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ATTACHMENT 1 GENERAL SANTOS WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

General Santos City, popularly known as the Philippines’ Tuna Capital, has exerted serious efforts in addressing its Solid Waste Management (SWM) problems. Its increasing population and economic activities have brought about the urgent need to identify strategic actions aimed at improving its SWM program for improved public health and sustainable environmental management. At present, the City’s solid waste management problems include, among others: rising solid waste generation; limited waste diversion efforts; improper disposal management; and limited public and private sector participation.

This 10-Year Ecological Solid Waste Management (ESWM) Plan of the City updated through the collaboration with the regional offices of Department of Environment and Natural Resources-Environmental Management Bureau (DENR-EMB) in Region XII in response to the growing critical Solid Waste Management concerns of the City and in consultation with its various stakeholders.

This Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan of General Santos City seeks to achieve the following:

Install, improve and sustain appropriate, effective and efficient technologies, physical infrastructure, service delivery mechanisms and processes for waste reduction, collection, processing and disposal.

Build, strengthen and sustain mutually beneficial and effective partnerships and collaborations with civil society and private sector for solid waste management public education, community participation and service delivery.

Create necessary policies and mechanisms to build, strengthen and sustain small and medium enterprises for the service delivery of solid waste management.

Reduce LGU subsidies in solid waste management and generate revenues from waste management processes in solid waste reduction, collection, processing and disposal.

Complement pertinent agencies and institutions in achieving their respective mandates that relate to solid waste management, especially in standards enforcement, public education and special projects.

Establish, implement and continuously improve governance and management policies, competencies, systems and structures for solid waste management.

Specifically, the Plan intends to achieve the following objectives:

Ensure that 100% of City residents are aware and practicing waste segregation at source by 2017;

Divert at least 70.7% of daily waste generated in collection area in 2017 and 90% by end of year 10;

Expand the City’s waste collection coverage in 2017 ;

Pilot-testing at specific waste generating point sources are established in 2017 as learning sites for Solid Waste Management implementation;

Establish an effective and efficient waste collection system adopted by 2017;

Operate a number of community based composting facilities by 2017, and the City Material Recovery Facility (MRF) by 2018 fully operational;

Operate the City’s RA 9003 compliant category 4 sanitary landfill by mid2016;

Enforce the comprehensive Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2008 in support to the implementation of the 10-year Ecological Solid Waste Management plan by 2016;

Establish a sustainable Solid Waste Management implementation mechanism by 2016 with clear accountability, sufficient budget allocation and local policy and enforcement support;

Strengthen the collaboration among key stakeholders, including the barangays, national government agencies (NGA), communities, non-government organizations (NGO), private sector (PS) and the people’s organizations (POs)

In relation to the above objectives, strategic actions have been identified in relation to waste segregation and reduction at source, segregated collection and transport, material recovery and processing, and disposal management. Solid Waste Management strategies are based on existing conditions, provisions of Republic Act 9003 and its Implementing Rules and Regulations, and the results of the Waste Assessment and Characterization Study (WACS) conducted.

Key considerations as basis in an Integrated Sustainable Waste Management (ISWM) planning

Location and accessibility of the City in relation to its neighboring cities and Provinces and Regions

- Most strategic entry point to the Brunei-Indonesia-Malaysia-Philippines East Asean Growth Area (BIMP-EAGA) region

- Good road networks linking the City to various cities and provinces in Mindanao

- International standard airport with 3.2 km runway, 3-berth fish port and expanded seaport as access to all points in the country by land, sea and air transport

- Transshipment point of goods and services to international markets

- Education center and Hospitals with modern facilities

Geophysical and Political Features

- 26 barangays

- 22 classified as urban barangays, and four rural barangays

- Located in GSC are 3 sluggish rivers, 6 creeks within the City, 3 large cold springs, and several minor springs as potential source of water

- Rivers drain directly to the Sarangani Bay

- Underground water usually shallow.

Economic Sector

- Country’s tuna capital

- Most Competitive City in the Philippines “for two consecutive years

- An alternate Information Communication Technology hub outside of Metro Manila

- The country’s number 1 exporter of sashimi-grade tuna

- Economic hub in the South Cotabato-Cotabato City-Sultan Kudarat-Sarangani Province-General Santos City (SOCCSKSARGEN) region

- Home of large agri-based industries

- Developing and promoting the Tuna Value Added Products (TVAP) as the City’s One Town One Product (OTOP)

- Agricultural and livestock production in about 26,000 hectares of land makes the City’s economy more vibrant

- Large recyclers, consolidators and junkshops

- Region 12’s center of commerce and trade, finance, services and education.

Solid Waste Management strategies adopted are based on Waste Assessment Characterization Survey major findings:

Waste Assessment Characterization Survey (WACS) Result

- Average per capita waste generation from households within the collection area is 0.44 kg per day for the urban areas and 0.33 kg/day for rural areas;

- Average per capita waste generation from all sources is 0.62 kg per day within the collection area and 0.55 kg per day for the entire City.

- Total waste generation within the collection area is approximately 169,961 kilos per day; major waste generators within the collection area are the households, Public Market and food establishments:

66% are biodegradable;are the households, Public Market and food establishments: ⇒ 16% are recyclable; ⇒ 18% are residual;

16% are recyclable; 16% are recyclable;

18% are residual; 18% are residual;

0.5% is special. Total waste generation within the whole City amounts to 292 tons/day: 0.5% is special. Total waste generation within the whole City amounts to 292 tons/day:

Households account for 76% (222 tons/day) of the total wastes generated Households account for 76% (222 tons/day) of the total wastes generated

within the whole City;account for 76% (222 tons/day) of the total wastes generated ⇒ Industries, food establishments and Public

Industries, food establishments and Public Market comprise 4.9%, 4.3% and Industries, food establishments and Public Market comprise 4.9%, 4.3% and

4.1%, respectively, of the City’s waste generation;establishments and Public Market comprise 4.9%, 4.3% and ⇒ 64% of total wastes generated within the

64% of total wastes generated within the City are biodegradable 64% of total wastes generated within the City are biodegradable

16% are recyclable; 16% are recyclable;

20% are residual; 20% are residual;

0.4% is special wastes. 0.4% is special wastes.

Estimated volume of waste disposed at the City’s disposal facility is 91 tons/day.

R-II Builders/Phil Ecology Systems Consortium Incorporated, in coordination with the GSC-LGU, particularly the Waste Management Office (WMO) and the Special Projects Division of the City Planning and Development Office (CPDO) conform the Sanitary Landfill (SLF) pre-engineering design activities to the city’s WACS result.

Other factors that were considered in Integrated Solid Waste Management Planning include:

Current Solid Waste Management Practices

- Recyclable waste are usually segregated and sold to local junkshops;

- Generally waste generators are aware and practice waste segregation;

- None segregate collection discouraged sustainability, particularly in areas covered by the City collection system because of the inadequate support in engineering component i.e. equipment requirement, and collection system;

- Some waste collectors hired by major business establishment bring their mixed wastes to common collection points such as markets;

- Uncollected wastes are usually burned or illegally dumped in streets, canals, vacant lots;

- Segregation and diversion are practiced by some industries, some schools, puroks and barangays.

LGU Solid Waste Management Services and Resources Solid Waste Management Organization

City Environment & Natural Resources Office (CENRO) created in 1996 with Solid Waste Management Division; this division has plantilla positions of 115. In 2007, same 68 job orders were filled to augment manpower requirement;

The City created its Sustainable Waste Management Board (SuWMB) through City Ordinance No. 14, Series of 2005 amended by Ordinance No. 28, Series of 2014;

Barangay Solid Waste Management committees are created in most barangays

Waste Management Office (WMO) created through Ordinance No.13, Series of 2012 with 149 plantilla positions. Job orders hired are 244 personnel but only 80 of these assign at collection services.

Current Solid Waste Management Program

- Recyclable Waste Fair is conducted during Earth Day Celebration as part of the social campaign on Solid Waste Management and a regular activity of the Solid Waste Management Board.

- Information, Education Campaign (IEC) activities are ongoing;

- Provided collection services to markets, City hall, playground, business establishments and households along major roads;

- With 16 collection vehicles (1 armroll, 6 compactors and 6 mini dump trucks, and 3 ten-wheeler trucks)

- Staff of the Waste Management Office has established vermi composting at the WMO compound;

- The Waste Management Office is providing continuing technical assistance in the establishment and operation of Material Recovery Facilities and composting facilities in barangays, puroks and schools;

- The Waste Management Office is operating an open disposal facility, equipped with 1 functional heavy equipment, operator and a dump keeper;

- The City has entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with indigenous peoples of Sinawal allowing the LGU to use an area of not less than 63 hectares for the City’s planned sanitary landfill project and LGU to provide basic, health and other services as stipulated in the contract of agreement;

- Budget for Solid Waste Management activities under Waste Management Office is appropriated regularly; In 2014, a total of P68,996,463.49 was budgeted for Solid Waste Management; this increased in 2015 to P73,241,771.28 with an increase of 4,245,307.79 for the Capital Outlay; and P68,512,685.88 in 2016, for Personnel Services, Maintenance & Other Operating Expenses and Capital Outlay support;

- The City is currently enforcing City Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2008.

Current Participation of Barangays in Solid Waste Management

- Barangays of Apopong, Bula, Calumpang, City Heights, Dadiangas South, Dadiangas West, Labangal, Katangawan, San Isidro, Conel, Tambler, and Lagao are already implementing collection operations in portions of their respective barangays using their own dump trucks and conducting Information, Education Campaign (IEC) and enforcement activities. A Clean and Green program is conducted with a monetary reward for the cleanest and greenest barangays. Barangay Lagao tapped the different schools in the implementation of Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2008 while poster making, scrap to craft and mural painting contest are also a continuing activity of the barangay as part of environmental awareness and solid waste management campaign.

Current Participation of the Private Sector in Solid Waste Management

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A number of establishments, mostly industrial, commercial establishments, and institutions directly transport their wastes to the City’s disposal facility using their own vehicles or by contracting private garbage collection providers;

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Residential subdivisions with contracted private garbage haulers are Cahilsot in Calumpang, Gensanville in Bula, and Sarangani Homes in San Isidro, Camella Homes,

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Sarangani Homes 1 and II, Agan Homes, La Cassandra.

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Based on the above key considerations and findings, the following Solid Waste Management strategies shall be adopted:

Waste segregation as mandated through an Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance No. 12 Series of 2008 with corresponding provisions on fines and penalties will be enforced.

An enforcement mechanism will be developed to facilitate compliance to the said mandate. In addition, waste segregation is also supported by Information, Education Campaign activities such as community dialogues and dissemination of information and other strategies as identified in the city’s social marketing plan.

The Barangay Solid Waste Management Committees (BSWMCs) play a significant role in the promotion of waste segregation among households and other point sources within their jurisdiction. An incentive system is incorporated in the Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance No. 12, series of 2008 to encourage compliance among waste generators, particularly the households and industries that generate bulk wastes.

Segregated collection is mandatory for the city, barangay and private collection systems as stipulated in the Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2008. Collection of segregated biodegradable and recyclable wastes will be the responsibility of the barangays, while residual and special wastes will be for the City.

Only residual waste will be received at the Sanitary landfill. Segregated collection will continue to be a shared responsibility between the City, and barangays with support from private collectors. There will be expansion of City collection services from its current coverage. For areas, which will not be covered by any collection service, MRFs will be designated as collection points in the city.

A “time and motion study” will be conducted to support the improvement of the collection system. Sharing cost of SWM for households will be explored.

Operational MRFs are mandated in all schools, malls, barangay/purok, City hall, markets, industries, hospitals, ports, airport, fish port, churches and other major waste generators. The City shall establish an MRF with composting facility for the biodegradable waste recovered within its collection area. While the City Material Recovery Facility is not yet functional, model vermi composting and transition heap composting facilities shall continue to operate.

Major waste generators mandated to undertake composting at source may make arrangements with the City for the purpose of having their biodegradable waste processed. Fee for such arrangements can be explored.

The LGU will safely close and rehabilitate its existing disposal facility at Barangay Tambler to start in 2016 in accordance with the provisions of DENR-DAO 09, series of 2006. A category 4 sanitary landfill shall be established and operated by mid 2016.

A Private sector participation has been sought in the design, build and operation of the city’s Sanitary Solid Waste Management and Disposal Facility in Barangay Sinawal. Ordinance No. 220 Series of 2015 has been passed by the Sangguniang Panlungsod authorizing the City Mayor, Honorable Ronnel C. Rivera to enter into and sign the amended special conditions of contract.

Establish a sustainable Solid Waste Management implementation mechanism by 2016 with clear accountability, sufficient budget allocation and local policy and enforcement support.

The major components of a 10-year Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan, including institutional and other support systems, are outlined below.

Engineering Component

Stage 1: Waste Segregation and Reduction at Source

- Full enforcement of waste segregation (into four typesbiodegradable, recyclable, residual and special wastes) will be mandatory to all waste sources within the collection service area.

- Receptacles will be provided by waste generators, only storage receptacles in public places will be provided by the City.

- The owner or person in charge of premises containing six (6) or more residential units shall provide a designated area and containers for the residents in which to accumulate source-separated recyclable materials.

- Schools, industrial establishments and commercial establishments shall undertake composting of biodegradable waste that they generate at source.

- Those without adequate space for composting may enter into arrangements with their Barangay, City, or authorized private collectors for the collection and disposal and/or composting of their biodegradable waste.

Stage 2: Segregated Collection

- Segregated collection will be mandatory for barangays and private garbage collectors.

- “No segregation, no collection” policy will be enforced by the City.

- Simultaneous with the “segregation at source” campaign, the City and barangays may enter into arrangements with micro and small private enterprises in the waste management areas such as collection of segregated biodegradable, recyclable, residual and special wastes.

- Barangays will be responsible for collecting residual, biodegradable and recyclable wastes and transporting these to their material recovery facilities.

- City will be responsible for the collection of segregated residual and special wastes and transporting these to the disposal facility.

- Material Recovery Facilities (MRFs) will be placed and serve as designated collection points by the City.

- By start of 2017, the City collection service will be expanded.

- In 2017, barangays without collection trucks will be covered by the City collection service. However, City collection service in these barangays will be concentrated in barangay centers where designated collection points for residual wastes-material recovery facilities are located.

- A more detailed waste collection study to cover collection capacity, schedule of collection and coverage, routing scheme, maintenance support and other components of the City’s collection system will be conducted and prepared in 2017.

- Sharing cost of Solid Waste Management for households will be explored as one of the schemes to enhance Solid Waste Management services.

Stage 3: Materials Recovery and Processing

- The City will develop and improve the vermi composting to be established at the Sanitary Landfill Facility.

- These facilities will be managed by the Waste Management Office together with the Solid Waste Management Technical Working Group.

- Initial and subsequent testing of vermi cast/compost produced shall be done.

- Vermi cast/compost produced at the composting facilities can be utilized in the City’s road island gardens, farm and nurseries.

- Existing reported MRFs/composting facilities will be assessed, assisted and be made functional.

- Technical assistance will be provided by Waste Management Office to improve composting methods, trial demonstration in gardens or farms, and in linking their compost or organic fertilizer produced with market.

- Junkshops and waste consolidators in the Barangays were organized as Material Recovery Facility through a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with Waste Management Office.

- Equipment such as granulator will be procured to divert potential residual waste being dump to be able to extend the life of the sanitary landfill cell.

Stage 4: Disposal Management

- The City will safely close and rehabilitate its existing disposal facility at Barangay Tambler in accordance with the provisions of DENR- DAO-09, series of 2006, and other laws applicable in closing a disposal facility.

- The Waste Management Office in coordination with the City Social Welfare and Development Office (CSWDO) and Barangay officials of Siguel to plan in providing for a possible alternative livelihood programs to waste pickers that shall be displaced at the closure of the existing open dumpsite.

- The closed dumpsite will be monitored according to an approved closure and rehabilitation plan.

- A category 4 sanitary landfill established in Barangay Sinawal will be operated by mid 2016.

- Sanitary Landfill capacity requirement shall be implemented by phase.

- A private sector participation has been sought in the design, build and operation of the city’s Sanitary Solid Waste Management and Disposal Facility in Barangay Sinawal. Ordinance No. 220 Series of 2015 has been passed by the Sangguniang Panlungsod authorizing the City Mayor, Honorable Ronnel C. Rivera to enter into and sign the amended special conditions of contract.

- There shall be a separate cell for toxic and hazardous wastes (THW) as stipulated in the Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) conditions.

- Only residual and domestic special wastes will be accepted in the facility.

Education Component

Information, Education Campaign activities will focus on households, Public Markets, institutions, commercial and industrial establishments.

Barangays, puroks, institutions such as schools, and hospitals, vendors association of markets, industries and business establishments will have to take an active role in the promotion of good Solid Waste Management practices.

Information, Education Campaign - Teams at all levels will be formed and capacitated.

Involvement of existing groups/organizations such as vendors associations in markets has been done as strategies in Consultations among citizens.

Consultations among citizens, BSWMCs, communities and private establishments will be a regular activity of WMO.

Use several channels specific to major stakeholders will be used.

Policy Enforcement Component

The comprehensive Ecological Solid Waste Management (ESWM) Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2012 will be strictly enforced by trained and deputized SWM enforcers. Local Ordinances on solid waste management user fees; tipping fees will be drafted and enacted by

2017.

Monitoring and Evaluation System

The Monitoring and Evaluation system that shall be developed and focus on the following:

Functionality and capacity building of Solid Waste Management organizations at all levels;

Adoption of waste segregation, and diversion at source;

Effectiveness and efficiency of segregated collection;

Operation of composting facilities and Material Recovery Facilities;

Effectiveness and efficiency of the Sanitary Landfill operations;

Effectiveness and efficiency of support mechanisms such as education, monitoring and evaluation, incentives and awards system;

Functionality of existing institutional arrangements.

Incentives and Awards System

Incentives and Awards System is part of the Solid Waste Management program of the LGU, linked with other agencies and organizations. The reward system will be implemented to ensure an extensive participation of stakeholders.

Reward for enforcers cited under section 45 of ordinance No. 12, Series of 2012.

Barangays Share in the collection of garbage fees shall be implemented (Section 46 of Ordinance 12, S. 2008)

Enforcers share from fines imposed (section 45 of Ordinance No. 12, S. 2008)

Business establishments Discounts for early payers of business permits

Barangays, schools, hospitals, markets, industries and other major waste generators for:

o

Cleanest, Greenest Award/Recognition

o

Waste Diversion Achievers

o

Exemplary performance in waste diversion and community extension services

o

Industries having the most outstanding Pollution Control Officer; and others.

Above all, local governance supports systems critical to the achievement of the Solid Waste Management goals, targets and objectives of the plan are the following:

Institutional Arrangements

The Sustainable Waste Management Board (SuWMB) will be the primary organization to oversee the implementation of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan.

The City has expressed its intention to build, strengthen and sustain mutually beneficial and effective partnerships and collaborations with civil society and private sector for solid waste management public education, community participation and service delivery. Another objective of the City is to create necessary policies and mechanisms to build, strengthen and sustain small and medium enterprises for the service delivery of solid waste management. After due consultation with the City stakeholders, a new institutional arrangement will be implemented.

The Barangay Solid Waste Management Committees (BSWMCs), SWM committees in the different schools, hospitals, markets, City hall compound and other major waste sources will be the key players in ensuring that Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan strategies are adopted at the barangay level, and implemented at the point source levels in line with LGU-wide objectives.

Financing Arrangements

The Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan is estimated to require a total budget of PhP1,057.5 billion over the ten-year implementation period.

- Total capital outlay makes up around 50.26% of the total budget at PhP531.5million;

-

Maintenance and Other operating Expenses (MOOE) amounts to PhP526 million, or 49.74%.

Potential Solid Waste Management revenue sources are:

- Garbage collection fee or environmental management fee (EMF) from households;

- Garbage collection fee or environmental management fee from business establishments;

- Additional charges for special trips to collect large and unusual quantities of wastes;

- Tipping fees;

- Fines and penalties;

- Donations, grants, and corporate sponsorships.

All revenues will form part of the Solid Waste Management special account proposed to be created.

The projected total revenues over the ten-year period of 1.275 billion will cover the total Solid Waste Management costs. This means that the city will not subsidized the cost on SWM except on year 2023 where another cell in the sanitary landfill will be constructed there is a need to provide additional cost that may also be partly funded by external sources through loans, donations, and grants.

Issues and Concerns Issues and problems related to Solid Waste Management continue to challenge the LGU. These were considered in Integrated Solid Waste Management planning.

Limited resources and strategies to strictly enforced waste segregation and reduction at source.

Collection system has limited capacity to expand and cope with segregated collection.

Limited support for the establishment and operation of facilities to support processing of biodegradable wastes recovered.

Inadequate support mechanisms on enforcement advocacy and institutional related to Solid Waste Management.

Existing disposal facility not Republic Act 9003 compliant.

Insufficient coordination among key Solid Waste Management implementers and stakeholders, including City, Barangay Solid Waste Management Committees (BSWMCs) and private sector to increase Solid Waste Management participation.

Delayed implementation of the sanitary landfill.

This 10-Year Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan will serve as a guide for the City to achieve two of its major targets:

Waste diversion of daily waste generated away from disposal facility through reduction and segregation at source, segregated collection, composting and recycling; and

Improved disposal management.

It will also guide the City in providing necessary support mechanisms and logistics that will result in good governance practices in Solid Waste Management. Its integrated approach highlights the need not only for engineering intervention for improved quality of Solid Waste Management service delivery but also education/advocacy, institutional, policy and enforcement, incentives and awards, monitoring and

evaluation; and financing strategies to ensure sustainability of Plan implementation. More than these, the Plan brings to the fore public and private participation as a pre-requisite to efficient and effective Solid Waste Management program.

1.0

INTRODUCTION

General Santos City, popularly known as the Philippines’ Tuna Capital, is a highly urbanized City created by Republic Act 5412 on July 8,

1968. It is located between 125

Manila and Cebu and southwest of Davao. Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia are located down south. GenSan is nearest to Bandar, Brunei at approximately 718 nautical miles. At this position, GenSan is the most strategic entry point to the Brunei-Indonesia-Malaysia- Philippines East Asean Growth Area (BIMP-EAGA) region and can be regarded as its Southern Backdoor 1

region and can be regarded as its Southern Backdoor 1 1’ and 125 17’ East longitude

1’ and 125

and can be regarded as its Southern Backdoor 1 1’ and 125 17’ East longitude and

17’ East longitude and between 5

Backdoor 1 1’ and 125 17’ East longitude and between 5 58’ and 6 20’ North

58’ and 6

1’ and 125 17’ East longitude and between 5 58’ and 6 20’ North altitude at

20’ North altitude at the southeast of

Along with the City’s economic growth is its fast urbanization trend. Rapid annual population growth of 2.71 is attributed to in- migration due to business, industrial development, and educational opportunities in the City. The LGU places the Generals, as its citizens are called, at the center of concerns for sustainable development.

1.1

Purpose

It firmly believes that the Generals are entitled to a healthy and productive life in harmony with nature. To make the City livable and competitive, proactive urban plans and support policies are needed. 1

These socio-economic developments within the City, however, have largely resulted to Solid Waste Management (SWM) problems. It is estimated that 292,572 kg/day (292.5 tons/day) are generated within the City. Average per capita waste generation from households within the collection area is approximately 0.44 kg. per day.

Waste Assessment Characterization Survey (WACS)

- Average per capita waste generation from households within the collection area is 0.44 kg per day for the urban areas and 0.33 kg/day for rural areas;

- Average per capita waste generation from all sources is 0.62 kg per day within the collection area and 0.55 kg per day for the entire City.

1 Taken from the City Development Strategies Report Gensan Sheep Development Agenda: An Executive and Legislative Agenda.

- Total waste generation within the collection area is approximately 169,961 kilos per day; major waste generators within the collection area are the households, Public Market and food establishments:

Key Issues

City’s rising solid waste generation is projected as population and economic activities are expected to increase. At present, solid wastes seen in vacant lots, canals, creeks and rivers are evidences of the City’s more serious Solid Waste Management-related problems, including:

Mixed waste collection;

Improper disposal management;

Relatively low volume of wastes diverted at source;

Intermittent public and private participation;

Insufficient functional support mechanisms such as engineering support, advocacy and enforcement, non-implementation of Solid Waste Management incentives and Integrated Sustainable Waste Management (ISWM) framework that serves as a guide for the City in improving its Solid Waste Management program.

Existing structure of Waste Management Office (WMO) is not responsive to the function or mandate of the office.

Non-appointment of Waste Management Office head

The City’s attempts to solve Solid Waste Management problems, however, emphasize its recognition of the growing concern on the effects of increasing solid waste generation to public health and environmental management. In 1993, the City formed Task Force Basura and established the City’s Clean & Green Council to assist the government in beautification and cleanliness campaigns. Through the Council, waste segregation and backyard composting were piloted in several barangays.

In 1995, the City became a recipient of technical assistance from Governance in Local Democracy (GOLD), a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) project. A component of the said project was Urban Environmental Action Program through which Solid Waste Management was identified as one of the most critical environmental action areas. Under this Project, the City’s Solid Waste Management Council was created to formulate the Solid Waste Management Ordinance and Integrated Solid Waste Management Plan (ISWMP). However, only the City’s Solid Waste Management Ordinance was drafted and enacted, Ordinance No. 08 Series of 1997- An Ordinance Enacting the Comprehensive and Integrated Solid Waste Management System of the City of General Santos.

Philippine Regional and Municipal Development Project (PRMDP) of the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) funded through Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) came into the scenario for

infrastructure development for Solid Waste Management program and on capability building to enhance the delivery of services by the City government. In 2001, the City acquired an Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) issued by Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) for the construction of the Sanitary Landfill (SLF) at Barangay Sinawal. However, Disposal Facility has not immediately constructed because negotiation with Indigenous Peoples of Sinawal (IPs) and LGU has to be perfected through a MOA, for the LGU to use a portion of the ancestral land for the City’s Sustainable Waste Management and Energy Recovery Facility Project.

In 2005, The City entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with Philippine Environmental Governance 2 Project (Ecogov2) and Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)-Region 12 for Ecogov2’s technical assistance to the City on Solid Waste Management. A primary aim of the Project is to assist the City in the completion of a 10-Year Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan and its initial implementation. The Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan guides the City in improving its Solid Waste Management program. It identifies a strategic action that addresses present Solid Waste Management-related problems of the City on:

Waste segregation and reduction at source;

Collection and transport;

Materials recovery and processing; and

Disposal management.

It also highlights the need to improve not only collection and disposal activities of the City but also the urgent demand to:

Make operational a functional Solid Waste Management organization from the Purok level to the Barangay level;

Mobilize the community for support and participation on Information, Education Campaign, advocacy, and technology improvements;

Appropriate funds for collection equipment as required;

Enforce local policies to support implementation of the Solid Waste Management plan;

Enhance and implement incentives and awards systems that encourage waste segregation and diversion, use of common facilities, partnerships, among others as stipulated under Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2008.

Goals for the Plan

This 10-year Ecological Solid Waste Management plan will serve as a guide for the city to achieve two of its major targets:

Waste diversion of daily waste generated away from disposal facility through reduction and segregation at source, segregated collection, composting and recycling; and

Improved disposal management.

It will also guide the City in providing necessary support mechanisms and logistics that will result in good governance practices in Solid Waste Management. Its integrated approach highlights the need, for not only engineering intervention for improved quality of Solid Waste Management service delivery but also education-advocacy, institutional, policy and enforcement, incentives and awards, monitoring and evaluation and financing strategies to ensure sustainability of Plan implementation. More than these, the Plan brings to the fore public and private participation as a prerequisite to efficient and effective Solid Waste Management program.

Intent of RA 9003

The City’s Ecological Solid Waste Management plan seeks to deepen understanding and participation of public and private sector participation in solid waste management. It reinforces not only compliance to Republic Act (RA) 9003-The Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000, but also good governance practices in solid waste management such that transparency, accountability, participation and functionality are upheld in the City’s Solid Waste Management program. Ultimately, with the vision of making General Santos City a globally competitive one, this ESWM Plan is expected to enable the City to deliver quality solid waste management services and increase public and private sector participation for improved public health and sustainable environmental management.

1.2

Approach

The City’s Solid Waste Management-Technical Working Group (SWM-TWG) and staff from Solid Waste Management-related City Departments participated in a series of trainings and workshops as components in the updating of the 2016-2026 Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan. Consultations with barangay representatives were conducted for consensus decision making.

The Technical Working Group (TWG) uses the existing information and data available at the City Planning and Development Office (CPDO), Waste Management Office (WMO), Waste Amount Characterization Survey conducted by the LGU-GSC particularly the offices of the Waste Management Office and Special Projects Division of the City Planning and Development Office. R-II Builders and Philippine Ecology Consortium technically and financially assisted the WACS activity. Focus group discussions (FGD) also one of the approaches of the TWG aside from using previous studies relating on Solid Waste Management. The Waste Assessment Characterization Survey (WACS) result was the information in establishing the waste profile of the city in terms of volume and characteristics as part of the Sanitary Solid Waste Management pre-engineering design activities.

The Local Government of General Santos City through the Solid Waste Management- Technical Working Group (SWM TWG) initiated the updating of this GSC 10-year Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan (ESWMP). With the operationalization of the City Sanitary Landfill at Barangay Sinawal, waste diversion of the daily waste generated is the most significant of having improved strategies that aims to reduce the volume of waste being dump into the landfill. Waste diversion strategy will eventually extend the lifespan of the landfill cell at the same time give a cost benefit to the LGU in delaying provision of funds for the construction of another cell. The city also intends to make the waste segregation and reduction at source become way of life of the Generals. More, importantly, this document complies with the provisions of Republic Act 9003 otherwise known as the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act of 2000, giving responsibility and accountability to local government units for planning and management of solid wastes.

This Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan represents the work of many people and different national agencies’ contribution. Those who made direct contributions in coordination with various sectors of the community and following the planning process and tools provided by the National Solid Waste Management Commission (NSWMC) particularly the following:

Mr. Ferdinand J. Pareja, MPA Engr. Niño G. Arancon Ms. Rosita P. Lehito Mr. Danilo Canencia Ms. Teresa N. Garay

TWG -Team Leader Member Member Member Member

Waste Management Office City Planning & Devt. Office City Planning & Devt. Office City Health Office City Environment & Natural

Engr. Egualberto S. Gatiera

Member

Resources Office City Engineering Office

Mr. Abelardo E. Lllagas Assistance From:

Member

City Agriculturist Office

Mr. Bin Jaleel B. Almanza

City Planning & Dev’t. Office

2.0 GENERAL SANTOS CITY PROFILE

2.1

LOCATION

General Santos City, the Philippines’ Tuna Capital since the 1970’s, is a port city created by Republic Act 5412 on July 8, 1968. It is the southernmost city in the country located between 125°1’ and 125°17’ East longitude and between 5°58’ and 6°20’ North latitude at the southeast of Manila and Cebu and southwest of Davao down south. GenSan as the city is popularly known, Brunei, Indonesia & Malaysia are located nearest to Bandar- Brunei at approximately 718 nautical miles. At this position, GenSan is the most strategic entry point to the Brunei-Indonesia- Malaysia-Philippines East Asean Growth Area (BIMP-EAGA) region. It is regarded as its Southern Backdoor. Municipalities of South Cotabato, Sarangani and Davao del Sur are the nearest neighbors of this 53,606 hectares city. LAND AREA

The total land area of the City is 53,606 2 hectares.

2 As used by OCPDC for planning purposes.

 

Distance

 

Distance

Major

 

Barangay

(km) from

Barangay

(km) from

Infrastucture

Distance (km)

the CBD

the CBD

Facilities

Apopong

5

Katangawan

10

Makar Port

6

Baluan

6

Labangal

6

GSC Airport

17

Batomelong

19

Lagao

3.5

Fishport

14

Buayan

8

Ligaya

9

   

Bula

3.5

Mabuhay

11.6

   

Calumpang

6

Olympog

15

   

City Heights

1

San Isidro

5.5

   

Conel

13

San Jose

17.5

   

Dad. East

 

Siguel

23.5

   

Dad. North

CBD

Sinawal

16

   

Dad. South

Tambler

16.5

   

Dad. West

 

Tinagacan

13.5

   

Fatima

9

Upper Labay

22

   

LAND USE MAP

2.2

HISTORY

Early Beginnings

GenSan started off as Pres. Manuel L. Quezon’s dream settlement area for farmers. On February 27, 1939, Gen. Paulino Santos of the National Land Settlement Authority (NLSA) led 62 pioneers in opening the fertile lands for agriculture. As the settlement’s economy grew and diversified, it became known after its founder, Gen. Santos and also for its corn, coconut and livestock industry including its Dadiangas Wharf. Consequently, more investors came in due to the strategic location of the city, its promising agriculture, a thriving tuna fishing industry and an LGU that is bullish for progress. This encouraged foreign donors to provide technical and infrastructure development assistance to the city, which became the backbone of the city’s fast growing economy.

HISTORICAL SNAPSHOTS

On February 27, 1939, General Paulino Santos landed on the shores of the beautiful Sarangani Bay with 62 first batchers of Christian settlers under the National Land Settlement Administration (NLSA) program of then President Manuel L. Quezon.

1947. Ireneo L Santiago was elected in November 1947 as mayor of the Municipality of Buayan. His administration was credited for the

establishment of the basic institutions and infrastructures like the wharf, the municipal building costing P19, 700.00, public school buildings, and a constabulary barracks.

1955. The administration of Mayor Pedro Acharon, Sr. concerned itself with the barrio programs of President Magsaysay. Through the

PACD (Presidential Assistance for Community Development), feeder roads connecting the remote barrios to the national highways were built. Artesian wells were established to solve the problem of water supply among the rural folks. Likewise, he finished the projects started by Mayor Santiago particularly Makar Wharf which was declared an open port of entry in 1959. The Buayan airport was also rehabilitated from the ruins of the war during his term. 1960. Dr. Jorge Royeca’s administration emphasized cleanliness, beautification and health services. During his administration, General

Santos Municipality was declared the cleanest town in the province of Cotabato. Anti-littering law was strictly implemented, stray animals were impounded, trees were planted along the national highway, and the continuous beautification of parks and the public plaza were pursued. Worth mentioning was the successful relocation of the squatters found along the beaches into Alunan Street.

1964. During Mayor Lucio Velayo's term, the place saw the establishment of the following projects: the first two public secondary

schools: one in Bula and the other in Conel; the establishment of the fire department; the concretization of the Philippine National Bank; and the establishment of deep wells in different barangays particularly in Klinan, Conel, and Tinagakan. Multi-national companies such as Standard Fruits Company (STANFILCO), the Coca-Cola Bottling Company were established in the municipality. The administration of Mayor Velayo also saw rapid stride in the field of media communication with the publication of the first local newspaper, the Southern

Review, and the establishment of the first radio station, DXGS. Economic growth gained a very significant leap during Mayor Velayo's term. Multi-million agri-based corporations such as Dole-Philippines, General Milling Corporation and UDAGRI began operating in the area. This time, the municipality qualified as a fourth class city prompting Congressman Salipada Pendatun to file House Bill 5862

converting General Santos Municipality into a city and renaming it Rajah Buayan City. Unfortunately, the residents in a plebiscite called for the purpose rejected this bill. The failure to convert General Santos Municipality into a city, however, occurred not in the halls of Congress but in the hollowed halls of the Supreme Court in recognition of the people's "rejection" of their cityhood.

1968. Thru the efforts of Congressman James Chiongbian, the passage of Republic Act (RA) 5412 transforming the Municipality of General

Santos into a city made Antonio C. Acharon the last municipal mayor and the first city mayor of General Santos. A more enduring testament to the magnanimity of the Acharon-Cahilsot family are the land donations to the government which include the present sports complex (10 hectares); PC Barracks (9 hectares); Pedro Acharon Elementary School (1/2hectare); Romana Cahilsot Elementary School; the Bliss Project in Calumpang; the City Cemetery; and what is now Silway area. The educational needs of the city were given emphasis during Acharon's time with the opening of several public elementary schools in six barangays (Apopong, Sinawal, Upper Labay, Labangal, Dadiangas Heights Lagao and Sitio Uhaw, Tambler). Two existing public elementary schools in the poblacion area, Dadiangas West and Dadiangas South, were divided and gave rise to two additional public elementary schools, Pedro Acharon Elementary School and Ireneo Santiago Elementary School. During Mayor Antonio Acharon's incumbency, other important infrastructure projects were government hospital, a new public market, concreting of major city streets and highways, building of bridges and dikes, the improvement of Makar

Wharf, and the start of the construction of a modern City Hall. The economic growth of the city was undeniable with its declaration by the Department of Finance as a first class city based on its income in 1975. Mayor Antonio Acharon's term is the longest spanning almost two decades.

1986. After the peaceful People Power Revolution in 1986, Atty. Dominador Lagare, one of the persistent opposition leaders who fought

and opposed the Marcos regime, was appointed the officer-in-charge of the city. Just like his predecessor, Atty. Lagare was a Mindanaon

having been born in Barangay Conel in 1943. The incumbency of Atty. Lagare was too short to fully appreciate the impact to the development of General Santos City. It was during Atty. Lagare's term that the construction of the unfinished city hall was completed in time for the Foundation Day Celebration of the city on February 27, 1987.

1988. Appointed as an OIC mayor vice Atty. Lagare starting March 1, 1987, Mayor Rosalita T. Nuñez is credited for the adoption of the

symbolic slogan "boomtown Dadiangas" as a catchword to create an image of feverish economic growth in the post-Edsa period. But more than a manifestation of the pioneering spirit of the people, the term assumed significance as a socially constructed word - born of the people, promoted and developed across time by the conscious efforts of the various segments of the community particularly the business sector and the local media. The government's adoption of the term as a strategy for development was explained in the 1991 publication by the city government: "It formulated a strategy to promote General Santos City as a "BoomTown" aimed at creating an image or even an atmosphere of feverish economic growth. In this, it has won the support of the private sector to embark on a program to attract foreign and domestic investors to the city. Furthermore, through private sector efforts, continuous lobby pressure is exerted on the National Government to push through with its plans and programs for the city at the soonest possible time." The city caught the attention of foreign leaders involved in the Philippine Aid Plan (PAP) who selected General Santos City as one of their first pilot projects. Under the city's $2.2 billion development plan are two components financed by PAP. One includes agroport (fishport complex), telecommunications, airport expansion, and seaport expansion; another encompasses industrial estates, road networks, pro-people organizations, and environment. The development plan made General Santos City the "concentration of the largest infrastructure projects in the country today", a natural result of its crucial role in both the SOCSARGEN growth area and SOCSARGEN'S role in the East ASEAN Growth Area (EAGA).

1992. With the assumption of Mayor Adelbert W. Antonino, who won the May 11, 1992 election, the city continued to develop as a major

economic center. This is further boosted by the implementation of the Philippine Assistance Projects (PAP) of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). These include the international standard General Santos Airport, the Makar Wharf, Fishport Complex and the Agro-Processing Center. General Santos City's incessant march to the 21st millennium is undeniable at the end of Mayor Antonino's first term, which is also marked by improvements in organizational structure.

1995. Mayor Nuñez was back at the helm of local governance in 1995. The city was host to the Palarong Pambansa and the 1 st BIMP-

EAGA FRIENDSHIP GAMES in 1996, which highlighted the city's capability for social and economic growth and as an active partner in national development endeavors. The EAGA Games was participated by the 8 focus areas of the BIMP-EAGA member countries namely:

Brunei Darussalam; East Kalimantan, West Kalimantan, North Sulawesi of Indonesia; Labuan, Sarawak, Sabah of Malaysia and Mindanao- Palawan of Philippines. These events were economic development "boosters" which has a net effect of promoting the city as a tourist destination and investor's haven for manufacturing, exports, services and real estate.

1998. In the May 11, 1998 elections, Mayor Adelbert W. Antonino returned as City Mayor of General Santos. His administration was

guided by Project FIRST - Fast Integrated Reform for Social Transformation. This concept anchored on improving accessibility to basic

social services and ensuring that development becomes sustainable. The vehicle was the Shelter, Health, Education, Environment and Peace and Order or SHEEP Program. Antonino’s second term saw the computerization of city’s operations (time management system, Tax Revenue Assessment & Collection System, among others). The Most Competitive City in the Philippines award was given by the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) to the city in recognition to its rapid growth and business friendliness.

2001. Vice-Mayor Pedro B. Acharon, Jr. assumed the mayoral position when Mayor Adelbert W. Antonino resigned nearing the end of

his term. Mayor Jun Acharon handily won the May 2001 elections with overwhelming margin and landed him in the city’s history as the third elected Mayor Acharon. His running mate, the second-generation Antonino scion -- Darlene Magnolia Antonino-Custodio -- won lopsidedly as representative for the 1 st District of South Cotabato and Gen. Santos City. Bullish economic prospects particularly in the service industry have paved for the establishments of three higher educational institutions ACLC, General Santos Doctors’ Medical School Foundation, and Brokenshire College SOCCSKSARGEN. In 2002, the city capped the Most Competitive City (mid-sized category) for the second time. The city airport has served as connecting flight hub of Indonesian airline Merapati -- for its General Santos-Davao-Manado circuit.

In May 2004, Mayor Acharon and his 11 party mates were successfully re-elected including Rep. Darlene A. Custodio. This second term has opened new economic opportunities for the whole constituents with the re-establishment of the KCC Mall and the expansion of Gaisano Mall. The 2nd YamanGensan and 5th National Tuna festivals saw renewed confidence from the local economic players and visitors. Major city thoroughfares were expanded. The Population and Basic Services (PBA) Integrated Survey were held in the later part of the year.

2007. Mayor Acharon was re-elected for the third time. The country’s leading fast food chains have opened markets in the city. After the

re-opening of the Lion’s Beach to the public for beach and outdoor reveling in 2005, progressive efforts are undergoing in the area.

2008. The Bulaong Land Transportation Terminal was expanded in 2008. New investments are coming such as Robinson’s Place General

Santos City, Sta. Lucia Realty, Vista Land Company, among others. In addition, expansions were seen at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Mindanao Medical Center, KCC Mall, and Notre Dame of Dadiangas University.

2010. Darlene Magnolia Antonino-Custodio was elected as City Mayor. During the term of former City Mayor Hon. Darlene Magnolia

R. Antonino-Custodio, “MagandangGenSan!” was developed as the city brand. A citywide survey was conceptualized and is designed to gather data on community socio-economic (food, housing and infrastructure, livelihood, agriculture/industry, skills and economic development), demographic (age, sex, education, ethnicity, population size, structure and distribution, deaths) and health (general health, maternal, newborn and child health, family planning). This information serve as inputs to local development planning, as baseline data for indicators necessary for monitoring progress in localizing the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and data for monitoring and evaluating existing, and identifying future, programs of the LGU. The information is also useful in validating existing service statistics such as the Field Health Service Information System (FHSIS). On November 11, 2010, Executive Order No. 031, mandated the implementation of a City Socio-Economic and Health Census to be known as “CityCen 2011 – I’m Counted”.

2011. City Socio-Economic and Health Census aka CityCen 2011 is implemented pursuant to EO No, 31. The immediate use of the

CITYCEN 2011 is to provide baseline data for the Community Service Information System (CSIS) of General Santos City as basis for periodic assessment of its development status. It will also serve as inputs in planning and developing programs, projects and activities (PPAs) of, and basis for budgeting and appropriations for, various LGU frontline services.

In the near future, the data will be used primarily for monitoring the delivery of LGU services. At the community level, it will be used to update the household data to strengthen the Barangay Information Center and in establishing Community Services Center. It will also serve as basis for certification of barangay or purok and in granting of community tax certificates.

2013. Hon. Mayor Ronnel C. Rivera was elected as New Mayor of the city. GREEN to C.L.E.A.N. in GenSan, is the new administration’s

banner slogan. This is an acronym for the major development strategies and the aim to “Create a Livable Environment for All towards Nation- building in GenSan”. This highlights the inclusiveness of this administration’s governance and recognizes that nation-building starts with nurturing, protecting and blocks of the nation towards productivity and empowering the building progress. These building blocks are the families, the households, the communities, the barangays and the local government units as a whole. The final result of the census

was declared official through Resolution No. 282 adopting the results of the City Socio-Economic and Health Census (CityCen 2011 – “I’m counted” Project) as the City baseline data and supporting the implementation of the information policies for the City of General Santos.(

CDS/ELA 2014-2016, Local Government Unit of General Santos City)

2.3

POPULATION

GenSan, is the country’s 15th most populous city of half a million people based on the 2010 national census. Population density was 1,004 persons per square kilometer while average household size was 4.14. Although Barangay Calumpang has the most number of populations, the most densely populated barangay is Dadiangas West with a density of more than 16,000 per square kilometer. Population growth rate was highest from 1975 to1980 at 10.39% when in-migration was at its height. The growth rate drastically dropped to 5.3% in1990; then gradually tapered off to 3.9% from1990-2010 and 2.71% from 2000-2010.

General Santos City - Population Census - 2010

General Santos

Land

Area** sq

Urban/ Rural-

2010

 

City

km

2010

 

536.06

538,086

Apopong

19.07

U

45,089

Baluan

10.04

U

6,132

Buayan

4.93

U

10,375

Bula

2.93

U

32,364

Calumpang

7.89

U

67,156

City Heights

4.75

U

23,772

Conel

51.56

U

9,762

Dad East

0.61

U

4,821

Dad North

0.97

U

9,430

Dad South

0.61

U

7,212

Dad West

0.86

U

15,202

Fatima

24.98

U

65,189

Katangawan

19.13

U

11,959

Labangal

12.52

U

57,746

Lagao

12.5

U

47,254

Mabuhay

38.44

U

19,533

San Isidro

14.72

U

42,661

San Jose

38.09

U

7,486

Siguel

52.87

U

9,905

Sinawal

68.76

U

10,718

Tambler

57.74

U

15,845

Tinagacan

23.59

U

5,631

Batomelong

15.87

R

2,851

Ligaya

6.67

R

4,202

General Santos City - Population Census - 2010

General Santos

Land

Area** sq

Urban/ Rural-

2010

City

km

2010

Olympog

22.51

R

2,965

Upper Labay

23.45

R

2,826

2.4 ECONOMIC PROFILE/LAND USE

Economy and Industry General Santos City is the center of commerce and trade in Region XII known as the SOCCSKSARGEN region. Its strategic location and excellent infrastructure and support facilities are very important factors in the emergence of SOCCSKSARGEN as the country's leading producer of export-quality major commodities. Major economic activity is primarily anchored in two sectors namely the agro and fishing industries. Agro-industry Endowed with rich volcanic soil, ample and well distributed rainfall all throughout the year and a typhoon-free climate, SOCCSKSARGEN produces export quality high value crops such as corn, coconut, pineapple, asparagus, banana and rice. It also yields quality exotic fruits, vegetables and cut flowers and a top producer and exporter of quality livestock such as poultry, hogs, and cattle. Most of these bountiful harvest and production are transported through GenSan’s seaport and airport, highlighting the city’s role as transshipment point and service hub of the region.

Fishing industry

General Santos City is the largest producer of sashimi-grade tuna in the Philippines giving it the title "Tuna Capital of the Philippines". GenSan also accounts for the second largest daily total fish catch in the country after Navotas City. Locals boast that nothing can rival the freshness of fishes and seafoods that are found in GenSan. The fishing industry yields a total daily capacity of 750 metric tons of fish catch alone and employs about 7,800 workers. The city is also home to seven (7) tuna processing plants in the country. The Fishport Complex in Barangay Tambler has a 750 meters (2,460 ft.) quay and a 300 meters (980 ft.) wharf for2,000 GT reefer carriers. The fishport is equipped with modern facilities that comply with international standards on fish catch handling.

Infrastructures

General Santos City boasts of excellent infrastructure facilities that support its role as transshipment point of people as well as goods and services to international markets such as the USA, Europe, Australia, Singapore and Japan. These also provide access to the city by air, water and land transportation.

Air Transportation

The General Santos City Airport is the largest airport in Mindanao. This international standard airport has a 3,227-metre concrete runway capable of handling wide-bodied jets like Airbus A340 and Boeing 747-400. Flights to and from Manila, Iloilo and Cebu are currently being handled in the airport by Philippine Airlines, Airphil Express and Cebu Pacific Air. These carriers service an ever increasing demand in the volume of both passenger and cargo traffic to and from the city and SOCCSKSARGEN region.

Sea Transportation

The Makar Wharf is the international port of the city and is one of the finest ports in the country. It is located approximately 2 kms. away from the central business district. With a 740 meters (2,430 ft.) docking length and a 19 meters (62 ft) width, the wharf can accommodate up to nine (9) ship berthing positions at a time. The port is complete with modern facilities such as container yards, storage and weighing bridges. Several shipping companies operate regular inter-island ferry service to and from other major ports in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. Negros Navigation, Super Ferry and Sulpicio Lines ply these inter-island shipping routes. Numerous Indonesian shipping lines operate international ferry services between General Santos City and neighboring ports in Indonesia carrying both passenger and cargo loads.

Land Transportation

Commuting in and around General Santos City is fast and convenient. More than 400 passenger buses and jeepneys handle routes within the city and neighboring provinces. Air-conditioned taxis also ply the city streets offering commuters a choice of a more comfortable mode of transportation. Three-wheeled motorized cabs known as tricycles are the city's main mode of public transport for quite a long time. Privately owned motorcycles locally known as “habal-habal” are popular and fast means of public transport at anytime of the day, anywhere in the city. This is the reason why commuters patronize this transport mode.

Commercial Activities

Typical of highly-urbanized cities in country, General Santos City has its own share of commercial strips and a central business district .

The former, comprising mostly of banks, offices and service establishments, stretch along public transport routes thereby serving both local consumers and passers-by from the neighboring localities.

Major commercial strips of the city include the stretch of Daproza Street, Jose Catolico Avenue, Pedro Acharon Sr. Boulevard, Santiago Boulevard, National Highway and Ireneo Santiago Boulevard. There are 5 malls in the city, 3 of which are located in J Catolico Ave, 1 Santiago Boulevard and 1 in Daproza Avenue. Another 1 is going to open late 2013.

The city’s Central Business District on the central portion of the city is concentrated in the Pioneer Avenue (both Barangays Dadiangas South and Barangay Dadiangas West) and Santiago Boulevard.

Central Business District Map

Central Business District Map

2.5

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

2.5.1

Geographical Location

General Santos City lies at the Southern part of the Philippines.

Santos City lies at the Southern part of the Philippines. and 125 17’ East longitude and
Santos City lies at the Southern part of the Philippines. and 125 17’ East longitude and
Santos City lies at the Southern part of the Philippines. and 125 17’ East longitude and

and 125 17’ East longitude and between 5 58’ and 6 20’ Southeast of Manila, Southeast of Cebu and Southwest of Alabel, Malungon and Maasim of Sarangani Province and the and T’boli of South Cotabato surround the city.

and the and T’boli of South Cotabato surround the city. I t i s l o

It is located between 125

North

Davao. The municipalities of

municipalities

1’
1’

is

latitude.

The

of

city

Polomolok

2.5.2 Political Subdivision

GenSan is part of the SOCCSKSARGEN region and the first congressional district. It is

classified as a highly urbanized city with first class income. It

on the new national census classification of urbanity of barangays, 22 are already

level of more than 5,000 and at least

Only

Batomelong, Ligaya, Olympog and Upper Labay have remained rural for not having met the criteria for urban classification of barangays.

2.5.3 Topography

has a total of 26 barangays. Based

considered urban having reached the criteria of a population five (5) institutional facilities and business establishments

within

their

jurisdiction.

Majority of the entire land area constitutes wide flat lands stretching northeast of the city and undulating terrain. Mt. Matutum, towards the North, towers at 2,293 meters above sea level. Mt. Parker, at the Southwestern part of South Cotabato, towers at 2,040 meters above sea level.

2.5.4 Mineral Deposits

Uncertain quantities of mineral deposits are present in the city. Such minerals are limestone, iron sand, sulfur, copper, gold, nitrate, luminate, rutile and guano. Abundant sand and gravel are being quarried at the Silway, Siguel and Buayan rivers.

2.5.5 Inland and Underground Waters

There are six sluggish rivers draining the city. There are also six creeks, three large cold springs and several minor springs that have potentials as sources of potable water. Underground water is usually shallow.

3.0

CURRENT SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT CONDITIONS

3.1 Institutional Arrangements- Solid Waste Management Organization

LGU Solid Waste Management Services and Resources At present, the primary LGU office responsible for overseeing all Solid Waste Management activities of General Santos City is the City Waste Management Office (WMO).

Solid Waste Management implementation is supported by the establishment of the General Santos City Waste Management Office (WMO), which was created through Ordinance No. 13, Series of 2012, tasked to manage solid waste and air and wastewater (domestic waste) management. Specifically, the Waste Management Office is assigned to coordinate the maintenance, closure and aftercare of Tambler dumpsite; transfer waste disposal operations from dumpsite to landfill; enforce ordinances prohibiting open burning, waste

segregation, recycling and composting; and directly accountable for implementing the City’s Solid Waste Management activities for the following:

waste collection and transport system;

disposal facility management;

street sweeping, maintenance of parks and plazas;

coordination and facilitation activities related to IEC,

monitoring and evaluation (M and E) and enforcement; and

technical assistance to barangays, puroks, and point sources, e.g., schools, hospitals, industrial establishments, for enforcement of waste segregation at source, establishment and operation of MRF, including composting and recycling facilities.

enforcement of Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance No. 12, series 0f 2008.

Barangay Solid Waste Management Committees (BSWMCs) have been created in most barangays through the technical assistance of the Waste Management Office. These committees are not sustainably functioning because of the changes in Barangays leaders.

Current Solid Waste Management Practices

The following are the common Solid Waste Management practices of major waste sources within the City.

Table3.1 Solid Waste Management practices of major waste sources within the City

Source

 

Current Solid Waste Management Practices

 

Households

HHs

practice

segregation,

recyclable

wastes

are

sold

to local

junkshops/house to house “ambulant buyers”. Some HHs practice

Source

Current Solid Waste Management Practices

 

composting at source. Kitchen wastes usually used as feeds to animals. Large percentage of HHs still burning their wastes. Open dumping in streets, creeks or vacant lot. Some barangays collect garbage fee and varies from one barangay to another.

Public Markets

Of the 8 public markets in GSC, common collection points are identified. Markets such as Malakas, Central Public Market and Laray Bagsakan are both practicing waste segregation.

General Stores

General stores used to segregate but were not sustained due to absence of segregated collection system except for recyclables which are sold to junkshops. Remaining wastes are collected by either the barangay or City. Some large establishments, such as malls, bring their wastes directly to the disposal facility. Garbage fee is integrated in the business permit which is minimal as to the volume of waste generated.

Food

Some food establishments segregate their kitchen waste for pets or hogs. Mixed wastes are collected by either City or barangays. There are food establishment owners hiring private individuals to collect their waste, and bring these to the market collection bins. Kitchen wastes from Fitmart and KCC malls are collected by private individuals for backyard piggeries.

Establishments

Institutions

No segregation is being practiced by institutions such as offices, banks, lending shops and pawnshops. Mixed wastes are collected by the City collection system. Burning is still a practice when collection services are not available. Some churches and schools provide receptacles for biodegradable and non-biodegradable wastes. Recyclable wastes are also recovered and sold to junkshops while biodegradable wastes are composted in pits. Some institutions have their own or hire private collectors. Residuals are disposed of via the LGUs collection system. Doctors Hospital practice total waste segregation and conducts regular housekeeping.

Industries

Only few industries practice segregation at source. Some large industries have their own trucks or hire private contractors to transport their waste to the City’s disposal facility.

Transport

Mixed wastes from foreign sea vessels are unloaded by a private collection contractor and dumped these at the City’s disposal facility. Inter-island vessels have private collection systems who do initial segregation before disposal.

Vehicles and

Facilities

Source

Current Solid Waste Management Practices

 

Wastes at the airport are also managed by a private contractor. Recyclable wastes are recovered. At the fishport, segregation and collection is irregular. Transport terminals at KCC and Gaisano malls have their own receptacles but no segregation.

Service

Recyclable wastes are recovered and sold to junkshops. There are no appropriate receptacles for the other types of waste generated. The City or barangays collect and transport their waste to the disposal facility.

Centers

Recreational

Most beach resorts maintain their own open dumps within their sites. Burning still a common practice.

facilities

Special Waste

No segregation. Large establishments have their own collection system or hire private contractor. Others are served by the City’s collection system.

Generators

Slaughterhouse

Slaughterhouse and dressing plants partially practice segregation. No collection services provided and resort to bury their waste within their sites.

3.2 Inventory of Equipment and Staff At present, the City has 16 garbage collection vehicles. Only 9 of the 16 are in fair running condition. Two compactors are due for replacement. All collection trucks are already past their ten-year useful life but have recently been repaired. Two compactors have been provided with rear end lifters.

Table 3.2

Number and Condition of Existing City Collection Fleet

 

Year

Useful

Years

Description

Acquired

Qty

Life

Used

Condition

Armroll (Megalift) Isuzu FTR Compactor Hino 8 cu.m.

1999, 2001

1

10

-

Fair

1994

3

10

22

Fair

Compactor Isuzu FWD 8cum Dumptruck Daewoo 10W Dumptruck Hino 6W

1996

3

10

20

Poor, for replacement 3 Good, 1 Fair Fair

1998

5

10

18

1994

4

10

22

Total

16

The Waste Management Office has 149 plantilla positions and 140 of these are currently filled-up. In addition, as of December 2015, there are 244 approved job orders hired mostly assigned as street-sweepers and garbage collectors. Waste Management Office Existing Organizational Structure

3.3

Source Reduction

Current Participation of Barangays, Puroks/Subdivisions, schools and the Private Sector in Solid Waste Management

The city has already implemented several initiatives with regard to solid waste management. There are policies to support the national law on waste segregation and prohibiting open burning, through the City Ordinance No. 12, Series of 2008. The mayor deputized solid waste enforcers as recommended by the WMO to implement ESWM ordinance No. 12, series of 2008. Household backyard composting is mandated while schools, industrial establishments, institutions, and commercial establishments also undertake composting of biodegradable waste that they generate at source. Those without adequate space for composting may enter into arrangements with their barangay, the City or private entities for the composting of their biodegradable waste.

Since there are a number of commercial and industrial establishments within the City, waste reduction techniques is promoted. These include, among others, reduced use of packaging and disposable quantities. This is supported by City Ordinance No. 03, Series of 2014- an ordinance regulating the use of plastic bags and expanded polystyrenes (Styrofoam) as food service containers in the City of General Santos and providing penalties thereof.

Waste Recyclable Fair

The Sustainable Waste Management Board passed a resolution making Waste Recyclable Fair a regular activity of the board. The activity was started in 2007 in partnership with barangays, private sector, malls, junkshops, DENR-EMB XII, and industries during Earth Day celebration. Proceeds from the Fun Run during Earth Day /“TakboparasaMundo” were utilized in the procurement of bamboo seedlings for Silway river bank rehabilitation project. “No segregation No Collection Policy” also launch.

Ambulant junk buyers, junkshops and consolidators within the city play an important role in the recovery of recyclable wastes. In support to the achievement of the LGU’s waste diversion target and in compliance with the provisions of Republic Act 9003, various barangays, puroks, and schools have established their MRFs and composting facilities with the technical assistance from Waste Management Office in the establishment and operation of these facilities. Although some of the MRF are non-functional.

Point Source Modeling by SWM TWG

Based on the Ecological Solid Waste Management plan of the city, the following implementation activities are undertaken by the SWM- TWG in coordination with the Waste Management Office such as creation of Solid Waste Management organization in the pilot point sources, enforcement of segregation at source and segregated collection, Information, Education Campaign/social marketing. Waste Management Office preliminary launched the partnership between Barangay LGU and Junkshop Owner - to recognize all junkshop as the

Material Recovery Facility of the Barangay. Presently, Barangay North and Bula are in partnership with fourteen (14) junkshops serving as MRF of the barangay.

Waste Management Office also coordinated with the Department of Education for the issuance of memorandum order to all schools to establish its on-site material recovery facility and composting area. Several schools already complied with the order and been recognized as a Model Point Source.

with the order and been recognized as a Model Point Source. Figure 3.2 Vermi composting set

Figure 3.2 Vermi composting set up by the SWM-TWG.

3.4

Collection

Current City Collection and Transfer

A number of industrial and institutional establishments directly transport their wastes to the City’s disposal facility using their own

vehicles or by contracting private garbage collection providers. Residential subdivisions contracted private garbage haulers are Cahilsot

in Calumpang, Gensanville in Bula, and Sarangani Homes, Agan Homes 1 & 2, La Cassandra and Camella Homes in San Isidro.

Collection and Transport by the Private Sector Building contractors and real estate developers, Malls have their own collection trucks or hire private collectors. They may opt to avail of special collection trips from the City’s collection service. However, segregation is not fully observed yet by the private haulers’ collection operators. Similar to barangays, dump trucks and other open collection vehicles used by private haulers are mandated to be covered with nets, sacks to prevent wastes from being blown during the transportation.

Barangay LGUs of Apopong, Bula, Calumpang, City Heights, Dadiangas South, Dadiangas West, Labangal, San Isidro, Katangawan and Lagao are already implementing collection operations in portions of their respective barangays using their own dump trucks.

Most of Public Markets within the City are served by the City’s collection service. In addition, the City’s collection crew serves main thoroughfare of barangays Dadiangas East, Dadiangas North, Dadiangas South, and Dadiangas West in the Central Business District of the City. In addition to these the City’s collection service covers portions of other urban barangays, such as Bula, Calumpang, City Heights, Labangal, Lagao, Tambler, Fatima, Apopong, and San Isidro all other barangays are serve based on request. With two shifts per day and a conservative rate of one trip per shift per truck, the current collection fleet should be able to make an average of 28 trips per day to the Tambler dumpsite. This is if no down time for equipment servicing and repairs. There is also a current policy that a compactor should only be operated by one driver assigned to it for maintenance purposes. Since the City shares the provision of collection services with some barangays there is a need to revisit the current system of collection and transport of wastes to its final disposal. Therefore,, it is the intention of the City to encourage wider public-private partnerships in the delivery of wastes management services. Figure 3.3. Collection Map- City Waste Collection Service Area Central Business District

of wastes management services. Figure 3.3. Collection Map- City Waste Collection Service Area Central Business District

Table 3.3 Capacity of City Collection Vehicles Regularly Used, 2015

       

CAPACITY

   

EQUIPMENT/ UNIT

PLATE

NUMBER

MAKE/TYPE

IN CUBIC

METER

STATUS

REMARKS

COLLECTION OPERATION

         
     

COMPACTOR

     

1

HINO EH-700

SDV-145

LIFTER

8

OPERATIONAL

     

COMPACTOR

     

2

HINO EH-700

SDV-146

LIFTER

8

OPERATIONAL

     

COMPACTOR

     

3

HINO EH-700

SDV-147

LIFTER

8

OPERATIONAL

4

HINO EH-700 FF

SDV-148

DUMPTRUCK

8

OPERATIONAL

 

5

HINO RANGER

SFJ-703

COMPACTOR

8

OPERATIONAL

 
         

NON-

CHASSIS REPAIR-WMO MOTORPOOL

6

HINO RANGER

SFJ-705

COMPACTOR

8

OPERATIONAL

         

NON-

 

7

DAEWOO

SEN-975

DUMPTRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

FOR REHABILITATION

8

HINO WD4D

SDV-363

DUMPTRUCK

8

OPERATIONAL

 

9

HINO RANGER

SFK-149

COMPACTOR

8

OPERATIONAL

 
         

NON-

 

10

DAEWOO DV15T

SEN-980

DUMPTRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

TOP OVERHAUL-WMO MP

11

ISUZU TANKER

SGP-287

WATER TANKER

20

OPERATIONAL

 
         

NON-

UNDER REHAB-

12

ISUZU TANKER

SHA-395

WATER TANKER

20

OPERATIONAL

CONTRACTOR DAVAO

13

DAEWOO DV15T

SEN-972

DUMPTRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

 
 

MITSUBISHI

     

NON-

 

14

CANTER

SHX-271

DUMPTRUCK

5

OPERATIONAL

MINOR REPAIR-WMO MP

     

ARM ROLL

     

15

ISUZU FTR 33

SGY-429

TRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

     

ARM ROLL

 

UN

 

16

ISUZU FTR 33

TRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

UNREGISTERED

17

MITS. CANTER

SHX-272

DUMPTRUCK

5

 

FOR RELEASE

 

MITSUBISHI

         

18

CANTER

SGP-295

DUMPTRUCK

5

OPERATIONAL

19

ISUZU

SJT-899

DUMPTRUCK

5

OPERATIONAL

 
       

NON-

 

20

MITS. CANTER

SGC-923

DUMPTRUCK

5

OPERATIONAL

FOR REPAIR

         

NON-

 

21

DAEWOO

SEN-973

DUMPTRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

FOR REPAIR

         

NON-

UNDER REPAIR-

22

DAEWOO

SEN-974

DUMPTRUCK

10

OPERATIONAL

CONTRACTOR DAVAO

DUMPSITE OPERATION

         

3.5

Transfer

 

LOADER

 

NON-

 

23 DRESSTA LA 534

COMPACTOR

5

OPERATIONAL

FOR REHABILITATION

24 KOMATSU D80

BULLDOZER

 

OPERATIONAL

 

From 2014, the Management

simple transfer station at City Engineer’s Compound. A ramp made of earthfill is utilized with 2- 10 cum3 steel bins servicing 5 cm3 mini dumptrucks from markets and narrow streets areas. This initiative saves time and fuel and faster scheme of collection.

Waste Office initiated a

3.6 Processing Facilities (MRFs and Composting Facilities)

For now, there are fourteen (14) junkshops entered into memorandum of agreement with the LGU through the Waste Management Office as partners in collecting all types of recyclables. Barangay San Isidro and Calumpang are recipients of composter machine from Countrywide Development Fund (CDF) as a way of reducing waste thereby produces compost which can be use as soil conditioner.

Table 3.4 Material Recovery Facilities

 
 

Particular

   

No. (2015)

Own and Managed By

     

MRFs with Composting Facility MRFs only Composting only

 

13

Schools

16

1

MRFs with Composting Facility MRFs only

 

3

Puroks

13

MRFs

with

Composting

Facility

 

7

Brgy

MRFs only

 

8

3.7 Final Disposal

Disposal Management

The existing 5-has.disposal facility located at Purok Banwalan, Brgy. Tambler, is about 23 kms. distance from the city’s urban center or about 4 km south of the General Santos City Airport and a pasture land. It is being operated as an open dump since 2001 under City ENRO management and later under the Waste Management Office. General Santos City’s dumpsite is located at a publicly-owned land at Purok Banwalan, Barangay Tambler, under a pasture-lease or forest land grazing agreement (FLGA) to which the lessee agreed for its use as disposal facility since 2001 to ‘level off’ terrain. The site is found at elevations 136 to 272 meters above sea level along the road going to Aspang or about 3 km northwest of a junction of the national highway at the lowland just north boundary of Barangay Bawing.

3.8

Special Waste

The city has no collection storage for domestic special waste. Medical hazardous wastes are being handled by the hospitals/clinics. However, sometimes these are being dump at the dumpsite. Junk Cars are sold directly at the junkshops, waste oil from fast foods are bought by some businessman and recycled as diesel fuel, used oil are also recycled. Construction debris is use as filling materials in other private land. While the sewage sludge are not accepted at the dumpsite.

3.9 Markets for Recyclables

Increasing Solid Waste Management Participation of Junkshop and consolidators has been explored and strengthened, the city also make an effort of linkaging major waste generators, such as schools, malls, industrial establishments, hospitals, hotels, fishport, Makar wharf and airport. Local policy are incorporated in the Memorandum of Agreements between the LGU and junkshops on the operations as partner consolidators, Monitoring & Evaluation system for junkshops is also stipulated at the MOA, to ensure proper housekeeping as well as tracking of recovery of recyclable wastes citywide.

3.10 Information, Education and Communication Program

Information, Education Campaign for the Enforcement of Segregation and Reduction at Source

Increasing awareness of full enforcement of waste segregation and campaign for composting at source from all sources is a major objective of the IEC program. Objectives, related activities and necessary participation of waste generators in the implementation of waste segregation and composting are widely disseminated. In addition, stakeholders are inform on the provisions of Ecological Solid Waste Management ordinance.

Flyers and brochures on the what, why and how of waste segregation and basic composting techniques are develop. Distribution of IEC materials are not enough for the campaign to all waste generators, namely:

Household;

Public market stall owners and transient vendors;

Commercial establishments;

Institutions; and

Industrial establishments.

Mobilization of Public and Private Associations/Groups and sharing of best practices is encouraged. For households, Barangay IEC teams conducting barangay assemblies/bench conference/dialogues/consultations as information, education campaign venues. Purok officials are

tasked to mobilize purok leaders to assist in doing house-to-house information dissemination. Collaboration with market vendors association are established and strengthened to ensure the sustainability of the program. Regular meetings with institution heads and participation of parents, teachers and community associations (PTCAs) are also activities that undertaken by the WMO-IEC team in coordination with the Department of Education. Trainings on composting technologies at source are conducted.

Full enforcement of waste segregation has not been implemented on a City-wide level. However, it should be noted that there are barangays in which waste segregation and composting has already been initiated since 2000. Barangay Lagao, City Heights, Calumpang and San Isidro implemented segregation for households, business establishments and Public Market. They are also conducting IEC and enforcement activities.

3.11

Costs and Revenues

Solid Waste Management Expenditures

In 2015, the City has incurred the following expenditures for solid waste management.

Total O & M Costs

2014

2015

Total Collection Operating Cost

84,770,721.59

125,487,126.73

Equipment

29,000,000.00

Total Cost

84,770,721.59

154,487,126.73

3.12

Key Issues

Brief description of key Ecological Solid Waste Management issues facing the community:

Rising issues and concerns brought about by increasing population, booming economic activities and insufficient support for proper waste management are the following:

10 year Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan not implemented

Insufficient functional coordination between the city, barangays, puroks, academes, institutional, industrial, business and others key implementers and partners including mechanisms such as enforcement, incentives, advocacy and most the engineering component.

Change of administration both city and barangay affects the sustainability of waste management implementation.

Despite of the high level of awareness, waste management among the constituents/stakeholders is not a priority because of poor enforcement of the law and engineering component.

Mixed wastes collection by the city, barangay and private collection system is tolerated.

Bringing of wastes outside collection schedule, pile of waste on streets, canals and vacant lots still a practice

Burning is still a practice.

Limited private and public participation.

Insufficient support for waste management effort such as engineering, enforcement, equity/funding and waste diversion efforts.

Distribution of IEC materials are not enough for the campaign to all waste generators

Several MRFs are temporary in nature, for compliance only and non- functional

Improper waste disposal practice.

Non priority in the procurement of collection fleet and equipment in sustaining waste management effort

Waste Management Office has no permanent head to focus on the mandates of the office especially in the implementation of Ecological Solid Waste Management plan including the maintenance, closure of Tambler dumpsite; transfer waste disposal operations from dumpsite to landfill;

Collection route and schedule not sustain because of the insufficient number of collection vehicles.

4.0 Waste Assessment Characteristics Survey

A solid waste assessment was conducted to arrive at a Solid Waste Management situational analysis that will be the basis for the formulation of the Ecological Solid Waste Management plan. The outputs of the assessment are:

a) baseline data on waste generation from identified sources;

b) baseline data on the volume of waste disposal at the dumpsite; and

c) descriptions of current Solid Waste Management practices and awareness level among the different waste generators.

These data are important in determining the requirements and capacities of proposed Solid Waste Management facilities and in setting feasible waste diversion targets. The assessment was done in three stages, namely:

a) orientation on assessment and sampling methods;

b) waste characterization and interviews on SWM practices; and

c) data analysis.

The Solid Waste Management Technical Working Group was given an orientation on the purpose, scope and procedure of the solid waste assessment. This activity included the identification of categories and sub-categories of different waste sources within the City; determination of sample size; selection of samples or “waste cooperators;” and necessary preparations for the actual assessment. Actual Waste Assessment and Characterization Survey (WACS) and data analysis were conducted by the LGU-GSC, particularly the following Offices-the Special Projects Division of the City Planning and Development Office (CPDO); and headed by the Waste Management office (WMO). Solid wastes from selected samples of each category were collected, segregated and measured. Waste Assessment and Characterization Survey was conducted for each category on all waste sources such as households, markets, malls, industries, institutions, commercials, fish port, makar port, airport, slaughterhouse and resorts.

Table 4.1

Sample Size for WACS, by Category, General Santos City

Waste Source Category

Population

Sample

Size

Food Establishments

389

43

General Stores

1,231

114

Malls

3

2

Other Stores

1,1234

112

Institutions

765

74

Market

8

3

Recreation Centers

90

15

Waste Source Category

Population

Sample

Size

Residential (households)

66,942

38 3

Service Centers

465

48

Slaughterhouse and Dressing Plants

10

3

Special Waste Generators

423

48

Industries

65

6

Fish port

1

1

Solid wastes collected for the assessment activity were sorted and characterized either on site or brought to a sorting area at the City Engineer’s Office - Motor pool. Members of the WACS teams and garbage collectors undertook the actual sorting, measurement of the solid waste samples and data recording.

Following the actual WACS, data analysis was done to generate solid waste baseline data and 10-year projections for the City collection

area and whole City. The said data analysis following:

Figure 4.1 On-site waste characterization of solid wastes from the fish port.
Figure 4.1 On-site waste characterization of solid wastes from the
fish port.

presented summaries on the

the collection area by source; the whole City by source; generated by source; generation of households and non-

diversion.

and City’s collection coverage, for derived:

of the whole City, by waste type by

within the collection area of the City,

total daily waste generation within

total daily waste generation within

composition of daily wastes

average per capita waste household sources; and

potential volume for waste

Using projections on population growth the 10-year Plan period, the following were

projected daily waste generation source;

projected daily waste generation by waste type, by source; and

projected daily waste collection by waste type by source.

3 Total households of the ten barangays within the collection area stratified into high-, medium-, low-income households.

The same sample units for the actual WACS were also interviewed for documentation of present Solid Waste Management practices of identified waste sources. As requested by EMB-DENR, documentation was done on the Solid Waste Management program of the City using the form prescribed by the National Solid Waste Management Commission (NSWMC).

Benchmarking

A six-day study tour in Negros Oriental and Cebu City was conducted for the SWM-TWG The study tour aimed to introduce actual Solid Waste Management working models to the solid waste management team with the goal of identifying applicable solid waste management models for the City. Solid waste management sites visited are shown in Table 4.2.

Table 4.2

Study Tour Sites Selected for SWM TWG

Places Visited

SWM Best Practices Showcased

Siquijor Island Phosphate Sibulan, Negros Oriental

Vermi-composting facility

Dumaguete City

Environmental user fee

Preparation of Environmental Code

Tag/Sticker system for collection of household biodegradable and non- biodegradable wastes

Vermi-composting facility

Environmental and Ecological Park

San Jose, Negros Oriental

Vermi-composting facility

Materials Recovery Facility

Controlled Dumpsite

Bais City, Negros Oriental

Vermi-composting facility

Operation of the Sanitary Landfill

▪ Controlled Dumpsite Bais City, Negros Oriental ▪ Vermi-composting facility ▪ Operation of the Sanitary Landfill

Plan Formulation

With the completion of the actual Waste Assessment Characterization activity, a Strategic Planning Workshop was conducted on to provide the solid waste management team -TWG with sound basis for full development of the engineering component of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan. Workshops on policy, institutional arrangements, and implemented advocacy support.

A series of discussions and reviews on the draft Plan was held. The draft Plan was then presented and reviewed in a plenary session by the Technical Working Group. Refinements of the plan were done based on the outcome of the review.

Solid Waste Generation

Current Waste Generation of Various Sources

Waste Generation Current Waste Generation of Various Sources The Solid Waste Management (SWM)-Technical Working Group

The Solid Waste Management (SWM)-Technical Working Group (TWG) weighing and sorting waste samples collected from 38 households within the collection area during the three-day WACS.

The result of the waste characterization survey, the average per capita waste generation from households within the collection area is 0.44 kg per day. In estimating waste generation in the whole City, it is assumed that residential waste generation in rural areas is 75% of that in the urban areas or 0.33 kg per day.

The combined generation rates of residential and non-residential sources such as institutions, business establishments, markets, and special waste sources, the average waste generation per capita is computed at 0.62 kg per day within the collection area and 0.55 kg per day for the entire City.

Current Waste Generation in the Collection Area

The waste collection area served by the City, barangay and private contractors covers ten urban barangays, including Bula, Calumpang, City Heights, Dadiangas South, Dadiangas West, Dadiangas East, Dadiangas North, Labangal, Lagao and San Isidro. It should also be mentioned that Barangay Apopong provides waste collection services to about 10% of its households. As shown in Table 4.3total waste generation in the collection area is approximately 169,961 tons per day. Major waste generators within the collection area are the households, Public Market and food establishments. Households account for 70% (119 tons/day) of the total waste generation within the collection area while the Public Market comprises 7%. Food establishments, too, have 7% share of the collection area’s total waste generation.

The combined wastes coming from fish port, general stores, industries, institutions, malls, recreation centers, service centers and special waste sources are estimated at 27 tons per day. It means that the combined volume of wastes generated daily by these sources is only three tons more than the combined total waste generated by all markets and food establishments within the collection area.

three tons more than the combined total waste generated by all markets and food establishments within
three tons more than the combined total waste generated by all markets and food establishments within
three tons more than the combined total waste generated by all markets and food establishments within

WACS at the City Public market, slaughterhouse and mall

Table 4.3

Extrapolated Current Waste Generation in the Collection Area in kg per day

Total Contribution

Composition in Percent

Source Sector

Total Waste

% Of

Biodegra-

Recycla-

Residual

Special

Total

Estimate

Total

dable

ble

Waste

FishPort (special collection) Food Establishments General Stores Industries Institutions Malls Public Market Recreation Centers Residential Service Centers Slaughterhouse (special collection) Special Waste Sources Total

2,852

1.7%

74%

17%

8%

0%

100%

12,070

7.1%

91%

2%

7%

0%

100%

3,677

2.2%

29%

33%

37%

1%

100%

4,438

2.6%

54%

15%

31%

0%

100%

3,968

2.3%

56%

30%

14%

1%

100%

3,424

2.0%

61%

22%

16%

0%

100%

11,956

7.0%

89%

3%

8%

0%

100%

2,891

1.7%

77%

11%

12%

0%

100%

118,589

69.8%

64%

16%

20%

0%

100%

2,571

1.5%

50%

21%

28%

1%

100%

466

0.3%

71%

0%

29%

0%

100%

3,058

1.8%

20%

43%

20%

17%

100%

169,961

100%

65.5%

15.6%

18.4%

0.5%

100%

Sixty-six percent (66%) of the total wastes generated within the collection area are biodegradable while sixteen percent (16%) are recyclable. This translates to 82% of the total wastes generated within the collection area can be diverted away from disposal facilities.

Total recyclable wastes generated in the collection area amounted to 28 tons daily. In the same year, 27 junkshops in General Santos City collectively recovered around 20 tons of recyclable wastes daily (excluding wet-cell batteries). Assuming that 70% of these, or 14 tons, were generated within the collection area of General Santos City, then 54% of recyclables, or 8%, of total wastes generated were diverted at source through the junkshops.

At present, there are 12 barangays with composting facilities at purok and other pilot point source areas, (e.g., schools). However, there are no records of their capacities except for Barangay Bula composting facility which processes about 0.6 tons of biodegradable wastes daily.

Special Waste Residual Waste 0.5% 18.4% Recyclable 15.6% Biodegradable
Special Waste
Residual Waste
0.5%
18.4%
Recyclable
15.6%
Biodegradable

65.5%

Figure 4.3

Waste Generation in Whole LGU

Composition of Waste Generated in the Collection Area, Percent Share by Weight

Approximately, General Santos City generates 292 metric tons of waste per day. Within the whole City, major waste generators are households, industries, food establishments and Public Market. Households account for 76% (222 tons/day) of the total wastes generated within the whole City (see Table 4.5).

Industries, food establishments and Public Market comprise 4.9%, 4.3% and 4.1%, respectively, of the City’s waste generation. Sixty-four percent (64%) of total wastes generated within the City are biodegradable while sixteen percent (16%) are recyclable (see Figure 4.4). Based on these, it can be inferred that 80% of the City’s total wastes can be diverted from disposal facility.

Table 4.4 Extrapolated Current Waste Generation in the Whole LGU in kg per day

Total Contribution

Composition in Percent

Source Sector

Total Waste

% Of Total

Biodegradable

Recyclable

Residual

Special

Total

Estimate

Waste

FishPort Food Establishments General Stores Industries Institutions Malls Public Market Recreation Centers Residential Service Centers Slaughterhouses & Dressing Plants Special Waste Sources

2,852

1.0%

74%

17%

8%

0%

100%

12,460

4.3%

91%

2%

7%

0%

100%

4,065

1.4%

29%

33%

37%

1%

100%

14,387

4.9%

54%

15%

31%

0%

100%

4,423

1.5%

56%

30%

14%

1%

100%

3,424

1.2%

61%

22%

16%

0%

100%

12,023

4.1%

89%

3%

8%

0%

100%

6,991

2.4%

77%

11%

12%

0%

100%

222,302

76.0%

64%

16%

20%

0%

100%

3,563

1.2%

50%

21%

28%

1%

100%

2,811

1.0%

41%

0%

59%

0%

100%

3,271

1.1%

20%

43%

20%

17%

100%

Total

292,572

100.0%

64.3%

15.7%

19.6%

0.4%

100%

Residual

Wastes

Special Wastes

0.4%

19.6%

0.4% 100% Residual Wastes Special Wastes 0.4% 19.6% Recyclable 15.7% Biodegradable 64.3% Figure 4.4. Composition

Recyclable

15.7%

Biodegradable

64.3%

Figure 4.4. Composition of Waste Generated in the Entire City, Percent Share by Weight

Waste Disposal Estimates (End-of-Pipe)

Two End-of-Pipe (EOP) studies conducted. Table 4.5 shows that the average volume of wastes disposed at the dumpsite is 251 cubic meters/day or 91 tons/day. Of this, nearly half account for wastes collected by the City, which amounts to 92 cubic meters per day (42 tons/day).

Table4.5.

Average Volume of Waste Disposed Daily at Dump Site

Waste Collection

Average No. of Trips per Day

Volume (cubic meters per day)

Weight (tons per day) 1

% Share by Weight

Service Provider

WMO/City

92

42

46%

 

10

Barangay

80

25

27%

 

11

Private Contractor

92

24

27%

 

11

Total

251

91

100%

 

33

1 Average bulk density used for compactors and Megapack trucks is 500 kg per cubic meter. Average bulk density used for dump truck collecting waste from the markets is also 500 kg per cubic meter. Average bulk density used for other collection vehicles is 300 kg per cubic meter.

Eight of the 26 barangays in General Santos City, i.e., Apopong, Bula, Calumpang, City Heights, Dadiangas South, Dadiangas West, Labangal and Lagao, provide waste collection services within their areas of jurisdiction and dispose an average of 80 cubic meters per day (25 tons/day) On the other hand, a number of establishments and institutions, mostly industries located in Barangay Tambler, bring their wastes to the disposal facility using their own vehicles or by contracting private garbage collection services. Total volume of wastes dumped by private haulers average at 92 cubic meters/day (24 tons/day).

The city’s volume of wastes dumped at the City’s disposal facility account for 46% of the total volume of waste disposal daily while barangays disposal comprise 27%. The remaining volume of wastes, 27%, is brought to the dumpsite by private collection services.

It is projected that if SLF becomes operational, this will increase to 259 tons/day. In year 5- 2020, total waste generation is expected to reach 386,671.06 kg/day. As collection services expand while the population and economy grow, daily waste generation in year 10 2025 is projected at 441,982.75kg/day. Using current percentage composition of wastes, by 2017, daily wastes generated within the collection area will be 356,864.61 kg per day composed of:

178,432.31 biodegradable, kg/day

56,027.74 recyclable, kg/day

122,404.56 residual, kg/day

Table 4.6.

Projected Waste Generation, kg per day, by 2016-2026

The total waste projection by year 2025 is 441,982.75. In projecting Waste Diversion of the

The total waste projection by year 2025 is 441,982.75. In projecting Waste Diversion of the waste stream from 2016 to 2025 as shown in Table 4.6, 64.3% of the biodegradable wastes will be diverted at source through composting and 15.7% of recyclable wastes at source through reuse or selling to junkshop, and the remaining potential residual is 10%, therefore waste to be disposed is about 44,198.27kg per day.

In 2017, net residual waste for disposal from the collection area to the sanitary landfill will amount to 104,561.33 kg/day. Even with the above mentioned waste reduction and recovery programs, the total generation of residual waste is projected to be approximately 17,843.23 kg per day. This clearly rationalizes why the city constructed a category 4 sanitary landfill.

Waste Amount Characterization Survey Result

- Average per capita waste generation from households within the collection area is 0.44 kg per day for the urban areas and 0.33 kg/day for rural areas;

- Average per capita waste generation from all sources is 0.62 kg per day within the collection area and 0.55 kg per day for the entire City.

- Total waste generation within the collection area is approximately 169,961 kilos per day; major waste generators within the collection area are the households, Public Market and food establishments:

R-II Builders/Phil Ecology Systems Consortium Incorporated, in coordination with the GSC-LGU, particularly the Waste Management Office (WMO) and the Special Projects Division of the City Planning and Development Office (CPDO) conform the Sanitary Landfill pre-engineering design activities to the city’s WACS result.

Waste Assessment Characterization Survey

- Total waste generation within the whole City amounts to 292 tons/day:

Households account for 76% (222 tons/day) of the total wastes generated within the whole City;

Industries, food establishments and Public Market comprise 4.9%, 4.3% and 4.1%, respectively, of the City’s waste generation;

64% of total wastes generated within the City are biodegradable

16% are recyclable;

20% are residual;

0.4% is special wastes.

- Estimated waste disposed at the City’s disposal facility is 91tons/day.

5.0 LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK

5.1 Laws and Policies in Support to the Solid Waste Management

Comprehensive and Integrated Solid Waste Management System

1997. Passage of Ordinance No. o8, Series of 1997. An Ordinance Enacting the Comprehensive and Integrated Solid Waste

Management System of the City of General Santos.

Sustainable Waste Management Board

The Sustainabale Waste Management Board is created through the passage of Ordinance No. 14, Series of 2005.

2005. The City has requested the Ecogov2 Project to assist in reviewing its existing organizational structure with respect to its evolving

waste management system. After the development of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan-2008-2018, the City Sangguniang Panlungsod passed Ordinance No. 14, series of 2005, an Ordinance Creating the General Santos City Sustainable Waste Management Board.

Ecological Solid Waste Management Ordinance

2008. The Passage of Ordinance No. 12, series of 2008 is in support to the Solid Waste Management Program of the Local Government

of General Santos City.

Creation of the Waste Management Office.

2012. After the approval of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Plan 2008-2018 through Sangguniang Panlungsod Resolutions No.

154 and 182, Series of 2008 the proposed waste management office in plan was materialized four years later. Waste Management

Office was then created through Ordinance No. 13, and Ordinance No. 17, Series 2012, responsible for waste management and in the implementation of the ESWM plan.

Ordinance No. 03 Series of 2014.

2014. In support to the city’s solid waste management program, an Ordinance regulating the use of Plastic Bags and expanded Polystyrene (Styrofoam) Food Service Containers in the City of General Santos and providing penalties for violation thereof was enacted by the Sangguniang Panlungsod.

Ordinance no. 28, series of 2014.