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Hydrological Cycle

Water is the source of all life on earth. The distribution of water, however, is quite varied; many
locations have plenty of it while others have very little. Water exists on earth as a solid (ice),
liquid or gas (water vapor). Oceans, rivers, clouds, and rain, all of which contain water, are in a
frequent state of change (surface water evaporates, cloud water precipitates, rainfall infiltrates
the ground, etc.). However, the total amount of the earth's water does not change. The
circulation and conservation of earth's water is called the "hydrologic cycle". The Hydrologic
Cycle module has been organized into the following sections:

The Earth’s Water Budget

Water covers 70% of the earth's surface, but it is difficult to comprehend the total amount of
water when we only see a small portion of it. The following diagram displays the volumes of
water contained on land, in oceans, and in the atmosphere. Arrows indicate the annual
exchange of water between these storages.

The oceans contain 97.5% of the earth's water, land 2.4%, and the atmosphere holds less than
.001%, which may seem surprising because water plays such an important role in weather. The
annual precipitation for the earth is more than 30 times the atmosphere's total capacity to hold
water. This fact indicates the rapid recycling of water that must occur between the earth's
surface and the atmosphere.
To visualize the amount of water contained in these storages, imagine that the entire amount
of the earth's annual precipitation fell upon the state Texas. If this was to occur, every square
inch of that state would be under 1,841 feet, or 0.3 miles of water! Also, there is enough water
in the oceans to fill a five-mile deep container having a base of 7,600 miles on each side.

Evaporation

Evaporation
the conversion of water from a liquid into a gas

Animation by: Bramer

Water is transferred from the surface to the atmosphere through evaporation, the process by
which water changes from a liquid to a gas.

Approximately 80% of all evaporation is from the oceans, with the remaining 20% coming from
inland water and vegetation. Winds transport the evaporated water around the globe,
influencing the humidity of the air throughout the world. For example, a typical hot and humid
summer day in the Midwestern United States is caused by winds blowing tropical oceanic
air northward from the Gulf of Mexico.
Image by: Globe

Most evaporated water exists as a gas outside of clouds and evaporation is more intense in the
presence of warmer temperatures. This is shown in the image above, where the strongest
evaporation was occurring over the oceans and near the equator (indicated by shades of red
and yellow).

Condensation

Condensation
the conversion of water from a gas into a liquid

Animation by: Bramer

Condensation is the change of water from its gaseous form (water vapor) into liquid water.
Condensation generally occurs in the atmosphere when warm air rises, cools and looses its
capacity to hold water vapor. As a result, excess water vapor condenses to form cloud droplets.
The upward motions that generate clouds can be produced by convection in unstable
air,convergence associated with cyclones, lifting of air by fronts and lifting over
elevated topography such as mountains.

Convection

Convection
atmospheric motions in the vertical direction

In meteorology, convection refers primarily to atmospheric motions in the vertical direction. As


the earth is heated by the sun, different surfaces absorb different amounts of energy and
convection may occur where the surface heats up very rapidly. As the surface warms, it heats
the overlying air, which gradually becomes less dense than the surrounding air and begins to
rise.

The bubble of relatively warm air that rises upward from


the surface is called a "thermal".

A simple demonstration of condensation through convection can be performed by placing a pot


of water on a heated stove. The burner represents the heating of the earth's surface by the sun,
while the water and the air above it represent the atmosphere. As the bottom of the pot
(earth's surface) begins to heat the water (lower atmosphere), warmer and less dense water
evaporates and rises (thermal) into the drier, colder air above the pot (middle atmosphere).
This causes the thermals to cool and water vapor within to condense, forming a small cloud, or
steam, that is visible above the pot of heated water.
Photo by: Bramer

This same process occurs in the real atmosphere as the water vapor within rising thermals
condenses to form a cloud, as occurred in the example shown above.

Fronts
boundaries between air masses

Fronts are boundaries between air masses. Depending on the air masses involved and
which way the fronts move, fronts can be either warm, cold, stationary, or occluded.

In the case of a cold front, a colder, denser air mass lifts the warm, moist air ahead of
it. As the air rises, it cools and its moisture condenses to produce clouds and
precipitation. Due to the steep slope of a cold front, vigorous rising motion is often
produced, leading to the development of showers and occasionally
severe thunderstorms.
In the case of a warm front, the warm, less dense air rises up and over the colder air
ahead of the front. Again, the air cools as it rises and its moisture condenses to
produce clouds and precipitation. Warm fronts have a gentler slope and generally
move more slowly than cold fronts, so the rising motion along warm fronts is much
more gradual. Precipitation that develops in advance of a surface warm front is
typically steady and more widespread than precipitation associated with a cold front.

Topography
forced lifting by the surface of the earth

Air is also lifted by the earth itself. When air encounters a mountain range, for
example, air is forced to rise up and over the mountains and if enough lifting occurs,
water vaporcondenses to produce orographic clouds.

In the United States, the prevailing winds are generally from west to east, so most
orographic clouds form on the western side of a mountain.

Why do orographic clouds appear to be stationary?


Air rises on a mountain's windward (upwind) side and sinks on the lee (downwind)
side. This sinking motion warms the air and causes the cloud to evaporate, destroying
the cloud. Therefore, even though the wind blows over the
mountain, condensation processes and associated cloud droplets are confined to the
windward side. This is why orographic clouds begin on the windward side of the
mountain and end near the summit.
Photograph by: Holle

The Rocky and the Sierra-Nevada Mountains are examples of mountain ranges that
produce orographic clouds. The large dark cloud in the upper right-hand corner of the
picture above and the smaller cloud just above the mountain are both examples of
orographic clouds.

Transport
transport of water vapor around the globe

Animation by: Bramer

In the hydrologic cycle, transport is the movement of water through the atmosphere,
specifically from over the oceans to over land. Some of the earth's moisture transport
is visible as clouds, which themselves consist of ice crystals and/or tiny water
droplets. Clouds are propelled from one place to another by either the jet stream,
surface-based circulations like landand sea breezes, or other mechanisms. However, a
typical 1 kilometer thick cloud contains only enough water for a millimeter of rainfall,
whereas the amount of moisture in the atmosphere is usually 10-50 times greater.

Most water is transported in the form of water vapor, which is actually the third most
abundant gas in the atmosphere. Water vapor may be invisible to us, but not to
satellites, which are capable of collecting data about the moisture content of the
atmosphere. From this data, visualizations like this water vapor image are generated,
providing a visual picture of moisture transport in the atmosphere.

Bright areas indicate higher amounts of moisture and are often associated with clouds.
Dark areas indicate less moisture, or relatively drier air. However, moist air does not
always contain clouds.

Precipitation
transfer of water from the atmosphere back to earth
Animation by: Bramer

Precipitation is the primary mechanism for transporting water from the atmosphere to
the surface of the earth. There are several forms of precipitation, the most common of
which for the United States is rain. Other forms of precipitation
include; hail, snow, sleet, and freezing rain. A well developed extra-tropical
cyclone could be responsible for the generation of any or all of these forms of
precipitation.

Amounts of precipitation can vary by location. For example, deserts like this one in
Nevada, average less than an inch of total precipitation per year.

The agricultural Midwest, however, receives approximately 15 inches per year, while
tropical rain forests like this one in Hawaii, can receive more than 100 inches of
precipitation per year!

Amounts of precipitation also vary from year to year. In 1988, an intense drought
gripped the Midwestern United States, disrupting agriculture because there was not
enough rain to sustain crops. Five years later in 1993, the same area was subjected
to severe flooding, greatly reducing the annual harvest because there was too much
water for crops to grow.
Groundwater
water that has penetrated the earth's surface

Animation by: Bramer

Groundwater is all the water that has penetrated the earth's surface and is found in one
of two soil layers. The one nearest the surface is the "zone of aeration", where gaps
between soil are filled with both air and water. Below this layer is the "zone of
saturation", where the gaps are filled with water. The water table is the boundary
between these two layers. As the amount of groundwater water increases or decreases,
the water table rises or falls accordingly. When the entire area below the ground is
saturated, flooding occurs because all subsequent precipitation is forced to remain on
the surface.
The amount of water that can be held in the soil is called "porosity". The rate at which
water flows through the soil is its "permeability". Different surfaces hold different
amounts of water and absorb water at different rates. Surface permeability is
extremely important for hydrologists to monitor because as a surface becomes less
permeable, an increasing amount of water remains on the surface, creating a greater
potential for flooding. Flooding is very common during winter and early spring
because the frozen ground has no permeability, causing most rainwater and meltwater
to become runoff.

Water that infiltrates the soil flows downward until it encounters impermeable rock
(shown in gray), and then travels laterally. The locations where water moves laterally
are called "aquifers". Groundwater returns to the surface through these aquifers
(arrows), which empty into lakes, rivers, and the oceans. Under special circumstances,
groundwater can even flow upward in artesian wells. The flow of groundwater is
much slower than runoff, with speeds usually measured in centimeters per day, meters
per year, or even centimeters per year.

Transpiration
transfer of water from plants to the atmosphere

Transpiration is the evaporation of water into the atmosphere from the leaves and
stems of plants. Plants absorb soilwater through their roots and this water can
originate from deep in the soil. (For example, corn plants have roots that are 2.5
meters deep, while some desert plants have roots that extend 20 meters into the
ground). Plants pump the water up from the soil to deliver nutrients to their leaves.
This pumping is driven by the evaporation of water through small pores called
"stomates", which are found on the undersides of leaves. Transpiration accounts for
approximately 10% of all evaporating water.

Runoffs
transfer of landwater to the oceans
Runoff is the movement of landwater to the oceans, chiefly in the form of rivers,
lakes, and streams. Runoff consists of precipitation that
neither evaporates, transpires nor penetrates the surface to become groundwater. Even
the smallest streams are connected to larger rivers that carry billions of gallons of
water into oceans worldwide.

Excess runoff can lead to flooding, which occurs when there is too
much precipitation. Two recent events in the United States have caused major
flooding.

An analysis of atmospheric conditions for the summer of 1993 showed a


stationary high pressure system, also known as the Bermuda High, centered much
closer to the United States than normally observed for that time of year. This
allowed unusual amounts of warm moist air to be transported northward from the
Gulf of Mexico and into the central portion of the country. This moisture-rich air
fueled showers and thunderstorms that brought significant amounts of rain to many
regions of the Midwest. Precipitation totals were so large and of such extended
duration that normal means of surface water removal (transpiration, groundwater,
and runoff) were inadequate. Rivers doubled, even quadrupled in size, as nearby
towns succumbed to the floodwaters.
A Summary of the Hydrologic Cycle
bringing all the pieces together

The hydrologic cycle begins with the evaporation of water from the surface of the
ocean. As moist air is lifted, it cools and water vapor condenses to form clouds.
Moisture is transportedaround the globe until it returns to the surface as precipitation.
Once the water reaches the ground, one of two processes may occur; 1) some of the
water may evaporate back into the atmosphere or 2) the water may penetrate the
surface and become groundwater. Groundwater either seeps its way to into the oceans,
rivers, and streams, or is released back into the atmosphere through transpiration. The
balance of water that remains on the earth's surface is runoff, which empties into
lakes, rivers and streams and is carried back to the oceans, where the cycle begins
again.

Lake effect snowfall is good example of the hydrologic cycle at work. Below is a
vertical cross-section summarizing the processes of the hydrologic cycle that
contribute to the production of lake effect snow. The cycle begins as cold winds
(horizontal blue arrows) blow across a large lake, a phenomena that occurs frequently
in the late fall and winter months around the Great Lakes.

Evaporation of warm surface water increases the amount of moisture in the colder, drier air
flowing immediately above the lake surface. With continued evaporation, water vapor in the cold
air condenses to form ice-crystal clouds, which are transported toward shore.

By the time these clouds reach the shoreline, they are filled with snowflakes too large
to remain suspended in the air and consequently, they fall along the shoreline
as precipitation. The intensity of lake effect snowfall can be enhanced by additional
lifting due to the topographical features (hills) along the shoreline. Once the snow
begins to melt, the water is either absorbed by the ground and becomes groundwater,
or goes returns back to the lake as runoff.

Lake effect snow events can produce tremendous amounts of snow. One such event
was the Cleveland, Ohio Veteran's Day Snowstorm from November of 1996, where
local storm snowfall totals exceeded 50 inches over two to three days.
The Hydrological Cycle
(also known as the water cycle) is the journey water takes as it circulates from the land to the sky and back again.

The sun's heat provides energy to evaporate water from the earth's surface (oceans, lakes, etc.). Plants also lose
water to the air - this is called transpiration. The water vapour eventually condenses, forming tiny droplets in
clouds.

When the clouds meet cool air over land, precipitation (rain, sleet, or snow) is triggered, and water returns to the
land (or sea). Some of the precipitation soaks into the ground. Some of the underground water is trapped between
rock or clay layers - this is called groundwater. But most of the water flows downhill as runoff (above ground or
underground), eventually returning to the seas as slightly salty water.

This Information page provides an understanding of the hydrological cycle. It describes the principal stages of the
cycle, with a brief description of each stage. A diagram gives a clear visual explanation. The links between the
hydrological cycle and the duties of a water utility to supply clean water and dispose of dirty water are also
explained.

Links to other web pages allow the reader (particularly teachers and students) to supplement the information
contained in this Information Note.

Where is all the Earth’s water?


Water is the most widespread substance to be found in the natural environment and it is the source of
all life on earth. Water covers 70% of the earth’s surface but it is difficult to comprehend the total
amount of water when we only see a small portion of it. The distribution of water throughout the earth
is not uniform. Some places have far more rainfall than others.

There are many reasons for this, such as where the mountains are and where the prevailing winds blow. This
rainfall distribution partly explains the differences in vegetation and why some areas are deserts and some are
rainforests.

Water exists in three states: liquid, solid and invisible vapour. It forms the oceans, seas, lakes, rivers and the
underground waters found in the top layers of the earth’s crust and soil cover. In a solid state, it exists as ice and
snow cover in polar and alpine regions. A certain amount of water is contained in the air as water vapour, water
droplets and ice crystals, as well as in the biosphere. Huge amounts of water are bound up in the composition of
the different minerals of the earth’s crust and core.

To assess the total water storage on the earth reliably is a complicated problem because water is so very dynamic.
It is in permanent motion, constantly changing from liquid to solid or gaseous phase, and back again. The quantity
of water found in the hydrosphere is the usual way of estimating the earth’s water. This is all the free water
existing in liquid, solid or gaseous state in the atmosphere, on the Earth’s surface and in the crust down to a depth
of 2000 metres. Current estimates are that the earth’s hydrosphere contains a huge amount of water - about 1386
million cubic kilometres. However, 97.5% of this amount exists as saline waters and only 2.5% as fresh water.

The greatest portion of the fresh water (68.7%) is in the form of ice and permanent snow cover in the Antarctic,
the Arctic and in the mountainous regions. 29.9% exists as fresh groundwaters. Only 0.26% of the total amount of
fresh water on the earth is concentrated in lakes, reservoirs and river system, where it is most easily accessible for
our economic needs and absolutely vital for water ecosystems.

The values for stored water given above are for natural, static, water storage in the hydrosphere. It is the amount
of water contained simultaneously, on average, over a long period of time, – in water bodies, aquifers and the
atmosphere. For shorter time intervals such as a single year, a couple of seasons or a few months, the volume of
water stored in the hydrosphere will vary as water exchanges take place between the oceans, land and the
atmosphere.
What is the Hydrological Cycle?
The total amount of water on the earth and in its atmosphere does not change but the earth’s water is always in
movement. Oceans, rivers, clouds and rain, all of which contain water, are in a frequent state of change and the
motion of rain and flowing rivers transfers water in a never-ending cycle. This circulation and conservation of
earth’s water as it circulates from the land to the sky and back again is called the ‘hydrological cycle’ or ‘water
cycle’.

How does the Hydrological Cycle work?


The stages of the cycle are:

 Evaporation
 Transport
 Condensation
 Precipitation
 Groundwater
 Run-off

Evaporation

Water is transferred from the surface to the atmosphere through evaporation, the process by which water changes
from a liquid to a gas. The sun’s heat provides energy to evaporate water from the earth’s surface. Land, lakes,
rivers and oceans send up a steady stream of water vapour and plants also lose water to the air (transpiration).

Approximately 80% of all evaporation is from the oceans, with the remaining 20% coming from inland water and
vegetation.

Transport
The movement of water through the atmosphere, specifically from over the oceans to over land, is
called transport. Some of the earth’s moisture transport is visible as clouds, which themselves consist of ice
crystals and/or tiny water droplets.

Clouds are propelled from one place to another by either the jet stream, surface-based circulations like land and
sea breezes or other mechanisms. However, a typical cloud 1 km thick contains only enough water for a millimetre
of rainfall, whereas the amount of moisture in the atmosphere is usually 10-50 times greater than this.

Most water is transported in the form of water vapour, which is actually the third most abundant gas in the
atmosphere. Water vapour may be invisible to us, but not to satellites which are capable of collecting data about
moisture patterns in the atmosphere.

Condensation

The transported water vapour eventually condenses, forming tiny droplets in clouds.

Precipitation

The primary mechanism for transporting water from the atmosphere to the surface of the earth is precipitation.
When the clouds meet cool air over land, precipitation, in the form of rain, sleet or snow, is triggered and water
returns to the land (or sea). A proportion of atmospheric precipitation evaporates.

Groundwater
Some of the precipitation soaks into the ground and this is the main source of the formation of the waters found on
land - rivers, lakes, groundwater and glaciers.

Some of the underground water is trapped between rock or clay layers - this is called groundwater. Water that
infiltrates the soil flows downward until it encounters impermeable rock and then travels laterally. The locations
where water moves laterally are called ‘aquifers’. Groundwater returns to the surface through these aquifers,
which empty into lakes, rivers and the oceans.

Under special circumstances, groundwater can even flow upward in artesian wells. The flow of groundwater is much
slower than run-off with speeds usually measured in centimetres per day, metres per year or even centimetres per
year.

Run-off

Most of the water which returns to land flows downhill as run-off. Some of it penetrates and charges groundwater
while the rest, as river flow, returns to the oceans where it evaporates. As the amount of groundwater increases or
decreases, the water table rises or falls accordingly. When the entire area below the ground is saturated, flooding
occurs because all subsequent precipitation is forced to remain on the surface.

Different surfaces hold different amounts of water and absorb water at different rates. As a surface becomes less
permeable, an increasing amount of water remains on the surface, creating a greater potential for flooding.
Flooding is very common during winter and early spring because frozen ground has no permeability, causing most
rainwater and meltwater to become run-off.

This entire process repeats as illustrated in Figure 1.

Figure 1.
The stages of the Hydrological Cycle.
A Water Balance

A considerable portion of river flow does not reach the ocean, having evaporated those areas with no natural
surface run-off channels. On the other hand, some groundwater bypasses river systems altogether and goes
directly to the ocean or evaporates.

Every year, the turnover of water on Earth involves 577,000 km3 of water. This is water that evaporates from the
ocean surface (502,800 km3) and from land (74,200 km3). The same amount of water falls as atmospheric
precipitation, 458,000 km3 on the ocean and 119,000 km3on land. The difference between precipitation and
evaporation from the land surface (119,000 ?– ?74,200 = 44,800 km3/year) represents the total run-off of the
Earth’s rivers (42,700 km3/year) and direct groundwater run-off.

How does Water Supply and Sewage Disposal


fit into the Hydrological Cycle?
We have seen that water flows into rivers, lakes and into groundwater storage. Most importantly, for our daily
water needs, it also flows into our homes and taps. A network of underground pipes, pumping stations and
treatment works ensures that clean, fresh drinking water is delivered by our local water utility to our homes every
day of the week. After water has been used, the water utility collects, transports and then cleans this dirty water
and returns it safely back into rivers where it can continue its journey downstream to the sea.

The water utility’s responsibility begins at the precipitation stage of the hydrological cycle. Utilities in some water-
scarce countries encourage the collection of rainwater from rooftops (rainwater harvesting) but in most of Europe
the hydrological cycle begins with surface waters.

Figure 2 illustrates the water utility’s role in the hydrological cycle.


Completing the Cycle
The river continues its journey back to the sea where the cycle starts again. Water evaporates to form clouds,
condenses to droplets and eventually falls as rain on to the ground.

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