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School Grade Level 9 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE Teaching Dates and Time
School
Grade Level
9
DAILY LESSON LOG
Teacher
Learning Area
SCIENCE
Teaching Dates and
Time
Quarter
SECOND QUARTER
 

MONDAY

 

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

I.

OBJECTIVES

 

A. Content Standard

The learners demonstrate understanding of the development of atomic models that led to the description of the behavior of electrons within the atoms.

B. Performance Standard

Describe how Bohr’s model of the atom improved Rutherford’s atomic model

 

Explain how Quantum Mechanical Model of the atom describes the energies and positions of the electrons.

 

C. Learning

 

S9MT-IIa-13

Competency/Objectives

Determine the characteristic colors that metal salts emit

Relate colors emitted by salts to the structure of the atom

 

Describe how it is likely to find the electron in an atom by probability

Write the

   

electron configuration of the elements in the third period

Determine

   

the pattern of filling the orbitals based on the given distribution for the first 10 elements

Devise

rules in filling up the orbitals

II.

CONTENT

FLAME TEST

PREDICTING THE PROBABLE LOCATION OF AN ELECTRON

ELECTRON

   
 

CONFIGURATION

III.

LEARNING RESOURCES

 

A. References

         
 

1. Teacher’s Guide pages

pp. 83-85

pp. 85-88

pp. 88-89

   
 

2. Learner’s Materials pages

pp. 100-104

pp. 104-108

pp. 108-109

   
 

3. Textbook pages

         
 

4. Additional Materials from Learning Resource

Project Ease, Chemistry

Project Ease, Chemistry

Project Ease, Chemistry

   

5.

(LR)portal

Module 10 What’s inside the Atom?

Module 10 What’s inside the Atom?

Module 11 Electron Configuration

B.

Other Learning Resource

https://www.youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/

 

/watch?v=cKzh5yeQGjA

watch?v=lqWL0WMtlYk

IV.

PROCEDURES

 

A. Reviewing previous lesson or presenting the new lesson

Discuss earlier concepts of the atomic structure.

Draw an atom as describe by Niels Bohr.

Draw an atom as describe in Quantum Mechanical Model

B. Establishing a purpose for the lesson

Let the students watch a video about fireworks competition.

Explain the fault in Bohr’s Model of the Atom

Compare clues in a treasure map with electron configuration.

C. Presenting examples/Instances of the new lesson

Explain the reason of the different colors from fireworks.

Do Activity 2.

Write the electron configuration of a hypothetical element x with atomic no. 30

D. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 1

Give important reminders when dealing with chemicals.

Discuss Guide

Do Activity 3

questions.

E. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 2

Do Activity 1. “The Flame Test”.

Prove that electrons found in definite orbits around the nucleus is not accurate. Introduce the Quantum Mechanical Model of the Atom.

Discuss Guide questions.

F. Developing mastery

Discuss Guide questions. Explain what happens to an excited electron.

Discuss the quantum no. As shown in table 2

Discuss Aufbau principle, Hund’s rule and Pauli’s Exclusion principle.

p.107

G. Finding practical application of concepts and skills in daily living

Explain that the color emitted by an element can be used to identify the name of the element.

   

H. Making generalizations and abstractions about the lesson

Relate the color observed from an element and the structure of atom.

 

Infer that properties of elements depends on the arrangement of electrons outside the nucleus.

I. Evaluating learning

How can the energy of the electron be compared to a ladder?

How quantum mechanical model of the atom be compared to a cloud?

Write electron configuration of elements in the 4 th period.

J. Additional activities for application or remediation

 

Watch videos about quantum mechanical model.

Watch videos about electron configuration.

V.

REMARKS

 

VI.

REFLECTION

 

A. No. of learners who earned 80% in the evaluation

 

B. No. of learners who require additional activities for remediation who scored below 80%

 

C. Did the remedial lessons work? No. of learners who have caught up with the lesson

 

D. No. of learners who continue to require remediation

 

E. Which of my teaching strategies worked well? Why did these work?

 

F. What difficulties did I encounter which my principal or supervisor can help me solve?

 

G. What innovation or localized materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other teachers?

 
School Grade Level 9 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE Teaching Dates and Time
School Grade Level 9 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE Teaching Dates and Time
School
Grade Level
9
DAILY LESSON LOG
Teacher
Learning Area
SCIENCE
Teaching Dates and
Time
Quarter
SECOND QUARTER
MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

VII.

OBJECTIVES

 

A. Content Standard

The learners demonstrate understanding of

 

How atoms combine with other atoms by transferring or by sharing electrons

 

Forces that holds metals together

 

B. Performance Standard

The learners should be able to

 

Explain the formation of ionic and covalent bonds

Recognize different types of compounds (ionic or covalent) based on their properties such as melting point, hardness, polarity and electrical and thermal conductivity

Explain how ions are formed

 

C. Learning

S9MT-IIb-14

S9MT-IIc-d-15

 

S9MT-IIe-f-16

 

Competency/Objectives

Identify the number of valence electrons of atoms

Write the Lewis Symbol of the common metals and non-metals

 

Illustrate

Explain

Make a

how an ionic bond formed

how covalent

model of a metallic bond

bonding takes

Show how

place

Relate the

Compare the electronegativity and ionization energy values of metals and non- metals

Show the relationship among the number of valence electrons, electronegativity, and ionization energy

ions are formed

Illustrate

properties of metals to the kind of bond they are made of

 

the sharing of electrons

VIII.

CONTENT

MAPPING THE PERIODIC TABLE

LEWIS SYMBOL

IONIC BOND

COVALENT BOND

METALLIC BOND

IX.

LEARNING RESOURCES

 

C.

References

         

6.

Teacher’s Guide pages

pp. 90-92

pp. 92

pp. 93

pp. 93-96

pp. 96-97

7.

Learner’s Materials pages

pp. 113-115

pp. 115-117

pp. 118-119

pp. 118-119

pp. 121-123

8.

Textbook pages

         

9.

Additional Materials from Learning Resource

Project Ease, Chemistry Module 14 Chemical Bonds

Project Ease, Chemistry Module 14 Chemical

Project Ease, Chemistry Module 14 Chemical

Project Ease, Chemistry Module 14 Chemical Bonds

Project Ease, Chemistry Module 14 Chemical Bonds

10.

(LR)portal

Bonds

Bonds

D.

Other Learning Resource

 

https://www.youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/

https://www.youtube.com

https://www.youtube.com/

 

/watch?v=Sk7W2VgbhO

watch?v=DEdRcfyYnSQ

/watch?v=LkAykOv1foc

watch?v=eVv3TpaQ2-A

g

X.

PROCEDURES

 

K. Reviewing previous lesson or presenting the new lesson

Review the Bohr model of the atom and point out where the valence electrons are.

What are valence electrons?

Which type of element tends to loose electron/s? Gain electron/s?

How ionic bond takes place?

What type of bond will be formed from a metal and non-metal? What type of bond will be formed from two non- metals?

L. Establishing a purpose for the lesson

Show a periodic table.Ask the students, how are the elements arranged in the periodic table?.

Operationally define electronegativity and ionization energy. Discuss Lewis structure.

Ask students, if you have two sandwiches and you see your classmate don’t have anything to eat, what would you do?

Watch video about covalent bond

What type of bond will be formed by two metals?

M. Presenting examples/Instances of the new lesson

Ask the students,Why atoms bond with other atoms?

Show how to write the Lewis Structure of an element.

Get the difference of the electronegativities of sodium and chlorine and show the transfer of electrons .

Get the electronegativity difference between Carbon and Oxygen.

Explain how metallic bond happens.

N. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 1

Do Activity 1

Do Activity 2

Do Activity 3

Show how to construct the Lewis structure of CO 2 .

Do Activity 5 Fill in tables 3 and 4

O. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 2

Discuss Guide questions.

Discuss Guide

Discuss Guide questions.

Do Activity 4

Discuss Guide questions.

questions.

P. Developing mastery

Where are the metals and non-metals in the periodic table?

Discuss the Octet Rule.

What should be the difference in the electronegativity of two elements for it to become ionic?

When do covalent bond takes place?

What are some properties of metals? What are some common uses of metals?

Q. Finding practical application of concepts and skills in daily living

Show a picture of sodium- a very reactive metal, and chlorine -a very poisonous gas. Point out that when these elements bond, salt will be formed.

Elements wants to become stable by having 8 valence electrons. Ask students, do you have your own goal?

Relate the saying, Its better to give than to receive to the topic.

Ask students, if you have a book and your seatmate don’t have, what would you do?

Why do we use gold in making jewelry? Why do we use iron in making grills?

R. Making generalizations and abstractions about the lesson

What type of elements has low ionization energy? High electronegativity?

How do electronegativity and ionization energy plays an important role in chemical bonding?

What element forms cation? Anion?

Differentiate polar from non-polar covalent bond

Metals are malleable, lustrous, ductile, and are good conductor of heat and electricity.

     

What happens after a cation and anion are produced?

   
 

S.

Evaluating learning

Short quiz

Short quiz

Short quiz

Make a HUGOT line about covalent bond.

Fill in table 5

 

T.

Additional activities for application or remediation

 

Watch video about Lewis structure

Watch video about ionic bonding

 

Watch video about metallic bond

XI.

REMARKS

 

XII.

REFLECTION

 
 

H.

No. of learners who earned 80% in the evaluation

 
 

I.

No. of learners who require additional activities for remediation who scored below 80%

 
 

J.

Did the remedial lessons work? No. of learners who have caught up with the lesson

 
 

K.

No. of learners who continue to require remediation

 
 

L.

Which of my teaching strategies worked well? Why did these work?

 
 

M.

What difficulties did I encounter which my principal or supervisor can help me solve?

 
 

N.

What innovation or localized materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other teachers?

 
GRADE 1 to 12 DAILY LESSON LOG School Grade Level 9 Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE
GRADE 1 to 12
DAILY LESSON LOG
School
Grade Level
9
Teacher
Learning Area
SCIENCE
Teaching Dates and
Time
Quarter
SECOND QUARTER
   

MONDAY

 

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

I. OBJECTIVES

 

A. Content Standard

The learners demonstrate understanding of

 

How atoms combine with other atoms by transferring or by sharing electrons

 

Forces that holds metals together

 

B. Performance Standard

The learners should be able to

 

Explain the formation of ionic and covalent bonds

 

Recognize different types of compounds(ionic or covalent) based on their properties such as melting point, hardness, polarity and

electrical and thermal conductivity

 

Explain how ions are formed

C. Learning

S9MT-IIe-f-16

 

Competency/Objectives

Recognize ionic and covalent compound based on their physical properties

       

II. CONTENT

         

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

 

A. References

         

1. Teacher’s Guide pages

pp. 98-102

         

2. Learner’s Materials pages

pp. 123-124

         

3. Textbook pages

         

4. Additional Materials from

Project Ease, Chemistry Module 14 Chemical Bonds

         

Learning Resource

5.

(LR)portal

B.

Other Learning Resource

https://www.youtube.com/

         
 

watch?v=SMBA7E6ZZjg

IV.

PROCEDURES

 

A.

Reviewing previous lesson or presenting the new lesson

Differentiate ionic from covalent bond based on how they form.

B.

Establishing a purpose for the lesson

Is there a way to distinguish ionic from covalent compounds aside from how they were formed?

C.

Presenting examples/Instances of the new lesson

Show how construct the improvised conductivity apparatus .

D.

Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 1

Do Activity 6

E.

Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 2

Discuss findings through group reporting.

F.

Developing mastery

Watch video about the difference of ionic and covalent compounds

G.

Finding practical application of concepts and skills in daily living

Explain why it is dangerous to walk in floodwater after a typhoon.

H.

Making generalizations and abstractions about the lesson

How can we distinguish ionic compounds from covalent compounds base on physical properties?

I.

Evaluating learning

Summative Test

J.

Additional activities for application or remediation

 

XIII.

REMARKS

 

XIV.

REFLECTION

 

A.

No. of learners who earned 80% in the evaluation

 

B.

No. of learners who require additional activities for

 

remediation who scored below

80%

C. Did the remedial lessons work? No. of learners who have caught up with the lesson

D. No. of learners who continue to require remediation

E. Which of my teaching strategies worked well? Why did these work?

F. What difficulties did I encounter which my principal or supervisor can help me solve?

G. What innovation or localized materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other teachers?

GRADE 1 to 12 School Grade Level 9 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning SCIENCE 9
GRADE 1 to 12
School
Grade Level
9
DAILY LESSON LOG
Teacher
Learning
SCIENCE 9
Area
Teaching Dates and
Time
Quarter
SECOND
 

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURDAY

I. OBJECTIVES

 

A. Content Standard

The learners demonstrate an understanding of forces that hold metals together

 

B. Performance Standard

 

C. Learning Competency /Objectives Write the LC code for each.

S9MT-IIc-d15

S9MT-IIe-f16

     

1.

Explain properties of metals in terms of their structure.

1.

Explain how ions are formed.

II.

CONTENT

 
 

Metallic Bond and the Properties of Metals

Formation of Ions

     

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

 

A. References

       

1. Teacher’s Guide

pp. 96- 97

p.93

   
 

pages

2. Learner’s Materials pages

pp. 121- 122

pp. 116- 119

     

3. Textbook pages

       

FRIDAY

The learners shall be able to analyze the percentage composition of different brands of two food products and decide on the products’ appropriate percentage composition create.

4.

Additional Materials from Learning Resource (LR)portal

   

B. Other Learning Resource

   

IV.

PROCEDURES

 

A. Reviewing previous lesson or presenting the new lesson

Let the students classify some compounds as either ionic compound or covalent compound.

Demonstrate to the students an activity that shows the formation of ions in a solution (ex. Table salt in water can make the water a good conductor of electricity). Ask the students how is this change of electrical conductivity becomes possible.

Let them recall the definition of ionic and covalent bond based on their answer. Ask the students to differentiate these two types of bond.

Gather some answers to the students.

Let the students recall first how table salt forms.

Students will recall that table salt ( NaCl) is a product of ionic bonding or the transfer of electron from a metal to a nonmetal which causes an electrically neutral atom of metal to become positively charge and an electrically neutral atom of nonmetal to be negatively charge.

B. Establishing a purpose for the lesson

Post a question on the board that says “If metals can bond

Introduce to the students the process of ionization or the

 

with nonmetals and

formation of electrically charged atoms or molecules.

nonmetals can bond to nonmetals, is it possible for metals to bond with metals?”

Solicit answers from the students and ask them how it will happen.

(Answers must be noted to be used as the lesson progresses).

Another question to be posted is this “ Is the bond that exists among metals can be the reason for its properties?”

Tell to the students that ions can be grouped as positively charged ions or cation and negatively charged ions or

anion. Mention also that ions can be an atom or it can be a molecule.

Explain to the students that properties of a solution depends on the type of ions that are found on it.

C. Presenting

Show the students some pictures of metals which display some of its characteristics. Ask them to explain what characteristic of metal is shown on the pictures.

Post a list of ions on the board as examples.

examples/Instances of the new lesson

(The list must show the groupings of ions as cation and anion, as well as atoms and molecules).

( Make a list of these characteristics on the board)

Present to them pictures of some food products or drinks that are sources of ions needed by our body.

D. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills #

Divide the class into small groups and ask them to

Ask the students to form 6 small groups for the activity. The students will identify the

1

 

perform Activity # 5 Bonding Among Metals.

ions from the food products and drinks that will be assigned to them by their teacher. They also need to group these ions as cation or anion and as an atom or as a molecule.

Students must share the result of their investigation in the class.

E.

Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills #

The students will report their findings on the said activity in

Tell to the students that aside from the presence of

2

the class.

 

( Note for any misconception that may arise during this procedure)

After the students have able to report their work, it is time to explain to them the answers for the said activity. Any misunderstanding that the teacher noted must be explained thoroughly to the students until they grasp the correct idea.

ions in foods and drinks that we eat, there are other important uses of ions.

Each group will investigate some uses of ions. Some of the possible topics to be assigned to the students are the following: fluorescent light, neon lights, battery, ionosphere, sickle cell anemia.

The students will research on how ions are involved on each topic.

( Assigning of these topics must be done a day before the lesson so that the students can research and

   

bring their materials in class on the assigned date.)

F. Developing mastery (leads to Formative Assessment 3)

Go back with the pictures you have presented as examples for the characteristics of metals, ask the students to explain the pictures based on the concept of metallic bonding and the “sea of electrons”.

Students will be sharing their research in the class and they are expected to discuss how they find ions useful.

G. Finding practical application of concepts and skills in daily living

Ask the students to suggest some ways on how they can use the lesson in their daily living.

The class will have an open forum about food supplement, vitamins and energy drinks they used and how these things help them in their daily lives.

( Motivate them by giving additional points for those who can answer correctly)

H. Making generalizations and abstractions about the lesson

Call for at least three volunteers that may sum up the lesson.

To generalize the lesson ask the following to the students:

1. What is ion?

The teacher can prepare incomplete statements that will be completed by the students to guide them what to generalize.

2. Define ionization.

3. What are the two types of ions?

4. Give examples of ions as atom and as a molecule.

 

5. What are some of the uses of ions in our lives?

I. Evaluating learning

The students may answer Table 5. Types of chemical bond on page 122 of the LM.

Use an exit paper for the evaluation. Ask the students to write what they have learned about ions.

J. Additional activities for application or remediation

   

V. REMARKS

 

VI. REFLECTION

A. No. of learners who earned 80% in the evaluation

B. No. of learners who require additional activities for remediation who scored below 80%

C. Did the remedial lessons work? No. of learners who have caught up with the lesson

D. No. of learners who continue to require remediation

E. Which of my teaching strategies worked well? Why did these work?

F. What difficulties did I encounter which my principal or supervisor can help me solve?

G. What innovation or localized materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other teachers?

School Grade Level 10 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE Teaching Date and Time
School
Grade Level
10
DAILY LESSON LOG
Teacher
Learning Area
SCIENCE
Teaching Date and Time
Quarter
FOURTH
 

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

I. OBJECTIVES

The learner demonstrate understanding of the type of bonds that carbon forms that result in the diversity of carbon compounds.

A. Content Standard

 

B. Performance Standard

 

C. Learning Competency/Objectives

 

S9MT-IIh-18

Write the LC code for each.

Recognize the general classes and uses of organic compound.

Recognize the

general classes and uses of organic compound.

Recognize the general classes and uses of organic compound.

Recognize the general classes and uses of organic

Recognize the general classes and uses of organic compound.

Explain how carbon is

compound.

Perform guided

Differentiate organic compound by inorganic compound.

Show oil and gas formation.

used or applied in everyday life.

Perform guided experiments in determining the properties of common organic compounds

experiments in determining the properties of common organic compounds.

Discuss the major classes of organic compounds.

II.

CONTENT

 

The variety of carbon compound (Organic Compounds)

 

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

 

A. References

         

1. Teacher’s Guide pages

 

pp.105-106

 

pp.105-106

 

pp.107-108

 

pp.107-108

2. Learner’s Materials pages

pp.127,129

pp.131-132,142-143

 

pp.131-132

 

pp.132-135

 

pp.132-135

3. Textbook pages

         

4. Additional Materials from Learning Resource (LR)portal

         

B. Other Learning Resource

   

M

P

https://www.youtube.com/wa t tch?v=0WAV47hsCpY

http://2012books.lardbuck

et.org./books/principles-

of-general chemistry-

v1.0/s28-01-functional-

groups-and-classes-html

IV.

PROCEDURES

 

A. Reviewing previous lesson or presenting the new lesson

Recall carbon atoms

Review organic

How oil and gas formed?

What are the important uses of carbon compound?

Describe the physical properties of matter.

compounds

B. Establishing a purpose for the lesson

Begin the lesson by writing “organic”, inorganic”, and “compound” on the board.

Start the lesson by giving short motivating activity. Ask two volunteers to go in front and match the following to its appropriate object. (see attachment # 2)

Introduce the lesson by asking the students to explain how carbon is used or applied in their everyday life?

Ask one representative/ volunteer from the class to be blind folded.( Use actual lubricating oil, ethyl alcohol, and gasoline ) and guess the object using his sense of smelling and touching.

Ask the students if they finished answering their experiment which was done yesterday.

Ask the students to create a concept map. Branching off the sides will be the students understanding of the word.

If not provide at least 10-15 minutes to answer the questions in the activity.

Ask students if they had an idea of where is gasoline come from?

   

C. Presenting examples/Instances of the new lesson.

Show pictures of organic and inorganic compound. On the board let the students classify them according to its proper

Let the students watch

Do activity # 1 Organic

Let the student describe the appearance/ properties of each object.

 

a

Compounds: Are They Useful ( See Attachment # 5 )

video clips about Oil and

 

Gas Formation.

 

group. (see attachment

       

#1)

Let them identify each household products and its important uses

D. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 1

Show a video clips about organic and inorganic compounds

Lead the students to discover that gasoline is only one of the sample products of the major classes of organic compounds.

Presentation of the result of the activity

Before letting the students do the experiments, discuss first the safety precautions that the students should take on the conduct of the experiments.

Let them go to their proper groupings for the final analysis and exchanging of ideas.

Perform activity #2 Properties of Common Organic Compounds

E. Discussing new concepts and practicing new skills # 2

Based from the video presented, ask the students

Provide a photo copy of

Checking and discussion of the activity results

Students were instructed to observe and take down notes while conducting an experiments.

Presentation of the result of the activity per group.

to differentiate organic compounds from inorganic compounds.

the major classes of organic compound.

Assign each group of students to conceptualize the major classes of compounds, its functional groups and its important uses. (see attachment #3)

Students will answer the some guide questions.

 

F. Developing mastery

How is carbon compound

What are the important uses of organic compounds?

What are the important uses of hydrocarbons?

The students will answer

Checking of the result of the activity.

(leads to Formative Assessment 3)

differ from inorganic compounds?

guide questions. (see attachment #6)

   

Discuss the properties of common organic compounds.

G. Finding practical application of concepts and skills in daily living

Why is it important to have fat in your diet?

Why do some motorists prepared to use unleaded gasoline than any type of gasoline?

Why do some motorists prepared to use unleaded gasoline than any type of gasoline?

Why are some label products of some household materials has remarkable word of “always keep at room temperature”?

Why are some label products of some household materials has remarkable word of “always keep at room temperature”?

H. Making generalizations and abstractions about the lesson

Why carbon so special compared to other elements?

Can you describe major classes of organic compounds?

What are carbon compounds?

What are the common properties of organic compounds?

What are the common properties of organic compounds?

I. Evaluating learning

 

Short Quiz (See Attachment)

See Rubrics

See Rubrics

See Rubrics

J. Additional activities for application or remediation

Construct the structure of hydrocarbons assigned using marshmallows, raisins and toothpicks. The marshmallows will be the hydrogen atoms, raisins should be the carbon atoms, and toothpicks will be the bond.

Enumerate other examples of organic compounds that you usually used in your everyday living.

     

IV. REMARKS

         

V. REFLECTION

 

A. No. of learners who earned 80% in the evaluation

 

B. No. of learners who require additional activities for

 

remediation who scored below 80%

C. Did the remedial lessons work? No. of learners who have caught up with the lesson

D. No. of learners who continue to require remediation

E. Which of my teaching strategies worked well? Why did these work?

F. What difficulties did I encounter which my principal or supervisor can help me solve?

G. What innovation or localized materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other teachers?

School Grade Level 9 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE Teaching Dates and Time
School
Grade Level
9
DAILY LESSON LOG
Teacher
Learning Area
SCIENCE
Teaching Dates and
Time
Quarter
SECOND QUARTER
 

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

I. OBJECTIVES

 

A. Content Standard

Use the unit mole that quantitatively measures the number of very small particles of matter.

 

B. Performance Standard

Analyse the percentage composition of different brand of two food products and decide on products on appropriate percentage composition.

C. Learning

 

S9MT-Iii-19

Competency/Objectives

• Assess students’ prior knowledge about mole

Measure the mass of a given number of objects.

Calculate the mass of one mole of a substance using the periodic table

Describe the relationships among the number of moles, mass, and number of particles.

Apply the mole concept in completing a given set of data.

concept

and

percentage composition of compounds.

Record the mass with the correct number of significant figures.

of elements.

 

Measure the mass of an object.

 

Record the mass with the correct number of significant figures.

Relate the mass of the object to the number of pieces per item.

II. CONTENT

 

Mole Concept

Molar Mass

Inter-conversions Among Mass, Moles and Number of Particles

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

 

A. References

       

1. Teacher’s Guide pages

117-119

120-121

121-123

125-129

125-129

2. Learner’s Materials pages

145-149

149-150

151-152

152-153

152-153

3. Textbook pages

       

4. Additional Materials from

       

Learning Resource (LR)portal

B. Other Learning Resource

       
 

IV. PROCEDURES

 

A. Reviewing previous lesson or presenting the new lesson

Ask how scientists count very small particles such as atoms, ions and molecules.

• Based on the previous activity, ask how large quantities of objects can be counted conveniently.

• Ask what counting unit is used by chemists in counting tiny particles such as atoms and molecules and its equivalent number.

Ask how chemists count tiny particles such as atoms and molecules.

Describe molar mass.

Recall on how to count

Have students perform the Molar Mass Relay. (See

particles of substances from given masses.

 

Before answering the question, let them answer the Pre-Assessment in the LM on page 145.

Ask what Avogadro’s number is.

attachment #2 for the mechanics.)

Ask if one mole of different substances have the same mass.

B. Establishing a purpose for the lesson

Ask students

the

Ask why the unit mole consists of a very large number compared to

Ask

how many

Tell the students to come to their corresponding group mates to perform this activity. The first group to answer correctly will be given an artificial gold medal (prize is optional).

Tell the students to come to their corresponding group mates to perform this activity. The first group to answer correctly will be given an artificial golden cup (prize is optional).

equivalence of the

hydrogen atom and oxygen atom are there in one molecule of water or the atomic

 

following counting units:

A Pair of shoes =

case, ream, and dozen.

A Dozen of eggs =

Ask if one mole of sulfur has the same

ratio. (2:1) Ask the total no. of atoms of hydrogen and oxygen in a dozen

A Case of coke =

mass as one mole of aluminum.

A Ream of paper =

molecules of water. (24 atoms of H and 12 atoms of O).

Show them a picture of a golden cup. Tell students that this golden cup contains 3.01 x10 24 atoms. (See attachment #4)

Ask them the advantage of using these units in counting too many objects compared to counting them one by one. Ask them what other ways to make counting too many objects easier and faster.

Show them a picture of a gold medal thru a slide.

Ask what will be the number of atoms of H

(See attachment #3)

and

O

in

one mole of

A pure gold medal has a mass of 591 g.

water molecules. (2 moles or 1.21 x 10 24 H

Questions:

atoms and 1 mole or 6.02 x 10 23 O atoms)

1.) How many moles of gold atoms are there in

1. How many moles of gold are there? (5 moles)

       

How can you calculate the mass of 1 mole of water molecules?

the gold medal if its molar mass is 197 g? (3 moles)

2. What is the mass of the golden cup? (The molar mass of gold is 197 g, so the mass is 985g)

 

2.) How many atoms of

 

The first who will answer correctly will be given a prize.

gold are present? (1.81 x10 24 atoms)

Let them show their solution.

 

Let

them

show

their

solution.

 

C.

Presenting

Mang Juan is constructing his bahay kubo and he needs to buy a lot of iron nails.

How are iron nails bought from a hardware store, by number or by mass? Why are they usually sold by mass? What instrument is used for getting the mass of objects like iron nails? Is it possible to determine the exact number of iron nails he bought for his bahay-kubo using a weighing scale? How?

Present one mole of sulfur and one mole of aluminum. The mass of one mole of sulfur is 32.01 g while the mass of one mole of aluminum is 27.00 g. Ask why one mole of different substances have different masses.

Present table 3 on page 150 of the module.

Ask how they convert a given mass to moles then to number of

Ask how they convert a given number of moles into mass in grams.

examples/Instances of the new lesson

Ask how the molar mass of oxygen gas O 2, sugar, and hydrogen peroxide is determined.

particles.

   

Ask if the same process is used as what they did with the mass of 1 mole of water. Ask them how they will prepare exactly 6.02 x 10 23 molecules or 1 mole of table sugar.

 

D.

Discussing new concepts and

Perform Activity1:

Perform Activity 2:

 

Perform Activity 3:

Perform Activity 4:

Perform Activity 5:

practicing new skills # 1

 

Counting by Getting the Mass of an Object

“Total Count Vs. Mass”

“The Mass of One Mole of a Substance”

“The Relationship Among Mole, Mass and Number of Particles”

“The Chemist’s Mole”

(Demonstrate the proper use of the platform balance first.)

E.

Discussing new concepts and

Answer the guide questions.

Answer the guide questions.

 

Answer the guide questions.

Answer the guide questions.

 

Answer the guide questions.

practicing new skills # 2

F. Developing mastery

Discussion

on

the

Discussion

on

the

Discussion

on the

Discussion

on

the

Discussion on the results of the activity.

results of the activity.

results of the activity.

results of the activity. Discuss how to derive the molar mass of different substances using the periodic table.

results of the activity.

Ask what counting unit is used by chemists in

Present table

3

on

Ask

what

Ask what mathematical operation is used to convert a given no. of atoms into moles. (division)

page 150 of the LM. Ask what tool provides information on the mass of one mole of an element. (Ans. : the periodic table of elements)

mathematical

 

counting

tiny

particles

operation is used to convert a given mass

of moles.

into

no.

such as atoms and molecules and its equivalent number.

 

(division)

 

Ask what mathematical

Emphasize that

Ask what mathematical operation is used to convert no. of moles to particles. (multiplication)

operation is used to convert a given moles into mass. (multiplication)

scientists are able

to

count very small particles by means of a

 

platform

balance

and

 

the periodic table. Listed on the periodic table the mass of 1 mole of an

element.

 

Ask why the equivalent

number is

 

called

Avogadro’s number. Present and discuss the sample problem in the module on page 149.

G. Finding practical application

Ask

what can

 

be

a

Ask if 50 g of gold and 50 g of silver have the same number of atoms and explain their answer.

 

Ask them to arrange the following substances from the lightest to heaviest. Ne, N 2 , H 2 , He,CO 2

Ask how many CO 2 molecules are released into the atmosphere if 32g of methane (CH 4 ) reacts with 128 g of oxygen gas and produce

Ask what must be the mass of methane (CH 4 ) required to produce 5

moles of CO 2 if burning 1 mole of methane produces 1 mole of carbon dioxide.

of concepts and skills in daily

convenient way of counting large quantities of

living

objects. (counting getting the mass)

 

by

 
     

Ask how many

CO 2

In what ways in your daily life can you apply this procedure?

 

(Answer: H 2, He, CH 4, Ne, N 2, CO 2, )

Ask which can be used to fill up a balloon that can rise up in the air. (H 2, He, and CH 4 because their molar mass is lighter than oxygen gas).

88g of CO 2 along with 72 g of water vapor.

(Convert 88 g CO 2 into moles and to no. of particles, the answer is 1.20x10 24 molecules).

molecules are released out of this mass of methane. (Show the chemical equation, see attachment #5). Ask how they think it will affect the environment, and what action must be done.

     

Ask why hydrogen and methane gas is not used in party balloons. (They are both flammable, He is an inert gas).

   

H.

Making generalizations and

Ask if they think scientists do the same way (in the activity) when counting the number of very small particles such as atoms and molecules and what are the instruments used. (periodic table and platform balance)

Ask them to describe molar mass.

Ask how to determine the

Ask how to determine the no. of moles and

Ask how to determine the no. of moles and particles

abstractions about the lesson

mass of one mole an element and a compound

Ask if moles of different substances have the same mass.

particles from a given mass of substance.

from a given mass of substance and vice versa.

I.

Evaluating learning

Solve the problems on page 149 of the LM.

Give a short quiz. (See attachment #1)

Present table 5 in the LM on page 152 and give it as a quiz.

   

J. Additional activities for application or remediation

Watch the video “ One Mole and Avogadro’s Number” from https://www.youtube.com/

       

V. REMARKS

 

VI. REFLECTION

 

A.

No. of learners who earned

 

80% in the evaluation

B.

No. of learners who require

 

additional activities for remediation who scored below

 

80%

C.

Did the remedial lessons

 

work? No. of learners who have

caught up with the lesson

D.

No. of learners who continue

 

to require remediation

E.

Which of my teaching

strategies worked well? Why did

these work?

F.

What difficulties did I

encounter which my principal or supervisor can help me solve?

G.

What innovation or localized

materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other teachers?

School Grade Level 9 DAILY LESSON LOG Teacher Learning Area SCIENCE Teaching Dates and Time
School
Grade Level
9
DAILY LESSON LOG
Teacher
Learning Area
SCIENCE
Teaching Dates and
Time
Quarter
SECOND QUARTER
 

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

I. OBJECTIVES

 

A. Content Standard

Use the unit mole that quantitatively measures the number of very small particles of matter.

 

B. Performance Standard

Analyse the percentage composition of different brand of two food products and decide on products on appropriate percentage composition.

 

C. Learning

S9MT-Iii-19

   

S9MT-IIj-20

   

Competency/Objectives

Covert given mass into moles and number of particles and vice versa.

Prepare a concept map on the Mole Concept.

Calculate

the

.Apply the concept of percentage

composition

in

Recall past lessons.

percentage composition by mass of compounds

Answer test items correctly and honestly.

 

choosing

grocery

items.

 
 

given their chemical formula.

Realize that the amount of substances intake can be monitored with the use of percentage composition.

II. CONTENT

Inter-conversions Among Mass, Moles and Number of Particles

Mole Concept

Percentage Composition of a Compound

Summative Assessment

III. LEARNING RESOURCES

 

A. References

     

1. Teacher’s Guide pages

pp.126-129

p.

130

 

pp. 130-132

 

p.

133

2. Learner’s Materials pages

p.154

p.

155

 

pp. 155-157

 

p.

159

3. Textbook pages

       

4. Additional Materials from Learning Resource (LR)portal

       

B. Other Learning Resource

   

IV. PROCEDURES

 

A.

Reviewing previous lesson or

How do you convert a given mass of a substance into number of moles and number of particles?

Recall on how to determine the no. of moles and particles from a given mass of substance and vice versa.

Recall on how to solve for molar mass of a compound.

Recall on how to solve for the percentage composition of compounds

presenting the new lesson

B.

Establishing a purpose for the

As

a

group,

they will

Let them watch the video “What is a Mole?” from https://www.youtube.com

Ask the total number of students in the class and how many are males and females. Ask the percentage of male and female in the class.

Ask: “Have you given the task by your parents to buy groceries in the supermarket? Do you take time to look at the nutritional facts of an

lesson

construct their own concept map on how to easily convert mass to mole and to number of particles and vice versa using a marker and cartolina. Let them explain their answer (5 pts.).

 

Ask on the percentage by mass of hydrogen in one mole of water, given that in 18g of water there is 2 g of hydrogen.

item before buying it? Why is it important to look at the nutritional facts before buying or consuming a product?”

C.

Presenting

Let them explain their concept map.

Based on the previous activities, ask how they will organize their knowledge on the concept of mole.

Show the video “How

Present a label of canned goods such as corned beef or meat loaf. Ask if all of the ingredients are good to one’s health. Ask how one can regulate the

examples/Instances of the new lesson

to

Calculate

 

Percentage Mass” from https://www.youtube.co

   

9g

Present the formula for determining the percentage composition by mass of a compound.

amount of food to be taken in order to keep a healthy lifestyle.

     

Give more examples on calculating the percentage composition of compounds.

 

D.

Discussing new concepts and

Part I

Perform Activity 6

 

Perform the problem solving on page 157 of the LM.

 

Perform Activity 7:

practicing new skills # 1

 

Perform the “Mole Relay” (See attachment #6 for the mechanics.)

“Mole Map”

“It’s Grocery Time!”

Part II

 

Give the set of problems from page 154 of the LM to be answered individually.

E.

Discussing new concepts and

     

Answer the guide questions.

 

practicing new skills # 2

F. Developing mastery

Discussion on the results of the activity

Discussion on the results of the activity 6.

Discussion on the results of the activity.

Discussion on the result of the activity.

Have students recite their answers to the guide questions.

G. Finding practical application

Ask

why

6.02x10 23

Follow up their search about the scientists involved in the development of mole concept. Have a discussion regarding this matter.

The roots of the plants absorb the nutrients from the soil. Potassium is the mineral responsible for a healthy root system. If you were a farmer, which of the following fertilizers are you going to use? K 2 SO 4 , KCl, K 2 O, or

Calcium is important in our diet because it makes our bones healthier.

of concepts and skills in daily living

particles

called

the

Avogadro’s Number.

 

Instruct them to search on the contributions of Amedeo Avogadro in science. Ask them what they think are the good qualities of Avogadro and other scientists involved in the development of the

Which

calcium

supplements contain

the

highest

 

percentage

Calcium? (Ans:

of

K

2 CO

3 ?

 

CaCO 3 ) Calcium carbonate:

CaCO 3 , Calcium

 

concept of mole that they want to emulate.

     

citrate: Ca 3 (C 6 H 5 O 7 ) 2 , Calcium gluconate:

Ca(C 6 H 11 O 7 ) 2 Remember that the decision on which supplement should take depends on side effects and the advice of a physician. Calcium carbonate is used as an antacid, so it decreases the acidity in the stomach. Nutritionists recommend that it should be taken with meals. (Meals cause stomach acid to be produced for digestion).

Ask in what other ways they can make use of the concept on percentage composition.

H.

Making generalizations and

Ask how to do conversions of mass to mole and to number of particles and vice versa.

Ask the importance of using the mole concept and molar mass of a compound in expressing amount of substance.

Ask how to solve for the percentage composition of a compound.

Ask why knowledge on percentage composition of substances is important.

abstractions about the lesson

I.

Evaluating learning

       

J. Additional activities for application or remediation

       

V. REMARKS

 

VI. REFLECTION

 

A.

No. of learners who earned

80% in the evaluation

B.

No. of learners who require

additional activities for remediation who scored below

 

80%

C.

Did the remedial lessons

work? No. of learners who have

caught up with the lesson

D.

No. of learners who continue

to require remediation

E.

Which of my teaching

strategies worked well? Why did these work?

F.

What difficulties did I

encounter which my principal or

supervisor can help me solve?

G.

What innovation or localized

materials did I use/discover which I wish to share with other

teachers?