to get annoyed.
• They can compare answers in pairs. • Ask How do we know that the teacher is going to get
• Check the answers with the class. annoyed? (Because Maria isn’t listening.)
ANSWERS • Remind students that be going to can also be used to
1 Madison loves dancing. make predictions based on present evidence.
2 Skateboarding is fun.
3 don’t like playing volleyball. Exercise 12
4 Stealing money is wrong. • Students look at the pictures and complete the sentences
5 Josh hates doing housework. with the verbs and expressions in the box.
6 My favourite hobby is reading. • They can compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
Extra activity
• Students write jumbled-up sentences for their partners ANSWERS
to reorder, using gerunds as the sentence subject and 2 He’s going to eat a burger.
the verb + -ing form. 3 It’s going to rain.
4 She’s going to make a cake.
• Make sure that students give their partners an even mix
5 I’m going to win the race.
of forms to practise and make sure that they are using
both forms correctly. Extra activity
• On the board, write some unrelated sentences
be going to (1)    page 8  describing three different situations, e.g.
My bus is late.
Aim James is in a café.
Alice is buying a lot of crisps and soft drinks.
To review be going to for plans and intentions
• In pairs, students write matching sentences with be
Warm-up going to based on the present evidence, e.g. I’m going to
• Ask students What are you going to do on your next holiday? be late for school. James is going to order some food. Alice
and elicit responses. is going to have a party.
• Remind students that be going to can be used to describe • Ask students to think of other possible sentences with
future plans and intentions. be going to for each of the situations on the board. See
how many different ideas the students can come up
Exercise 11 with.
• Students read the summer camp activities form and write • Monitor and check that students are using be going to
affirmative and negative sentences about Zoey’s plans. correctly.
• They can compare answers in pairs. • Elicit their sentences and write some of them on the
• Check the answers with the class. board.
ANSWERS
1 She’s going to explore the countryside.
2 She isn’t going to take art and craft classes.
3 She’s going to play outdoor sports.
4 She isn’t going to do a yoga course.
5 She’s going to learn a foreign language.

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Present continuous for future    page 9  Extra activity
• On separate pieces of paper write simple situations that
Aim require an instant decision, e.g. I’m hungry. – I’ll make you
To review the present continuous for future arrangements a sandwich. I can’t carry all these bags. – I’ll help you, etc.
Warm-up • Make a few copies of each so that you have several sets.
• Ask students about their plans for the near future, e.g. • Split the class into groups of six to eight students
What are you doing this afternoon after school? What are and give each one a set. Each student takes a turn to
you doing at the weekend?, etc. Elicit responses with the read out a situation. Another student must call out a
present continuous. decision with will / won’t.
• Remind students that the present continuous can be • Monitor and check that students are taking turns and
used to describe future arrangements that have been using will / won’t properly.
confirmed.

Exercise 13 will / be going to    page 9 


• Explain that The Domes are a band and the text is their
schedule for the next two weeks.
Aim
To review the difference between will and be going to for
• Check that students understand the verb perform.
predictions
• Students write the questions and then use the
information in the text to answer them. Warm-up
• Check the answers. Ask one student to read out a • On the board, write the following sentences:
question and another to give the answer. Zac is a fast runner. He’ll win.
ANSWERS Zac is running faster than the other runners. He’s going to win.
1 When are The Domes playing in Colombia? • Ask students which prediction is based on opinion and
They’re playing in Colombia on 4th March. which is based on present evidence.
2 How many concerts are they giving in Brazil? • Remind students that we can use will to make predictions
They’re giving two concerts. based on opinion. We use be going to when there is strong
3 Where are they performing in São Paulo? evidence that we can see right now.
They’re performing at the Morumbi Stadium.
4 Where are they going after Brazil? Exercise 15
They’re going to Colombia. • Remind students that we often use (don’t) think with will.
5 Where is the tour finishing? • Students complete the sentences.
It’s finishing in Monterrey, Mexico. • Check the answers with the class.
6 How many cities are they visiting in Latin America?
They’re visiting seven cities. ANSWERS
1  ’s going to be   ​2  will  ​3  will  ​4  ’re going to be   5​   will  ​
Extra activity 6  ’m going to be
• Students write a similar schedule for their favourite band.
• In pairs, they take turns to ask and answer questions First conditional    page 9 
about when and where the band is playing.
Aim
To review the first conditional
will: future    page 9 
Warm-up
Aim • Ask students If it’s sunny at the weekend, what will you do?
To review the use of will and won’t to talk about the future and elicit responses. Review the form of the first conditional.
Ask what tense the verb takes in the if clause (present) and
Warm-up the main clause (will). Ask when and where we need to add
• Tell the students The school is going to close for a week. a comma to the sentence (The comma follows the if clause
What will you do? when it is the first part of the sentence.).
• Elicit students’ answers with will and won’t, e.g. I’ll get up • Remind students that we use the first conditional to talk
late. I won’t study. I’ll help my parents, etc. about future situations which are probable.
• Remind students that will / won’t can be used to express
Exercise 16
decisions made at the moment.
• Students complete the sentences with the correct form of
Exercise 14 the verbs in brackets.
• Students complete the dialogue using will and won’t and • Check the answers with the class.
the verbs in brackets. ANSWERS
ANSWERS 1  ’s; ’ll go   ​2  don’t give; will be   ​3  ’ll buy; help  
1  ’ll take   ​2  won’t take   ​3  will you be   ​4  won’t be   ​ ​4  won’t pass; doesn’t study
5  Will you have   6​   ’ll eat
© Copyright Oxford University Press
Welcome 21

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1 I’ve never had so much fun!

Grammar Exercise 2 Comprehension


Present perfect (affirmative and negative)
• Students read the text again and answer the questions.
Past participles
• They can compare answers in pairs.
been / gone
• Check the answers with the class.
Present perfect (interrogative and short answers) ANSWERS
ever / never 1 Kitesurfing and coasteering.
2 Coasteering.
Present perfect / past simple
3 It comes from the UK.
4 You have to wear a wetsuit, a life jacket, and a helmet.
Vocabulary 5 She thinks it’s amazing.
Experiences 6 She’s planning to do kitesurfing.

Communication Extra activity


Booking an activity • Write these sentences on the board.
Pronunciation: Strong and weak forms of have 1 Linda has done ocean sports before.
2 Coasteering involves climbing, jumping, swimming,
Skills and sailing.
Reading: A magazine article about the Duke of 3 Joe thinks that coasteering is quite safe.
Edinburgh’s Award 4 Coasteering started in the 1980s.
5 Joe learnt about coasteering in the UK last year.
Listening: A teenager talking about his experience of
the Award • Students read the article again and decide if the
sentences are true or false. Ask them to correct the false
Speaking: Talking about experiences
sentences.
Writing: A postcard about your experiences
ANSWERS
Topics 1 False. She has never done ocean sports.
2 False. Coasteering involves climbing, jumping, and
Sports, experiences, and activities
swimming. It doesn’t involve sailing.
Community service 3 True.
4 False. Coasteering started in the 1970s.
5 True.
Presentation    page 10 
Consolidation
Aim • Remind students to copy any new words or phrases
To present the new language in an interesting context from the text into their vocabulary books.

Text
The text is about an ocean sports festival in the US.
Language focus    page 11 
A journalist interviews the festival organizer about the sport
of coasteering.
Aim
To practise the target language
Warm-up
• Ask students to look at the photos. Ask What can you Exercise 3
see? What are the people doing? Use the photos to teach • Students read the article again. They match the
waterskiing, coasteering, kitesurfing, and surfing. Ask Can beginnings and endings of the sentences.
you do these sports in your country? Have you tried them? • Check the answers with the class.
Which one would you like to try? Why? ANSWERS
​2  d  ​3  a  ​4  b  ​5  c
Exercise 1 Read and listen  $ 03
• Give students time to read the sentences. Check that they Exercise 4  $ 04
understand them all. • Students read the conversation and the words in the box.
• Play the CD. Students read and listen, and then choose the • Play the CD. Students listen and complete the
correct words. conversation. Stronger students can try to work out the
• Check the answers with the class. answers themselves and then listen to check.
ANSWER • They can compare answers in pairs.
2  the US   3  a journalist • Check the answers with the class.
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 10 
© Copyright Oxford University Press
22

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ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 04 Exercise 2  $ 06
1  I haven’t   2  Have you ever done   3  I have   • Ask students to look again at the experience in exercise 1.
4  ’ve done   5  haven’t done
• Play the CD. Students listen and write what the people
Alice  What did you do at the weekend, Hugo?
are doing.
Hugo  I went to an ocean sports festival and I tried
coasteering. It was amazing! Have you ever tried it? • They can compare answers in pairs.
Alice No, 1I haven’t. I think it sounds crazy! • Check the answers with the class.
Hugo  No, it isn’t. It’s so much fun, and it’s really exciting. ANSWERS / audio cd track 06
2
Have you ever done anything exciting? 1 They’re flying in a plane.
Alice Yes, 3I have. I 4’ve done a parachute jump. 2 She’s doing a parachute jump.
Hugo  Wow! A parachute jump?! I 5haven’t done that! 3 He’s riding a horse.
4 They’re going whitewater rafting.
Exercise 5 Focus on you
• Students tick the things they have done. Do not elicit Extra activity
answers at this point. • In pairs or groups, students take turns to mime an
activity from exercise 1. The others guess which
Exercise 6 Pairwork
activity it is.
• In pairs, students tell their partner what they have done.
Stronger students can add more ideas, using the same
verbs, e.g. I’ve eaten sushi. I’ve visited Chile. Exercise 3 Pairwork
• Ask some students to tell the class about their partner. • Students work individually to tick the things in exercise 1
that they have done.
ANSWERS
• Ask a student to read out one of the things from exercise
Students’ own answers.
1 that they have done. Ask When did you …? Where did you
do this? Did you enjoy it? Elicit the answers.
Vocabulary    page 12  • Point out to students that some of the verbs in the
expressions are irregular in the past simple form.
Experiences • Students then work in pairs to ask and answer questions
about their experiences.
Aim • Ask some students to tell the class something they learnt
To present and practise vocabulary for experiences: be in about their partner.
the newspaper, climb a mountain, do a parachute jump, fly in ANSWERS
a plane, go whitewater rafting, meet a famous person, ride a Students’ own answers.
horse, sleep in a tent, visit a foreign country, win a competition
Exercise 4 Pairwork
Warm-up • Elicit or explain the meaning of least + adjective.
• Ask students to look at the pictures and to say what they • Model a sentence for students before they begin the
can see. Point to a few of the pictures and ask Have you
activity, e.g. Flying in a plane is the least exciting activity
ever done that / been there?
because I fly a lot. Underline the gerund as subject and
Exercise 1  $ 05 encourage students to use it in their discussions.
• In pairs or individually, students match as many pictures as • In pairs, students discuss questions 1 and 2. Encourage
they can with the experiences. them to give reasons for their answers.
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers. • Students should think of other adjectives to describe
the experiences to support their argument, e.g. boring,
• Check comprehension by asking students to translate
interesting, fantastic, terrible.
these words into their language: parachute, whitewater,
foreign, and competition. • Monitor and give help where necessary. Make a note of
any repeated errors to check at the end of the lesson.
• Play the CD again. Students listen and repeat chorally,
then individually. • Ask some students to tell the class about their conclusions
and invite others to agree or disagree. Contribute with
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 05 your own views, too.
do a parachute jump
1 win a competition ANSWERS
2 visit a foreign country Students’ own answers.
3 meet a famous person
Extra activity
4 ride a horse
5 climb a mountain • Students choose their favourite experience from
6 go whitewater rafting exercise 1. In class or for homework, they design a
7 sleep in a tent poster encouraging people to try the experience.
8 be in the newspaper • You can display the posters around the classroom.
9 fly in a plane

© Copyright Oxford University Press


Unit 1 23

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ANSWERS
Consolidation 1  has lost   2  haven’t invited   3  haven’t seen   4  have
• Remind students to copy the vocabulary from this visited  5  haven’t heard   6  haven’t done   7  has been
lesson into their vocabulary books.
Exercise 2
Further practice • Students complete the sentences with the present perfect
Website; Workbook  page 69 of the verbs in the box.
• Check the answers with the class.
Grammar    page 13  ANSWERS
1  ’ve read   2  hasn’t flown   3  haven’t met   4  have
Present perfect (affirmative and negative) bought  5  ’ve lost

Aim been / gone


To present and practise the affirmative and negative forms of
the present perfect Aim
To present and practise the difference between been and
Warm-up gone
• Ask students What have you done this morning / afternoon
at school? and elicit present perfect responses if possible. Warm-up and grammar box
• Go through the grammar box with the class and elicit
Grammar boxes students’ answers to the questions.
• Go through the first grammar box with the class. Explain ANSWERS
that finished isn’t the past simple form of finish, but the
1  No, he isn’t.   2  Yes, he is.
past participle. Draw attention to the form of the present
perfect (have (’ve) / has (’s) or haven’t / hasn’t + past • On the board write the following two sentences.
participle). 1 Jack was in the library but now he’s in the classroom.
2 Jack was in the classroom but now he’s in the library.
• Ask students to read the sentences and choose the
correct words in the second grammar box. • Ask students to complete matching sentences in the
present perfect with been or gone: 1 Jack has ____ (been)
• Check the answers with the class.
to the library. 2 Jack has ____ (gone) to the library.
ANSWERS • Remind students to check the rules on page 68.
1  don’t know   ​2  don’t know   ​3  don’t know
Rules    page 68 
• Highlight that the present perfect describes past events
without reference to a time period, e.g. Have you ever met Exercise 3
anyone famous? Yes, I’ve met Madonna. • Students complete the sentences with been or gone.
• The present perfect can also describe events which have Remind them to think carefully about the meaning of
happened in a period of time which has not yet finished, each sentence and to look back at the grammar box if
e.g. (It’s 11 a.m.) I’ve tidied my bedroom this morning. necessary.
• Ask students to look back at the text on page 10 to find • Check the answers with the class.
affirmative and negative examples of the present perfect. ANSWERS
• Remind students to check the rules on page 68. 1  been  ​2  gone  ​3  gone  ​4  been  ​5  gone
Rules    page 68 
Exercise 4 Game!
Past participles • Give students a few minutes to look again at the
experiences on page 12 and to decide which they have
Grammar box done.
• Go through the grammar box with the class. • Put students into pairs to compare their experiences and
• Point out that for regular verbs the past participle ends see who has done more things.
in -ed, as in the past simple. Say the base form of some • Ask pairs to report back to the class and see who in the
regular verbs and elicit the past participles, e.g. T: walk.  class has done the most things.
SS: walked.
• Focus on irregular verbs and draw students’ attention to Finished?
the list on page 98 of the Student’s Book. Choose verbs • Students write sentences about their own experiences.
they have seen in the text on page 10, e.g. do, have, meet, Encourage them to use and and but to join their ideas.
and elicit the past simple and past participle forms. • Ask students to compare their experiences with a partner.
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class. Ask
Exercise 1
other students Have you done this?
• Students complete the sentences with the affirmative or
negative present perfect form of the verbs in brackets. ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.
• Check the answers with the class.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


24 Unit 1

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Consolidation Exercise 3  $ 09
• Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules • Ask students to read the list of activities before they listen.
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books. • Play the CD. Students listen and match the people with
the activities.
Further practice • Check the answers with the class.
Website; Workbook  pages 68−70 ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 09
1  a meal in a restaurant   ​2  a film   3​   a football match   ​
Communication    page 14  4  a room in a hotel
1
Receptionist  Hello. Bella Italia. Can I help you?
Booking an activity Clive  Yes, please. I’d like to book a table for six tonight.
Receptionist  We have a free table at 8 p.m. Would that
Aim be OK?
To present and practise the language of booking an activity Clive  Yes, that’s fine.
Receptionist  OK. Can I have your name and phone
Warm-up number, please?
• Elicit or explain the meaning of the verb book. Clive  Yes. It’s Hargreaves, 0118 496 0722.
• Ask What is paintballing? Have you ever been paintballing? Receptionist  Thank you. Goodbye then. See you later.
Do you wear special clothes? Use this discussion to 2
introduce the words session and equipment. Receptionist  Hello. Can I help you?
Sam  Yes, please. I’d like to book two tickets for the 8.30 p.m.
Exercise 1  $ 07 showing of Blue Moon, please.
• Play the CD. Students read and listen, and then complete Receptionist  OK. I’ve booked that for you. You can collect
the booking form. Stronger students can read the your tickets when you get to the cinema.
dialogue themselves and complete the form before Sam  Thanks. Goodbye.
listening to the CD. 3
• Check the answers with the class. Receptionist  Sportsline. How can I help you?
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 14  Sally  I’d like to book two tickets for the Oxford York match on
Friday evening.
ANSWERS
Receptionist  OK. That’ll be £58. Can I have your name and
1 Joe Tucker
email address, please?
2 Saturday 8th February at 1 p.m.
Sally  Sure. It’s Sally Williams and my email is Williams@
3 ten
coldmail.com.
4 £190
Receptionist  I’ve booked the tickets for you. I’ll send you an
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then individually. email to confirm that.
Sally  Great. Thanks.
Learn it, use it!
Receptionist  Not a problem. Bye.
• Go through the Learn it, use it! box with the class. Draw 4
students’ attention to the different ways to ask for booking Receptionist  Good morning. Can I help you?
details and to reply. Fernando  Yes, please. I’d like to book a room for
• Elicit examples of other situations where we need to make tomorrow night.
a booking. Receptionist  OK, that’s fine. Will you need car parking?
• In pairs, students ask and answer questions using the Fernando  No, I’m arriving by train.
expressions in the box. Stronger students can substitute Receptionist  OK, I just need your name then, please.
their own details. Fernando  It’s Fernando Cardoso.
Receptionist  That’s fine. See you tomorrow evening.
Exercise 2 Pronunciation  $ 08 Fernando  Thank you. Goodbye.
• Play the CD. Students listen to the pronunciation of have
in the sentences. Draw special attention to the /əv/ sound Exercise 4 Pairwork
of the unstressed have in questions. • In pairs, students read the information and choose
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then individually. between the two events. Tell them to plan the details they
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 14  will give (day, time, number of people).
• Practise the pronunciation of the prices with the class.
Extra activity • Explain 18+ age limit.
• Read out the sentences from exercise 2 placing the • Students take turns to play the parts of the receptionist
stress on the underlined words as follows. Students and the person making a booking.
underline the stressed syllables (Have you been here • Students can then make dialogues about the other event.
before? Yes, I have. Have you booked a session? No, I
haven’t.).
• Monitor and give help where necessary.
• Ask one or two pairs to act out their dialogues for the class.
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
Unit 1 25

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Extra activity Exercise 2
• Students can make another role play, choosing an activity • Students reorder the words to make questions and then
write true short answers.
from exercise 3 or a different activity of their own choice.
• Check the answers with the class.
Further practice ANSWERS
Website; Workbook  page 71 1 Has your best friend ever been to the UK?
2 Have you ever seen a tiger?
3 Have you and your family ever moved house?
Grammar    page 15  4 Have you ever played table tennis?
5 Have your parents ever made pizzas?
Present perfect (interrogative and short 6 Have you ever swum in a lake?
answers) Students’ own answers.

Aim Exercise 3
To present and practise the interrogative and short answer • Students write two negative sentences for each set of
forms of the present perfect prompts.
• Check the answers with the class.
Warm-up
ANSWERS
• On the board, write ____ (Have) you ____ (eaten) Indian 1 My parents haven’t met my teacher. My parents have
food? ____ (Have) you ____ (ridden) a horse? never met my teacher.
• Ask students to complete the sentences. See if you can 2 I haven’t run ten kilometres. I’ve never run ten
elicit affirmative and negative short answers. kilometres.
3 Alice hasn’t eaten Thai food. Alice has never eaten Thai
Grammar box
food.
• Go through the grammar box and draw students’ attention 4 You haven’t been to Paris. You’ve never been to Paris.
to the forms of the interrogative and short answers. 5 We haven’t tried whitewater rafting. We’ve never tried
• Review some past participles of irregular verbs by writing whitewater rafting.
the infinitives on the board and eliciting the past participle.
• Ask students to look back at the text on page 10 and to Present perfect / Past simple
find examples of the interrogative form.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 68. Aim
Rules    page 68  To present and practise the difference between the present
perfect and the past simple
Exercise 1
• Students write the present perfect questions and answers. Warm-up and grammar box
• Check the answers with the class. • Ask Have you ever been camping? When did you go? Elicit a
student’s affirmative answer, e.g. Yes, I have. I went last summer,
ANSWERS
then write the questions and answers on the board.
1 Have Flora and Ivan travelled a lot? No, they haven’t.
2 Have I won a prize? Yes, you have. • Go through the grammar box with the class. Ask students
3 Has Lucy ridden a horse? No, she hasn’t. to choose the correct words.
4 Have you found your passport? No, I haven’t. • Check the answers with the class.
5 Has Tim been to Canada? Yes, he has. ANSWERS
1  past simple   ​2  present perfect​
ever / never • Elicit the two different tenses in the questions and
answers on the board. Circle the time expression, e.g. last
Aim summer, and ask which tense describes a past event in
To present and practise the use of ever and never with the a specific time (past simple), and which refers to a past
present perfect event at no particular point in time (present perfect).
• Elicit other examples of time references that can be used
Warm-up and grammar box with the past simple, e.g. yesterday, on Sunday, last week,
• On the board, write Have you ____ (ever) done a parachute last year, two years ago, etc.
jump? No, I’ve ____ (never) done a parachute jump. Rules    page 68 
• Students write ever and never in the correct gaps.
• Students read through the grammar box. Ask students to Exercise 4
complete the rules with ever and never. • Students complete the sentences with the correct verb
• Check the answers with the class. forms.
ANSWERS
• Check the answers with the class.
1  ever  ​2  never ANSWERS
• Remind students to check the rules on page 68. 1  ’s gone   2  saw  3  Did they get married   4  Has Katie
Rules    page 68  ever flown   5  started  6  haven’t tried
© Copyright Oxford University Press
26 Unit 1

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Finished? ANSWERS
• Students write five questions to ask a partner. 1 She’s done the Bronze Award.
2 She showed retired people how to use a computer and
• They exchange questions with their partner and write true
how to go online.
answers.
3 She learnt how to ride a unicycle.
ANSWERS 4 Because she has never been good at sports.
Students’ own answers. 5 She went on a canoeing trip with two friends in Canada.
6 Students’ own answers.
Extra activity
• Ask some pairs to read their questions and answers to Extra activity
the class. Ask other students to ask further questions • Tell students to imagine they are going to do the Duke
about the answers using the past simple. of Edinburgh’s Award.
• As a class, brainstorm some activities that students
Consolidation could do for each section of the award. Make notes on
• Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules the board.
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books. • Ask students to choose and plan an activity for each
section of the award. Tell them they can use the ideas
Further practice on the board, or their own ideas.
Website; Workbook  pages 68−70 • Students can compare their ideas in pairs and discuss
why they chose these activities.
Skills    pages 16–17  • Ask some students to present their ideas to the class.
Discuss as a class what students could learn from each
Reading of the activities mentioned.

Aim Listening
To read and understand a magazine article about the Duke
of Endinburgh’s Award Aim
Warm-up To listen to a teenager’s experience of the Duke of
Edinburgh’s Award
• Point to the photo of the Duke of Edinburgh and ask Do
you know who this is? Discuss as a class who the Duke of Exercise 3  $ 10
Edinburgh is (see Background notes).
• Give students time to read the sentences.
• Point to the other photos and ask What do you think young
• Play the CD. Students listen and choose the correct
people have to do for the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award? What
answers.
do you think they learn from these things?
• Play the CD again for students to check their answers.
• Elicit a few ideas. Use the photos to teach unicycle and
canoeing. • Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 10
Background notes 1  the same   2  a primary school   3  guitar  
• Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh (born 1921) is the 4  basketball  5  hiking
husband of the British Queen Elizabeth II. He was born Tara  Have you ever slept in a tent, Oliver?
in Greece into the Greek and Danish royal families, but Oliver  Yes, I have. I slept in a tent when I did my Duke of
became a British citizen before he married Elizabeth. Edinburgh’s Award last year.
• The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award scheme encourages Tara  Oh, have you done the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award?
young people to take part in a range of challenging What was it like?
activities designed to help them develop qualities such Oliver  It was great.
as maturity, independence, and leadership. Tara  Did you do the Bronze Award last year?
Oliver  No, I didn’t. I did the Silver Award.
Tara  Is that very different from the Bronze Award?
Exercise 1
Oliver  Not really. The four sections are the same, but you do
• Read through the list of activities with the class, and check the activities for longer.
that students understand them all. Tara  What community work did you do?
• Students read the magazine article and tick the activities Oliver  I helped at a homework club at a primary school. It
that Jessica mentions. was fun!
ANSWERS Tara  What else did you do?
canoeing playing football volunteering Oliver  Umm … well, for the skills section I learnt to play a
musical instrument. I thought about the drums, but in the
Exercise 2 end I chose the guitar. Then for the sport …
• Students read the article again and answer the questions. Tara  I know! You joined the school football team.
• Check the answers with the class. Oliver  No, I didn’t actually. I joined the school basketball
team. I’m still on the team!
• Discuss question 6 with the class, encouraging as many
Tara  That’s great!
students as possible to join in and express their opinions.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
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Oliver  Then … I went on an expedition with my friends.
Consolidation
Tara  Where did you go?
Oliver  We went hiking in Snowdonia. And we slept in • Tell students that they should keep a note of mistakes
mountain huts. It was freezing! that they make in their writing, and use the grammar
Tara  It sounds amazing! rules in the Workbook to revise and learn grammar
points that they find difficult.
Extra activity
• Write these gapped sentences on the board. Further practice
1 Oliver did his Duke of Edinburgh’s Award last  . Website; Workbook  page 72
2 For the Silver Award, you have to do the activities for
 .
3 Oliver is still on the school basketball  .
4 Oliver and his friends slept in huts.
5 It was  .
• Students work individually or in pairs to complete the
sentences from memory with one word.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
1  year  2  longer  3  team  4  mountain  5  freezing

Speaking
Aim
To practise talking about experiences

Exercise 4 Pairwork
• Read the task with the class, then ask two confident
students to read out the example questions and answers.
• Elicit or point out that we use the present perfect to ask
about experiences, then the past simple to find out more.
• Read through the experiences with the class and check
that students understand everything.
• Put students into pairs to ask and answer the questions.
• Ask some pairs to tell the class something they learnt
about their partner.

Writing
Aim
To write a postcard about an exciting holiday

Exercise 5
• Students read Dave’s postcard.
• Elicit some ideas to replace the phrases in bold and
brainstorm some ideas to add in the second paragraph.
Make notes on the board.
• Students replace the phrases in bold with their own ideas
and write a second paragraph with their own ideas.
• Students swap their postcard with their partner who
corrects any mistakes.
• Ask some students to read their postcards to the class. Ask
other students Whose holiday sounds the most fun? Why?
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


28 Unit 1

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2 I haven’t finished it yet!

• Play the CD. Students read, listen, and find the book titles.
Grammar
• Check the answers with the class.
Present perfect + yet and already
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 18 
Present perfect + just
Present perfect + for / since ANSWERS
1  The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay
Vocabulary 2  Russian Roulette, Scorpia Rising, and Crocodile Tears.
Books Exercise 2 Comprehension
• Students read the text again and answer the questions.
Communication
• They can compare answers in pairs.
Buying presents
• Check the answers with the class. Check students
Pronunciation: /h/
understand fight, protect, spy, suspense, and librarian.
Skills ANSWERS
Reading: A short story 1 She was nine years old.
2 They happen in an imaginary world.
Listening: A teenager talking about his reading habits
3 She prefers the books.
Speaking: Talking about a book you have read recently 4 He likes spy stories.
Writing: A book review 5 Anthony Horowitz wrote the Alex Rider series.
6 Think about what interests you, then ask your local
Topic librarian or bookshop. There’s something for everyone.
Different types of books
Consolidation
• Remind students to copy any new vocabulary from the
Presentation    page 18  text into their vocabulary books.

Aim Language focus    page 19 


To present the new language in an interesting context
Aim
Text To practise the target language
The article discusses the popularity of books with
teenagers, and two teenagers describe the books they Exercise 3
most like to read. • Explain Russian roulette and crocodile tears.
• Students read the text again and decide if the things have
Background notes or haven’t happened yet.
• The Harry Potter fantasy novels by British writer • Check the answers with the class.
JK Rowling have sold over 500 million copies and
have been made into a series of films starring Daniel ANSWERS
Radcliffe. 1  (✓)  ​2  (✗)  ​3  (✗)  ​4  (✓)
• Suzanne Collins, an American television scriptwriter and Exercise 4
novelist, is best known for The Hunger Games trilogy.
• Students look back at the text to find which phrases Anna
The Hunger Games (2012) is the first in the Hunger
and Ben use to describe each of the four books.
Games film series based on her novels, starring Jennifer
Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen. • Draw attention to the use of already and yet.
• The British writer Anthony Horowitz has written over 50 • Students can compare answers in pairs.
novels. He has also written screenplays for television. • Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
Warm-up 1  d  ​2  a  ​3  b  ​4  c
• Ask What sort of things do you read? Elicit answers.
• Ask students to read the title of the text and ask them Background notes
what they think it means (Some people have the • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003) is by
impression that teenagers don’t read enough.). JK Rowling. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and
Sherlock Holmes Short Stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Exercise 1 Read and listen  $ 11 are from the Oxford Bookworms series. The Amber
• Students look at the book cover. Find out who has read Spyglass (2000) is by Philip Pullman.
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and elicit other
books in the Harry Potter series.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
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Exercise 5 Focus on you ANSWERS
• Go through the list. Elicit or give the titles in the students’ 1  detective story / crime story   ​2  autobiography  ​
language and elicit the names of the authors. 3  love story   ​4  horror story   ​5  fantasy story   ​
6  biography  ​7  spy story
• Students write sentences as in the example.
• Find out which is the most popular book. Exercise 2  $ 12
ANSWERS • Read through the sentences with the class and explain
Students’ own answers. spaceship and murderer.
• In pairs, students read the sentences and match them
Exercise 6 Pairwork with the book types. This can be done as a whole-class
• In pairs, students exchange information about books they activity if you prefer.
have and haven’t read yet. • Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
• Monitor and check students are using the present perfect • Check the answers with the class.
correctly with already and yet.
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 12
ANSWERS 1  love story   ​2  science-fiction story   ​3  autobiography  ​
Students’ own answers. 4  spy story   5​   detective story / crime story   6​   horror
story  ​7  fantasy story   ​8  biography
Vocabulary    page 20  • Students listen again and repeat chorally, then
individually.
Books Exercise 3 Pairwork
• Students choose one of the book types and make up
Aim the opening sentence of a book. Tell them to include
To present and practise vocabulary for different types of characters or situations that will provide clues about the
books: autobiography, biography, detective story / crime story, type of book.
fantasy story, horror story, love story, science-fiction story,
• Students take turns to read their sentence to a partner,
spy story
who guesses the type of book.
Warm-up • Stronger students can choose one or two more book
• Books closed. Giving spy story as an example, ask students types and write opening sentences. Weaker students can
to think of as many different genres of books as they can, work in pairs to write the opening sentence, and then join
using their own language. another pair to read and guess.
ANSWERS
Background notes Students’ own answers.
• The Hydrogen Sonata, published in 2012, is Iain M Banks’
ninth Culture novel about the science-fiction society, Extra activity 1 (for weaker students)
the Culture. • In pairs, students discuss their favourite types of book,
• The Hound of the Baskervilles was published in 1902 using the following example dialogue:
and was the third of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s novels to S1: What do you think about fantasy stories?
feature Sherlock Holmes. S2: I don’t like them. I think they’re boring.
• Trollope’s autobiography in An Autobiography and Other S1: Really? I think they’re great. But I hate love stories, etc.
Writings by Anthony Trollope is the only autobiography
by a major Victorian novelist. It was published after his Extra activity 2 (for stronger students)
death in 1882 and was a best-seller. • In pairs, students discuss films they have seen which
• From the Heart by Alan C. McKean and Merlin by Janet are based on books they have read. They decide if they
Hardy-Gould are from the Oxford University Press prefer the book or the film.
Dominoes series, which offers students a fun reading • Ask some students to give their opinions and invite the
experience while building their language skills. others to agree or disagree.
• Frankenstein by Mary Shelley was published in 1818 and
tells the story of the monster created by the scientist, Extra activity 3
Frankenstein. • Find out which is the most popular genre in the class
• Mozart is a biography of the famous musician and was by calling out each of the vocabulary items and asking
published in 2006. It was written by Julian Rushton. students for a show of hands.
• The Big Story by John Escott is from the Oxford • Students record the results in a graph or pie chart for
Bookworms series, which gives students practice homework.
accessing information with high-interest topics.
Extra activity 4
Exercise 1 • Students design a poster of their favourite book for
homework. Encourage them to illustrate it and to
• Individually or in pairs, students match the covers with
include a short description of why they think people
the book types.
should read it.
• Check the answers with the class.
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Consolidation Exercise 3
• Remind students to make a copy of the new vocabulary • Read out the three example answers and point out how
they relate to the prompts.
from this lesson into their vocabulary books.
• Students write the sentences.
Further practice • Check the answers with the class.
Website; Workbook  page 74 ANSWERS
1 I’ve already made my bed.
Grammar    page 21  2
3
Have you watched Sally’s new video yet?
Mike hasn’t seen the photos of his birthday party yet.
4 The train hasn’t arrived yet.
Present perfect + yet and already 5 We’ve already watched the latest Superman film.
6 Have you read this autobiography yet?
Aim
To present and practise the use of already and yet with the Exercise 4
present perfect • Go through the list with the class and check students
understand post something on a blog. Remind students of
Warm-up and grammar box the list of irregular verbs on page 98.
• Review the present perfect by writing on the board, • Students write sentences with already and yet.
gapped sentences, questions, and short answers with
• Check the answers with the class.
the main and auxiliary verbs missing, for students to
complete. ANSWERS
• Review the meanings of already and yet. 1 She’s already made her bed.
2 She hasn’t cleaned her room yet.
• Ask students a few questions with yet, e.g. Have you had
3 She hasn’t done the shopping yet.
lunch yet? Have you finished your (art project) yet? Have you
4 She’s already finished her homework.
seen (film title) yet? Elicit short answers: Yes, I have or No, I
5 She hasn’t spoken to Ana about tonight yet.
haven’t, and, if possible, answers with already.
6 She’s already posted photos on her blog.
• Ask a student to read out the example question and 7 She hasn’t bought her mum’s birthday present yet.
answers in the grammar box. 8 She’s already studied for the English test.
• Students complete the two gapped sentences with
already and yet. Exercise 5
Answers • Students complete the email with the words in the box.
1  yet  ​2  already • Check the answers with the class.
• Explain that we use yet in negative and interrogative ANSWERS
sentences to talk about something that hasn’t happened, 1  already  ​2  haven’t  ​3  already  ​4  yet  ​5  ’ve already   ​
but we are expecting it to happen. 6  yet  ​7  has
• Explain that we use already in affirmative sentences to
talk about something that has happened, often sooner Exercise 6 Game!
than we expected. • Put students in pairs and read out the instructions.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 73. Individually, students write down their six guesses about
actions their partner has already done / hasn’t done yet
Rules    page 73 
this week.
Exercise 1 • Students ask their questions. They get one point for each
• Students read the sentences and choose the correct words. correct answer and add up their score at the end.
• They can compare answers in pairs. • Find out which students scored the maximum of six
• Check the answers with the class. points. Elicit some of their sentences with already and yet.

ANSWERS Finished?
1  already  ​2  yet  ​3  yet  ​4  already  ​5  already  ​6  yet • Students write about things they have and haven’t done
today.
Exercise 2
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class.
• Students use the prompts to write the sentences in the Ask other students Is this sentence true for you, too?
correct order. Remind them to think carefully about the
position of already and yet. ANSWERS
• Check the answers with the class. Students’ own answers.

ANSWERS Extra activity


1 Have you read this spy story yet? • Students choose a famous person. They write a list of
2 I’ve already done my homework. things this person has already done and things he / she
3 Hurry up! The film has already started. hasn’t done yet without revealing his / her identity.
4 Have you met the new student yet? • In pairs, students use their list to describe the person.
5 We haven’t done the shopping yet. Their partner has to guess who it is.
6 Bruno has already downloaded some songs.
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Consolidation Exercise 2 Pronunciation  $ 14
• Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules • Play the CD. Students listen to the pronunciation of the
letter h in each word.
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books.
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then
Further practice individually.
Website; Workbook  page 73 Transcript    Student’s Book  page 22 

Extra activity
Communication    page 22  • If students need more practice, say some more words
for students to repeat, e.g. house, happy, help, has,
Buying presents Hawaii, etc.

Aim Exercise 3  $ 15


To present and practise language for buying presents • Ask students to describe what they can see in the pictures.
Pre-teach snowglobe, mug, souvenir, wrap, and gift bag.
Warm-up
• Play the CD. Students listen and answer the questions.
• Ask students When did you last buy a present? Who was it
for? What was it? Where did you buy it? Elicit responses. • They can compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
Exercise 1  $ 13
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 15
• Pre-teach receipt and check students understand 1  baseball cap; brother; £6.99   ​2  snowglobe and mug;
best‑seller and change. mum and dad; £12.98   ​3  T-shirt and gift bag; sister;
• Students read through the dialogue and the expressions £17.98
in the box before they listen. Ask them to predict where 1
the expressions belong. Assistant  Good afternoon. Can I help you?
• Play the CD. Students listen and complete the dialogue. Boy  Um, I’m looking for a present for my brother. How much
• Check the answers with the class. is this T-shirt?
Assistant  The white T-shirt? It’s £14.99.
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 13
Boy  Mmm, that’s quite expensive.
1  I’d like to get   2  What about   3  How much does it Assistant  What about the baseball cap? It’s only £6.99.
cost  4  I’ll take it   5  Here’s your change Boy  OK, I’ll take it.
Assistant  Good morning. Can I help you? Assistant  That’s £6.99 then.
Julia  Yes, please. I’m looking for a present for my dad. 1I’d like Boy  Here you are.
to get him a book. Assistant  Here’s your change and your receipt. Thank you.
Assistant  Well, what kind of books does he read? 2
Julia  He loves crime stories. Assistant  Hello. Can I help you?
Assistant   Has he read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Girl  Yes, please. How much is the snowglobe?
Larsson? It’s a best-seller. Assistant  It’s usually £9.99 but there’s a sale at the moment
Julia  Yes, he has. He’s already read it. He loved it. and it’s only £7.99.
Assistant  2What about The Girl Who Played with Fire, then? It’s Girl  OK. And how much is the mug?
the next book in the series. I’ve just finished it. It’s great! Assistant  In the sale it’s £4.99.
Julia Cool! 3How much does it cost? Girl  OK, I’ll take the snowglobe for my mum and the mug for
Assistant  It’s £8, but there’s a sale at the moment. There’s a my dad. How much is that?
10% discount, so that’s £7.20. Assistant  It’s £12.98 altogether.
Julia Great. 4I’ll take it. Here you are. Girl  Here you are.
Assistant  5Here’s your change and your receipt. 3
Julia Thanks. Assistant  Hello. Can I help you?
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then Boy  Yes, please. I’m looking for some souvenirs.
individually. Assistant  The souvenirs are over there near the window.
Boy  Thank you. How much is this T-shirt?
Learn it, use it!
Assistant  It’s £14.99.
• Go through the Learn it, use it! box with the class. Explain Boy  Hmm. OK, I’ll take it. Could you wrap it for me? It’s a
that just in I’m just looking means only or simply. present for my sister.
• Ask students to look back at the dialogue to find examples Assistant  Sorry, we don’t wrap things here, but there are
of the expressions in the box. some gift bags over there. They’re £2.99 each.
• In pairs, students practise using the expressions. Boy  OK, I’ll take one.
Assistant  That’s £17.98 altogether.
Extra activity Boy  £17.98. Here you are.
• In pairs, students act out the dialogue in exercise 1. Assistant  Here’s your change.
• Ask one or two pairs to act out the dialogue for the
class.

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Exercise 4 Pairwork Extra activity
• In pairs, students plan their dialogue, deciding on the type • Mime being asleep and then waking up suddenly and
of shop, its products, and what the customer wants to buy.
looking surprised. Ask What have I just done? (You’ve
• In pairs, students act out the dialogue and then swap roles. just woken up.) Ask students in turn to mime doing
• Ask one or two pairs to act out their dialogue for the class. something, then ask other students to guess what they
ANSWERS have just done.
Students’ own answers.
Further practice Present perfect + for / since
Website; Workbook  page 76
Grammar box
• Read out the sentences.
Grammar    page 23  • Students complete the rules with for and since.
• Check the answers with the class.
Present perfect + just
• Remind students to check the rules on page 73.
Aim Rules    page 73 

To present and practise the present perfect with just, and the Exercise 3
present perfect with for and since • Students complete the time expressions with for or since.
Warm-up • Check the answers with the class.
• With books closed, write these verbs on the board: break, ANSWERS
do, eat, find, finish, have, miss, pass, score, send, take. 2  for  3  for  4  since  5  for  6  since  7  since  8  for
• Tell students they will need to know the past participles
of these verbs for this lesson. Ask Which verbs do you think Exercise 4
have irregular past participles? • Students complete the sentences with the correct verb
• Put students into pairs and get them to guess the past forms and words.
participles of the verbs. They can then check their answers • Check the answers with the class.
in the list of irregular verbs on page 98. ANSWERS
1  has studied; for   2  have lived; since   3  hasn’t eaten;
Grammar box since  4  ’ve had; for   5  haven’t read; for   6  haven’t
• Read out the sentences. seen; since
• Students choose the correct words to complete the rules.
• Check the answers with the class. Finished?
• Students write sentences about themselves, using for and
ANSWERS
since.
1  affirmative  2  have or has
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class.
• Explain that we use just in affirmative sentences to talk Ask other students to change them so that they are true
about something that has happened, often sooner than
for them.
we expected.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 73. ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.
Rules    page 73 

Exercise 1 Consolidation
• Students complete the sentences with the correct verb • Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books.
forms and just.
• Check the answers with the class.
Further practice
ANSWERS Website; Workbook  page 73
1  has just scored   2  ’ve just had   3  ’ve just finished  
4  ’s just taken   5  ’ve just sent
Skills    pages 24–25 
Exercise 2
• Point to the first picture and read out the example Reading
sentence.
• Students write the sentences. Aim
• Check the answers with the class. To read and understand an extract from a spy story
ANSWERS Warm-up
1 She’s just done the shopping. • Ask students to look at the picture. Ask Who can you see
2 He’s just broken a bottle. in the picture? (A man and a woman.) Where are they? (In a
3 They’ve just missed the bus. café.) Students look at the title. Ask What are the man and
4 It’s just eaten a fish. woman talking about? Elicit students’ guesses.
5 He’s just had a swim.
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Exercise 1 6 His favourite author is Charlie Higson.
• Students read the story quickly and answer the question. 7 His favourite book is SilverFin – the first young James
• Check the answer with the class. Ask What is agent 006’s Bond book.
job? (She’s a spy.) Who does she work for? (The government 8 He bought a book that David Beckham, the football
Secret Services) What is she doing at the coffee shop? (She’s player, has written about his life. / He bought David
working there and listening to the man at the table.) Beckham’s autobiography.
Interviewer  How often do you read?
ANSWER Lee  I love reading. I read every day.
The waitress is agent 006. Interviewer  When do you read?
Lee  My favourite time to read is in bed before I go to sleep.
Exercise 2 Interviewer  How many books have you read since the
• Pre-teach pour, smile, gun, kill, shocked, and special forces. beginning of the year?
• Students re-read the text in detail and answer the Lee  Mmm … one, two, three, four, five, six. I’ve read six books
questions. since January. I’ve just started my seventh.
• Check the answers with the class. Interviewer  What type of books do you like?
Lee  I like spy stories and science fiction. I like non-fiction,
ANSWERS
too. I like biographies particularly of sportspeople and
1 He returned on Monday.
musicians.
2 She poured the coffee.
Interviewer  What type of books do you hate?
3 He hasn’t told her because it’s top secret.
Lee  I read everything … except love stories!
4 It is very exciting and dangerous.
Interviewer  Who is your favourite author?
5 He killed someone a week ago.
Lee  My favourite author is Charlie Higson. I’m a big James
6 She calls her boss at Secret Services MI9.
Bond fan and I love the young James Bond series. I’ve read
• Elicit the meanings of the expressions, I’m not sure, Oh all five books in the series.
come on, I risk my life every day, didn’t seem interested, he’s Interviewer  What’s your favourite book of all time?
just admitted the murder, and well done. Lee  Mmm … that’s a hard question! Probably SilverFin – the
first young James Bond book.
Extra activity
Interviewer  What was the last book you bought?
• Books closed. Ask more questions to see how much Lee  The last book I bought was a book that David Beckham,
students remember, e.g. Where has the man just been? the football player, has written about his life.
(In Australia) What has he done this month? (He’s flown Interviewer  And how do you choose a book to read, Lee?
a plane, done a parachute jump, and met a famous Lee  Well … I often read reviews on the Internet, and friends
politician.) How do we know he’s dangerous? (He’s killed sometimes recommend books, too. When friends have
lots of people.) just read a really interesting book they usually tell me
about it …
Listening
Speaking
Aim
To listen to an interview with a teenager about his reading Aim
habits To ask and answer questions about a book you have read
recently and complete a questionnaire
Warm-up
• Students name authors and describe books by them. Then Warm-up
they vote for the best-sounding book. • Prepare students for exercise 4 by choosing a book that
• On the board, write the following names: Charlie Higson, everyone has studied at school. Ask the questions from
Young James Bond, SilverFin, and David Beckham. Explain the questionnaire and elicit answers from the class.
that the students will hear the names in the listening • For question 8, you could elicit as many adjectives as
exercise. possible to describe a book. Write students’ suggestions
on the board under the headings Positive and Negative.
Exercise 3  $ 16
• Ask students to read the questions and to think about Exercise 4 Pairwork
which key words they need to listen out for. • Give students time to think about the book they last read
• Play the CD. Students listen and answer the questions. and to consider their answers to the questions.
• Check the answers with the class. • In pairs, students ask each other the questions and record
the answers. Monitor and give help where necessary.
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 16
• Ask some students to tell the rest of the class about their
1 He reads every day.
partner’s answers.
2 He reads (in bed) before he goes to sleep.
3 He’s read six books (since the beginning of the year). ANSWERS
4 He likes spy stories, science fiction, and non-fiction Students’ own answers.
books.
5 He hates love stories.

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Writing
Aim
To write a book review

Warm-up
• Ask students if they ever read reviews of books, films,
or TV shows. Ask What do you expect to find out from a
good review?
• Write their answers on the board and leave them up.

Exercise 5
• Students choose a book and use the questionnaire in
exercise 4 to plan a review. Tell them to make notes first
on each of the questions and then to use their notes to
produce a first draft.
• Students swap drafts with a partner, who checks and
corrects any mistakes.
• Students then write a final version of their review in class
or for homework. They can add illustrations or photos if
they wish.
• You can display the reviews around the class and
encourage students to read each other’s work.
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.

Extra activity 1
• In groups, students make a list of three or four novels
that they have all read.
• They then take turns to describe a character from one
of these books, without naming him / her or any other
character in the book. The other students in the group
listen and guess the name of the character.

Extra activity 2
• In pairs, students choose a writer that they both like.
Ask them to do some research for homework to gather
some information about this person.
• In class, students pool their information and plan an
interview for a TV chat show. One student takes the part
of the writer and the other takes the part of the chat
show host. They work together to prepare questions
and answers, and practise their interview.
• Ask pairs to act out their interview for the class.

Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 77

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A Review

Grammar Exercise 5
Present perfect (affirmative and negative) Background notes
Past participles • Sydney is a city on Australia’s south-east coast and is the
been / gone country’s largest city. It has a population of more than
Present perfect (interrogative and short answers) 4.5 million people.
ever / never
ANSWERS
Present perfect / Past simple
1  just  ​2  yet  ​3  already  ​4  for  ​5  has been   ​
Present perfect + yet and already 6  haven’t been   ​7  been
Present perfect + just
Present perfect + for / since My Progress
• Students read the sentences and choose the faces that
Vocabulary are true for them.
Experiences: be in the newspaper, climb a mountain, do a • If students have fewer than three smiley faces, encourage
parachute jump, fly in a plane, go whitewater rafting, meet them to review the grammar or vocabulary of the
a famous person, ride a horse, sleep in a tent, visit a foreign previous two units and do more practice.
country, win a competition
Songs
Books: autobiography, biography, detective story / crime
story, fantasy story, horror story, love story, science-fiction The following songs would be appropriate to use at this
story, spy story point:
• The Long Way Around by Dixie Chicks (past simple /
present perfect)
Vocabulary • A Little Deeper by Ms Dynamite (present perfect)
Exercise 1 • Memory Lane by McFly (past simple / present perfect)
• Thank You for the Music by ABBA (present perfect)
ANSWERS
​2  f  ​3  b  ​4  h  ​5  a  ​6  g  ​7  c  ​8  d • Message in a Bottle by The Police (present perfect)
• Here Comes the Sun by The Beatles (present perfect)
Exercise 2
ANSWERS
1  love story   ​2  detective story / crime story 
​3  science-fiction story   4​   horror story  
​5  autobiography / biography   ​6  spy story

Grammar

Background note
• The London Eye is one of the largest Ferris wheels in
the world and attracts more than 3.5 million visitors a
year. It is on the south bank of the River Thames.

Exercise 3
ANSWERS
1  ’ve seen   ​2  ’ve visited   ​3  ’ve walked   4​   ’ve eaten   ​
5  haven’t had   ​6  has spent   ​7  hasn’t been   ​8  hasn’t
rained

Exercise 4
ANSWERS
1  Have you seen   ​2  have  ​3  was  ​4  put 
5  Have you ever met   6​   haven’t  ​7  saw

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A Culture club

Grammar Exercise 3 Focus on you


Present perfect
• Students make notes on the questions in the exercise to
prepare a short text.
Past participles
• If students need more support with this, you can
been / gone brainstorm ideas as a class and write them on the board.
ever • Students write a draft of their text and swap with a
Imperatives partner, who checks it for mistakes.
can • They write a final version.
• Ask students to read their texts to the rest of the class or
Vocabulary display them on the wall.
Experiences
ANSWERS
Geography
Students’ own answers.
Wild animals
Extra activity
Topics • Students write a short paragraph or tell the class about
Visiting different places their most exciting experience. When everyone has spoken,
Discovering new experiences students vote to choose the most exciting experience.
• You could record students’ experiences on the board and
see how many students have done particular things. If
Aim there are enough common experiences, students could
To read and understand a tour operator’s web page offering record the results in a pie chart or graph for homework.
adventure tours in Argentina
Further practice
Warm-up
Workbook  pages 68−77
• Ask Has anyone been on an adventure or activity holiday?
What outdoor activities did you do? Elicit different activities
and write them on the board.

Background notes
• An adventure holiday focuses on outdoor activities
such as cycling, trekking, and extreme sports. It may
also include the opportunity to observe wildlife.

Exercise 1
• Before students answer the questions, write wildlife on the
board and explain its meaning. Ask students to scan the
text and see how many examples of wildlife they can find.
(dolphins, penguins, southern right whales).
• Students scan the web page quickly and find out the
number of tours offered by the company.
ANSWER
four

Exercise 2
• Students read the text carefully and answer the questions.
• They can compare answers in pairs.
• Check answers with the class.
answers
1 It’s one of the few moving glaciers in the world.
2 Because only 5,000 now exist.
3 It’s in north-west Argentina.
4 It got its title of cultural capital of the Americas in 2006.
5 She’s travelled three times with Argentina Adventure
Tours.
6 He’s ridden horses, seen whales, penguins, and
dolphins, and learnt to dance the tango.
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3 What should I do?

• They can compare answers in pairs.


Grammar
• Check the answers with the class.
should / shouldn’t
Second conditional ANSWERS
1 If you’ve got headaches or other symptoms caused by
Vocabulary stress.
2 Because students who sleep well get better marks.
Illnesses and symptoms
3 A student should take a break of ten minutes after
studying for 50 minutes.
Communication
4 They should exercise for at least 30 minutes, four times
At the doctor’s a week.
Pronunciation: /ʊ/ and /uː/ 5 Dark chocolate contains chemicals which can improve
your mood and concentration.
Skills 6 They should do one thing they love every day and try to
Reading: An online problem page relax.
Listening: A parent and a teacher talking about a student
Extra activity
Speaking: Giving advice
• Write these questions on the board or read them to the
Writing: A reply to a message post giving advice
class.
1  What problems can stress cause?
Topics 2  What should you do to fall asleep more quickly?
Health 3  What advice does the web page give about walking?
Looking after your physical well-being 4  What would happen if you ate a big bar of
chocolate?
• Students answer the questions from memory, then
Presentation    page 28  check their answers in the health advice page.
• Check the answers with the class.
Aim ANSWERS
To present the new language in an interesting context 1 It can cause headaches and other problems.
2 You should go to bed before midnight and you
Text shouldn’t use your mobile phone or read in bed.
The text is a web page giving secondary school students 3 You should walk around to avoid backache, and you
advice about how to deal with stress. should walk to school or go for a walk in your lunch
break.
Warm-up 4 You’d have stomach ache.
• Ask How much time do you spend doing homework each
week? Do you get stressed about your studies? What makes Consolidation
you feel stressed? What do you do to help you feel less • Remind students to make a note of any new words or
stressed? What’s the best way to deal with stress? phrases from the text in their vocabulary books.
• Elicit answers, and encourage students to talk about their
own experiences.
Language focus    page 29 
Exercise 1 Read and listen  $ 17
• Read the topics with the class and make sure students Aim
understand everything. To practise the target language
• Play the CD. Students read and listen, and match the tips
with the topics. Exercise 3
• Check the answers with the class. • Students look at the health advice page again and
complete the sentences with the correct verb forms.
ANSWERS
2  Sleep  3  Time management   4  Exercise  5  Food 
• Check the answers with the class. Make sure that students
understand the sentences. You could get students to
6  Relaxation
translate the sentences into their own language to check
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 28  understanding.
Exercise 2 Comprehension ANSWERS
• Students read the health advice page again and answer 1  ’d be   2  rested; ’d have   3  wouldn’t feel; ate  
the questions. 4  would you do; didn’t have

© Copyright Oxford University Press


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Exercise 4 • Students listen again and repeat chorally, then
• Read the example sentence and elicit or point out that we individually.
use should for advice.
Extra activity
• Students write sentences with should or shouldn’t from the
health advice page. • In small groups or as a whole class, students take
turns to choose an illness / symptom from exercise 1
• Check the answers with the class.
and mime it. The others guess what it is, giving their
ANSWERS answer in a full sentence (You’ve got a sore throat / a
1 You should make a timetable to manage your time. temperature, etc.).
2 You shouldn’t spend too much time sitting down.
3 You shouldn’t have too much chocolate. Exercise 2  $ 19
Exercise 5 Focus on you • Give students time to read through the dialogues.
• Read through the ideas in the box and check that • Play the CD, pausing after each conversation to give
students understand them all. students time to write the answers.
• Read out the example sentences. • Check the answers with the class.
• Students write sentences with the ideas in the box and • Ask Which phrases ask what the problem is? (What’s the
add four ideas of their own. matter? / What’s wrong?) Which phrases show sympathy?
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class. (Poor you! / Oh, dear.)
Correct any mistakes as a class. ANSWERS
ANSWERS
1  earache  ​2  should  ​3  well  ​4  rash  ​5  should
Students’ own answers. Exercise 3 Pairwork
Exercise 6 Pairwork • Students work in pairs to write two short dialogues
• Put students into pairs to compare and discuss their ideas like the ones in exercise 2. Ask some pairs to read their
and make a poster with their eight favourite tips. dialogues to the class.
• Ask pairs in turn to show their poster to the class and read • Read the task in exercise 3 with the class and tell students
out their tips. they are now going to do spoken practice, without
writing the dialogues first.
• Discuss as a class which are the most important tips.
• Demonstrate the activity with a confident student. Ask
ANSWERS What’s the matter? Encourage the student to choose
Students’ own answers. an illness from exercise 1. When he / she answers,
show sympathy and offer some advice from the box in
Consolidation exercise 3.
• Suggest to students that they could write some • Students work in pairs to have conversations.
personalized reminders to themselves using should and
shouldn’t, to help them study effectively.
• Ask some students Did your partner give you good advice?
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.
Vocabulary    page 30  Extra activity 1
Illnesses and symptoms • Ask students for other remedies used in their families
for the illnesses in exercise 1. They can discuss these in
groups and report back to the class.
Aim
To present and practise the vocabulary for illnesses and Extra activity 2
symptoms: backache, a cold, a cough, an earache, a headache,
• For homework, students research local or traditional
a rash, a sore throat, stomach ache, a temperature, toothache
cures used in their country for common illnesses. Ask
Warm-up them to make notes and to share their information at
the start of the next class.
• Ask students to look at the pictures and to identify the
illnesses in their own language.
Consolidation
Exercise 1  $ 18 • Remind students to copy the vocabulary from the
• Individually or in pairs, students match the pictures with lesson into their vocabulary books.
the illnesses and symptoms. Tell them to look for parts of
the body in the expressions to help with the meaning. Further practice
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers. Website; Workbook  page 79

ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 18


toothache
1  backache  2  a cough   3  a temperature   4  a cold
5  stomach ache   6  a headache   7  a sore throat
8  a rash   9  an earache
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Grammar    page 31  Extra activity
• Give students the following situations: 1 It’s cold, but I
should / shouldn’t want to go out. 2 I’ve got an important exam tomorrow.
3 I love playing computer games. In pairs or as a whole
Aim class, students give advice for each situation. (Example
To present and practise should and shouldn’t answers: 1 You should take a jacket. 2 You should study.
3 You shouldn’t play for hours without a break.)
Warm-up • Stronger students can think of their own situations and
• Ask students What should you do if you have a headache? ask for advice.
and elicit responses.

Grammar boxes Exercise 3


• Go through the first grammar box with the class. Explain • Read out the example question and point out the word
that should is a modal verb, like can and that for all modal order: should + subject + verb.
verbs there is only one form for all persons. • Students write the questions and short answers.
• Point out that the negative form is shouldn’t. • Check answers by asking students in turn to read out one
• Draw students’ attention to the question and short answer of the questions. Ask another student to give the short
structures with should. Point out that should is used answer.
instead of do / does. ANSWERS
• Go through the second grammar box with the class. 1 Should he go to school? No, he shouldn’t
• Check the answer with the class. 2 Should I exercise more? Yes, you should.
3 Should she ask for help? Yes, she should.
ANSWER
4 Should we study all night? No, you shouldn’t.
base form
• Highlight that modal verbs are always used with another Exercise 4
verb in the base form and that we use should / shouldn’t to • Read out the first part of the online post and the example
give advice. answers. Explain that the replies below all give advice to
• Ask students to look back at the text on page 28 and to Katya.
find examples of should / shouldn’t. • Students complete the online post and replies with should
• Remind students to check the rules on page 78. and shouldn’t and the verbs in the box when necessary.
Rules    page 78  • Check the answers with the class.

Exercise 1 ANSWERS
1  should eat   ​2  should drink   ​3  shouldn’t miss   ​
• Students complete the sentences with should or shouldn’t. 4  should go   ​5  shouldn’t worry   ​6  should; wear   ​
• They can compare answers in pairs. 7  should
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
Extra activity
1 should • Students could work in pairs and write their own reply
​2 shouldn’t with advice for Katya, using should or shouldn’t.
​3 shouldn’t • Ask pairs in turn to read their advice to the class. Ask
​4 should Whose advice is best?
​5 shouldn’t
Finished?
Exercise 2
• Students read the post and write sentences giving advice.
• Read out the example answer and point out that students
have to think of a suitable verb for each sentence. • Students can compare their sentences in pairs.
• Students complete the sentences. • Read the post to the class, then ask some students to read
their sentences out to the class. Ask other students whose
• Students compare their answers in pairs. advice is best. Elicit more advice from the class.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
ANSWERS Students’ own answers.
1 should go
​2 shouldn’t eat Consolidation
​3 should put on • Remind students to make a note of the grammar and
​4 shouldn’t play the rules from this lesson in their grammar books.
• Students can practise reading the dialogues in pairs.
Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 78

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Communication    page 32  • Play the CD. Students listen and repeat chorally, then
individually.
At the doctor’s Transcript    Student’s Book  page 32 

Extra activity
Aim
• If students need more practice with these sounds,
To present and practise language used for a consultation encourage them to shape their lips in a small o for the
with a doctor /ʊ/ sound and to raise their tongues for the /u:/ sound.
Warm-up Then play the CD again for students to repeat.
• Ask students When did you last have a sore throat / • You can then ask them to repeat the following words
backache / toothache? What did you do? Elicit responses. chorally, then individually: /ʊ/ look, push, cook and /uː/
blue, food, flew.
Exercise 1  $ 20
• Draw attention to the picture and ask What is the Exercise 3  $ 22
doctor looking at? What problem has the boy got? Elicit • Students complete the table with the words.
suggestions. • Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
• Pre-teach allergic, prescription, and pill. • Check the answers with the class.
• Students complete the dialogue with the questions in the
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 22
box.
/ʊ/, foot, 1good, 2put, 3would
• They can compare answers in pairs.
/uː/, fruit, 4knew, 5soon, 6through
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
• You could play the CD again for students to listen and
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 20 repeat chorally, then individually.
1  How long have you had it?   2  Where does it hurt? 
3  Are you allergic to any medication?   4  Can I still do Exercise 4  $ 23
sport? • Give students time to read the notes to prepare them for
Doctor  Hello, Liam. How can I help you? the information they need to listen for.
Liam  I’ve got terrible backache. • Play the CD. Students listen and complete the notes.
Doctor  I see. 1How long have you had it? • They can compare answers in pairs.
Liam  I’ve had it for about a week. I was working in the
• Check the answers with the class.
garden when it started to hurt.
Doctor  Right, let me have a look. 2Where does it hurt? ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 23
Liam  Just here. 1  stomach ache   2  temperature  3  Wednesday
Doctor OK. 3Are you allergic to any medication? 4  four  5  three  6  a lot of water
Liam  No, I’m not. Doctor  Good morning, Kaylee. How can I help you?
Doctor  Good. Here’s a prescription for some painkillers. You Kaylee  I’ve got 1stomach ache and a 2temperature.
should take two pills twice a day for a week. Doctor  How long have you had the problem?
Liam  OK, thanks. 4Can I still do sport? Kaylee  I’ve had it since 3Wednesday.
Doctor  No, you shouldn’t do any sport at the moment. You Doctor  OK. I’m going to write a prescription for you. You
should rest. should take this medicine 4four times a day for 5three days.
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then And you should drink 6a lot of water.
individually.
Exercise 5 Pairwork
Learn it, use it! • In pairs, students choose a problem and prepare a
• Go through the Learn it, use it! box with the class. Draw dialogue at the doctor’s. Remind them to look back at the
attention to the different ways of describing pain using dialogue in exercise 1 for useful expressions to use.
hurt and pain. • Students practise their dialogues. Stronger students can
• Practise the falling intonation of the questions. choose another problem, swap roles, and act out another
dialogue.
• Ask students to find examples of the expressions in the
dialogue in exercise 1. • Monitor and check that students are asking and
answering questions appropriately. Make a note of any
• In pairs, students can practise asking and answering
repeated errors to check with the class at the end of
questions using the expressions in the box.
the lesson.
Extra activity • Ask one or two pairs to act out their dialogues for the class.
• In pairs, students practise the dialogue in exercise 1.
Consolidation
Then ask them to swap roles and practise the dialogue
again. Stronger students can change the illnesses / • Remind students to make a note of any new words and
symptoms and use their own ideas. phrases from this lesson in their vocabulary books.

Further practice
Exercise 2 Pronunciation  $ 21 Website; Workbook  page 81
• Voice the /ʊ/ and /uː/ sounds in the table.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
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Grammar    page 33  Extra activity
• Students write new endings for the sentences in
Second conditional exercise 2 and then compare ideas in pairs. Elicit their
ideas for the class.
Aim
To present and practise the second conditional Exercise 3
Warm-up • Students complete the questions and answers with the
correct verb forms.
• Ask students to imagine they could meet any famous
person in the world. Ask Who would you choose? Elicit • Check the answers with the class. Then ask Do you agree
responses using I would like to meet … and write their with the answers? What would you do in these situations?
choices on the board. Elicit a range of answers.
ANSWERS
Grammar boxes 1  found; ’d take   2  would you visit; went  
• Go through the grammar boxes with the class. 3  ’d visit; went
• Ask students to complete the gaps in the second
grammar box. Exercise 4 Game!
• Check the answers with the class. • Students do the quiz individually, then discuss their
answers in pairs.
answers
• Ask pairs in turn Who is more honest, you or your partner?
1  the past simple   ​2  would + base form
• See who is the most honest student in the class overall.
• Draw students’ attention to the verb forms in the two
clauses. Explain that in the if-clause, the verb is always ANSWERS
in the past simple and in the main clause we always use Students’ own answers.
would + base form.
Extra activity
• Tell students that in speech we use the contracted forms
I’d, you’d, etc. instead of I / you would.
• Write these sentence beginnings on the board.
1  If I found …
• Point out that a sentence can begin with either the 2  If I won …
if-clause or the main clause, but when the if-clause comes 3  If one of my friends …
first, we follow it with a comma.
• Ask students to complete them with their own ideas.
• Highlight that we use the second conditional to talk about
unlikely or imaginary situations in the present or the future.
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class.
• Look at the famous people mentioned in the warm-up. ANSWERS
Ask If you met (famous person), how would you feel? Write Students’ own answers.
the question on the board and elicit answers: If I met
(famous person), I’d feel (emotion). Finished?
• Remind students to check the rules on page 78. • Students write three things they would do and three
Rules    page 78  things they wouldn’t do if they won the lottery. Check
they are using the second conditional correctly and
Exercise 1 make a note of any repeated errors to check at the end
• Students choose the correct words in the sentences. of the lesson.
• They can compare answers in pairs. • As a whole class, students exchange ideas.
• Check the answers with the class. ANSWERS
answers Students’ own answers.
1  ’d travel   ​2  ’d pass   3​   would  ​4  didn’t  ​5  ’d call
Extra activity
Exercise 2 • Write If I won the lottery, … on the board. In small
• Students complete the second conditional sentences and groups or as a whole class, students make a chain of
questions with the correct forms of the verbs in brackets. second conditional sentences, e.g. If I won the lottery, I’d
Tell them to look at the grammar boxes if they need help. buy a plane. If I bought a plane, I’d fly to Australia. If I flew
• They can compare answers in pairs. to Australia, …, etc. Continue as long as possible.
• Check the answers with the class.
Consolidation
ANSWERS
• Encourage students to make a note of the grammar and
1  had; would buy   ​2  would be; failed   3​   wouldn’t go; the examples from this lesson in their grammar books.
had  ​4  Would you scream; found   ​5  heard; would you
call
Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 78

© Copyright Oxford University Press


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Skills    pages 34–35  ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 24
Summary a
Mrs Taylor  Good morning, Miss Green. I’m Sarah Taylor –
Reading Peter’s mum.
Miss Green  Oh yes. Thank you for coming.
Aim Mrs Taylor  I’m really worried about Peter. His marks in maths
To read and understand an online problem page are very bad this year.
Miss Green  Yes, they are. I’m not very happy with him.
Warm-up Mrs Taylor  Oh dear! What’s the problem exactly?
• Ask students Do you ever read problem pages? Where do you Miss Green  Well, he doesn’t listen in class.
read them? What kind of problems do people write about? Mrs Taylor  Peter says maths is difficult.
Elicit responses. Miss Green  If he listened to the lessons, it wouldn’t be
difficult.
Exercise 1
Mrs Taylor  But he says he doesn’t understand the lessons.
• Give students time to look at the web page and the Miss Green  But he never asks questions. If he asked questions,
pictures. I’d be happy to explain.
• Students choose the correct answer. Mrs Taylor  Maybe maths is too difficult for him.
• Check the answer with the class. Ask Do you ever read Miss Green  No, that’s not the problem. Peter’s an intelligent
advice pages online or in magazines? boy. If he concentrated more on his work, his marks would
ANSWER
be better.
3  an advice site Mrs Taylor  He doesn’t do much homework. Do you give him
homework every day?
Exercise 2 Miss Green  Yes, he should do twenty minutes of homework
• Give students time to read through the questions. Check every day, but he never does it. If he did his homework, it
that they understand everything. would certainly help.
Mrs Taylor  Oh dear. I didn’t know that. I’m really sorry. I’ll talk
• Students read the web page and then answer the
to Peter tonight and I’ll check his homework in future.
questions.
• Encourage students to write full sentences in their Exercise 4  $ 24
answers. • Give students time to read the six pieces of advice.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs. • Play the CD. Students listen and tick the advice that they
• Check the answers with the class. hear from Miss Green.
ANSWERS • They can compare answers in pairs.
1 The worst part is when Reese’s friends come over and • Check the answers with the class.
his little brother won’t leave them alone.
ANSWERS
2 He should promise to spend some time with his little
They should tick 2, 4, 5, and 6.
brother.
3 Reese’s parents can help him. Extra activity
4 She’s starting a new school because her mum has got a
• In pairs, students imagine and write the conversation
great job in a different town.
that Mrs Taylor has with Peter when she gets home.
5 She’s worried because she’s changing schools in the
middle of the term and she’s going to be ‘the new girl’. • Ask one or two pairs to act out the conversation for the
6 She should ask questions because everyone loves class.
talking about themselves.
7 An after-school club is a great way to make friends
because you already like similar things.

Listening
Aim
To listen to a parent and a teacher talking about a student

Warm-up
• Ask students Do your parents talk to your teachers? When?
What do they talk about? How do you feel about it? Elicit
responses.

Exercise 3  $ 24
• Ask two students to read out the summaries. Elicit the
meaning of pay attention.
• Play the CD. Students listen and choose the correct
summary of the conversation.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


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Speaking Writing
Aim Aim
To discuss problems with a partner and to give advice To write a reply to one of the people in exercise 5 giving
advice
Warm-up
• Ask students Who do you talk to if you have a problem? Do Exercise 6
your friends talk to you if they have a problem? Are you a • Read through the task with the class. Check that students
good listener? Elicit responses. understand everything.
• Elicit some expressions students can use to sound
Exercise 5 Pairwork sympathetic, e.g. Poor you! I’m sure it’s very difficult for you.
• Pre-teach get into trouble. • Students choose a problem from exercise 5 to answer and
• Give students time to read the two posts. To check that make notes for their reply.
they understand everything, ask What’s Mia’s problem? • Students write a first draft of their reply and swap with a
What’s Prash’s problem? partner, who corrects any mistakes.
• Read through the expressions in the box with the class. • Remind students that they should give advice and be
Elicit or give some examples of how to use each one, supportive in their reply.
e.g. Joining a club is a great way to make friends. I’m sure
everything will be fine. You should talk to your parents. You
• Students write a final draft of their replies in class or for
homework.
shouldn’t worry. Why don’t you ask for some help?
• Students work in pairs to discuss the problems and decide answers
what advice to give. Students’ own answers.
• Ask some students to tell the class what advice they
Extra activity
would give to each person.
• Students can read each other’s replies and vote on the
• Discuss as a class what the best advice is.
best advice.
answers
Students’ own answers. Further practice
Workbook  page 82
Extra activity
• Students can think of different problems and discuss
them with a new partner.
• If students need more support, you can brainstorm
other problems as a class and students can choose a
problem to discuss with their new partner.
• Ask pairs to tell the rest of the class about the problem
and the advice they would give.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


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4 They can’t be real!

Grammar • Mountain gorillas live in mountainous areas of Central


Possibility in the present: may / might (not), must, and Africa, mainly in Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic
can’t Republic of Congo. They are now an endangered
species, with only an estimated 880 creatures still living.
a / an, the, no article

Vocabulary Exercise 1 Read and listen  $ 25


Investigation • Give students time to read the opinions.
• Play the CD. Students listen and write the correct name for
Communication each opinion.
Speculating • Check the answers with the class.
Pronunciation: must be, might be, and can’t be ANSWERS
a  Thom  b  Jenny
Skills Transcript    Student’s Book  page 36 
Reading: A magazine article about urban legends
Listening: Two teenagers talking about urban legends Exercise 2 Comprehension
Speaking: Speculating about urban legends • Check that students understand huge.
Writing: Writing an urban legend • Students read the blogs again and answer the questions.
• They can compare their answers in pairs.
Topics • Check the answers with the class.
Stories from other cultures and urban legends ANSWERS
Mysteries from the past 1 He saw a huge, hairy animal.
2 It was walking on two legs.
3 She thinks they must be the footprints of a large animal
Presentation    page 36  but they were the wrong shape for an ape.
4 She thinks it isn’t very clear, but the animal looks like a
Aim bear.
To present the new language in an interesting context 5 Because apes usually prefer warm countries in Africa
and Asia, not cold, northern forests.
Text Consolidation
The text is two blogs about ‘Bigfoot’ or ‘Sasquatch’, a large • Remind students to make a note of any new vocabulary
ape-like animal which a lot of people believe might live in from the text in their vocabulary books.
North American forests.

Warm-up Language focus    page 37 


• Put students into pairs and give them two minutes to
write down as many animals as they can. Aim
• Write students’ ideas on the board. Make sure you include To practise the target language
cow, chicken, elephant, wolf, and cat as students may need
these later in the lesson. See who wrote the most correct Exercise 3
words. • Students complete the summary with the correct articles
• Point to the pictures and read out the title Hunting Bigfoot. or with a line.
Ask What kind of animal do you think this is? Use the • Check the answers with the class. Ask When do you use
pictures to teach ape. Ask Do you think this is a real animal? ‘a / an’, and when do you use ‘the’? When do you use no
Why? / Why not? Are there any stories about animals like this article? Elicit some ideas from students, in the students’
in your country? own language if necessary, but tell them not to worry
• Elicit a range of answers. if they can’t work out the rules because they will be
studying articles later in this unit.
Background notes
ANSWERS
• There have been numerous reported sightings of 1  –  2  the  3  –  4  an  5  –  6  a  7  a
Bigfoot, dating back to the 1920s. The creature is
reported to be between two and three metres tall, Exercise 4
and covered in dark brown or reddish-brown fur. Its • Students complete the sentences with the correct modal
footprints can measure 60 cm long. Most scientists verbs and the verbs from the blog.
discount the sightings as either misidentifications of
• Check the answers with the class. Make sure that students
bears or deliberate hoaxes.
understand all the sentences.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
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ANSWERS • Elicit the idea that scientists can investigate and search for
1  might live   2  can’t be   3  might not know   evidence, to find the truth.
4  must look   5  might not be   6  may exist
Exercise 1  $ 26
Exercise 5 Focus on you • Check that students understand myth and mythbuster
• Point to the first photo and read out the example. Elicit (someone who proves that a myth is not true).
other examples. Prompt students by asking questions, e.g. • Read out the three texts and ask Do you think that any of
Do you think it’s a dog? Is it a horse? them are true? Why? / Why not?
• Students look at the other photos and write sentences. • Students work individually or in pairs to complete the
Encourage students to write two or three sentences about article with the correct words.
each photo. • Play the CD. Students listen and check.
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class. • Play the CD again, pausing after each word for students to
Correct any mistakes with the modal verbs. repeat chorally, then individually.
ANSWERS
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers. 1  solve  2  discover  3  search for   4  check  
Exercise 6 Pairwork 5  record  6  explain  7  believe  8  prove  9  explore
• Ask two confident students to read out the example Exercise 2
dialogue. • Students choose the correct words.
• Students work in pairs to discuss the photos. • Check the answers with the class. Make sure that students
• Ask some pairs to choose a photo and discuss it for the understand all the questions.
class, without saying which photo it is. Ask other students • Give students time to prepare their answers to the
to guess which photo they are discussing. questions individually.
ANSWERS
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers. 1  investigate  2  exploring  3  check; search for  
Exercise 7 Pairwork 4  record  5  proves; believe   6  discovered; explain
• Read the two comments and check that students Exercise 3 Pairwork
understand them. • Students work in pairs to discuss their answers to the quiz.
• Students work in pairs to discuss the two comments. Tell Encourage students to give extra details.
them they must give reasons for their answers. • Ask some students Would you or your partner be a good
• Ask some students to tell the class if they and their partner investigator? Why? / Why not?
agreed or disagreed.
ANSWERS
• Ask for a show of hands to see who believes that Bigfoot
Students’ own answers.
might exist.
ANSWERS Extra activity
Students’ own answers. • Write these sentence beginnings on the board.
1  I would like to investigate …
Extra activity 2  I think it’s possible to prove that …
• Students could find some photos online like the ones 3  I’d love to explore …
in exercise 5. They could stick one or two in their 4  I think it’s impossible to explain …
notebooks and write some sentences saying what they • Students complete the sentences with their own ideas.
might be. • Ask some students to read their sentences to the class.
Ask other students Do you agree? Why? / Why not?

Vocabulary    page 38  ANSWERS


Students’ own answers.
Investigation Consolidation
• Remind students to copy the new vocabulary from this
Aim lesson into their vocabulary books.
To present and practise verbs associated with investigation:
believe, check, discover, explain, explore, investigate, prove, Further practice
record, search for, solve Website; Workbook  page 84
Warm-up
• Ask Do you enjoy learning about mysteries like Bigfoot?
What other mysteries do you know about? Prompt students
with some ideas if necessary, e.g. mysteries of boats or
planes that have disappeared. Ask How is it possible to solve
mysteries like this?

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Grammar    page 39  Extra activity
• In pairs, students practise the dialogue in exercise 2.
Possibility in the present: may / might Stronger students can adapt the dialogue, using their
(not), must, and can’t own words for buildings and places. Before doing this,
brainstorm other monuments with the class, and write
Aim them and their locations on the board.
To present and practise modal verbs used to express
possibility in the present: may / might (not), must, and can’t Exercise 3
• Students read the sentences and decide whether they
Warm-up
contain the correct modal verb.
• Ask What can you remember about Thom and Jenny? Do • Students correct the sentences with the wrong modal verb.
they think that Bigfoot exists?
• They can compare answers in pairs.
• Elicit some answers and write on the board: Thom thinks
that Bigfoot must exist. Jenny thinks that Bigfoot might exist. • Check the answers with the class.
• Point to the sentences on the board and underline the ANSWERS
modal verbs. Ask Who thinks it is possible that Bigfoot exists? 1  (✓)   2  (✗) You must be pleased.   3  (✗) She can’t be.  
(Jenny). 4  (✗) She might be at work or at home.

Grammar boxes Exercise 4 Game!


• Go through the first grammar box with the class. Point out • Students look at the picture and read the questions.
that may, might, must, and can’t are modal verbs, so they • In pairs, students make statements about the picture
each have one form and are followed by another verb in using may / might (not), must, and can’t.
the base form. • With weaker students you could go through the questions
• Students complete the rules in the second grammar box and elicit possible one- or two-word answers, and write
with the correct modal verbs. them on the board, e.g. What country is he in? (France) Why
• Check the answers with the class. is he there? (work). Students can then use the words as
prompts to help them form their statements.
ANSWERS
1  might  2  must  3  can’t • While the students are discussing the picture, check that
they are using the target grammar correctly. Make a note
• Explain that we use may / might when we think something of any repeated errors to check at the end of the lesson.
is possibly true but we aren’t sure. We use must when we
are sure that something is definitely true, and we use can’t Finished?
when we are sure something is definitely not true. • In pairs, students write sentences about the picture.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 83. • Ask students to share their ideas with the rest of the class.
Rules    page 83 
ANSWERS
Exercise 1 Students’ own answers.
• Students read the sentences and choose the correct words.
Extra activity
• They can compare answers in pairs.
• For homework, students find a picture in a magazine
• Check the answers with the class. or newspaper and write statements speculating about
ANSWERS the contents of the picture and reasons to support the
1  can’t  ​2  might  ​3  may  ​4  can’t  ​5  must  ​6  may statements.
• Students display their pictures and accompanying texts
Background notes around the classroom for the class to read.
• Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain in southern England, is
a double circle of huge stones which was constructed Consolidation
in several phases in the Neolithic period, probably • Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules
between 2600 and 2400 BC. Some theories suggest and examples from this lesson in their grammar books.
that Stonehenge was built as a burial site and for rituals
connected with the dead. Other theories suggest that it Further practice
was used as an astronomical observatory. Website; Workbook  page 83

Exercise 2
• Students complete the dialogue with may / might, must,
or can’t. Remind them to look carefully at the context to
work out the degree of certainty in each sentence.
• They can compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
1  may / might   ​2  can’t  ​3  must  ​4  may / might
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Communication    page 40  Exercise 3  $ 29
• Ask students to look at the table. Ask What problem do
Speculating the people have in the three conversations? Ask students to
think about the type of information they will need to fill in.
Aim • Play the CD. Students listen and complete the table.
To present and practise language for speculating about • They can compare answers in pairs.
situations in the present and events in the past • Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 29
Warm-up
1  jacket; in the gym   ​2  MP3 player; in her bag   3​   keys;
• Ask students to look at the picture and ask Where are the at Kevin’s house
people? (Outside a cinema). What’s the problem? (They’re
1
late for a film.) Ask Why do you think they’re late for the film?
Girl  I can’t find my jacket. Have you seen it?
Elicit ideas with may, might, must, and can’t.
Boy  No, I haven’t. When did you have it last?
Exercise 1  $ 27 Girl  I had it at lunchtime.
Boy  Have you looked in the common room? You might have
• Give students time to read the dialogue and the
left it there.
expressions in the box.
Girl  No, it can’t be there. I know I had it when I left the
• Play the CD. Students listen and complete the dialogue common room.
with the expressions. Stronger students can read and Boy  Where did you go after lunch?
complete the exercise on their own, and then listen Girl  I had PE. I know! It must be in the gym!
to check. 2
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 27 Mum  What are you looking for Sophie?
1  might be   ​2  must be   3​   might be late   ​4  might be   ​ Daughter  I’ve lost my MP3 player!
5  may still be   ​6  can’t be Mum  Your room is so untidy. It might be in there under all
Grace Where do you think Mark is? He’s really late. your clothes!
Matthew He 1might be at home. Daughter  Ha ha.
Grace  No, he 2must be on his way. I spoke to him about it Mum  It might be at Wendy’s house.
yesterday. Daughter  No, it can’t be there. I was listening to it on the bus
Matthew  Well, the bus 3might be late. this morning.
Grace  Or he 4might be on the next one. Mum  It might be in your bag.
Matthew  Let’s call him … He isn’t answering. Daughter Mmm … where’s my bag? You’re right. It was in my
Grace  His mobile phone 5may still be at home. bag. Why didn’t I think of that?
Matthew  It 6can’t be at home. He called me half an hour ago 3
on it. Oh look. There he is! Boy  Where are they?
Mark  Where have you been, guys? It’s late. We’re going to Girl  Where are what?
miss the film! Boy  I can’t find my keys.
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then individually. Girl  Have you looked in your room?
Boy  Yes, I have. They’re not there.
Learn it, use it! Girl  They might be in your pocket.
• Go through the Learn it, use it! box. Boy  No, I’ve already looked. … Hello … OK … I’ll come over
• In pairs, students ask and answer using the phrases. and get them now.
Girl  Who was that?
• Stronger students can form a variety of different questions
Boy  It was Kevin. He says he has found my keys.
and answers with the phrases.
Exercise 4 Pairwork
Extra activity
• In pairs, students practise dialogues for the situations in
• In groups of three, students practise the dialogue in the table. You may want to look at the first problem with
exercise 1. They should read as expressively as possible.
the class, eliciting questions, e.g. Where do you think she is?
• Students then choose one of the situations and write a
Exercise 2 Pronunciation  $ 28 dialogue for it using exercise 1 as a guide.
• Ask students to read the sentences before they listen. • Check that students are using the language for
• Play the CD and draw attention to the stress on the modal speculation correctly.
verbs and the weak sound of be. When the word following • Ask one or two pairs to act out their dialogues for the class.
be starts with a vowel, encourage students to link the two
words with a y sound rather than a glottal stop. answers
Students’ own answers.
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then individually.
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 40  Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 86
Extra activity
• Go through the sentences in exercise 2 backwards to
practise the weak forms and stress. For example: … on
his way. … be on his way. He must be on his way.
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Grammar    page 41  Exercise 3
• Students read and complete the texts.
a / an, the, no article • They can compare answers in pairs. If they disagree, ask
them to try to find the relevant rule in the grammar box.
Aim • Check the answers with the class.
To present and practise the differences between a / an, the, ANSWERS
and cases where no article is used before a noun 1  a sound   2  the sound   3  research  
4  the Atlantic Ocean   5  Puerto Rico   6  stories  
Warm-up 7  an old book   8  Italian  9  The old book
• On the board, write I ate   ​banana and    orange at
lunchtime.   ​banana tasted good, but    orange wasn’t Exercise 4 Game!
very nice. Elicit the correct articles (a, an, The, the). • Read the task with the class.
• Raise the question of why we use a / an in the first • Read through the topics with the class. Make sure that
sentence and the in the other. Students may be able to students understand them all.
suggest an answer to this, but if not, move on to the • Give students time to choose the topic for their partner to
grammar box and explain the rules as you go through it. talk about. They then prepare their own ideas.
Grammar box • Tell students they can use the timer on their phone or
• Students read through the rules and complete them watch to time their partner.
with the correct article or with a line where no article is • Students work in pairs and try to talk for one minute. Their
needed. partner times them and tells them when to stop.
• Check the answers with the class. • Monitor and help as necessary. Make sure students swap
roles. Make a note of any repeated mistakes to go over at
ANSWERS
the end of the lesson.
1  a / an   ​2  the  ​3  no article
• Ask Who talked for a minute without stopping?
• Remind students to check the rules on page 83.
ANSWERS
Rules    page 83 
Students’ own answers.
Exercise 1
Finished?
• Students read the sentences and choose the correct
words. Alternatively, you may choose to do this as a • Students write about a famous crime or mystery.
whole class activity, helping students with explanations • Display the stories around the classroom for students to
where necessary. read. Ask students to vote for their favourite story.
• If students do the exercise individually, they can compare ANSWERS
answers in pairs. Then check the answers with the class. Students’ own answers.
ANSWERS
Consolidation
1  an  ​2  the  ​3  homework  ​4  the; a   ​
5  Paulo; a; the sea   ​6  Tokyo; the biggest; Japan • Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books.
Extra activity
• Pick out some of the sentences in exercise 1 and ask Further practice
students to match the answers with rules in the rule Website; Workbook  page 83
box. For example, in sentence 1, we use an ant because
this is something we are talking about for the first time;
but we use the scarf because it is clear which one we
mean.

Exercise 2
• Pre-teach cashier.
• Students read and complete the text. Tell them to look
carefully at the text to see if a noun is appearing for the
first time or has been mentioned earlier.
• Students can compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class. For answer 13, make
it clear that although the word crime has not appeared
earlier in the text, we know which crime it is – it is the
specific one that the report has described.
ANSWERS
1  a  ​2  the  ​3  –  ​4  The  ​5  a  ​6  –  ​7  –  ​8  The  ​
9  the  ​10  the  ​11  the  ​12  an  ​13  the

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Skills    pages 42–43  Listening

Reading Aim
To listen to two teenagers talking about urban legends
Aim
Warm-up
To read and understand an article about urban legends
• Ask students Did you know the story about the Subte A
Warm-up line? How do you think this story might have started? Elicit
• Ask students to look at the title of the text. Ask What do suggestions.
you think the text is about? Elicit suggestions.
Exercise 3  $ 30
Exercise 1 • Before listening, students read the sentences and think
• Students read the question and then read the text quickly about the parts of speech (noun, adjective, or full clause)
to find the answer. that will be needed to complete the gaps. You could tell
students they only need to write one-word answers in the
• Check the answer with the class.
gaps in items 1, 2, and 3.
ANSWER • Students guess the answers. They may know the story
It is a humorous or shocking story that is passed from about the woman on the toilet. Use this as an opportunity
person to person. The story may sometimes seem true, to pre-teach exaggerated, stuck, and flush button.
but no one has ever proved it.
• Play the CD. Students listen and complete the sentences.
Exercise 2 You can pause the CD after some of Jada’s replies.
• Students read the text again in detail and answer the • Students can compare answers in pairs.
questions. • Check the answers with the class.
• They can compare answers in pairs. ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 30
• Check the answers with the class. 1  true  ​2  funny  ​3  person; person; Internet  
​4  she pressed the flush button before she stood up
ANSWERS
Dylan  What do you think of urban legends?
1 It opened in 1913.
Jada  I think some of them are stupid but most of them are
2 Because the lights stop working.
fun.
3 Because it’s an abandoned station.
Dylan  Do you think any of them could be true?
4 They see two men sitting on the platform.
Jada  Some of them may be true but they’re usually
5 Two brothers and all their friends were there.
exaggerated.
6 They noticed a large mark on their parents’ car.
Dylan  What type of urban legends do you like?
7 They thought it must be from the party.
Jada  I think some of the horror stories are great and I like
8 Their mother crashed it just before the weekend.
some of the funny legends.
Extra activity 1 Dylan  How do you think urban legends start?
Jada  I think people tell their friends and they pass from
• Ask students to look at the second paragraph and write
person to person. The Internet is a great way to start them.
the sentences You may have read it on the Internet. /
You can send multiple emails or put the legend on lots of
Someone might have sent it to you.
websites.
• See if you can elicit the meanings of the sentences in Dylan  What’s your favourite urban legend?
the students’ L1. If not, go through each sentence word Jada  I like the story about the woman who was stuck to a
by word. toilet seat on a plane for two hours because she pressed
• Explain that the structure: modal of possibility + have + the flush button before she stood up! It’s funny and it’s
verb in past participle is used to talk about possibility in shocking. The perfect urban legend!
the past.
Extra activity
Extra activity 2 • Ask students to tell the story of the woman in the plane.
• Ask students to find the opposites of the following Give them the opening, e.g. A 54-year-old woman was
words in the text: closed (opened); uncomfortable flying … and elicit suggestions to build up the story.
(comfortable); standing (sitting); lived (died); false (true); • In pairs, students invent details to make the story sound
winter (summer); terrible (amazing); left (returned). realistic (e.g. where the plane was going, how long the
flight took, when the woman went into the toilet, how
Consolidation she finally got out). Elicit and compare students’ ideas.
• Encourage students to make a note of any new words
and expressions from the story in their vocabulary books.

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Speaking Writing
Aim Aim
To discuss and make speculations about urban legends To write a new an urban legend

Warm-up Warm-up
• Ask students Do you sometimes receive emails telling stories • Make up an ordinary event and tell the class, e.g. A man
like the ones in this unit? Do you believe them? Do you send was walking to work when he lost his wallet. Later he found
them on to other people? Do you have a recent example of a it at the police station. Ask students Why isn’t this an urban
story like this? Discuss the questions with the class. legend? Elicit that an urban legend tells a surprising event,
which could be funny or shocking. At the same time it
Exercise 4 must sound as if it could be true.
• In pairs, students read and discuss the questions.
• Point out that could in the second question means the Exercise 7
same as might. • Students write their own urban legend. They can use one
• Monitor and check for any repeated errors to check at the of the situations in the Student’s Book or think of their
end of the lesson. own. Ask them to write notes to plan their story and to
include details to make it sound realistic.
• Ask some students to tell the class their favourite urban
legend. Find out if other students have heard the same • Students use their notes to produce a first draft and then
stories. How did they hear them? Were the details the swap drafts with a partner, who checks and corrects any
same? mistakes.
• Weaker students may find it easier to write the story in
ANSWERS
pairs and swap with another pair for error correction.
Students’ own answers.
• Students write their final version of the story in class or
Exercise 5 Pairwork for homework.
• Read out the text and check its meaning with the class. • Ask students to read out their urban legends or display
• Ask two students to read out the example dialogue. Draw them around the classroom for the other students to read.
attention to the use of language for speculating. The class can vote for the one that they think would be
the most popular.
• Practise the structure for expressing possibility in the
present again. ANSWERS
• In pairs, students discuss what the note might say. Check Students’ own answers.
that they are using appropriate language, and make a
note of any repeated errors to check with the class at the
Extra activity
end of the lesson. • Ask students to look on the Internet to find an urban
legend in their own language. Ask them to translate it
• Elicit a number of different suggestions for the contents of
into English and to tell the story to the class in the next
the note.
lesson.
ANSWERs
Students’ own answers. Further practice
Workbook  page 87
Exercise 6  $ 31
• Play the CD. Students listen and see if they guessed the
correct ending.
• Ask for a show of hands and see how many students
guessed correctly. You could also ask what they think of
the urban legend.
ANSWER / AUDIO CD TRACK 31
A man returned to a car park to find that his car was badly
damaged. At first he was very angry, but then he saw that
the person who had done the damage had left a note. He
opened the note and it said: ‘The people watching me think
I’m leaving my name and address, but I’m not.’

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B Review

Grammar Exercise 6
should / shouldn’t ANSWERS
Second conditional 1  −  ​2  the  ​3  the  ​4  the  ​5  The  ​6  a  ​7  the  ​8  −  ​
9  the  ​10  the
Possibility in the present: may / might (not), must, and
can’t My Progress
a / an, the, no article • Students read the sentences and choose the faces that
are true for them.
Vocabulary • If students have fewer than three smiley faces, encourage
Illnesses and symptoms: backache, a cold, a cough, them to review the grammar or vocabulary of the
an earache, a headache, a rash, a sore throat, stomach previous two units and do more practice.
ache, a temperature, toothache
Investigation: believe, check, discover, explain, explore, Songs
investigate, prove, record, search for, solve The following songs would be appropriate to use at this
point:
• Black and White Town by Doves (should)
Vocabulary
• If I Were a Rich Man (from the film / musical Fiddler on the
Background notes Roof ) (second conditional)
• Egypt is a country in North Africa with a population of • All I Want is You by Barry Louis Polisar, from the film Juno
over 90 million. It is famous for its ancient civilization (second conditional)
and the monuments from that period. The Egyptian • If I Were a Painter by Norah Jones (second conditional)
Pyramids at Giza are a popular travel destination. • It Must Be Love by Madness (must)
• Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756−1791) was a child • Once in a Lifetime by Talking Heads (might)
music prodigy and composer of the Classical era • I’ve Got a Feeling by The Beatles (a / the)
of music. He composed over 600 pieces of music, • Octopus’s Garden by The Beatles (an / the)
including several very popular operas.

Exercise 1
ANSWERS
1  a temperature   2​   a cold   ​3  a cough   4​   a headache   ​
5  stomach ache   ​6  backache  ​7  a sore throat

Exercise 2
ANSWERS
1  discovered  ​2  explained  ​3  believe  ​4  proves  ​
5  searching for   6​   solve

Grammar
Exercise 3
ANSWERS
1  shouldn’t go out   ​2  should buy   3​   shouldn’t eat   ​
4  should visit

Exercise 4
ANSWERS
1  had; ’d buy   2​   wouldn’t be; went   3​   would you do;
lost  ​4  Would your parents be; stayed

Exercise 5
ANSWERS
1  must  ​2  may  ​3  can’t  ​4  might

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B Culture club

Grammar Exercise 3 Focus on you


should / shouldn’t
• Read the task with the class.
Second conditional
• Read the three topics with the class and brainstorm some
ideas for each one. Write the ideas on the board.
Possibility in the present: may / might (not)
• Students work in pairs to design their poster.
Vocabulary • Monitor and help as necessary.
Illnesses and symptoms • Students take turns to present their posters to the class.
• Hold a brief class discussion on which things students or
Topics schools definitely should and shouldn’t do.
Bullying and cyberbullying
Extra activity
• For homework, students could choose another topic
Aim that they feel strongly about, e.g. protecting the
To read and understand an article about bullying; to design environment, or promoting sport in schools. They could
and present a poster make a poster with their ideas and suggestions for
what students or schools should and shouldn’t do.
Warm-up
• In the next lesson, students can work in small groups
• Read out the title of the article Bullying: let’s stop it now. Ask and present their posters to each other and discuss
What different kinds of bullying are there? How does bullying the ideas. Ask groups in turn to tell the class what they
make people feel? How can people prevent bullying? think students or schools should and shouldn’t do to
• Elicit a range of answers. tackle these problems.
Exercise 1
Further practice
• Read through the activities with the class, and check that Workbook  pages 78−87
students understand everything.
• Students decide which activities they consider to be
bullying.
• Students read the article to see which ideas appear in the
article.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
1  calling someone names   2  hitting someone  
3  sending nasty messages

Exercise 2
• Students read the article again and answer the questions.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
1 They use mobile phones or the Internet.
2 More than half of all teenagers.
3 Insecurity and worry, physical problems like headaches
and stomach aches, and victims may want to hurt
themselves.
4 Every kind of person.
5 Because many bullies were once victims themselves.
6 To ‘prove’ that they are strong and powerful.
7 A victim shouldn’t keep silent, fight back, or feel bad
about himself or herself.

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5 What were they doing?

ANSWERS
Grammar 1 Because the police rarely do anything.
Past continuous (affirmative, negative, interrogative, and 2 He was in a backstreet.
short answers) 3 He fell off his bike.
while 4 Because she was only in the supermarket for a few
Past continuous and past simple + when / while minutes.
5 Nothing happened.
Vocabulary
Crime
Extra activity
• Write these sentences on the board.
Communication 1  Thieves stole about 60,000 bikes in the US last year.
2 Casey and Van Neistat’s film showed that it was
Reporting a crime
difficult to steal bikes.
Pronunciation: /ə/ 3  Casey stole a lot of people’s bikes in New York City.
4 Steve felt scared of the two boys as soon as he saw
Skills them.
Reading: An extract from a textbook: The founding of 5  Eva saw a man standing close to her bike.
modern Australia • Students read the article again. They decide if the
Listening: A teenager talking about witnessing a crime sentences are true or false and correct the false sentences.
Speaking: Finding out how observant you are • Check the answers with the class.
Writing: An online article about a robbery ANSWERS
1 False. Thieves stole about 60,000 bikes in New York
Topics City last year.
Crime, ethics, and morals 2 False. Casey and Van Neistat’s film showed that it was
easy to steal bikes.
3 False. Casey stole his own bike in various situations in
Presentation    page 46  New York City.
4 False. Steve didn’t feel scared of the two boys as soon
Aim as he saw them.
To present the new language in an interesting context 5 True.

Text Consolidation
The text is a website article about bike crime, featuring • Remind students to copy any new vocabulary from the
stories by two teenagers who have been victims of bike text into their vocabulary books.
theft. It gives tips on how to keep your bike safe.

Warm-up Language focus    page 47 


• Focus on the photos and ask What do they show? What can
you see? Do you like biking? Do you bike to school? Is it safe to Aim
bike in your town or city? What dangers are there? How can To practise the target language
you keep yourself safe?
• Use the photos to teach lock and steal. Also teach thief
Exercise 3
and theft. • Students complete the sentences and put them in order
to tell the two stories.
Exercise 1 Read and listen  $ 32 • Students can refer back to the article on page 46 to help
• Read out the question. Pre-teach backstreet. them with the task.
• Play the CD. Students read and listen, and answer the • Check the answers by asking two confident students to
question. read out the completed stories.
• Discuss the answer with the class. ANSWERS
ANSWER Steve’s story
Steve cycled alone at night and Eva didn’t lock her bike. 2 They were walking towards me, and they were laughing
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 46  and talking.
3 They weren’t doing anything threatening.
Exercise 2 Comprehension 4 While I was cycling past them, one boy pushed me and I
• Students read the article again and answer the questions. fell off my bike.
5 While I was getting up, the other boy hit me.
• Check the answers with the class.
6 Then they took my bike and ran away.
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Eva’s story
1 I was cycling with my friend Jane.
Vocabulary    page 48 
2 We left our bikes outside a supermarket while we did
some shopping.
Crime
3 While I was waiting to pay, I looked outside.
4 I saw a guy standing near my bike, but he wasn’t doing Aims
anything suspicious. To present and practise words for criminal actions: burglary,
5 When I got outside, the guy was riding away on my kidnapping, mugging, murder, pickpocketing, robbery,
bike! shoplifting, vandalism
To present and practise words for criminals: burglar,
Exercise 4  $ 33 kidnapper, mugger, murderer, pickpocket, robber, shoplifter,
• Give students time to read the sentences. Check that they vandal
understand them all.
• Play the CD. Students listen and put the sentences in the Warm-up
correct order. • Remind students of the spy story in Unit 2 (page 24 of the
• Play the CD again if necessary for students to check and Student’s Book). Ask The man in the story committed a crime
complete their answers. – what did he do? (He murdered someone.) Elicit or give
the word for this type of criminal (a murderer).
• Check the answers with the class.
• Ask What was the crime in Steve and Eva’s stories? (Someone
Answers / Audio CD Track 33 stole their bikes.) What’s the word for a person who steals
1
A few weeks ago, I cycled to the leisure centre for basketball things? (a thief ).
practice. 2I locked my bike to a post outside. 3While I was
playing, I looked out of the window. 4A guy was standing Exercise 1  $ 34
near my bike, but he wasn’t looking at it. 5He was holding • In pairs or individually, students match the crimes with the
a black bag. 6I went on playing, and when I looked again, pictures.
the guy was still there. 7He was doing something to my • If they worked individually, they can compare answers
bike. 8I shouted and ran outside, but it was too late! 9He was in pairs.
running away with the front wheel of my bike!
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
Exercise 5 Focus on you ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 34
• Read out the example answer. Ask individual students robbery  1  burglary  2  pickpocketing  3  murder 
What about you? Give another example with the next 4  mugging  5  vandalism  6  shoplifting  7  kidnapping
activity on the list and elicit example answers from three • Students listen again and repeat chorally, then
or four students. individually.
• Students write their sentences. • Draw students’ attention to the Look! box and read through
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class. the definitions.
Correct any mistakes.
Extra activity 1
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.
• Prepare a wordsearch for students to practise the crime
vocabulary.
Exercise 6 Pairwork
• Students work in pairs to tell their partner what activities Extra activity 2
they were and weren’t doing at specific times yesterday. • Put students in pairs and give each pair a piece of paper
• Ask some students to tell the class something they learnt with a crime from exercise 1 written on it. Pairs prepare
about their partner. a mime for the crime on their piece of paper.
• Ask different pairs to perform their mime for the class.
Extra activity The others guess what the crime is.
• Ask students to write three more sentences about what
they were doing at specific times yesterday. Tell them Exercise 2  $ 35
that two sentences should be true and one should be • Students complete the table with the words for criminals.
false.
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class.
Correct any mistakes. ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 35
robber  1  shoplifter  2  burglar  3  pickpocket 
• Put students into pairs to read their sentences to each
4  murderer  5  mugger  6  vandal  7  kidnapper
other and guess the false sentence.
• Ask who managed to guess correctly.
• Draw attention to the spelling of robber, mugger, and
kidnapper. Point out that we double the final consonant of
ANSWERS the verb before adding the -ed ending in the past simple.
Students’ own answers. • You could play the CD again for students to repeat
chorally, then individually.

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• Students check the article on page 46 to find examples of
Extra activity
the affirmative and negative forms of the past continuous.
• Put students in pairs and ask them to cover exercise 2 in • Remind students to check the rules on page 88.
their books. They take turns to say a crime from exercise
1 and their partner responds with the word for the Rules    page 88 

criminal. Exercise 1
• Students complete the sentences with the past
Exercise 3 Pairwork continuous form of the verbs.
• Read out the first question and answer, then read out the • They can compare answers in pairs.
second question and elicit the answer. • Check the answers with the class and check that students
• Students could either work in pairs with their books open have spelt the verbs in the -ing form properly.
to ask and answer questions, or they could prepare their
questions and then ask and answer the questions with ANSWERS
their books closed, as a game. 1  was listening   2  wasn’t wearing   3  were doing
4  was running   5  weren’t paying   6  was watching
• At the end of the activity, ask all students to close their
books. Ask more questions to the whole class, e.g. What Extra activity
does a mugger do? Students race to give the correct
• For more practice, call out verbs together with different
answer.
subjects, to elicit the past continuous form, e.g. we – drive
ANSWERS (We were driving); he – not wait (He wasn’t waiting).
Students’ own answers.

Consolidation Past continuous (interrogative and short


• Remind students to copy the new vocabulary from this answers)
lesson into their vocabulary books.
Aim
Further practice To present and practise the interrogative and short answer
Website; Workbook  page 89 forms of the past continuous

Grammar box
Grammar    page 49  • Go through the grammar box with the class.
• Draw attention to the word order in the interrogative form
Past continuous (affirmative and and the use of was / were as the auxiliary verb rather than
negative) did in questions and short answers.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 88.
Aim Rules    page 88 
To present and practise the affirmative and negative forms
of the past continuous Exercise 2
Warm-up
• Students write the questions and then answer them.
• Ask students What were you doing at 8 p.m. yesterday • They can compare answers in pairs.
evening? and elicit responses using the past continuous if • Check the answers. Ask one student to read a question
possible. and another to answer.
ANSWERS
Grammar boxes 1 Was the burglar running away from the police? Yes, he /
• Go through the first grammar box with the class. Draw she was.
attention to the form: was / were + verb in -ing form. 2 Were you talking to Mr Peters after the lesson? No, I
Check students understand that was / were is used wasn’t.
depending on the subject pronoun, but the verb in -ing 3 Were the two boys copying during the test yesterday?
form doesn’t change. Equally was / were become wasn’t / No, they weren’t.
weren’t depending on whether the sentence is affirmative 4 Were the vandals writing graffiti on the wall last night?
or negative, but the verb in -ing form doesn’t change. Yes, they were.
• Ask students to read the sentences in the second
grammar box and choose the correct words. while
• Check the answer with the class.
Grammar box
ANSWER
• Ask a student to read out the sentences in the grammar
in progress in the past
box.
• Highlight that we use the past continuous to talk about • Students complete the rule with the correct word.
actions happening at a specific time in the past. However,
the form describes the actions as continuous rather than • Check the answer with the class.
starting and then ending. ANSWER
while
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• Explain the meaning of while − it links two actions ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 36
happening at the same time. Detective  Can I help you?
• Point out that while can go at the beginning of a sentence Ian  Yes, I want to report a crime.
or in the middle, between the two clauses. If it goes at the Detective  1What happened?
beginning, we separate the two clauses with a comma. Ian  Some boys stole my rucksack.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 88. Detective  2What were you doing?
Ian  I was walking along Redmond Street when two boys
Rules    page 88 
stopped me.
Exercise 3 Detective  3What did they do?
Ian  One boy pushed me and the other boy stole my bag.
• Students write sentences using the past continuous.
Then they ran away.
• They can compare answers in pairs. Detective  4What time did it happen?
• Check the answers with the class. Ian  It happened at four o’clock this afternoon.
ANSWERS Detective  5What was in your bag?
1 You were cycling to school while I was waiting for the Ian  Some books, my wallet, some money, and my keys.
bus. Detective  6What did the boys look like?
2 While we were playing basketball, Maria was studying. Ian  They were 15 or 16. They were wearing jeans and jackets.
3 The students were talking while they were doing a test. • Students listen again and repeat chorally, then
4 While we were walking down the street, our mum was individually.
watching us.
5 Jason was coming out of the cinema while we were Learn it, use it!
going in. • Go through the Learn it, Use it! box. Elicit extra or
6 While they were having lunch, they were watching TV. alternative information for the answers in the You say
column and write it on the board.
Extra activity • In pairs, students practise asking and answering questions,
• Write some sentence openings on the board, e.g. using the questions and answers in the box and the
While I was doing my homework, … information on the board.
Mum was cooking dinner while …
• Students complete the sentences with actions that were Exercise 2 Pronunciation  $ 37
happening at the same time. Write ideas on the board. • Ask students to read the sentences.
• As a whole class, practise pronouncing /ə/ on its own.
Finished? • Play the CD. Students listen and repeat chorally, then
• In pairs, students take turns to tell their partner what they individually.
were doing at the different times. Transcript    Student’s Book  page 50 
• Were any pairs doing the same thing at the same time?
Extra activity
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers. • Read out the sentences in exercise 2 again, placing
the stress on the underlined syllables as follows. (What
Consolidation was in the bag? What were you doing? He was walking
• Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules along the street. They were wearing jeans.) Ask students
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books. to underline the stressed syllables in the sentences. As
a whole class, read out the sentences together, placing
Further practice the stress on the underlined syllables.
Website; Workbook  page 88
Exercise 3  $ 38
Communication    page 50  • Teach the word suspect, used as a noun.
• Students read the crime report forms. As a whole class
Reporting a crime brainstorm the information the police will need, e.g. clothes
and appearance. Pre-teach quite, e.g. He was quite tall.
Aim • Play the CD. Students listen and complete the forms.
To present and practise language for reporting a crime • They can compare answers in pairs.
Warm-up • Check the answers with the class.
• Ask students Has anyone in your family ever reported a crime ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 38
to the police? What sort of information do the police want to 1 Place:  Greenside Park   ​Time:  3 o’clock yesterday
know about a crime? Elicit ideas. afternoon  ​Item stolen:  Bike  ​Number of suspects:  Four  ​
Description:  Girls, about 13 or 14. Girl that took bike, long
Exercise 1  $ 36 blonde hair, blue jeans, trainers
• Students read and complete the dialogue with the questions. 2 Place:  Number 29 bus / In River Street   T​ ime:  11 o’clock
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers. this morning   ​Items stolen:  Jacket  ​Number of suspects:  One  ​
Description:  Boy, quite tall and thin, about 15 or 16, orange
• Check the answers with the class.
T-shirt
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1 ANSWERS
Detective  Can I help you? 1  past simple   2  past continuous
Molly  Yes, I want to report a crime. • Point out that the past continuous actions in the example
Detective  What happened? sentences in the grammar box were in progress when
Molly  There was a group of girls in the middle of the road. they were interrupted by shorter actions. Explain that we
I stopped and then they stole my bike and ran away. use the past simple to describe actions which interrupt
Detective  Where did it happen? longer actions described in the past continuous.
Molly  It happened in Greenside Park. • Draw attention to the use of when and while. Explain that
Detective  When did it happen? when can be followed by either the past simple or the
Molly  It happened at three o’clock yesterday afternoon. past continuous. However, while is only followed by the
Detective  What did the girls look like? past continuous.
Molly  There were four girls. They were about 13 or 14. The
• Point out that both when and while can go at the
girl that took my bike had long blonde hair and she was
beginning or between two clauses of a sentence. Write
wearing blue jeans and trainers.
the first example sentence from the grammar box on the
2
board:
Detective  Can I help you?
Gary  Yes, I want to report a crime. While I was cycling past them, one of the boys pushed me.
Detective  What happened? • Elicit the different ways of forming the sentence with
Gary  A boy stole my jacket. I was going home on the number when or while:
29 bus. It was very hot so I took off my jacket and put it on When I was cycling past them, one of the boys pushed me.
the seat beside me. When the bus stopped, a boy stood up, One of the boys pushed me when I was cycling past them.
took my jacket, got off the bus, and ran away. One of the boys pushed me while I was cycling past them.
Detective  Where did it happen? • Remind students to check the rules on page 88.
Gary  It happened in River Street. Rules    page 88 
Detective  When did it happen?
Gary  It happened at eleven o’clock this morning. Exercise 1
Detective  What did the boy look like? • Pre-teach burn and alarm.
Gary  I didn’t see him very well, but he was quite tall and thin. • Individually or in pairs, students match the sentence
He was about 15 or 16. He was wearing an orange T-shirt. halves.
Exercise 4 Pairwork • Check the answers with the class. Ask students to read out
each sentence in full.
• Students prepare their roles, using the language in
exercise 1 as well as their own ideas for different details. ANSWERS
• In pairs, students practise their role play. Monitor and 2  a  ​3  f  ​4  e  ​5  c  ​6  b
check that they are using past tenses correctly.
Extra activity
• Ask one or two pairs to act out their role play for the class.
• Students write sentences from exercise 1 with the
ANSWERS clauses in the opposite order, e.g. My alarm went off
Students’ own answers. while I was sleeping. Katie’s pet iguana escaped while she
Further practice was cleaning her room.
Website; Workbook  page 91
Exercise 2
• Students read the text and choose the correct words.
Grammar    page 51  • Check the answers with the class.
Past continuous and past simple + when / ANSWERS
while 1  was sending   2  was opening  
3  looked  4  saw
Aim 5  were moving   6  ran  
7  was running   8  called  
To present and practise the past continuous and past simple
9  was watching   10  came  
in sentences with when and while
11  were moving   12  ran  
Warm-up 13  got  14  were disappearing
• Write the following sentence on the board: While I was Exercise 3
walking to school today, I met a friend. Underline was
• Students complete the text with the correct form of the
walking and met and elicit their forms. Ask students
verbs. Remind them to think carefully about which
to make sentences of their own using while, the past
actions were in progress when something else happened.
continuous and the past simple.
Remind them also to think carefully about which tense
Grammar box follows while.
• Students read the sentences in the grammar box and • Students can compare answers in pairs.
complete the rules with past continuous or past simple. • Check the answers with the class.
• Check the answers with the class.
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ANSWERS
1  stole; was walking   2  were travelling; met  
Background notes
3  woke; was snowing   4  was studying; flew   • Australia is the sixth-largest country in the world by
5  broke; was skiing   6  was waiting; arrived   area. It is also the twelfth largest economy.
7  were walking; started   8  was sleeping; got • The continent has been inhabited for over 40,000 years,
but Europeans didn’t discover it until the early 17th
Exercise 4 century.
• Read out the example answer and elicit other possible • In 1770, Britain claimed the eastern half of the country
endings to the sentence, e.g. I saw Maria. / Someone stole as its own, and in 1788, it began using it as a penal
my wallet. colony. The last convict ship arrived in 1848.
• Students complete their sentences with their own ideas. • Australia gradually became independent from Britain,
• Students can compare their answers in pairs. a process which culminated formally in 1986, with
• Ask some students to read their sentences to the class. legislation to break the remaining political ties between
Correct any mistakes as a class. the two countries. However, Australia is still part of the
British Commonwealth, and the British Queen is still the
ANSWERS
official head of state.
Students’ own answers.

Finished? Exercise 1
• Students use the verbs in the box to write a crime story. • Students look at the text and decide what kind of text it is.
They then exchange stories with a partner. • Check the answer with the class.
• Ask some students to read their stories to the class. Elicit ANSWER
other possible endings to the stories from the class. b  an educational text
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers. Exercise 2
• Pre-teach death sentence, penalty, convict, ancestor, and
Extra activity penal colony.
• If your students enjoy acting, they can act out their • Read through the questions with the class, and check that
crime story instead of reading it aloud. The others students understand everything.
watch and then describe the actions they saw, using • Students read ‘The story of Mary Wade’ and answer the
the past continuous and the past simple. questions.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs.
Consolidation
• Check the answers with the class.
• Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules
and examples from this lesson in their grammar books.
• Discuss question 6 with the class, encouraging as many
students as possible to join in and talk about their
personal reactions to the text.
Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 88 ANSWERS
1 Because she came from a very poor family.
2 They stole the girl’s clothes.
Skills    pages 52–53  3 They found it in Mary’s house.
4 They sent her to Australia.
Reading 5 She had 21 children.
6 Students’ own answers.
Aim
To read and understand an extract from a textbook: The Exercise 3
founding of modern Australia • Students read the facts and ‘Australia’s convicts’.
• Discuss the answers to the questions with the class.
Warm-up
ANSWERS
• Point to the map of Australia and ask What do you know Australia Day is on 26th January. It celebrates the arrival of
about Australia? What do you know about the modern the first convict ships in Australia in January, 1788.
country? What do you know about its history?
• Elicit some ideas. If students are struggling for ideas, ask
some more detailed questions, e.g. What language do they
speak in Australia? Why do they speak English? When did
British people first go there? Elicit some ideas, but do not
confirm them at this stage.

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Listening Writing
Aim Aim
To listen to a description of a crime To write an article about a robbery

Warm-up Exercise 6
• Ask What kinds of crimes do young people commit? What • Read through the task with the class and make sure
happens to them if the police catch them? Why do you think students understand everything.
some young people commit crimes? • With weaker classes, write on the board: I saw a robbery
• Elicit a range of answers from students. yesterday! I was in … Use the prompts to ask two or three
questions and elicit details of the crime. As students
Exercise 4  $ 39 answer, write the sentences on the board. Students can
• Read the task with the class. Give students time to read then continue the article.
the questions. • Students swap their article with their partner who corrects
• Play the CD. Students listen and answer the questions. any mistakes.
• Play the CD again for students to check and complete • Ask some students to read their articles to the class. Ask
their answers. other students Who was a good witness? Why?
• Check the answers with the class. ANSWERS
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD Track 39 Students’ own answers.
1 She was buying a pair of boots.
2 She was waiting at the cash desk. Extra activity
3 She was carrying a rucksack. • If you have time at the end of the class, play ‘alibi’. Set
4 The security guard stopped them. the scene for a crime, e.g. someone robbed a bank at 8
5 He found two pairs of shoes. p.m. last night. Choose three students to be suspects.
6 He took them to an office at the back of the shop. Tell them they were all together yesterday evening, and
7 The shop assistant called the police. they must decide on their alibi.
I was in a shoe shop with my mum yesterday. I was buying a • Allow them to go out of the classroom for two minutes
pair of boots. I was waiting at the cash desk to pay for them to plan their alibi. Meanwhile, brainstorm with the rest
when I saw two girls walking quickly towards the door of the of the class what questions students will ask.
shop. One of the girls was carrying a rucksack. While they • Ask the suspects to come back into the room one at a
were walking through the door, the security guard stopped time. Students question each suspect and try to find
them. He asked to look in the rucksack. One of the girls inconsistencies in their alibis. The suspects ‘win’ if no
opened the rucksack and the security guard found two pairs inconsistencies can be found.
of shoes. The two girls were shoplifters! The security guard
took the two girls to an office at the back of the shop and Further practice
the shop assistant called the police. Workbook  page 92

Speaking
Aim
To practise describing a picture of a crime

Exercise 5 Pairwork
• Read the task with the class. Give students one minute to
look at the picture carefully, then ask them to cover it.
• Read through the prompts with the class. With weaker
classes, elicit some of the questions that students need to
ask.
• Students ask and answer questions in pairs.
• Give students time to look briefly at the picture again,
then ask them to cover it.
• Students swap roles and practise again.
• Ask pairs in turn to tell the class who was a better witness.
ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.

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6 They’re used for fun!

Grammar Exercise 2 Comprehension


The passive
• Students read the questions and then read the text in
detail to answer them.
The passive: present simple
(affirmative, negative, interrogative, and short answers)
• They can compare answers in pairs.
The passive: past simple
• Check the answers with the class.
(affirmative, negative, interrogative, and short answers) ANSWERS
by + agent 1 They were very surprised and excited.
2 Their uncle took them to the Gadget Show Live.
Vocabulary 3 It was held in Birmingham.
The computer 4 They spent a whole day at the show.
5 They saw the presenters.
Communication Extra activity
Asking about a tourist attraction • In pairs or small groups, students discuss which
Pronunciation: Connected speech gadget from the text they would buy and give reasons.
• As a whole class, students share their views and
Skills explain their choices. Find out which gadget is the
Reading: A magazine article about the positive side of most popular.
the Internet
Listening: A teenager and a senior citizen talk about Consolidation
technology • Remind students to make a note of any new vocabulary
Speaking: Talking about technological inventions from the text in their vocabulary books.
Writing: A text about technological inventions

Topics Language focus    page 55 


Gadgets and inventions
Aim
The Internet
To practise the target language

Exercise 3
Presentation    page 54  • Students find the information in the text and complete
the matching exercise. Stronger students can do the
Aim matching on their own first and then look back at the
To present the new language in an interesting context text to check.
• They can compare answers in pairs.
Text • Check the answers with the class.
The text is a report by a teenager on a technology fair which ANSWERS
promotes new gadgets. 2  c  3  a  4  d  5  b
Warm-up Exercise 4
• Write gadget on the board and below write mobile phone, • Students find the sentences in the text and complete the
tablet, etc. Elicit the meaning of gadget and ask Which advertisements with the correct verbs.
gadgets have you got? Pre-teach I’d be lost without my … • They can compare answers in pairs.
and ask Which gadget would you be lost without? Why?
• Check the answers and go through their meanings.
Elicit responses.
ANSWERS
Exercise 1 Read and listen  $ 40 1 are shown
• Pre-teach fair. 2 is connected
• Read out the answer choices and ask students to say what 3 is worn 
they think each of these gadgets can do. 4 are offered
• Play the CD. Students read and listen, and choose the 5 are sold
correct answer for the question. 6 are used

ANSWER
b  headphones
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 54 

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Exercise 5 Focus on you ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 42
• Ask students to look closely at some of their possessions. 1 e  play games
Most of these will probably have the name of the country 2 a  surf the Internet
where they were made written somewhere. 3 b  send / receive emails
4 c  visit websites
• Students write sentences about five objects with
5 f  chat / socialize online
was made.
6 d  download / upload software, videos, music, photos
ANSWERS • Students listen again and repeat chorally, then
Students’ own answers. individually.
Exercise 6 Pairwork Exercise 3 Pairwork
• In pairs, students tell each other where each of their five • Read the task with the class, then ask two confident
possessions was made. students to read out the example question and answer.
• Ask some students to report back on any possessions • Model the activity by asking a few students questions
that come from the same country. Elicit sentences with about the Internet activities in exercise 1.
were made.
• Students then work in pairs to ask and answer questions.
ANSWERS Monitor and help as necessary. Make a note of any
Students’ own answers. repeated mistakes in the collocations or in pronunciation
to go over at the end of the lesson.
Vocabulary    page 56  • Ask some students to tell the class something surprising
they learnt about their partner.
The computer ANSWERS
Students’ own answers.
Aim
Extra activity
To present and practise computer vocabulary nouns:
CD-ROM drive / DVD drive, headphones, keyboard, memory
• Ask students to keep a diary of their Internet use for
a week, to practise the vocabulary and discover how
stick, microphone, mouse, printer / scanner, screen, speakers,
much they really use the Internet.
USB port, webcam
To present and practise computer vocabulary verbs:
chat, download, play, receive, send, socialize, surf, upload, visit Exercise 4 Pairwork
• Pre-teach device. Give students a few moments to
Warm-up consider their answers to the questions.
• Ask Who has got a scanner? What other things for your • In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer the
computer have you got? What do you use your computer for? questions. Monitor and help as necessary. Check students
Elicit some of the target vocabulary in English. are using the vocabulary correctly.
Exercise 1  $ 41 • Ask one or two pairs to tell the class about their partner.
• Ask students to look at the picture and see how many ANSWERS
computer words they know. Students’ own answers.
• Students match the objects in the picture with the words Extra activity
in the box.
• Students work in small groups and pool their
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
information from exercise 4. They summarize the results
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 41 for their group.
1  speakers  ​2  printer / scanner   ​3  headphones  ​ • Ask a member of each group to record their results on
4  microphone  ​5  webcam  ​6  screen  ​7  USB port   ​ the board. Students all copy down the information.
8  CD-ROM drive / DVD drive   ​9  keyboard   • For homework, ask them to write a short report on the
​10  memory stick   1​ 1  mouse class’s use of computers and computerized devices,
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then based on the groups’ results.
individually. Check students’ pronunciation of loanwords.
Consolidation
Exercise 2  $ 42
• Remind students to copy the new vocabulary from this
• Students match the verbs with the nouns to make lesson into their vocabulary books.
expressions for using the Internet.
• They can compare answers in pairs. Further practice
• Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers. Website; Workbook  page 94
• Check the answers with the class.

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Grammar    page 57  Exercise 2
• Students complete the sentences. With weaker students,
The passive go through the past participle forms of the verbs before
they do the exercise.
Aim • Check the answers with the class.
To present and practise the use of the passive ANSWERS
1  is spoken   ​2  are sent   ​3  aren’t used   ​4  are written
Warm-up
• Write the following sentences on the board: The passive: present simple (interrogative
People make these speakers in China. These speakers ______ and short answers)
made in China.
We sell the headphones online. The headphones are ______
online.
Aim
To present and practise the interrogative and short answer
• Elicit the missing words (are and sold).
forms of the present simple passive
• Explain that the gapped sentences are passive. The other
sentences are active. Grammar box
• Ask In the passive sentences, do we know who makes the • Go through the grammar box with the class. Point out the
speakers and sells the pens? (No) Explain that in an active structure of questions in the passive: (question word +)
sentence, the subject does the action. In a passive be + subject + past participle of the main verb, and short
sentence the action is more important than the subject, answers: yes / no + subject + be.
therefore the subject doesn’t need to be mentioned. • Remind students to check the rules on page 93.
• Students compare the active and passive sentences on Rules    page 93 
the board. Ask What happens to the object of the active
sentence in a passive sentence? (It becomes the subject.) Exercise 3
• Students re-order the words to make questions and then
Grammar box answer them.
• Go through the grammar box with the class and study the • They can compare answers in pairs.
two sentences. Ask Why is the verb ‘be’ different in the two
sentences? (In the first sentence the subject is singular. In • Check the answers with the class.
the second it is plural.) Ask What happens to the main verb ANSWERS
in the sentences? (It is always a past participle.) 1 Are e-books sold in shops? No, they aren’t.
• Students read the sentences and choose the correct words. 2 Are emails sent via the Internet? Yes, they are.
3 Is a webcam used with a computer? Yes, it is.
ANSWERs
1  isn’t  ​2  more Exercise 4
• Remind students to check the rules on page 93. • Explain native language and by.
Rules    page 93  • Students write the questions and then choose the
answers that they think are correct.
Exercise 1
• They can compare answers in pairs.
• Students decide if the sentences are active or passive.
Remind them to check if the subject does the action. • Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
ANSWERS
1  A  ​2  P  ​3  P  ​4  A 1 Where are Bollywood movies made?   b India.
2 When is the Chinese New Year celebrated?  
a  January or February.
The passive: present simple (affirmative 3 Where is sushi eaten?   b Japan.
and negative) 4 Which language is spoken as a native language by the
most people?   b  Mandarin Chinese.
Aim
To present and practise the affirmative and negative forms of Finished?
the present simple passive • Students write five present simple passive sentences.
• In pairs, students swap sentences and correct any mistakes.
Grammar box
• Ask some students to read out their sentences to the class.
• Go through the grammar box with the class. Draw
attention to the form of the present simple passive: Consolidation
present tense of be + past participle of the main verb. • Remind students to make a note of the grammar and
• Ask students What changes depending on the subject of the the rules from this lesson in their grammar books.
sentence: the verb ‘be’ or the main verb in the past participle?
(The verb be). Further practice
• Remind students to check the rules on page 93. Website; Workbook  page 93
Rules    page 93 

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Communication    page 58  Extra activity
• In pairs, students practise the whole dialogue in
Asking about a tourist attraction exercise 1. Encourage them to read as expressively as
possible.
Aim
To present and practise language for asking and answering Exercise 2 Pronunciation  $ 44
questions about a tourist attraction • Give students time to read the questions before they
Warm-up listen. Draw attention to the sound links.
• Ask students to look at the photo next to exercise 1. Ask • Play the CD. Students listen and repeat chorally, then
Where do you think this building is? When do you think it was individually.
built? Do you like it? Elicit responses. Transcript    Student’s Book  page 58 

Background notes Extra activity


• The Shard has 87 floors with offices, restaurants, bars, • Give students practice with other consonant–vowel links
shops, flats, and hotel rooms. The open-air viewing in the dialogue, e.g. Look at that building! / It’s amazing! /
platform on the 72nd floor has views over the whole of He’s designed a lot of famous buildings. / Is it the tallest
the city of London. building in the city? / Yes, it is.
• The Italian architect Renzo Piano is well known for
designs such as the New York Times Building, California Exercise 3  $ 45
Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, Kansai Airport • Ask students to read through the factfile and to think
(Japan’s second airport), Rome’s Auditorium Parco della about the kind of information they will need to listen for.
Musica, and the Centre Pompidou, which he designed • Pre-teach fabric.
with the British architect Richard Rogers.
• Play the CD. Students listen and write the information.
• The O2 Arena is a multi-purpose indoor arena in
• They can compare answers in pairs.
Greenwich, London.
• Check the answers with the class.
• The One World Trade Center is the tallest building in the
Western Hemisphere and stands at the centre of the ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 44
site where the twin towers of the World Trade Centre 1  O2 Arena   ​2  steel  ​3  2000  ​4  Richard  ​5  50
once stood. Tourist  Wow! That building’s amazing! What’s it called?
• The Tokyo Sky Tree is the world’s tallest free-standing Guide  Well, today it’s called the O2 Arena, but it was
broadcasting tower and was designed to symbolize a originally called The Millennium Dome.
place where tradition and the future meet. Tourist  It’s amazing! What’s it made of?
Guide  It’s made of steel and strong fabric.
Tourist  When was it built?
Exercise 1  $ 43 Guide  It was built for the Millennium and it was opened on
• Pre-teach glass and steel. 1st January 2000.
• Play the CD. Students read and listen, and write the Tourist  Really? Who was it designed by?
information. Guide  It was designed by a famous British architect, Richard
• They can compare answers in pairs. Rogers.
• Check the answers with the class. Tourist  How tall is it?
Guide  It isn’t very tall. The dome is about 50 metres high.
Transcript    Student’s Book  page 58 

ANSWERS Exercise 4 Pairwork


1 the Shard • Ask students to read the factfiles and tell them to look at
​2 glass and steel exercise 1 for questions they can ask.
​3 Renzo Piano  ​ • In pairs, students take turns to ask and answer questions
4 306 metres about the two buildings. Monitor and check that they are
• Students listen again and repeat chorally, then using passive verbs correctly. Make a note of any repeated
individually. errors to check with the class at the end of the lesson.
• Ask one or two pairs to act out their dialogues for the class.
Learn it, use it!
• Go through the Learn it, use it! box with the class. Extra activity
• Draw students’ attention to the phrases in the past simple • For homework, ask students to research a building in their
passive and elicit their meanings. country and to write their own factfile. Ask them to find a
• Ask students to look back at the dialogue and to find photo of the building and bring it to the next lesson.
examples of the phrases. • Students show their photo and use their factfile to
• In pairs, students practise asking the questions and answer questions from the class.
answering them with the information in the dialogue.
Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 96

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Grammar    page 59  answers
1 The documents were scanned.
2 The Eiffel Tower was designed by Gustave Eiffel.
The passive: past simple (affirmative and 3 These pictures weren’t drawn by Picasso.
negative) 4 The Simpsons cartoon wasn’t created by Walt Disney.

Aim The passive: past simple (interrogative


To present and practise the affirmative and negative forms of and short answers)
the past simple passive

Warm-up Aim
• Ask if students can remember some of the facts from To present and practise the interrogative and short answer
the previous lesson, e.g. Who was the Shard designed by? forms of the past simple passive
(Renzo Piano) When was it opened? (In 2012) When was the Grammar box
One World Trade Center completed? (In 2014).
• Go through the grammar box with the class. Point out
Grammar box again that the only difference from the present passive is
• Go through the grammar box with the class. Draw attention that we use past, not present, forms of be.
to the form of the past simple passive: past tense of be • Remind students to check the rules on page 93.
+ past participle of the main verb. Explain that the only Rules    page 93 
difference from the present passive is the tense of be.
• Remind students to check the rules on page 93. Exercise 3  $ 46
Rules    page 93 
• Pre-teach honey and add.
• Students complete the dialogue using the past simple
Exercise 1 passive.
• Go through the cultural references in the exercise. • Remind them to check the subject pronouns in brackets
Ask What is ‘Macbeth’? (A play) What is the ‘Mona Lisa’? and to think about the correct form of be. They should also
(A painting) Where are the Pyramids? (In Egypt). What is check if they need to complete a question or sentence.
radium? (A radioactive metal – it has been used in the • Play the CD. Students listen and check their answers.
treatment for cancer). • They can compare answers in pairs.
• Individually or in pairs, students complete the sentences. • Check the answers with the class.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 46
ANSWERS 1  wasn’t  ​2  it was made   ​3  was it eaten   4​   was it
1  was painted   2​   weren’t built   ​3  wasn’t discovered   ​ introduced  ​5  was it made   6​   was taken   7​   was added
4  was designed
Exercise 4
by + agent • Students write the past simple passive questions. They can
choose the answers with a partner.
Aim • Check the answers with the class.
To present and practise the use of by + agent ANSWERS
1 When was the CD invented? In 1982.
Grammar box
2 When was the first 3D film shown? In 1922.
• Go through the grammar box with the class. 3 When were the first MP3 players sold? In 1998.
• Explain that we use by if we want to identify who or what
did the action. The person / thing is referred to as the agent. Finished?
• Remind students to check the rules on page 93. • Students draw a timeline of the events and their dates.
Rules    page 93  They write sentences in the past simple passive, e.g. The first
electronic computers were used between 1940 and 1945.
Exercise 2 • Monitor and check that students are using the passive
• On the board write the two example sentences. Draw form correctly. Make a note of any repeated errors to
arrows between them to show: check with the class at the end of the lesson.
1 how the object in the active sentence becomes the • Ask students to read out their sentences.
subject in the passive sentence.
ANSWERS
2 how the subject of the active sentence becomes the
The first 3D film was shown in 1922. The CD was invented
agent in the passive sentence preceded by by.
in 1982. The first MP3 players were sold in 1998.
3 the forms of the verb in active and passive sentences.
• In pairs, students rewrite the sentences in the past simple Consolidation
passive. Remind them to decide whether the subject in • Remind students to make a note of the grammar rules
the active sentence is more important than the action. from this lesson in their grammar books.
• Check the answers with the class.
Further practice
Website; Workbook  page 93
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Skills    pages 60–61  Exercise 3  $ 47
• Students read the instructions and look at the table.
Reading • Play the CD. Students listen and complete the table.
• Check the answers with the class.
Aim ANSWERS / AUDIO CD TRACK 47
To read and understand an article about the positive side of 1  Ethan, 15 years old, teacher   ​2  Doris, 82 years old,
the Internet student
Interviewer  Last week a very special event was organized
Warm-up at Wycliffe High School. The event was called  ‘An
• Ask Do your grandparents use a computer? Do they find Introduction to the Internet’ but, surprisingly, it wasn’t
it difficult to use sometimes? Do you help them? Elicit planned for the students at the school. In fact, the
responses. students all became teachers for the day. Ethan and Doris
are here to tell us more about what happened. Ethan, can
Exercise 1
you explain what the idea behind the event was?
• Ask students to read the question and the answer options. Ethan  Sure. It was part of a national campaign to get older
• Students skim the text quickly and answer the question. people online. The idea in our school was for young
ANSWER people to help older people develop their computing
b  young people who know a lot about the Internet and skills. People over the age of 60 were invited to school for
digital technology the day and we taught them how to use the Internet.
Interviewer  That’s a great idea! So, were you a teacher on the
Exercise 2 day, Ethan?
• Give students time to read the questions. Ethan  Yeah, I was.
• Students read the text in detail and answer the questions. Interviewer  How old are you?
Ethan  I’m 15.
• They can compare answers in pairs.
Interviewer  OK! And, Doris, you were a student for the day,
• Check the answers with the class. weren’t you?
ANSWERS Doris  Yes, I was. I’m 82 and, before last week, I had never used
1 They are often criticized for spending too long in front a computer. I was very nervous.
of screens. Interviewer  Why were you interested in the event?
2 She was interviewed by The New York Times. Doris  Well, my son lives in Australia and it’s difficult to stay in
3 Teenage girls are the typical readers of Rookie. contact. I wanted to learn how to send him an email.
4 It was shown in 2007. Interviewer:  And did you learn that?
5 The songs were written and performed by Charlie. Doris  Yes, I did. Ethan was my teacher and he explained
6 He has used Twitter to write comments and he is everything very well. He even showed me how to use
followed by 20 million fans. Google Earth! I saw my son’s street and house on the
Internet! It was incredible!
Extra activity Interviewer  And, will you buy a computer now?
• Ask students Were people healthier in the past because Doris  Well, to be honest I already had a computer. My son
they didn’t have digital technology? What would you do if bought it for me a year ago but I was too frightened to
you didn’t have digital technology for a week? Discuss the use it! Now I send him an email every day. It’s wonderful.
questions as a class. Interviewer  Fantastic! It’s never too late to learn!

Consolidation Exercise 4  $ 47


• Encourage students to make a note of any new words • Give students time to read the sentences before they
and expressions from the text in their vocabulary books. listen again. Encourage them to predict the answers.
• Play the CD. Students listen and choose the correct words.
• They can compare answers in pairs.
Listening • Check the answers with the class.
Aim ANSWERS
To listen to an interview with a teenager and a senior citizen ​1  get older people online   2  older  ​3  Students  ​
who took part in a computer training day 4  send an email   ​5  her son’s house and street   ​
6  already had
Warm-up
• Ask students to imagine being someone who has never
learnt to use a computer. What problems would they have
in the modern world? How could they start learning the
skills needed to use a computer? Elicit ideas.

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Speaking answers
Students’ own answers.
Aim Extra activity
To ask and answer about inventions
• If students have access to computers in the classroom,
Warm-up ask them to choose a favourite application or website
and to give a tutorial for their partner on how to
• Ask students What do you think the most important
use it. If the other student already knows about the
invention has been in the past 50 years? Encourage students
application / website, ask them to take the role of a
to give reasons for their answers and to discuss further if
person who is looking at it for the first time.
they do not agree.
• To help the students plan their tutorial, pre-teach some
Exercise 5 Pairwork vocabulary for using a computer, e.g. access, attach,
• In pairs, students read the dialogue. Ask them to swap browse, (double-) click on, log off, log on, scroll down.
roles so they both have a turn at asking and answering.
• Students read the factfiles about the mobile phone and Further practice
the digital camera. Pre-teach wide, household, and own. Workbook  page 97
• Students prepare and practise dialogues about these
inventions, using the questions from the dialogue about
electronic computers.
• If students need more support, choose one of the
inventions and elicit questions and answers from the class
before they work in pairs.
• Monitor and check that students are using past simple
passive forms correctly. Make a note of any repeated
errors to check with the class at the end of the lesson.
• Choose two pairs to act out the dialogues for the class.
answers
Students’ own answers.

Extra activity
• In small groups or as a whole class, continue the
discussions about inventions. Ask students to discuss
the improvements in technology in their lifetime and
to say which recent inventions they think are the most
useful.

Writing
Aim
To write a short text about an invention

Warm-up
• Ask students What is your favourite gadget? When did you
get it? What does it do? Elicit responses.

Exercise 6
• Students choose an invention from exercise 5 or a new
invention to write about. Give them time to do some
research on the Internet or in the school library. If they
choose an invention from exercise 5, they can use the
information in their books, but encourage them to find
out some extra facts as well.
• Students make notes on their invention and prepare a first
draft. Remind them to use the passive where appropriate.
• Students can swap drafts with a partner, who checks and
corrects any errors.
• In class or for homework, students write their final text.
They can add photos if they wish.
• You can display the finished texts around the class.

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C Review

Grammar Exercise 5
Past continuous (affirmative, negative, interrogative, and Background notes
short answers) • Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi (1834−1904) was a French
while sculptor. He is most famous for his sculpture, the Statue
Past continuous and past simple + when / while of Liberty.
The passive • The Statue of Liberty stands on Liberty Island in New
The passive: present simple (affirmative, negative, York harbour. It was given to the US by France in
interrogative, and short answers) 1885 as a sign of their friendship during the American
The passive: past simple (affirmative, negative, Revolution. It is made of steel and coated in copper
interrogative, and short answers) and gold leaf. On its pedestal it is 93 metres tall. On its
journey to the US it travelled in 350 pieces and was
by + agent
then reassembled. For many people arriving in the
US by ship, the Statue of Liberty was the first thing
Vocabulary
they saw.
Crime: burglary, kidnapping, mugging, murder,
pickpocketing, robbery, shoplifting, vandalism; burglar, ANSWERS
kidnapper, mugger, murderer, pickpocket, robber, shoplifter, 1 Who was the Statue of Liberty designed by?
vandal 2 It was designed by Frédéric Bartholdi.
The computer: CD-ROM drive / DVD drive, headphones, 3 Where was it built?
keyboard, memory stick, microphone, mouse, printer / 4 It was built in France.
scanner, screen, speakers, USB port, webcam; chat, 5 Why was it given to the US?
download, play, receive, send, socialize, surf, upload, visit 6 It was given to the US to celebrate the 100-year
anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.
Vocabulary My Progress
Exercise 1 • Students read the sentences and choose the faces that
are true for them.
ANSWERS
• If students have fewer than three smiley faces, encourage
1  murderer  ​2  vandalized  ​3  vandals  ​4  burglary   them to review the grammar or vocabulary of the
​5  burglars  ​6  robbed  ​7  robbers previous two units and do more practice.
Exercise 2 Songs
ANSWERS The following songs would be appropriate to use at this
1  keyboard  ​2  headphones  ​3  mouse  ​4  memory point:
stick  ​5  DVD drive   ​6  printer • Kung Fu Fighting by Carl Douglas (past continuous and
past simple)
Grammar • Folsom Prison Blues by Johnny Cash (past simple and
Exercise 3 crime topic)
• Made in Heaven by Kylie Minogue (present simple passive)
ANSWERS
1  was cooking   ​2  were getting ready   ​3  was watching   ​ • Memories Are Made of This by Johnny Cash (present
4  Were you standing   ​5  was  ​6  wasn’t waiting   simple passive)
​7  was waiting

Exercise 4
ANSWERS
1  did you see   ​2  was doing   3​   heard  ​4  were standing  ​
5  were they doing   ​6  saw  ​7  were trying   ​8  were
opening  ​9  started  ​10  arrived  ​11  were running   ​
12  stopped

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C Culture club

ANSWERS
Grammar 1 They were first given their freedom in 1863.
The passive: past simple 2 Because the school was for whites only.
3 They insulted them and even gave them death threats.
Vocabulary 4 They gave other people the courage to fight for
Dates equality.
5 He was a church minister and the leader of the civil
Topics rights movement in the 1950s and 60s.
Individual freedom, discrimination, and segregation 6 They became illegal in 1964.
7 Dream Day on 28th August is the anniversary of Dr
King’s speech.
Aim
To learn about some famous African Americans; to learn how Exercise 3 Focus on you
the lives of African American have changed over time; to • Read the task with the class. As a class, brainstorm some
give a presentation on an important person in the history of famous people from the students’ own country.
your country • Write the names on the board, then point to each one
in turn and elicit answers to the questions in exercise 3
Warm-up about each person.
• Point to the photos and ask What do you think life was like • Students research a famous person from their country
for African Americans in the past? How has it changed now? and prepare a presentation. If students have access to
• Point to the photo of Martin Luther King and ask Do the Internet in class, they can do the research in class.
you know who this person is? Why do you think he was Otherwise, they can do the research and prepare their
important? presentation for homework.
Background notes
• Students take turns to present their famous person to the
class.
• Rosa Parks (1913–2005) was an African American
woman from Montgomery, Alabama. In the 1950s,
• Ask students Who has had the most effect on life in your
country? and discuss the question as a class.
it was expected that if there were not enough seats
on a bus, African American would give up their seats answers
to white passengers. On 1st December 1955, Rosa Students’ own answers.
Parks refused to give up her seat, and, as a result, was
arrested. This sparked the Montgomery bus boycott in Extra activity
which African Americans refused to use the buses until • Set up a class debate on this statement: ‘Positive
the policy on seating was changed. It was an important discrimination is a good thing.’ Divide the class into
part of the fight for civil rights, which culminated in the teams, one for and the other against the statement.
Civil Rights Act of 1964. Teams each choose three speakers and discuss
arguments and examples that they can use.
Exercise 1 • Organize the debate formally, with a student
• Give students time to read through the three options. chairperson and speakers taking turns to speak for a
maximum of two minutes. The others listen, and at
• Students read the magazine article and then answer the the end of the debate they can comment on which
question.
arguments they thought were the most convincing.
• Check the answer with the class.
ANSWER Further practice
b  Their actions helped black Americans get equality. Workbook  pages 88−97

Exercise 2
• Students read the article again and answer the questions.
• Students can compare answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.

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A Curriculum extra 

Grammar Extra activity


Present simple • Ask students to close their books. Ask What have you
Present perfect learnt about endangered languages? Elicit a few ideas,
Past simple then put students into pairs to note down a list of bullet
points with as many facts as they can remember from
Vocabulary the article.
Languages • Ask pairs in turn to tell the class their ideas. Make notes
on the board.
Project • Students can open their books and read the article
Write a personal statement on why you are studying again quickly to see what ideas they missed.
English
Project
Topic • Read through the Project box with the class. Make sure
Endangered languages that students understand everything.
• Discuss each of the questions in the Project box with the
Warm-up class and elicit some possible ideas for each topic. Make
• Ask What languages can you speak? What other languages notes on the board.
would you like to learn in the future? Why? • Students then write their personal statement.
• Elicit some ideas, then ask How many different languages • Students can compare their statements in pairs or small
are there in your country? How many languages do you groups.
think there are in the world? Which languages have the most • Ask some students to read their personal statements to
speakers? Elicit a few guesses. Use the discussion to teach the class. Ask other students Which ideas do you agree
Mandarin Chinese and Hindi. with? Do you hope to achieve the same things? How are your
• Ask Why do you think some languages are more popular goals different?
than others? Why do you think some languages are
endangered? Elicit a range of ideas.
Consolidation
• Remind students to copy new words or phrases from
Exercise 1 the lesson into their vocabulary books.
• Students read the article quickly and match the languages
with the number of native speakers of each language.
Remind students that they should read quickly, and not
worry at this stage if they do not understand everything.
• Check the answers with the class. Ask Which number do
you find most surprising? Why?
ANSWERS
2  a  3  b  4  c

Exercise 2
• Students read the article again and answer the questions.
• Check the answers with the class.
• Ask Do you think it’s sad when languages disappear? Why? /
Why not?
ANSWERS
1 Around 25 languages disappear every year.
2 Around 25% of the world know some English.
3 English is the most popular language on the Internet.
4 Boa Sr was the last person to speak Aka-Bo.
5 Linguists believe that languages are ‘more than just
words’.
6 There are 15 indigenous languages in Argentina.
7 Their education is in their native language and in
Spanish.

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B Curriculum extra 

ANSWERS
Grammar 1 When you feel cold you aren’t more likely to get colds.
Present simple 2 More oxygen enters your lungs when you breathe in
should fresh air.
Second conditional 3 Pictures of cities produced feelings of stress and worry
in the brain.
Vocabulary
Illnesses and symptoms
Extra activity
• Ask students to close their books.
Project • Write all the headings from exercise 1 apart from
Write a report on outdoor activities for young people in Recommended sports on the board.
your area • Put students into pairs and ask them to make notes
under each heading of information and facts they can
Topics remember from the article.
Helath and fitness • Write students’ ideas on the board.
• Students can open their books and read the article
Warm-up again quickly to find any information or facts that
everyone missed.
• Ask How healthy do you think you are? How much exercise
do you do? What kinds of exercise do you do? Elicit a range
of ideas, and encourage students to talk about their own Project
experiences. • Read through the Project box with the class. Make sure
• Ask Why is it important to exercise? In what ways is exercise that students understand everything.
good for you? Elicit a range of ideas. Try to elicit the idea • Write the three headings on the board and brainstorm
that exercise is good for both the body and the mind. ideas for each with the class. Make notes on the board.
• Elicit the first few lines of the report with the class, e.g.
Exercise 1 Young people can do a lot of sports in my area. For example,
• Read through the headings with the class. Make sure that they can …
students understand them all.
• Students write their reports individually.
• Students read the article quickly and complete the gaps • Students can compare their reports in small groups and
with the correct headings. Tell students not to worry if
discuss which recommendations are the best.
they do not understand everything in the article at this
stage. • Ask each group in turn to tell the class their best
recommendations. Discuss as a class what the local
• Check the answers with the class.
authority should do.
ANSWERS
2  Vitamin D   3  Fewer colds   4  Happiness   Consolidation
5  Better concentration • Remind students to copy any new words or phrases
from the lesson into their vocabulary books.
Exercise 2
• Check that students understand virus and breathe in.
• Students read the article again and complete the
summary.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS
1  sun  2  colds  3  good  4  memories  
5  20%

Exercise 3
• Students read the article again and rewrite the sentences
with true information.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs.
• Check the answers with the class.

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C Curriculum extra 

Grammar Extra activity 1


The passive: present simple • Write these numbers and dates on the board.
The passive: past simple 1 70  2 1997  3 10  4 12,500
by + agent • Ask students to scan the web page quickly to find the
numbers and write a sentence saying what each one
Vocabulary refers to. You could make this into a race, to make it
The environment more challenging.
• Check the answers with the class.
Project ANSWERS
Design a poster for a fundraising event for an 1 Algae provide about 70% of the world’s oxygen.
environmental charity 2 The Great Pacific Garbage Patch was discovered in
1997.
Topic 3 Only 10% of the 300 million tons of plastic produced
Pollution worldwide every year is recycled.
4 The Plastiki was made from 12,500 plastic bottles.
Warm-up
Extra activity 2
• Focus on the photos. Ask What can you see in each picture?
What environmental problems do the pictures show? Elicit a
• Ask students to close their books.
range of ideas. • Write the three questions from the web page on the
board.
• Ask Where does all the rubbish in the oceans come from?
What can people do to solve the problem? Elicit a range of • Put students into pairs and ask them to make notes
ideas, and encourage students to speculate and express under each question of information and facts they can
their own opinions. remember from the web page.
• Write students’ ideas on the board.
Exercise 1 • Students can open their books and read the web page
• Students read the web page quickly and match the again quickly to find any information or facts that
sections to the photos. everyone missed.
• Check the answers with the class.
ANSWERS Project
1  B  2  A  3  C • Read through the Project box with the class. Make sure
that students understand everything.
Exercise 2 • Brainstorm some ideas for where each event could be
• Students read the web page again and answer the held, and what it could be like.
questions. Remind students to write full sentences.
• Brainstorm some ideas of projects to raise money for.
• Students can compare their answers in pairs. • Students design their posters.
• Check the answers with the class. • Display the completed posters around the classroom for
ANSWERS students to look at.
1 He was sailing to California after a boat race. • Discuss as a class which is the best poster and which
2 The world produces 300 million tons of plastic each event sounds the most exciting.
year.
3 Sea animals like loggerhead sea turtles and fish, and Consolidation
people sometimes eat plastic. • Remind students to copy new words or phrases from
4 The journey on the Plastiki helped to publicize the the lesson into their vocabulary books.
problem.
5 Readers can help by putting all their rubbish in the bin,
using paper bags instead of plastic bags, and recycling
their plastic bottles.

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Workbook answer key

Unit 1 Present perfect / past simple Exercise 4


Suggested answer
Exercise 6 Receptionist  Hello. Bay 20 Skate Park.
Vocabulary 1 Have you called Can I help you?
2 have You  Yes, I’d like to go skateboarding.
Experiences
3 called Receptionist  Have you been here
Exercise 1 4 hasn’t been before?
1 be in the newspaper 5 left You  No, I haven’t.
2 visit a foreign country 6 Have you asked Receptionist  OK. What’s your name and
3 go whitewater rafting 7 haven’t mobile number, please?
4 win a competition 8 went You  It’s (student’s name) and my
5 sleep in a tent mobile number is (student’s number).
Exercise 7
Receptionist  When do you want to go
1  ’s done   ​2  ’s written   ​3  was  ​
Grammar 4  learnt / learned   ​5  loved  ​
skateboarding?
You  2 p.m. on Saturday.
Present perfect (affirmative and 6  climbed  ​7  has visited   ​8  ’s tried  ​
Receptionist  How many people are
negative) 9  did  ​10  fought  ​11  ate  ​
there?
12  ’ve never done
You  Four.
Exercise 2 Receptionist  Are you all over 12?
1  hasn’t had   ​2  haven’t spoken   ​ Communication You  Yes, we are.
3  ’ve seen   ​4  has started  
Booking an activity Receptionist  OK. That’ll be £10 for an
​5  haven’t come   ​6  ’ve tidied
hour. Is that OK?
been / gone Exercise 1 You  Yeah, that’s fine.
1 Have you been here before Receptionist  OK. I’ve booked that for
Exercise 3 2 What’s your name you. Goodbye. Have a nice day.
1 ’ve been to the cinema 3 When do you want to book the
2 has gone to Maria’s house session Skills
3 has gone to Rome 4 How many people are there
4 ’ve been to the shopping centre 5 Is that OK Reading

Present perfect (interrogative Exercise 2 Exercise 1


and short answers) 1 A  Hello. Can I help you? 1 Teenagers between the ages of 14
2 B  Yes, please. I’d like to book a and 17
Exercise 4 football pitch, please. 2 In the Siskiyou Mountains in
1 Have you seen my MP3 player? 3 A  OK. Can I have your name and northern California
2 I haven’t mobile number, please? 3 In July and August
3 Have you left it at school? 4 B  Yes, it’s Pedro Williams and my 4 For two weeks
4 I haven’t mobile number is 323-555-4911.
5 Have you looked in your room? Exercise 2
5 A  Thank you, Pedro. And when do
6 I have 1 He’s been on two survival camps.
you want the football pitch for?
7 Have you asked Dad? 2 He’s learnt to make a fire, build a
6 B  For 11.30 a.m. tomorrow.
8 I haven’t camp, find food in the wild, and
7 A  OK – Tuesday 22nd December at
9 Has he come home? how to use the sun to get clean
11.30 a.m. How many people are
10 he has water.
there?
11 Have you seen my MP3 player? 3 He thought it was brilliant.
8 B Twelve.
12 I have 4 She went on the survival camp last
9 A  That’s fine. And are you all over 13?
month.
10 B  Yes, we are.
ever / never 5 Her favourite activity was cooking
11 A  That’ll be £20 for the pitch.
over the campfire in the evening.
Exercise 5 12 B  That’s great. Thanks. Bye.
1 ’ve never done Writing
Exercise 3
2 Have you ever been
1 No, I haven’t. Exercise 3
3 ’ve never felt
2 It’s (student’s name) and my mobile Students’ own answers.
4 ’ve never had
number is (student’s mobile number).
5 Have you ever fallen
3 For 2 p.m. on Saturday.
6 Have you ever jumped
4 Two.
7 Have you ever met
5 Yes, we are.
6 Yeah, that’s fine.

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Unit 2 Communication Writing

Buying presents Exercise 3


Vocabulary Students’ own answers.
Exercise 1
Books 1 Assistant  Good morning. Can I help
Exercise 1 you?
Across:  2 crime   ​3  detective    ​ 2 Julia  Yes, please. I’m looking for a
4 fantasy   ​7  biography present for my dad. I’d like to get him
Down:  ​5  spy    ​6  horror a book.
3 Assistant  Well, what kind of books
Exercise 2 does he read?
1  autobiography  ​2  horror story   ​ 4 Julia  He loves crime stories.
3  detective story / crime story   ​ 5 Assistant  Has he read The Girl with the
4  love story   ​5  spy story Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson? It’s a
best-seller.
Grammar 6 Julia  Yes, he has. He’s already read it.
He loved it.
Present perfect + yet and already 7 Assistant  What about The Girl Who
Played with Fire, then? It’s the next
Exercise 3 book in the series. I’ve just finished it.
1 have you sent the email to Mary yet? It’s great.
I haven’t switched on the computer 8 Julia  Cool! How much does it cost?
yet. 9 Assistant  It’s £8, but there’s a sale at
2 Has Tom got up yet? the moment. There’s a 10% discount,
he hasn’t woken up yet. so that’s £7.20.
3 Have you bought the concert 10 Julia  Great. I’ll take it. Here you are.
tickets yet? 11 Assistant  Here’s your change and
you haven’t given me the money yet. your receipt.
4 Have they had their exam results yet? 12 Julia Thanks.
they haven’t seen them yet.
Exercise 2
Exercise 4 1 Which one would you like?
1  ’ve already read   ​2  ’ve already 2 It’s normally $14.99.
finished  ​3  ’s already seen   ​4  ’s 3 What size is she?
already visited   5​   ’ve already sent   ​ 4 Is this OK?
6  ’ve already taken   ​7  ’s already 5 Would you like it wrapped as a gift?
broken 6 That’s $11.49.
Exercise 5 7 Here’s your change and your
1  yet  ​2  already  ​3  yet  ​4  already  ​ receipt.
5  yet  ​6  already  ​7  yet  ​8  yet Exercise 3
Present perfect + just Students’ own answers.

Exercise 6 Skills
1  ’ve just painted   ​2  ’s just left   ​
3  ’ve just seen   4​   have just won   ​ Reading
5  ’ve just washed
Exercise 1
Present perfect + for / since 1  007  ​2  Dr. No  ​3  Daniel Craig

Exercise 7 Exercise 2
1  for  ​2  since  ​3  since  ​4  for 1 True.
2 False. He used guns or explosives
Exercise 8 that looked like everyday objects.
1  since  ​2  yet  ​3  already  ​4  just  ​ 3 False. They are the second most
5  already  ​6  for  ​7  since  ​8  yet successful series of films in the
history of cinema.
4 False. About half the world’s
population has seen a James Bond
film.
5 True.
6 False. Most people like Sean
Connery best.

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Unit 3 Communication
At the doctor’s
Vocabulary
Exercise 1
Illnesses and symptoms 1 terrible backache
Exercise 1 ​2 How long have you had it
1  temperature  ​2  sore throat   ​ 3 I’ve had it
3  toothache  ​4  stomach ache   ​ ​4 let me have a look
5  backache  ​6  headache  ​7  cough ​5
Just here
​6
Here’s a prescription for some
Grammar painkillers
​7 You should rest
should / shouldn’t
Exercise 2
Exercise 2 2  have  ​3  stay  ​4  can I   ​5  does
1  shouldn’t  ​2  should  ​3  shouldn’t  ​
4  should  ​5  should  ​6  should Exercise 3
a  4  ​c  5  ​d  3  ​e  2
Exercise 3
1 You shouldn’t run near the Exercise 4
swimming pool. 1 I’ve got a very bad headache.
2 Young children shouldn’t swim alone. 2 It hurts above my eyes.
3 You should drink lots of water 3 I’ve had it for two days now.
when you are playing sports. Exercise 5
4 You shouldn’t exercise for too long. 1 My arm hurts.
5 You shouldn’t eat in the leisure 2 does it hurt
centre. 3 It hurts near my hand.
Exercise 4 4 long have you had it
1 Should Matt work harder at school? 5 I’ve had it since Saturday. I fell off
he should my bike.
2 Should children watch TV late at 6 isn’t broken
night? 7 you should rest it for a week
they shouldn’t
3 Should I eat chocolate every day? Skills
you shouldn’t
Reading
Second conditional Exercise 1
Exercise 5 Tennis, football, yoga, and dance.
1  we’d have   ​2  didn’t have   ​
Exercise 2
3  Would  ​4  didn’t have   ​
1 People should do at least half an
5  wouldn’t  ​6  did
hour of exercise four or five times
Exercise 6 a week.
1  took; ’d feel   ​2  wouldn’t lose; 2 They can become obese and they
tidied  ​3  ’d enjoy; tried   ​4  Would aren’t as happy as people who are
… play; was   ​5  would pass; studied   ​ active.
6  had; would … eat 3 You can hurt your arm or leg, or get
backache.
Exercise 7 4 They should find a kind of exercise
1  wouldn’t be   ​2  had  ​3  had  ​ that they enjoy.
4  ’d go   5​   ’d have   ​6  didn’t spend   ​ 5 They would meet new people and
7  wouldn’t feel   8​   didn’t give make friends at the same time as
doing exercise.
Exercise 8
1 Would you be angry if your friend Writing
told a secret about you?
2 Would you tell the teacher if Exercise 3
someone cheated in a test? Students’ own answers.
3 What would you do if you won
£100?
4 What would you do if you saw a
famous person?
Students’ own answers.
© Copyright Oxford University Press
Workbook answer key 75

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Unit 4 Exercise 2
2 He must be on the next bus.
3 No, it can’t be true.
Vocabulary
4 She must be sad about something.
Investigation 5 They might be at home.

Exercise 1 Exercise 3
record  discover  explain   b  5  ​c  2  ​d  4  ​e  3
solve  explore  search for  
prove  investigate
Exercise 4
1 He may / might be at home and
Exercise 2 finishing his homework.
1  explained  ​2  solve 2 He may / might be on his way now.
​3  investigated  ​4  discovered 3 He must want to come.
5  record  ​6  searching for
​7  prove  ​8  explore
Exercise 5
Suggested answer
Ben  Where do you think Jun is? He’s
Grammar really late.
Possibility in the present: may / Mi  He might be at home and finishing
might (not), must, and can’t his homework.
Ben  No, he must be on his way now.
Exercise 3 I spoke to him about it this morning.
1  might  ​2  can’t  ​3  must  ​4  might  ​ Mi  Well, the train might be late.
5  must  ​6  may  ​7  might not Ben  Or he might be on the next one.
Mi  Let’s call him … he isn’t answering.
Exercise 4 Ben  His mobile phone must be at
1  might  ​2  can’t  ​3  must  ​4  might  ​ home.
5  must  ​6  must Mi  He must want to come. Oh look.
There he is.
a / an, the, no article
Jun  Where have you been, guys? It’s
Exercise 5 late. We’re going to miss the film!
1  an  ​2  the  ​3  the  ​4  Peru  ​5  a  ​
6  animals Skills
Exercise 6 Reading
1  an  ​2  the  ​3  −  ​4  −  ​5  The  ​
6  −  ​7  −  ​8  the  ​9  the  ​10  −  ​
Exercise 1
Three
11  the  ​12  a

Exercise 7 Exercise 2
1 They are chemicals which are
1 (✓)
unique to each person.
2 (✗) He loved books and music.
2 Scientists think women like a smell
3 (✗) He studied engineering at
which is very different from their
university.
own.
4 (✗) He was the first man to walk on
3 The physical signs of attraction
the moon.
are not being able to eat, sleep, or
5 (✓)
concentrate.
6 (✗) After 1994 he didn’t give
4 They change the way the body
autographs.
behaves, for example your hands
7 (✗) In 2005 a hairdresser tried to sell
might become hotter than usual, or
some of Armstrong’s hair.
you might find it difficult to speak
clearly because you feel nervous.
Communication
Writing
Speculating
Exercise 3
Exercise 1
Students’ own answers.
1  might  ​2  must  ​3  might  ​
4  might  ​5  may  ​6  can’t

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Unit 5 Communication
Reporting a crime
Vocabulary
Exercise 1
Crime 1  stole my rucksack   ​2  I was walking  ​
Exercise 1 3  they ran away   ​4  What time   ​
1  kidnapping  ​2  shoplifting  ​ 5  look like
3  robbery  ​4  vandalism  ​
Exercise 2
5  pickpocketing
2  e  ​3  b  ​4  d  ​5  a
Exercise 2 Exercise 3
1  murderer  ​2  shoplifter  ​
1 Yes, I want to report a crime.
3  mugger  ​4  vandalized  
2 A man stole my neighbour’s
​5  stolen  ​6  kidnapped
computer.
3 It was on Moore Street.
Grammar 4 It was ten o’clock in the morning.
Past continuous (affirmative and 5 I was making my bed in my
bedroom and looking out of the
negative)
window.
Exercise 3 6 He was wearing a white T-shirt with
1  wasn’t sleeping; was dancing   ​ dark trousers, trainers, a jacket, and
2  wasn’t playing; was drinking   ​ a cap.
3  wasn’t listening; was painting   ​ 7 He had long dark hair.
4  wasn’t playing; was reading   ​
5  wasn’t writing; was watching Skills
Past continuous (interrogative Reading
and short answers)
Exercise 1
Exercise 4 1  B  ​2  A  ​3  C
1  Were you talking   ​2  was  ​
3  Were you waiting   ​4  were  ​ Exercise 2
5  Were they robbing   6​   were   1 About 75,000 gang members live in
​7  were you wearing   8​   wasn’t Chicago.
2 It is one of the biggest gangs in
while Los Angeles and has even got
members in other countries.
Exercise 5 3 LA street gangs started recording
2  a  ​3  d  ​4  c  ​5  b  ​6  f music in the 1990s.
4 They listen to ex-gang members
Past continuous and past simple because they really know what life
+ when / while in a gang is like.
5 They learn camping skills.
Exercise 6
6 Because many of them have never
1  were walking; started   2​   met; was
left their neighbourhoods before.
shopping  ​3  learnt / learned; was /
It’s a new experience for them and
were living   ​4  were waiting; robbed  ​
it helps them to think about their
5  took; were staying
lives.
Exercise 7
1  was watching   ​2  heard  ​3  went  ​
Writing
4  was standing   5​   came  ​6  Was Exercise 3
he carrying   ​7  had  ​8  happened  ​ Suggested answers
9  called  ​10  ran  ​11  was talking   ​ 1 They were writing graffiti.
12  was he wearing   1​ 3  did the man 2 They use it to vandalize buildings
look  ​14  looked and mark their territory
3 Students’ own answers.

Exercise 4
Students’ own answers.

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Unit 6 by + agent Skills
Exercise 8 Reading
Vocabulary 1 The Internet is used by over 2
billion people. Exercise 1
The computer 2  A  ​3  C  ​4  B
2 My bike was stolen last night.
Exercise 1 3 The first books were printed in the
15th century. Exercise 2
1  screen  ​2  USB port   ​3  keyboard  ​
4 The 100 metres gold medal was 1 They could perform very difficult
4  mouse  ​5  speakers  ​
won by Usain Bolt. problems again and again.
6  headphones  ​7  microphone  ​
5 Online games are played by many 2 They were so big and expensive
8  webcam  ​9  printer  ​10  scanner  ​
people. that only big companies had
11  memory stick
6 The planet Uranus was discovered enough money to buy them.
Exercise 2 by William Herschel in 1781. 3 Computer experts used the first
1  receive  ​2  download  ​3  chatting  ​ personal computers.
4  sent  ​5  surf  ​6  upload  ​ The passive: past simple 4 It was used to type in instructions
7  playing (interrogative and short answers) to tell the computer what to do.
5 The first computer games were sold
Exercise 9 in the 1980s.
Grammar 2 What food was found in the 6 It made it easier for people with no
The passive Pyramids? training to use computers.
3 Where was money invented? 7 It has brought the opportunity to
Exercise 3 4 What sport was played on the sell goods all over the world quickly
are produced, are told, is served, isn’t moon in 1971? and easily.
cooked, are sold 5 When was the Empire State 8 Because there are small computers
Building built? you can wear or fit into your
The passive: present simple pocket, and 3D computers
(affirmative and negative) Communication for amazing film and gaming
experiences.
Exercise 4 Asking about a tourist attraction
1  sent  ​2  sold  ​3  is  ​ Writing
4  created  ​5  is Exercise 1
1  It’s called   ​2  is similar to   ​ Exercise 3
Exercise 5 3  What’s it made of   ​ Suggested answer
1  are taken   ​2  isn’t spoken   ​ 4  When was it built   ​ The first mobile phones were
3  are shown   ​4  aren’t grown   ​ 5  Who was it designed by   produced in the 1960s and weighed
5  is enjoyed ​6  He’s designed from 3kg to 40kg! In the 1990s
smaller, lighter phones were
The passive: present simple Exercise 2 produced. SMS messages became
(interrogative and short answers) 1 When was it built? possible, too. But mobile phones still
2 Who was it designed by? only had a few thousand customers.
Exercise 6
3 How tall is it? In the 2000s a new generation of
1 Are cars produced in India? they are
4 What’s it called? mobile phones were sold. They were
2 Is English spoken in the US? it is
3 Are letters sent on the Internet? smaller and lighter, and they had
Exercise 3
they aren’t access to the Internet, too. By 2007,
Suggested answer
4 Are hamburgers made with meat? they were used by 295 million people.
Tourist  Wow! Look at that building!
they are Now mobile phones are used all
What’s it called?
5 Is football played on ice? it isn’t over the world for lots of things:
Guide  It’s called the Mode Gakuen
downloading music, writing emails,
Cocoon Tower.
The passive: past simple and reading newspapers, etc. In the
Tourist  It’s amazing! What’s it made of?
(affirmative and negative) future there may be live TV on all
Guide  It’s made of steel, aluminium, and
mobile phones!
Exercise 7 glass.
1  was broken   ​2  wasn’t found   ​ Tourist  It’s very modern. When it was
3  was carried   ​4  weren’t contacted   ​ built?
5  were told   ​6  was won   7​   wasn’t Guide  It was built from 2006 to 2008.
beaten  ​8  was given   ​9  wasn’t Tourist  Who was it designed by?
taught  ​10  was downloaded Guide  It was designed by Tange
Associates.
Tourist  How tall is it?
Guide  It’s 204 metres tall.

© Copyright Oxford University Press


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Word list

This word list shows the new key words and phrases that are introduced in Champions 2nd edition Level 3. The words are
presented alphabetically and followed by a reference to where each is introduced.
Key: W = Welcome,  U = Unit,  R = Review,  Cc = Culture club,   Ce = Curriculum extra
Word  Translation / Definition Word  Translation / Definition
Aa bar U3 
a cold U3  bath U3 
a cough U3  battle CeA 
a headache U3  be in a newspaper U1 
a rash U3  be sick W 
a sore throat U3  bear U4 
a temperature U3  beg U5 
above U1  beggar U5 
abroad W  believe U3 
access U6  benefit CeB 
activity U1  between U4 
actually U3  bilingual CeA 
admire U3  biography U2 
admit U2  bird U4 
adventure U2  biscuit W 
advice U2  blogger U6 
affect CeA  blood CeB 
after-school U3  bone CeB 
agent U2  book U1 
agree U2  boss W 
alarm U5  bottle U5 
album U6  bowling U1 
algae CeC  boycott CcC 
alien U2  brain CcC 
allergic U3  brand new U4 
alligator U1  bread W 
allow CcC  break (noun) U3 
alone U3  break (verb) U2 
already U2  brochure U5 
amount CeB  bronze U1 
an earache U3  build U5 
ancient U4  building W 
anniversary RC  bully (noun) CcB 
ant U4  bully (verb) CcB 
anxious U3  bullying CcB 
ape U4  bungee jumping U1 
appearance U5  burglar U5 
archaeologist RB  burglary U5 
architect U6  burgle U5 
area RC  burn U5 
arrest U4  bus stop W 
arrival U5  busy U2 
art and craft W 
art gallery U2  Cc
assistant U2  café U2 
attend U6  calendar U4 
authentic U4  camel U1 
author U2  campaign CcB 
autobiography U2  campsite U4 
average U3  canoeing U1 
avoid U3  captain U3 
award U1  car park W 
carbon dioxide CcC 
Bb career U6 
backache U3  careful U5 
backstreet U5  carrot W 
banana W  case CcB 
bank W  cashier U4 

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Word  Translation / Definition Word  Translation / Definition
catch fire U2  criticize U6 
cause U3  cross U1 
cave U1  crowd CcC 
CD-ROM drive / DVD drive U6  culture CeA 
celebrity CcB  current U2 
century U4  cyclist U5 
challenging U1 
chance CcA  Dd
character U2  damage U5 
chat / socialize online U6  danger CeC 
check U4  dangerous U1 
cheese W  deal with U3 
chemical U3  death U5 
chemist W  death sentence U5 
chocolate W  debut U6 
circus U1  decide U4 
city U4  definitely U2 
civil rights CcC  dentist U3 
classical W  descendant U5 
clear the table W  deserve CcB 
clearly U4  design U6 
clever U6  detective story U2 
climb U1  determined CcC 
climb a mountain U1  develop U6 
climber U6  development U1 
climbing W  device U6 
cloud W  digital U6 
cloudy W  disappear U5 
coast U1  disappearance U4 
coasteering U1  disappointed W 
coffee pot U2  discover U1 
cola W  distance U5 
collect CcC  do a parachute jump U1 
collector U4  do the cooking W 
college U3  do the ironing W 
colony U5  dolphin U1 
come over U3  download U2 
commission U6  download software, videos, music, photos U6 
commit U5  dragon U2 
computerize U6  dream CcC 
concentration U3  driving test U2 
concert W  drums W 
concrete U6  duke U1 
confidence U1  dump CeC 
confidently CcB 
connect U6  Ee
contact U4  e-book U6 
contain U3  Egypt RB 
contestant U6  Egyptian U4 
continue U2  elect CcC 
control U6  electronic U6 
convert U6  emotionally CcB 
convict U5  empty U2 
copy U3  encourage U2 
costume U4  endangered CcA 
countryside CeB  engine U4 
couple U4  enter U5 
courage CcC  entertainment U4 
course W  equality CcC 
cow U4  equipment U1 
crash U4  escape U4 
crazy U1  evidence U4 
cream U3  exactly U2 
create U4  exam W 
creative W  exciting U1 
creature U2  exercise U3 
crime U4  exist CcA 
crime story U2  expensive U5 
© Copyright Oxford University Press
80 Word list

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Word  Translation / Definition Word  Translation / Definition
experience (noun) U1  Hh
experience (verb) CcA  haircut U3 
explain U4  hairy U4 
explore U4  half-day U1 
extinct CeA  harp W 
hate W 
Ff have an accident U1 
fabric U6  head CcB 
face U2  headphones U6 
fact U4  health U3 
factory U5  healthily U3 
fail U3  hear U1 
fair U6  heart CeB 
fairy U4  heavy U3 
family-sized U3  helicopter U1 
fan U2  helmet U1 
fantasy story U2  highlight U6 
farm U5  high-tech U2 
fashion U6  hiking U1 
feature U6  hip hop W 
feed the dog W  hit CcB 
fight (noun) U2  hobby W 
fight (verb) CcB  hold U6 
fill U5  honest U3 
film U4  honey U6 
film-maker U5  horror story U2 
fine U1  horse U1 
fire U2  horse riding U2 
fit CeB  household U6 
fitness U1  huge U4 
fly U1  humorous U4 
fly in a plane U1  hunger U2 
foggy W  hungry U2 
follow U6  hunt U4 
football match U1  hurt U3 
football pitch U1 
footprint U4  Ii
foreign W  ice pack U3 
forget U3  impress U3 
fountain U5  impressive U6 
free U1  improve U3 
freedom CcC  increase U5 
fresh air CeB  incredible U5 
full U5  indigenous CeA 
fun U1  indoors U5 
influence CcC 
Gg insecurity CcB 
gadget U6  inside U4 
garage U4  insist U2 
garbage CeC  instead U6 
generation U6  interest U2 
get married U1  interview U5 
glacier CcA  invent U1 
glass U6  investigate U4 
global CcA  involved CcB 
go out U4 
go whitewater rafting U1  Jj
goal U4  jazz W 
gold U1  jellyfish CeC 
governor CcC  join U1 
grab U4  journalism U6 
graduate CcC  journey U4 
graffiti U5  jump U1 
grow U2  just U2 
guidebook U4 
guitar W  Kk
gun U2  karaoke U1 
guy U3  keyboard U6 
© Copyright Oxford University Press
Word list 81

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Word  Translation / Definition Word  Translation / Definition
kidnap someone U5  murder someone U5 
kidnapper U5  murderer U5 
kidnapping U5  muscle CeB 
kill U2  museum U2 
kilometre U1  mysterious U2 
kitesurfing U1  mystery U4 
myth U4 
Ll
late W  Nn
lay the table W  nasty CcB 
layout U3  native (adjective) U6 
lazy W  native (noun) U6 
leader CcC  near W 
least U1  neatly W 
legend U4  nervous U3 
lemon U6  network U4 
level U1  New Zealand U1 
librarian U2  nightmare U5 
library W  nocturnal U2 
life jacket U1  northern U4 
limit U1  note U4 
line U4  notebook W 
load the dishwasher W  notice U4 
local authority CeB  nowadays U6 
lock U5 
lonely CeA  Oo
lose U1  obesity U3 
lottery U3  obviously U4 
love story U2  occasional U3 
lozenge U3  office U1 
lucky U4  opinion U4 
lung CeB  organized W 
organizer U1 
Mm out U1 
make fun CcB  outdoors CeB 
make my bed W  outgoing W 
manage U3  outside U1 
management U3  oxygen CeB 
manuscript U4 
mark U3  Pp
massive U4  pain U3 
matter U3  painkiller U3 
meal W  paintballing U1 
medication U3  painting W 
medicine U3  park W 
meet a famous person U1  participant U6 
member U1  part-time W 
memory stick U6  pass W 
memory U2  passport U1 
metre CcA  patch CeC 
microphone U6  patient W 
midnight U3  pay attention U5 
milk W  penal U5 
minister CcC  penalty U5 
miss W  penguin CcA 
mistake U4  perform W 
modern U4  permission W 
modernize U4  physically CcB 
monster U2  piano W 
mood U3  pick someone’s pocket U5 
most U1  pickpocket U5 
mountain biking U2  pickpocketing U5 
mouse U6  pill U3 
movement CcC, CeC  play games U6 
mug someone U5  pocket U5 
mugger U5  police officer U5 
mugging U5  police station W 
murder U5  politician U2 
© Copyright Oxford University Press
82 Word list

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Word  Translation / Definition Word  Translation / Definition
pop W  rock (music) W 
popular W  rocky U1 
possession U6  romantic CcA 
post (noun) U3, U5  , round-the-world U3 
post (verb) U2  rubbish CeC 
post office W  run away U5 
potato W 
pour U2  Ss
powerful CcB  sale CeC 
practice U3  Sasquatch U4 
practise U1  save CeC 
prefer U2  saxophone W 
prescription U3  scan U6 
presenter U4  scanner U6 
prime minister U5  sceptic U4 
printer U6  school trip U1 
prison U5  science-fiction story U2 
prize U1  scientific U4 
promise U3  score U2 
proof U4  scream U3 
property U5  screen U6 
protect CcA  scuba-diving U1 
prove U4  search for U4 
psychologist U4  secret agent U2 
publication U6  secret services U2 
publicize CeC  section U1 
purpose U6  send / receive emails U6 
push U5  sentence U5 
pyramid U4  separate CcC 
series U2 
Qq servant U5 
quietly U2  session U1 
shape U4 
Rr shard U6 
rabbit W  shine CeB 
raining W  shocked U2 
raise CeC  shocking U4 
rare U4  shoplift U5 
reach CeC  shoplifter U5 
react CcC  shoplifting U5 
real U4  shoulder U3 
receipt U2  show U1 
record U4  shy W 
recorder W  sick U3 
recycle CeC  silent CcB 
reflect U6  silver U1 
relaxation U3  similar U3 
release U6  ski U5 
repair CeB  skill U1 
reply U2  skin CcB 
report (verb) U5  slavery CcC 
reporter U1  sleep in a tent U1 
researcher CeB  smartwatch U6 
rest U3  smile (noun) W 
retired U1  smile (verb) U2 
return U2  smoking CeB 
reunite CeA  snowboarding U1 
ride U1  snowing W 
ride a horse U1  social network CcB 
right CcC  software U6 
rise U2  solve U4 
risk U2  soup U4 
rob U4  southern CcA 
rob a bank U5  space U3 
robber U5  spaceship U2 
robbery U5  speakers U6 
robot U6  special forces U2 
rock U1  speech CcC 
© Copyright Oxford University Press
Word list 83

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Word  Translation / Definition Word  Translation / Definition
spend U2  truth U4 
spider U3  turtle CeC 
sponsored CeC 
sport W  Uu
spy story U2  unforgettable CcA 
stand U4  unicycle U1 
state CcC  uniform W 
statement CeA  unlikely U3 
statue U2  upload software, videos, music, photos U6 
steal W  urban U4 
steel U6  USB port U6 
stomach ache U3 
stone U4  Vv
strange RA  vampire U2 
stress U3  vandal U5 
stressed U3  vandalism U5 
stressful U3  vandalize a building U5 
strong CcB  version U4 
successful U2  victim CcB 
sunny W  view (noun) U1 
surf the Internet U6  view (verb) U6 
surfing U1  viewer U6 
survive U1  violin W 
sushi U1  visit a foreign country U1 
suspect U5  visit websites U6 
suspense U2  vitamin D CeB 
suspicious U5  volunteer U1 
sweet W 
sympathetic U3  Ww
symptom U3  wait U2 
waiter U4 
Tt walk U2 
tablet U3  wallet U3 
take a break U3  watch U6 
take out the rubbish W  water W 
take part U1  way CeC 
talent U6  webcam U6 
tattoo U2  well W 
teen U2  wetsuit U1 
teenager U2  whale U1 
temple U4  whale watching CcA 
term U3  wheel U5 
terrifying U4  whole U3 
test U6  wide CcA 
theft RB  wild U4 
theory U4  win a competition U1 
thief RB  windy W 
threat CcC  witness U5 
threatening U5  world W 
tiger U1  World Wide Web U6 
timetable U3  worry CeB 
tiny CeB  writer U2 
tip U3 
tired U3  Xx
title U2  X-ray U2 
ton CeC 
toothache U3  Yy
top U1  yet U2 
top secret U2  yoghurt W 
topic U6 
total U1 
tour W 
tourist U4 
tourist attraction U1 
tower U6 
travel W 
treat U3 
trumpet W 
© Copyright Oxford University Press
84 Word list

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A Portfolio

Speaking and writing


1 I can describe what I have or haven’t done 4 I can make a booking by phone. B1
in my life. B1 Can I book a session, please?
 I’ve ridden a horse. 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5
Can you? /5
Can you? ___ / 5
5 I can identify different types of book. B1
2 I can ask my partner about his / her
autobiography
experiences.B1
1
When did youwin a competition?
2
1
3
2
4
3
5
4
5 Can you? /5
Can you? ___ / 5
6 I can have a conversation in a bookshop. B1
3 I can describe an experience in my life. B1 I’d like to buy a book.
I went to New York when I was ten. 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5
Can you? /5
Can you? ___ / 5

Reading, listening, and writing Can you?


Yes I’m not sure No

7 I can read and understand a text about ocean sports. B1


8 I can read and understand a text about teenagers’
reading habits. B1
9 I can read and understand a text about the
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award. B1
10 I can write a book review. B1

© Copyright Oxford University Press


Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2014 Portfolio A 85

4004718 Champions 2e TB3.indb 85 04/11/2014 14:29


B Portfolio

Speaking and writing


1 I can talk about how to have a healthy 4 I can identify investigation words. B2
lifestyle.B1 disappear
You should eat lots of fruit and vegetables. 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5
Can you? /5
Can you? /5
5 I can speculate about situations. B2
2 I can identify different kinds of illnesses She might be from Columbia.
and symptoms. B1 1
stomach ache 2
1 3
2 4
3 5
4
Can you? /5
5

Can you? /5 6 I can talk and speculate about urban legends.


B2
3 I can understand a conversation at the It might have been an animal.
doctor’s.B1 1
My arm hurts. 2
1 3
2 4
3 5
4
Can you? /5
5

Can you? /5

Reading, listening, and writing Can you?


Yes I’m not sure No

7 I can read and understand a text from an online problem page. B2

8 I can write a reply to a message post giving advice. B2

9 I can read and understand a text about searching for evidence. B2

10 I can write an urban legend. B2

© Copyright Oxford University Press


86 Portfolio B Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2014

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C Portfolio

Speaking and writing


1 I can identify different crimes and 4 I can ask and talk about popular gadgets.  B2
criminals.  B1 My computer was made in China.
kidnapping 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5
Can you? /5
Can you? /5
5 I can ask for and give information about
2 I can ask and answer questions about a technological gadgets. B2
crime.  B2 What do you use your computer for?
What were they wearing? 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5
Can you? /5
Can you? /5
6 I can write about an invention.  B2
3 I can describe a crime.  A2 The digital camers was invented in 1975.
I saw a robbery yesterday. 1
1 2
2 3
3 4
4 5
5
Can you? /5
Can you? /5

Reading, listening, and writing Can you?


Yes I’m not sure No

7 I can read an article about bike crime. B1

8 I can read and understand an extract from a textbook. B1

9 I can read and understand a text about a technology fair. B1

10 I can read and understand an interview about people and


technology. B1

© Copyright Oxford University Press


Photocopiable © Oxford University Press 2014 Portfolio C 87

4004718 Champions 2e TB3.indb 87 04/11/2014 14:29


1
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