Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 166

Power Transmission Enhancement Project – Sub-Project 2: IEE for Construction of new 220 kV

Transmission Line from D.I. Khan to Zhob with Zhob Sub-station

Initial Environmental Examination

June 2017

Islamic Republic of Pakistan: Proposed


Multitranche Financing Facility II (MFF II)
Second Power Transmission Enhancement
Investment Program

Prepared by National Transmission and Despatch Company


Limited for the Asian Development Bank.
Power Transmission Enhancement
Investment Programme II

TA 8488 (PAK)

Initial Environmental Examination

Sub-Project 2: Construction of new 220 kV


D.I. Khan-Zhob Transmission Line with
Zhob Sub-station

June 2017

Prepared by National Transmission & Despatch Company Limited (NTDC)


for the Asian Development Bank (ADB)

The Initial Environmental Examination Report is a document of the borrower. The views
expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of ADB’s Board of Directors,
Management, or staff, and may be preliminary in nature. Your attention is directed to the
“terms of use” section of the ADB website.

In preparing any country program or strategy, financing any project, or by making any
designation of or reference to a particular territory or geographic area in this document, the
Asian Development Bank does not intend to make any judgements as to the legal or other
status of any territory or area.
CURRENCY EQUIVALENTS

As of 20th June 2017 Currency Unit – Pak Rupees (Pak Rs.)


Pak Rs 1.00 = $ 0.009 US$1.00 = Pak Rs. 105.8

CONVERSIONS

1 meter = 3.28 feet


1 hectare = 2.47 acre

LOCAL TERMINOLOGY

Kacha Weak structure (composed of mud/clay)


Pakka Robust/strong structure (composed of bricks/concrete)
Tehsil Area of land with a city or town that serves as its
administrative centre

Acronyms

ADB Asian Development Bank


ACGIH American Government Individual Hygienist
ANSI American National Standards Institute
AOI Area of Influence
BEIS Biological Exposure Indices
BOQ Bill of Quantities
CLL Concurrent Legislative List
CO Carbon Monoxide
COI Corridor of Impacts
EA Executing Agency
EC Electrical Conductivity
EHS Environment & Health Guidelines
EHV Extra High Voltage
EIA Environmental Impacts Assessment
EMF Electric and Magnetic Field
EMMP Environmental Management & Monitoring Plan
EMU Environmental Management Unit
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
ESIC Environment and Social Impacts Cell
ft feet
GHGs Green House Gases
GOP Government of Pakistan
GRM Grievance Redress Mechanism
GSO Grid Station Operation
ICNIRP International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection
IEE Initial Environmental Examination
IPIECA International Petroleum Industry Conservation Associates
km Kilo Meter
MFF Multi tranche Finance Facility
NCS National Conservation Strategy
NEP National Environmental Policy
NEPRA National Electric Power Regulatory Authority
NEQS National Environmental Quality Standards
NESC National Electrical Safety Code
NGOs Non-Government Organizations
NOC No Objection Certificate
NTDC National Transmission and Despatch Company
Ops Operational Policies
OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration
PCB Polychlorinated Biphenyl
PEL Permissible Exposure Limit
PEPA Pakistan Environmental Protection Act
PMU Project Management Unit
PPEs Personal Protective Equipment’s
RE Resident Engineer
REA Rapid Environmental Assessment
RoW Right of Way
SOP Standard Operating Procedure/Practices
SPS Safeguard Policy Statement
TL Transmission Line
TLC Transmission Line Construction
TLV Threshold Limit Value
TOR Terms of Reference
TPS Thermal Power Station
UNDP United Nations Development Program
WAPDA Water and Power Development Authority
WMP Waste Management Plan
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................ 1
General ............................................................................................................................1
Project Details .................................................................................................................2
Scope of the IEE Study and Personnel .........................................................................3
Project Benefits ..............................................................................................................4
Social Benefits ................................................................................................................4
Structure of Report .........................................................................................................5

POLICY, LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE FRAMEWORK............................................................ 4


Statutory Framework ......................................................................................................4
Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997 ..............................................................4
Baluchistan Environmental Protection (Amendment) Act, 2012 ................................4
KPK Environmental Protection Act, 2014 .....................................................................5
Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency Review of IEE and EIA Regulations,
2000 ............................................................................................................................5
National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS).....................................................6
ADB Policies ..............................................................................................................6

ADB’s Public Communication Policy 2011........................................................................7


ADB’s Accountability Mechanism Policy 2012 ..................................................................7
Other Environment Related Legislations .....................................................................8

Comparison of International and Local Environmental Legislations ......................10


Implications of national policies and regulations on proposed project ..................11
Implications of ADB’s safeguard policies on proposed project...............................11
EMF Exposure Guidelines............................................................................................13

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT.............................................................................................. 18


General ..........................................................................................................................18
Scope of Work...............................................................................................................18
Sub-Project Alignment .................................................................................................18

Width of RoW ................................................................................................................19


Categorization of the Project .......................................................................................19

TOC-i
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Need for the Project......................................................................................................19


Design Aspects .............................................................................................................20
Design Standards for Grid Station & Transmission Line ......................................20
Climatic Consideration.................................................................................................24
Civil Works and Other Facilities ..................................................................................24
Equipment & Machinery ...............................................................................................24
Governance Issues of the Sector Relevant to the Project ........................................26
Tower Structures for Transmission Line ....................................................................26
Safety Parameters ........................................................................................................26
Tower Erection and scale of the project .....................................................................28
Analysis of Alternatives ...............................................................................................28
‘Do Nothing’ Scenario ..................................................................................................29
Alternative Construction Methods ..............................................................................29
Alternative Geometry ...................................................................................................29
Proposed Schedule for Implementation .....................................................................29

DESCRIPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL BASELINE CONDITIONS ...................... 33


Physical Environment ..................................................................................................34
Topography, Geography, Geology, and Soils ......................................................34
Seismology ..........................................................................................................34

Climate, Temperature and Rainfall ......................................................................34


Groundwater Resources ......................................................................................35
Surface Water Resources ....................................................................................35
Ambient Air Quality ..............................................................................................35
Noise ....................................................................................................................35
Biological Environment................................................................................................37

Flora .....................................................................................................................37
Fauna ...................................................................................................................37
Protected Areas/ National Sanctuaries ................................................................37
Wetlands and Aquatic Biology .............................................................................37
Game Reserves & Wildlife Sanctuaries ...............................................................37
Socioeconomic Environment ......................................................................................37

TOC-ii
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Political and Administrative Setup ........................................................................38


Demographic Analysis .........................................................................................38
Employment .........................................................................................................39
Income Sources and Expenditure ........................................................................39
Economic Infrastructure ..............................................................................................40
Social Infrastructure .....................................................................................................40
Religious, Archaeological and Historical Sites..........................................................41
Women Participation in Different Activities ...............................................................41
Village Profiles ..............................................................................................................41

ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND MITIGATION MEASURES .................. 43


Subproject Location .....................................................................................................43
Impact Assessment and Mitigation ......................................................................43
General Approach to Mitigation ..................................................................................43
Cultural Heritage, Mosques, Religious Sites, and Social Infrastructure .................45
Impacts During Pre-Construction Stage.....................................................................45
Impact due to Land Acquisition ............................................................................45
Impacts during Construction Stage ............................................................................46
Physical Impacts ..................................................................................................46
Biological Environment.........................................................................................51

Socioeconomic and Cultural Environment ...........................................................52


Impacts During Operational Stages ............................................................................56
Air Pollution and Noise from the Enhanced Operations .......................................56
Pollution from Oily Run-Off, Fuel Spills and Dangerous Goods ...........................56
Impacts on Ecological Resources ........................................................................57
Environmental and Social Risk Assessment ........................................................57

Effect of Electro Magnetic Field (EMF) ................................................................58


Excessive Noise Problem ....................................................................................58
Failure to Work of Electronic Devices/Equipment ................................................58
Danger to Bird Movements ..................................................................................59
5.8. Cumulative impacts ......................................................................................................61
Environmental and Social Benefits of the Project .....................................................61

TOC-iii
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

INFORMATION DISCLOSURE, PUBLIC CONSULTATION AND PARTICIPATION .................. 62


Approach to Public Consultation ................................................................................62
Public Consultation Process .......................................................................................62
Results of Public Consultation ....................................................................................62
Social Framework Agreement .....................................................................................63
6.4.1 Parties to Agreement ...........................................................................................63
6.4.2 Agreement Contents ............................................................................................63

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING PLAN ................................................ 64


General ..........................................................................................................................64
Environmental Management Plan (EMP) ....................................................................64
Environmental and Social Monitoring Plan ................................................................89
Objectives ............................................................................................................89
Role and Responsibilities of Project Management Consultants (PMC)................89
Role and Responsibilities of Contractor ...............................................................89
Institutional Structure for Implementation and Operation of the Project ................90
Environmental and Social Monitoring by ESIC ..........................................................93
Environmental Training................................................................................................94
6.1.1. Capacity Building and Training ............................................................................94
Estimated Environmental and Social Management Costs ...................................... 100

Grievance Redress Mechanism ................................................................................. 101


7.7.1 GRM – Preconstruction Phase........................................................................... 102
7.7.2 GRM - Construction and Operational Phases .................................................... 103

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS........................................................................... 106


Conclusions ................................................................................................................ 106
Recommendations...................................................................................................... 106

ANNEXURES 1
Annexure I - REA CHECKLIST ................................................................................................2
Annexure II - SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE ..............................................................................6
Annexure III - PUBLIC CONSULTATION ..............................................................................14
Annexure IV - PHOTOLOG ....................................................................................................17
Annexure V - BROCHURE .....................................................................................................34

TOC-iv
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

ANNEXURE VI – ARCHAEOLOGICAL CHANCE FIND PROCEDURES.......................... 37

TOC-v
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

List of Tables
Table 3.1 Equipment and machinery 220 kV Zhob Grid Station: .........................................................................24
Table 3.2 Equipment and machinery 220 kV Dera Ismail Khan – Zhob T/Line ....................................................25

Table 3.3 Equipment and machinery of Extension at 220 kV D.I Khan Grid Station ............................................26
Table 7.1: Environmental Management Plan .......................................................................................................66
Table 7.3: Environmental Monitoring Plan............................................................................................................96

Table 7.5: Estimated Environmental and Social Management Costs ................................................................. 100
Table 7.4: Grievance Redress Process .............................................................................................................. 101

TOC-vi
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

List of Figures
Figure 1.1: Location map of proposed project site .................................................................................................2
Figure 1.2: Site of proposed 220 kV double circuit single conductor transmission line from Zhob to Dera Ismail
Khan (220 km). .................................................................................................................................3
Figure 3.1: Interconnection Schemes of existing NTDC Network.........................................................................21
Figure 3.2: Planned NTDC Network .....................................................................................................................22

Figure 3.3: Planned QESCO Network ..................................................................................................................23


Figure 4.1: Seismic Zoning Map of Pakistan and Project Area ............................................................................36
Figure 7.1: NTDC’s Institutional Setup for Project Implementation ...................................................................91

Figure 7.2: Organogram of NTDC Environment and Social Impact Cell ...........................................................92
Figure 7.3: Grievance Redress Procedure during the Pre-Construction Phase ................................................. 103
Figure 7.4: Grievance Redress Procedure during the Construction and Operational Phases ........................... 104

TOC-vii
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1. INTRODUCTION
1. The condition of the power transmission system in Pakistan is inadequate to meet the rapidly growing
demand for electrical power. This situation limits national development and economic growth. To
enable the transmission system to deliver newly added generating capacity, the existing network has
to be expanded. The overall contribution of power infrastructure also requires institutional
arrangements and capacity that support strategic management of the sector, and planning and
management of investments.

2. Due to inflow of new power, the existing system needs up gradation and installment of new grids and
transmission lines. The proposed 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and associated Transmission line is also a
step towards improved energy transmission system. This document is the Initial Environmental
Examination (IEE) for the construction of the proposed station and transmission line. The proposed Grid
Station and Transmission line are being funded by Asian Development Bank (ADB).

3. The proposed project is classified as category ‘B’ according to ADB Environment safeguards, based on
the detailed site visits and subsequent preparation of the Rapid Environmental Assessment (REA)
Checklist. The potential impacts are site-specific, few (if any) of them are irreversible, and in most cases
mitigation measures can be designed more readily than for category ‘A’ projects. Thus, an initial
environmental examination (IEE) has been prepared.

2. LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS


4. The project will comply with ADB Safeguard policy, 2009, the national legislation relating to the
environment in Pakistan, and other international protocols and obligations. The national legislation
relating to the environment in Pakistan in order to obtain the required regulatory clearances is as follows:

 ADB’s Environmental Safeguard Guidelines, 2009, describe ADB’s policies and procedures for any
project funded by ADB.
 The Pakistan National Conservation Strategy (NCS), which outlines the country’s primary approach
towards encouraging sustainable development, conserving natural resources, and improving
efficiency in the use and management of resources.
 Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997, which empowers the EPA to delegate powers to the
Provincial EPAs, identifies categories of projects to which the IEE/EIA provisions will apply, develop
guidelines for conducting IEE and EIAs and procedures for their submission, review and approval,
develop environmental emission standards for parameters such as air, water and noise, etc.
 The National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS), 2010 specify the maximum allowable
concentrations of pollutants in municipal and liquid industrial effluents, maximum allowable
concentration of pollutants in gaseous emissions from industrial sources, etc.
 The other provincial and departmental applicable laws and regulations include Forest Act, 1927. The
Telegraphy Act, 1910 which makes a provision of installing poles/towers without acquiring any land,
Provincial Wildlife (Protection, Preservation, Conservation and Management) Acts, Ordinances and
Rules (Act, 1972), Antiquities Act, 1975, Provincial Local Government Ordinances, 2001, etc.

3. Description of the Project

Executive Summary-i
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

5. This Tranche II subproject consists of the development of a new 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and new D.I
Khan – Zhob Transmission Line, about 220 km in length. The transmission line route passes through 9
villages in D.I Khan district of KP Province, FR D.I Khan of FATA and Zhob district of Baluchistan
province. There will be installation of 660 towers i.e. each tower will be erected at a distance of 335 m
as reported by Survey & Investigation Section of NTDC.

6. The existing land use of the Grid station site and Transmission line corridor is mostly rocky/barren land
with some part consisting of agricultural land. Some scattered forest trees and few fruit trees are likely
will be affected by the sub-project.

4. ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVES
7. An analytical overview of the alternatives has been considered for this sub-project. The analysis has
been carried out critically so as to justify the need of the project. The various alternatives, which have
been considered during the study, are; i). No project option, ii) Alternatives of Location, iii) Alternative
Construction logistics and iv) Alternate Labor Options.

5. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL BASELINE CONDITIONS


8. The physical environment was observed within 500 meters area of Influence around the project boundary
and 150 meters from either side of the center line of transmission line along the project route. The
physical, biological and social environments of the project area are provided below.

Physical Environment

9. Topography and Geology: A part of the project area lies in the alluvial plain of D.I Khan district, while
rest of the area falls in FR D.I Khan and Zhob district, which mostly consists of rugged rocky/barren
areas. The greater part of the area consists of extensive series of calcareous sandstones and shale.

10. Seismology: The project area lies in seismic Zone 2B & 3 which is a low hazard zone and slightly high
hazard corresponding to peak ground acceleration (PGA) values of 0.16 to 0.24 and 24.0 to 32.0 m/sec2.

11. Hydrology and Geohydrology: River Indus and related Chishma Right Bank Canal are the major
surface water sources in the project area in D.I Khan district while the water bodies in rest of the project
area are river Khora with its tributaries i.e Spinkai Ghasha , Kharmeri nala, Tangi Khwar, Mandi river,
Khamistani river and Zhob river tributaries. It is perennial and flows throughout the year. It also causes
floods in the monsoon season, when it receives excessive rainfall water from upstream. The water table
is fairly near to deep the surface at 30 to 150 feet. Some parts of the project area have the seasonal
water table position and dug wells generally run dry.

12. Climate: The climate of the D.I Khan district and FR D.I Khan is hot and dry during summer and cold
and dry in winter. The mean maximum and minimum temperatures during summer are about 46oC and
28oC respectively. The mean maximum and mean minimum temperatures during winters are about 27oC
and 6oC respectively. The Zhob district of Baluchistan has highest mean temperature of 37oC to 23oC in
summers and 13 to -10O C in winter. The annual rainfall is approximately 295 mm to 1048 mm in D.I
Khan and FR D.I Khan areas, while in Zhob district the average annual rainfall is 285 mm.

Biological Environment

Executive Summary-ii
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

13. The proposed Transmission line area is mostly covered with cereal crops and also some scattered forest
trees. Naturally grown shrubs are also present on the land. Jungli Kikar (Wild Acacia niloica), Sufaida
(Eucalyptus), Aak (Calotropis), Sheesam (Dilbergia Sisso) and Jandh (Prosopis cineraria) were observed
on the project land. Orchards of Citrus, Guava and date fruits are present in the project area. The tract
inhabits a variety of fauna and mammals, reptiles and birds.

Social and Cultural Environment

14. The major castes in D.I Khan districts are Baluch and Jatts in addition to Pathan families. In FR D.I Khan,
the major castes are Wazir, Battani, Gandapur and Sherani while in Zhob district, Mandokhel, Kakar,
Sherani, Harpals, Babers Sherani and Syed are the major castes. Major occupations are farming,
business, service and labor. The total population of D.I Khan district was 0.853 million, FR D.I Khan had
0.389 million and Zhob district had 0.275 million persons according to the census report, 1998. There
are no officially protected heritage sites or historic, religious or archeologically important sites located
within or near the project area. Women work in the fields along with men and also teach at schools.

6. STAKEHOLDERS AND PUBLIC CONSULTATIONS


15. In accordance with ADB guidelines, the consultation process was carried out to share the information
with the stakeholders/public on the proposed works and the expected impacts on the physical, biological
and especially socio-economic conditions of the project corridor.

16. At various locations along the project site, stakeholders/public consultations were carried out along the
project corridor. Most of the public were in favor of the project. The major concerns/issues raised by the
stakeholders were regarding loss of trees and crops etc. and their compensation process; to ensure
accessibility of the field activities by community people; conflicts due to the uses of common resources
by the contractor during the construction activities and compensation for losses. All the concerns/issues
have been taken care of and addressed accordingly in the respective chapters of the report.

7. ENVIRONMENTAL & SOCIAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND MITIGATION MEASURES


17. For the sake of impacts assessment, Area of Influence (AOI) was established consisting of a 2 km wide
strip across the project boundary where trees, etc., will be affected, and direct and indirect impacts of the
Project are envisaged. The major impacts on physical, biological and social environments and their
mitigation measures are described below.

18. Land Resources: The proposed Transmission line will not require Land Acquisition, only the crop and
trees compensation will be paid to the owners. The other impacts on the land resources will include
physical disfiguration, soil erosion and contamination during the construction activities, drainage and
waste disposal. Proper mitigation measures have been considered to minimize the other impacts on the
land resources.

19. Water Resources: River Chenab crosses in the middle of the project area but project activities will cause
no impact on it. Transmission line may also have to pass a small canal used for agriculture and domestic
purpose. Apart from this major river, some small drains are present in the AOI. It is anticipated that the
project activities will not cause any impact on these surface water bodies as these are not near the
campsite, which lies within the GS boundary, and no construction activity will be done near them.
Subsurface water resources may be contaminated at construction campsites.
Executive Summary-iii
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

20. Ambient air quality and noise Levels: To control the effects on the ambient air quality and noise level,
proper tuning of vehicles, sprinkling of water on katcha tracks etc. have been proposed. In order to
mitigate high noise levels, temporary acoustic barriers shall be used, wherever felt necessary.

21. Biological Resources: It is estimated that the implementation of project activities will cause cutting of
about 6,000 trees. Compensatory trees will be planted at a ratio of 3:1.

22. Social and Cultural Environment: The major social impacts will include disturbance to accessibility,
communicable diseases, security of public as well as workers. So to resolve the social conflicts, proper
mitigation measures have been proposed.

23. Environmental and Social Risk Assessment: An effort has also been made to assess the
environmental and social risks during the construction as well as operation stages. Proper mitigations
(where required) have also been proposed.

24. Environmental and Social Benefits of the Project: Along with negative impacts of the Project, some
major expected positive impacts have also been identified including availability of electricity as per
demand, installation of industry, employment opportunities and other linked benefits.

8. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING PLAN


25. A comprehensive environmental management and monitoring plan (EMMP) has been prepared to
effectively manage and monitor the environmental and social impacts of the project. The salient features
of EMMP are provided below.

26. Environmental Management Plan: To manage the environmental and social impacts of the Project,
significant negative impacts and their mitigations have been covered in this section. For the ease to
understand and identify the impacts and to implement their mitigations, a mitigation matrix has been
developed as a ready reference for the proponent and contractor to minimize the negative impacts or to
manage activities in such a manner to avoid any adverse negative impacts.

27. Environmental and Social Monitoring Plan: Keeping in view the impacts and existing institutional
setup of NTDC, an environmental and social management plan has been developed. Environment and
Social Impact Cell (ESIC) of NTDC will be responsible for the overall environmental and social issues of
the project. Responsibilities have been assigned to each key player of the project including Client,
Consultant and Contractor.

28. The total preliminary estimated cost for compensation of trees and shrub losses, environmental and
social management costs has been calculated to be PKR 6.72 million.

9. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


29. Based on the available preliminary plans, field surveys and assessment of the impacts, the Project is not
expected to cause any significant environmental and/or social impacts along the project corridor.
Furthermore, adoption of the proposed EMP will help in mitigating or minimizing any adverse impacts
due to the implementation of the Project.

Executive Summary-iv
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Introduction

General

30. The condition of the power transmission system in Pakistan is inadequate to meet the rapidly
growing demand for electrical power. This situation limits national development and economic
growth. In order to enable the transmission system to deliver newly added generating capacity,
the existing network has to be expanded. The overall contribution of power infrastructure also
requires institutional arrangements and capacity that support strategic management of the
sector and planning and management of investments.
31. The Power generation capacity of Pakistan is 19,855 MW including all resources such as hydel,
thermal and Independent Power Producers (IPPs). For dispersal of power from these
hydropower projects, which are mostly located in northern part of the country, large and
extensive power transmission network consisting of 500 kV, 220 kV transmission lines and grid
stations will be required. All the power plants in WAPDA’s power system are operated in an
integrated manner to supply power to the national grid consisting of a large network of High
Voltage and Extra High Voltage (HV & EHV) transmission lines and grid stations. National
Transmission and Dispatch Company (NTDC) is responsible for construction, maintenance and
operation of transmission lines and grid stations of 220 kV, 500 kV and above.
32. The project is part of the NTDCL’s overall power development program and is proposed to
strengthen the transmission system to fulfill the need of secure, safe and reliable power supply
and to meet not only the existing requirement but also the future demand of the country for
sustained economic growth.
33. Due to inflow of new power, the existing system requires upgradation and installment of new
grids and transmission lines. The proposed 220 kV Transmission line from Dera Ismail Khan to
Zhob along with 220 KV substation is also a step towards improved energy transmission system.
This document is the Initial Environmental Examination (IEE) for the construction of 220
transmission line nearly 220 km in length and new grid station at Zhob. The proposed grid station
and transmission line are being funded by Asian Development Bank (ADB).
34. The proposed sub-project aims to meet rapidly growing demand for electrical power. The
feasibility study for the sub-project was prepared by consultants and has demonstrated the need
for the proposed improvements based on electricity demand and network studies and that
significant benefits can accrue in the form of reduced load on transformers and reduction in
transmission line losses. Thus, there is a clear and immediate future need for this sub-project.
35. The proposed project will help to fulfill the overall objective of the MFF to encourage economic
growth and improve transmission efficiency by creating a series of national improvements. The
improved transmission efficiency will contribute to expansion of economic opportunities by
improving capacity and efficiency and security of supply of power.

1|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

36. The proposed project is classified as category ‘B’ according to ADB environment safeguards,
based on the site visits and preparation of the ADB Rapid Environment Checklist (REA). The
expected impacts are site-specific, few if any of them are irreversible, and in most cases
mitigation measures can be designed more readily than for category ‘A’ projects. An initial
environmental examination (IEE) has thus been conducted.

Project Details

37. This report presents the Initial Environmental Examination (IEE) for the construction of a new
220 kV Transmission line from Dera Ismail Khan to Zhob with a length of 220 km along with 220
kV Grid station at Zhob. The Figure 1.1 presents the location map of the proposed project site.
38. The IEE study takes into account the natural environment (air, water, land, flora & fauna), human
health and safety. This study evaluates the project’s potential environmental risks and impacts
in its areas of influence and outlines planning, designing and implementation by preventing,
minimizing, mitigating or compensating for adverse environmental impacts and enhancing
positive impacts throughout project implementation.
39. The Social Assessment (SA) has been conducted to evaluate the project’s potential positive and
adverse effects on the affected people and to examine project alternatives where adverse effects
may be significant. The breadth, depth and type of analysis in the social assessment are
proportional to the nature of the project and scale of its potential effects, positive or adverse, on
the affected people.
40. The IEE has been conducted for the proposed project under MFF- Tranche II, of the Asian
Development Bank (ADB) project, Power Transmission and Enhancement Multi-Tranche
Finance Facility (PTEMFF). Thus, this IEE presents the results and conclusions of
environmental assessment for the proposed construction of new 220 kV Transmission line from
Dera Ismail Khan to Zhob along with 220 kV Grid station at Zhob and is submitted on behalf of
Government of Pakistan (GoP), Ministry of Water and Power, and National Transmission and
Dispatch Company (NTDC). An IEE has been carried out to fulfill the requirements of ADB
safeguard policy statement, 2009.
41. The Power Transmission Enhancement MFF loan has to be approved by ADB and the sub
project under consideration falls under tranche 2 of the MFF. The total cost of the 220 kV DC
Transmission line is estimated at PKR 6625 million. ADB will fund the design, civil works and
procurement of equipment. The PC-1 has been approved and detailed designs are being
prepared. The Figure 1.2 shows the site of the proposed project of 220 KV Transmission line
and Grid station.
42. The environmental assessment requirements of the Government of Pakistan (GoP) for power
transmission projects are not identical to those of ADB. The environmental regulations of the
GoP categorize development projects into two schedules according to their anticipated potential
environmental impacts. The proponents of projects that have more adverse environmental

2|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

impacts (Schedule II) are required to submit an environmental impact assessment (EIA). The
base line data was developed and analyzed to identify potential environmental impacts of the
project. An Environmental Assessment Checklist methodology was adopted to identify the high
risk activities and suggest their mitigation measures. Where possible, eliminating the risk by
altering the scope or method of execution of work was preferred rather than minimizing the risk
with control measures.
43. The GoP has requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB) to provide finance for the proposed
subproject, to help fulfill the overall objective of the MFF to encourage economic growth and
improve transmission efficiency by creating a series of national improvements. The improved
transmission efficiency will contribute to expansion of economic opportunities by improving
capacity and efficiency in Quetta Electric Supply Company (QESCO) region of Baluchistan
province.

Scope of the IEE Study and Personnel

44. This sub-project will involve construction of a new 220 kV Zhob Grid station and associated D/C
transmission line with a length of 220 km and extension of 220 KV D.I Khan Grid station (2 Line
bays). This IEE study includes field reconnaissance of the entire transmission line route and
Zhob Grid station.
45. The study area included the site of transmission line corridor within the RoW (15 m either side
of transmission line) and the whole area on both sides of the transmission line including all
irrigation facilities, water supply, habitable structures, schools, health facilities, hospitals,
religious places and sites of heritage or archaeological importance and critical areas (if any)
within 200 meters of the transmission line alignment.
46. The study process began with scoping and field reconnaissance during which a Rapid
Environmental Assessment (REA) Checklist was prepared to establish the potential impacts and
categorization of project activities. The environmental impacts and concerns requiring further
study in the environmental assessment were then identified. The methodology of the IEE study
was then elaborated in order to address all interests. Subsequently, both primary and secondary
baseline environmental data was collected from the proposed works and the intensity and likely
location of impacts were identified with relation to the sensitive receivers; based on the work
expected to be carried out. The significance of impacts from the power transmission work was
then assessed and, for those impacts requiring mitigation, measures were proposed to reduce
impacts to acceptable limits.
47. Public consultation (PC) was carried out in July & August, 2016 in accordance with ADB
guidelines. Under ADB requirements, the environmental assessment process must also include
meaningful public consultation during the completion of the draft IEE. In this IEE, the PC process
included verbal disclosure of the sub-project works as a vehicle for discussion. Interviews were
conducted with local families and communities and line departments along the transmission line

3|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

alignment. Written records of the responses have been passed to the project proponent, NTDC.
The responses from respondents have been included in this IEE.

Project Benefits

48. The benefits associated with the proposed 220 kV transmission line and 220 KV Zhob substation
mainly include:
 Overall power supply position in Baluchistan area will be improved.
 The project will help to provide uninterrupted power supply to underdeveloped areas of
Baluchistan.
 Voltage profile of Zhob and its surrounding areas will be improved.
 Implementation of the project will help to uplift the social life of the area, creation of new jobs
and business opportunities.
 Additional revenues to government exchequer from the levy of taxes on finished goods,
electricity duty due to additional sale of power & GST etc.
a) The other benefits of the proposed 220/132 kV transmission line & substation are as follows:

 Improvement in reliability of NTDCL and QESCO system networks.


 Increase in the available system capacity to meet future load growth at/around
proposed project.
 Serve as 220 kV source of power to feed QESCO load center.
 Improvement in power supply position of QESCO.

Social Benefits

49. The expected social benefits from the proposed sub-project are as follows:

 Provision of more reliable supply of electricity to the consumers.


 Fulfillment of power demand for rural electrification program etc.
 Improvement in living standard of local population.
 Creation of small business services.
 Creation of new job opportunities for local communities.
 Development of new accommodation facilities and the local people will be exposed to
new income generation opportunities.
 Socio economic uplifts of the community such as improved production, incomes and
market activities.
 Tube wells electrification which will provide additional water for irrigation, increase
cropped areas and also production.

4|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

 Developments of new industries in the area will create gainful employment to the
increasing work force.
 Additional revenues to Government exchequer from the levy of taxes on finished goods,
electricity duty due to additional sale of power & GST etc.
50. In the overall analysis, the improvement in ecological environments coupled with higher
production is envisaged to bring out substantial economic gains for the people living in the
project area.

Structure of Report

51. This IEE reviews information on existing environmental attributes of the Study area. Geological,
hydrological and ecological features, air quality, noise, water quality, soils, social and economic
aspects and cultural resources are included. The report predicts the probable impacts on the
environment due to the proposed sub-project. This IEE also proposes various environmental
management measures. Details of all background environmental quality, environmental
impact/pollutant generating activities, pollution sources, predicted environmental quality and
related aspects have been provided in this report. The report follows ADB guidelines and
includes:
 Executive Summary
 Introduction
 Policy, Legal and Administrative Framework
 Description of the Project
 Description of Environmental and Social Baseline Conditions
 Assessment of Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures
 Information Disclosure, Public Consultation and Participation
 Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan
 Conclusion and Recommendations

5|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 1.1: Location map of proposed project site

2|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 1.2: Site of proposed 220 kV double circuit single conductor transmission line from Zhob to Dera Ismail Khan (220 km).

3|Page
Power Transmission Enhancement Project – Sub-Project 2: IEE for Construction of new 220 kV
Transmission Line from D.I. Khan to Zhob with Zhob Sub-station

Policy, Legal and Administrative Framework


52. Direct legislation on environmental protection is contained in several statutes, namely the
Pakistan Environmental Protection Act (1997). In addition, the Land Acquisition Act (1894) also
provides powers in respect of land acquisition for public purposes. There are also several other
items of legislation and regulations that have a indirect bearing on the subproject or general
environmental measures.

Statutory Framework

53. The Constitution of Pakistan distributes legislative powers between the federal and the provincial
governments through two ‘lists’ attached to the Constitution as Schedules. The Federal list covers
the subjects over which the federal government has exclusive legislative power, while the
Concurrent list contains subjects regarding which both the federal and provincial governments
can enact laws. “Environmental pollution and ecology” is included in the concurrent list; hence
both the federal and the provincial governments can enact laws on this subject. However, to date,
after 18th Constitutional Amendment, federal ministry of Environment has been dissolved and
the provincial governments are authorized to formulate environmental laws and regulations. The
key environmental laws affecting this subproject are discussed below.

Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997

54. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997 is the basic legislative tool empowering the
government to frame regulations for the protection of the environment. The act is applicable to a
wide range of issues and extends to air, water, soil, marine, and noise pollution, as well as to the
handling of hazardous wastes.
55. The key features of the law that have a direct bearing on the proposed subproject relate to the
requirement for an Initial Environmental Examination (IEE) and Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA) for development subprojects. Section 12(1) requires that: “No proponent of a
subproject shall commence construction or operation unless he has filed with the Federal Agency
an Initial Environmental Examination [IEE] or, where the subproject is likely to cause an adverse
environmental effect, an Environmental Impact Assessment [EIA], and has obtained from the
Federal Agency approval in respect thereof.” The Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency has
delegated the power of review and approval of environmental assessments to the provincial
environmental protection agencies, in this case the Baluchistan and KPK EPAs.

Baluchistan Environmental Protection (Amendment) Act, 2012

56. After 18th Constitutional Amendment in the Constitution of Pakistan, the Federal Ministry of
Environment has been dissolved and subject of environment has been handed over to provinces.
EPA Baluchistan has formulated its own act. The major content of the act is same as of PEPA,
1997. Minor amendments/changes have been made viz.,
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

 The Name of Act has been changed into “Baluchistan Environmental Protection (Amendment)
Act, 2012”.
 For the words “Federal Government”, wherever occur, the word “Government” shall be
substituted;
 For the words “Federal Agency”, wherever occur, the words “Provincial Agency” shall be
substituted; and
 For the word “National”, wherever occurs, the word “Baluchistan” shall be substituted.
 All the other clauses, sub-clauses, sections and sub-sections are almost same.

KPK Environmental Protection Act, 2014


57. In accordance with provincial regulatory requirements, an IEE satisfying the requirements of the
KPK Environmental Protection Act (2014) is to be submitted to KP environmental protection
agency (KP-EPA) for review and approval, and subsequent issuance of NOC before the
commencement of construction.

Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency Review of IEE and EIA Regulations, 2000

58. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Act, 1997 (PEPA, 1997) provides for two types of
environmental assessments: Initial Environmental Examinations (IEE) and Environment Impact
Assessments (EIA). EIAs are carried out for subprojects that have potentially ‘significant’
environmental impacts, whereas IEEs are conducted for relatively smaller subprojects with a
relatively less significant impact. The Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency Review of IEE
and EIA Regulations, 2000 (the ‘Regulations’), prepared by the Pak-EPA under the powers
conferred upon it by the PEPA, categorizes subprojects for IEE and EIA. Schedules I and II,
attached to the Regulations, list the subprojects that require IEE and EIA, respectively.
59. The Regulations also provide the necessary details on the preparation, submission, and review
of IEEs and EIAs. The following is a brief step-wise description of the approval process:
(i) A subproject is categorized as requiring an IEE or EIA using the two schedules attached to
the Regulations.
(ii) An EIA or IEE is conducted as per the requirement and following the Pak-EPA guidelines.
(iii) The EIA or IEE is submitted to the concerned provincial EPA if it is located in the provinces
or the Pak-EPA if it is located in Islamabad and federally administrated areas. The Fee
(depending on the cost of the subproject and the type of the report) is submitted along with
the document.
(iv) The IEE/EIA is also accompanied by an application in the format prescribed in Schedule IV
of the Regulations.
(v) The EPA conducts a preliminary scrutiny and replies within 10 days of the submittal of a
report, a) confirming completeness, or b) asking for additional information, if needed, or c)
returning the report requiring additional studies, if necessary.
(vi) The EPA is required to make every effort to complete the IEE and EIA review process within
45 and 90 days, respectively, of the issue of confirmation of completeness.
(vii) Then the EPA accords their approval subject to certain conditions:

5|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

(viii) Before commencing construction of the subproject, the proponent is required to submit
an undertaking accepting the conditions.
(ix) Before commencing operation of the subproject, the proponent is required to obtain from the
EPA a written confirmation of compliance with the approval conditions and requirements of
the IEE.
(x) An EMP is to be submitted with a request for obtaining confirmation of compliance.
(xi) The EPAs are required to issue confirmation of compliance within 15 days of the receipt of
request and complete documentation.
(xii) The IEE/EIA approval is valid for three years from the date of accord.
(xiii) A monitoring report is to be submitted to the EPA after completion of construction,
followed by annual monitoring reports during operation.
60. Distribution lines and grid substations of 11 kV and above are included under energy subprojects
in Schedule II, under which rules EIA is required by GoP. Initial Environmental Examination (IEE)
is required for distribution lines and grid stations less than 11 kV and large distribution subprojects
(Schedule I). A review of the need for EIA/ IEE submission is therefore required by the relevant
EPA(s), in this case the KPK and Balochistan Environmental Protection Agencies (EPAs) as the
proposed subproject will be located in both these provinces.

National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS)

61. The National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS) were first promulgated in 1993 and have
been amended in 1995 and 2000. The following standards that are specified in the NEQS may
be relevant to the Tranche this subproject of Tranche-IV:
62. Maximum allowable concentration of pollutants (32 parameters) in municipal and liquid industrial
effluents discharged to inland waters, sewage treatment facilities, and the sea (three separate
sets of numbers).
63. Maximum allowable concentration of pollutants (2 parameters) in gaseous emissions from
vehicle exhaust and noise emission from vehicles.

ADB Policies

ADB’s Safeguard Policy Statement (SPS), 2009


64. The Asian Development Bank’s Safeguard Policy Statement (SPS) 2009 requires that
environmental considerations be incorporated into ADB’s funded project to ensure that
the project will have minimal environmental impacts and be environmentally sound.
Occupational health & safety of the local population should also be addressed as well
as the project workers as stated in SPS. A Grievance Redress Mechanism (GRM) to
receive application and facilitate resolution of affected peoples’ concerns, complaints,
and grievances about the project’s environmental performance is also established and
provided in Chapter 8.

6|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

65. All loans and investments are subject to categorization to determine environmental
assessment requirements. Categorization is to be undertaken using Rapid
Environmental Assessment (REA) checklists, consisting of questions relating to (i) the
sensitivity and vulnerability of environmental resources in project area, and (ii) the
potential for the project to cause significant adverse environmental impacts. Projects
are classified into one of the following environmental categories:

Category A: A proposed project is classified as category A if it is likely to have


significant adverse environmental impacts that are irreversible, diverse or
unprecedented. These impacts may affect an area larger than the sites or facilities
subject to physical works. An environmental impact assessment (EIA) is required.

Category B: A proposed project is classified as category B if its potential adverse


environmental impacts are less adverse than those of category A projects. These
impacts are site-specific, few if any of them are irreversible, and in most cases
mitigation measures can be designed more readily than for category A projects. An
initial environmental examination (IEE) is required.

Category C: A proposed project is classified as category C if it is likely to have minimal


or no adverse environmental impacts. No environmental assessment is required
although environmental implications need to be reviewed.

Category FI: A proposed project is classified as category FI if it involves investment of


ADB funds to or through a financial intermediary (FI).

66. As a result of the completion of the REA checklist, the sub-project has been classified
as Category ‘‘B’’ and thus a detailed and comprehensive IEE study has been prepared
including the EMP.

ADB’s Public Communication Policy 2011


67. The PCP aims to enhance stakeholders’ trust in and ability to engage with ADB, and
thereby increase the development impact of ADB operations. The policy promotes
transparency, accountability, and participatory development. It establishes the
disclosure requirements for documents ADB produces or requires to be produced.

ADB’s Accountability Mechanism Policy 2012


68. The objectives of the Accountability Mechanism is providing an independent and
effective forum for people adversely affected by ADB-assisted projects to voice their
concerns and seek solutions to their problems, and to request compliance review of
the alleged noncompliance by ADB with its operational policies and procedures that
may have caused, or is likely to cause, them direct and material harm. The
Accountability Mechanism a “last resort” mechanism.

7|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Other Environment Related Legislations


69. The Table 2.1 provides a summary of all legislations, guidelines, conventions and
corporate requirements.

Table 2.1: Environmental Guidelines and Legislations


Legislation/Guideline Description
NEP is the primary policy of Government of Pakistan addressing
environmental issues. The broad Goal of NEP is, “to protect, conserve
and restore Pakistan’s environment in order to improve the quality of
National Environmental life of the citizens through sustainable development”. The NEP
Policy (2005) (NEP) identifies a set of sectoral and cross-sectoral guidelines to achieve its
goal of sustainable development. It also suggests various policy
instruments to overcome the environmental problems throughout the
country.
It empowers the government to declare certain areas reserved for the
Khyber Pakhtunkhwa protection of wildlife and control activities within in these areas. It also
Wildlife and Biodiversity provides protection to endangered species of wildlife. As no activities
Act, 2015 are planned in these areas, no provision of this law is applicable to the
proposed project.
Balochistan Wildlife It is an Act to provide protection, preservation, conservation,
(Protection, sustainable and management to the Wildlife, and establishment and
Preservation, management of protected areas in the province of Balochistan.
Conservation and
Management) Act, 2014

Balochistan Antiquities It is an Act to provide for preservation and protection of antiquities in


the province of Balochistan and for the matters connected therewith
Act, 2014
or ancillary thereto.
It ensures the protection, preservation, development and
maintenance of antiquities in the province of KPK. The Act defines
“antiquities” as ancient products of human activity, historical sites, or
sites of anthropological or cultural interest, national monuments, etc.
The Act is designed to protect these antiquities from destruction, theft,
The KPK Antiquities Act negligence, unlawful excavation, trade, and export. The law prohibits
new construction in the proximity of a protected antiquity and
(2016)
empowers the GoKPK to prohibit excavation in any area that may
contain articles of archaeological significance. Under the Act, the
subproject proponents are obligated to ensure that no activity is
undertaken in the proximity of a protected antiquity, report to the
Department of Archaeology, GoKPK, any archaeological discovery
made during the course of the project.
The Act empowers the provincial forest departments to declare any
forest area as reserved or protected. It empowers the provincial forest
departments to prohibit the clearing of forest for cultivation, grazing,
The Forest Act (1927)
hunting, removing forest produce, quarrying and felling, lopping and
topping of trees, branches in reserved and protected forests. No
protected forest is situated in the Project area.
It ensures the protection of Pakistan’s cultural resources. The Act
defines “antiquities” as ancient products of human activity, historical
The Antiquities Act sites, or sites of anthropological or cultural interest, national
(1975) monuments, etc. The Act is designed to protect these antiquities from
destruction, theft, negligence, unlawful excavation, trade, and export.
The law prohibits new construction in the proximity of a protected
antiquity and empowers the GOP to prohibit excavation in any area

8|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Legislation/Guideline Description
that may contain articles of archaeological significance. Under the Act,
the subproject proponents are obligated to ensure that no activity is
undertaken in the proximity of a protected antiquity, report to the
Department of Archaeology, GOP, any archaeological discovery
made during the course of the project.

Pakistan Penal Code It authorizes fines, imprisonment or both for voluntary corruption or
fouling of public springs or reservoirs so as to make them less fit for
(1860)
ordinary use.
NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL AND CONSERVATION STRATEGIES
Before the approval of NEP, the National Conservation Strategy
(NCS) was considered as the Government’s primary policy document
National Conservation on national environmental issues. At the moment, this strategy just
exists as a national conservation program. The NCS identifies 14 core
Strategy
areas including conservation of biodiversity, pollution prevention and
abatement, soil and water conservation and preservation of cultural
heritage and recommends immediate attention to these core areas.
The plan recognizes IEE/EIA as an effective tool for identifying and
Biodiversity Action Plan
assessing the effects of a proposed operation on biodiversity.
There is a well-established framework for environmental management
in Pakistan. The Ministry of Environment deals with environment and
biological resources. Within the ministry, the NCS unit established in
1992 is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the strategy.
Two organizations, the Pakistan Environmental Protection Council
(PEPC) and the Pak EPA are primarily responsible for administering
Environment and the provisions of the PEPA, 1997. The PEPC oversees the functioning
of the Pak EPA. Its members include representatives of the
Conservation
government, industry, non-governmental organizations and the
private sector. The Pak EPA is required to ensure compliance with the
NEQS, establish monitoring and evaluation systems, and both identify
the need to and institution of legislations whenever necessary. It is
thus the primary implementing agency in the hierarchy. The Provincial
Environmental Protection Agencies are formed by the respective
provinces.
INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS
The Convention requires countries to take action to avoid
endangering migratory species. The term "migratory species" refers
The Convention on to the species of wild animals, a significant proportion of whose
Conservation of members cyclically and predictably cross one or more national
Migratory Species of jurisdictional boundaries. The parties are also required to promote or
Wild Animals (1981.21) cooperate with other countries in matters of research on migratory
species. There are no endangered species of plant life or animal life
in the vicinity of the Project.
Convention on The convention requires Pakistan to impose strict regulation
International Trade in (including penalization, confiscation of the specimen) regarding trade
Endangered Species of of all species threatened with extinction or that may become so, in
Wild Fauna and Flora order not to endanger their survival further.
(1973)
International Union for Lists wildlife species experiencing various levels of threats
Conservation of Nature internationally. Some of the species indicated in the IUCN red list are
and Natural Resources also present in the wetlands of Pakistan.
Red List (2000)

9|Page
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Legislation/Guideline Description
SF6 gas is listed in the Kyoto Protocol as one of the six
greenhouse gases subject to monitoring. SF6 has to be used in
closed systems in order to avoid emissions. 194 member states
agreed to extend the Kyoto protocol until 2020 with the aim of
reducing the emission of greenhouse gases.
Kyoto Protocol/Paris
Agreement The Paris Convention agreed to reduce climate-damaging
greenhouses gases under the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as of 2020. 195
member states negotiated and adopted this agreement on the
twenty-first session of the Conference of the Parties under the
framework convention on climate change in Paris on 12 December
2015.
This directive stipulates SF6 gas recovery down to a final vacuum
IEC 62271-4 directive of < 20 mbar. The IEC requirements are exceeded by far when
using DILO devices as DILO service carts enable a final vacuum
of < 1 mbar depending on the type of device.
IEC 60480 guideline This guideline stipulates the limit values for the re-use of SF6 gas
in medium and high voltage switchgear.
EMF Exposure limits by These exposure limits have been provided for monitoring of EMF
IFC for ‘general public’ limits in order to prevent any adverse health effects in the general
and ‘occupational public as well as amongst workers.
exposure’

Comparison of International and Local Environmental Legislations


70. The ADB SPS requires application of pollution prevention and control technologies and
practices consistent with international good practice, as reflected in internationally
recognized standards. The SPS states that when host country regulations differ from
these standards, the EA will achieve whichever is more stringent.

71. A comparison of applicable local and international guidelines for ambient air quality
has been provided in Table 2.5 below. In the case of most pollutants, the NEQS
standards for ambient air quality are more stringent in comparison to USEPA and
WHO/IFC standards. The applicable and most stringent parameters for each
respective pollutant are highlighted in green.

72. Similar to the standards for air quality, the comparison of noise standards provided in
Table 2.6 clearly shows that NEQS standards for noise are more stringent in
comparison to the WHO/IFC standards. The only exception is the daytime noise level
standard for Industrial areas where the World Bank/IFC standard is more stringent (70
dB(A)) in comparison to NEQS (75 dB(A)) and so for this particular parameter, the
WHO/IFC standard will be used. Apart from this one exception, the NEQS standards
have been used for this sub-project.

73. As far as regulations regarding other environmental parameters are concerned such
as acceptable effluent disposal parameters, the local regulations i.e. NEQS take

10 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

precedence over any other international regulations such as WHO/IFC since these
specific IFC standards only cover a limited number of parameters relating to effluent
disposal etc and the NEQS are generally more stringent.

Implications of national policies and regulations on proposed project


74. The Pak-EPA formulated regulations in 2000 for ‘Review of IEE and EIA’ which
categorise development projects under three schedules - Schedules I, II and III.
Projects are classified on the basis of expected degree and magnitude of
environmental impacts and the level of environmental assessment required is
determined from the schedule under which the project is categorised.

75. The projects listed in Schedule-I include those where the range of environmental
issues is comparatively narrow and the issues can be understood and managed
through less extensive analysis. Schedule-I projects require an IEE to be conducted,
rather than a full-fledged EIA, provided that the project is not located in an
environmentally sensitive area.

76. The proposed sub-project has been categorized as Schedule-I and thus an IEE study
has been conducted.
77. This IEE study will be submitted to the relevant provincial EPAs for review and
any comments in order to receive the respective NOC from each province where the
scope of work is to be conducted. Each provincial EPA will respond within 10 working
days from receipt of the IEE report and confirm the completeness of the report for
detailed review or request additional information to be provided in order for the review
to take place.

78. Each provincial EPA will make every effort to review the IEE report within 45
days of the issuance of completeness of the report. Upon completion of the review, an
NOC will be issued, with conditions from the EPA if felt necessary.

Implications of ADB’s safeguard policies on proposed project


79. The objectives of ADB’s safeguards are to:
 avoid adverse impacts of projects on the environment and affected people, where
possible;

 minimize, mitigate, and/or compensate for adverse project impacts on the


environment and affected people when avoidance is not possible; and

 help borrowers/clients to strengthen their safeguard systems.

80. ADB’s SPS sets out the policy objectives, scope and triggers, and principles for three
key safeguard areas:
 environmental safeguards,

11 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

 involuntary resettlement safeguards, and

 Indigenous Peoples safeguards.

81. The objective of the environmental safeguards is to ensure the environmental


soundness and sustainability of projects and to support the integration of
environmental considerations into the project decision-making process. ADB’s policy
principles are summarized in Table 2.2 below.
Table 2.2: ADB Policy Principles

Policy principle Summary

1 Screening and Screening process initiated early to determine the


categorization appropriate extent and type of environmental
assessment.

2 Environmental Conduct an environmental assessment to identify


assessment potential impacts and risks in the context of the
project’s area of influence.

3 Alternatives Examine alternatives to the project’s location,


design, technology, and components and their
potential environmental and social impacts,
including no project alternative.

4 Impact mitigation Avoid, and where avoidance is not possible,


minimize, mitigate, and/or offset adverse impacts
and enhance positive impacts. Prepare an
environmental management plan (EMP).

5 Public consultations Carry out meaningful consultation with affected


people and facilitate their informed participation.
Involve stakeholders early in the project preparation
process and ensure that their views and concerns
are made known to and understood by decision
makers and taken into account. Continue
consultations with stakeholders throughout project
implementation. Establish a grievance redress
mechanism.

6 Disclosure of Disclose a draft environmental assessment in a


environmental timely manner, in an accessible place and in a form
assessment and language(s) understandable to stakeholders.
Disclose the final environmental assessment to
stakeholders.

12 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

7 Environmental Implement the EMP and monitor its effectiveness.


management plan Document monitoring results, and disclose
monitoring reports.

8 Biodiversity Do not implement project activities in areas of critical


habitats.

9 Pollution prevention Apply pollution prevention and control technologies


and practices consistent with international good
practices. Adopt cleaner production processes and
good energy efficiency practices. Avoid pollution, or,
when avoidance is not possible, minimize or control
the intensity or load of pollutant emissions and
discharges. Avoid the use of hazardous materials
subject to international bans or phaseouts.

10 Occupational health and Provide workers with safe and healthy working
safety conditions and prevent accidents, injuries, and
disease. Establish preventive and emergency
Community safety. preparedness and response measures to avoid, and
where avoidance is not possible, to minimize,
adverse impacts and risks to the health and safety of
local communities

11 Physical cultural Conserve physical cultural resources and avoid


resources destroying or damaging them. Provide for the use of
“chance find” procedures.

EMF Exposure Guidelines


82. Although there is public and scientific concern over the potential health effects
associated with exposure to EMF (not only high voltage power lines and substations,
but also from everyday household uses of electricity), there is no empirical data
demonstrating adverse health effects from exposure to typical EMF levels from power
transmissions lines and equipment.

83. However, while the evidence of adverse health risks is weak, it is still sufficient to
warrant limited concern. Table 2.3 lists exposure limits for general public exposure to
electric and magnetic fields published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing
Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) while Table 2.4 provides the exposure limits for
occupational exposure.

84. It is important to mention that no national guidelines on EMF exposure exist at present.

13 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Table 2.3: ICNIRP exposure limits for general public exposure to electric and magnetic
fields

Frequency Electric Field (V/m) Magnetic Field (uT)

50 Hz 5000 100

60 Hz 4150 83

Source: ICNIRP (1998): “Guidelines for limiting exposure to time-varying electric,


magnetic, and electromagnetic fields (up to 300 GHz).

Table 2.4: ICNIRP exposure limits for occupational exposure to electric and magnetic
fields

Frequency Electric Field (V/m) Magnetic Field (uT)

50 Hz 10,000 500

60 Hz 8300 415

Source: ICNIRP (1998): “Guidelines for limiting exposure to time-varying electric,


magnetic, and electromagnetic fields (up to 300 GHz).

14 | P a g e
Power Transmission Enhancement Project – Sub-Project 2: IEE for Construction of new 220 kV Transmission Line from D.I. Khan to Zhob with Zhob Sub-station

Table 2.5: Comparison of International and local Air Quality Standards*

USEPA WHO/IFC Pak. NEQS

Avg. Time Standard Avg. Time Standard Avg. Time Standard


Pollutants

3 hrs 0.5 ppm 24 hr 20 ug/m3 Annual Mean 80 ug/m3


SO2
1 hr 75 ppb 10 min 500 ug/m3 24 hrs 120 ug/m3

8 hrs 9 ppm
(11 mg/m3) 8 hrs 5 mg/m3
CO - -
35 ppm 1 hr 10 mg/m3
1 hr (43 mg/m3)

Annual 100 ug/m3 40 ug/m3


1 yr 40 ug/m3 Annual Mean
Mean (53 ppb)
NO2
80 ug/m3
1 hr 200 ug/m3 24 hrs
1 hr 100 ppb

8 hrs 100 ug/m3 130 ug/m3


0.07ppm
O3 8 hrs 1 hr
(148 ug/m3)

Annual Mean 360 ug/m3


TSP - - - -
24 hrs 500 ug/m3
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

1 yr 20 ug/m3 Annual Mean 120 ug/m3


3
PM10 24 hrs 150 ug/m
24 hr 50 ug/m3 24 hrs 150 ug/m3

Annual
15 ug/m3
Annual Average
15 ug/m3 1 yr 10 ug/m3
Mean
PM2.5 35 ug/m3
3 3 24 hrs
35 ug/m 24 hr 25 ug/m
24 hrs
15 ug/m3
1 hr

*: The standards highlighted in green for each respective pollutant are the most stringent based on a comparison between local and international
regulations and thus shall be applicable for the proposed project.

16 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Table 2.6: Comparison of International and Local Noise Standards*

Limit in dB(A) Leq

Category of Area/Zone NEQS WHO/IFC

Day Time Night Time Day Time Night Time

Residential area (A) 55 45 55 45

Commercial area (B) 65 55 70 70

Industrial area (C) 75 65 70 70

Silence zone (D) 50 45 55 45

*: The standards highlighted in green for each respective Area/Zone are the most stringent based on a comparison between local and international regulations and thus shall be
applicable for the proposed project.

17 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Description of the Project

General

85. This Chapter provides an overview of the project including the proposed Transmission line and
Grid station, project components, design considerations, construction procedures, operation and
maintenance activities.
86. The sub-project is located in the districts of D.I Khan in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), Zhob in
Baluchistan province along with FR DI Khan of Federal Administrative Tribal Area (FATA). The
main objectives of the sub-project is to enhance the transmission capacity of NTDC system by
addition of new 220 kV Transmission line conducting the DI Khan 220 KV substation to new 220
KV Zhob S/C to meet the growing power demand of QESCO.
87. The addition of new 220 kV Transmission line in NTDC system is a part of NTDC’s overall power
development program and is proposed to strengthen the transmission system. In the recent
years, there was quantum jump in the power demand as a result of which NTDC systems were
stressed and congested at various strategic locations. Thereby, the system was stretched
beyond capacity and this caused overloading which resulted in even forced outages. This has
necessitated that the transmission system be strengthened and expanded to fulfill the need for
secure, safe and reliable power supply and to meet not only the existing requirements but also
the future demand of the country for sustained economic growth.

Scope of Work

88. The scope of work consists of the following components:

I. New 220 kV Substation with 2x160MVA transformers at Zhob Substation

II. Extension of two line bays at 220 kV D.I Khan Substation

III. 220 kV D/C Transmission line from D.I. Khan to Zhob (220 km)

Sub-Project Alignment

89. The sub-project is on ‘Turn-key’ basis i.e. construction by a contractor/ developer and turn-over
to NTDC in a ready-to-use condition which includes design, supply and installation. In this
context, the proposed design provided by NTDC will be finalized by the contractor at the stage
of implementation. The Survey & Investigation (S&I) wing of NTDC has marked the route
alignment of transmission line on grand trunk sheet (G.T. Sheet). Thus, it is pointed out that
although the proposed alignment/ route alignment of transmission line including design and right-
of-way was provided by the concerned section of NTDC (i.e. Survey & Investigation), but still this
will be finalized by the contractor/ developer. Once the detailed design work has been completed,
NTDC will review these designs before contracts are finalized and modifications will be
incorporated, if considered necessary. Certification to ADB that the detailed designs comply

18 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

with IEE (including EMP) recommendations will be required before contracts can be made
effective.

90. The construction of 220 km connecting transmission line from 220 KV DI Khan substation to 220
kV Zhob substation, passes through 9 villages belonging to 5 villages in DI Khan district, one in
FR DI Khan and one in Zhhob district. There will be installation of 660 towers on lines, i.e. each
tower will be erected at a distance of 335 m as reported by Survey & Investigation section of
NTDC.

Width of RoW

91. In consultation with the Survey & Investigation section of NTDC and the E&SIC (PMU), NTDC,
the width of RoW for T/L was taken to be 30 meters, i.e. 15 meters on either side from the center
of transmission line and it was 225 m2 (i.e. 15m x15m) in case of tower spotting.

Categorization of the Project

92. The transmission line route passes through agricultural land in the villages of Pusha, Muddy,
Hassani, Kot Essakhel, Drabban, Derazanda and Manda Zai Kelley. There will be no major
environmentally significant impact, except some forest tree removal and temporary disturbance
to crops. The water bodies are Chishma Right Bank Canal, River Khora with its tributaries i.e
Spinkai Ghasha , Kharmeri nala, Tangi Khwar, Mandi river, Khamistani river and Zhob river
tributaries. There will be no major disturbance to environmental settings of the area, if routine
environmental management procedures and engineering controls are implemented thoroughly.
93. Categorization is based on the most environmentally sensitive component and the Zhob Grid
Station and Zhob – DI Khan Transmission line subproject is categorized as a Category “B” sub-
project under ADB’s requirements, thus an IEE has been conducted.
94. The aspects of the project with potential for significant environmental impacts need to be
assessed in detail and environmental assessment has therefore focused on significant impacts
from the construction aspects as well as consultation with the public all along the proposed
alignment of the transmission line and grid station. This report has also surveyed the transmission
line corridor and immediate hinterland that may be affected by knock on effects from impacts
such as waste disposal.

Need for the Project

95. The conditions of the power distribution system in Pakistan are inadequate to meet rapidly
growing demand for electrical power. This situation limits national development and economic
growth. Electricity demand is expected to grow by 7.80% per annum during next 10 years over
the period 2009-19. The existing power distribution infrastructure has to be improved and
upgraded to ensure a reliable power supply to increasing number of industrial, agricultural,
commercial, and domestic consumers. The overall contribution of power infrastructure also

19 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

requires institutional arrangements and capacity that support strategic management of the sector,
and planning and management of investments. Overall the proposed MFF facility has been
designed to address both investment and institutional aspects in the electrical power sector.
96. As the result of this, enhancement in capacity of NTDC transmission system is required for power
evacuation. The proposed project has therefore been prepared to meet the requirement which
will also result in overall power efficiency and stability to deliver adequate & quality power to the
consumers.

 Main objective of project is to enhance the transmission capacity of NTDC system by addition
of new 220 kV T. Line to meet the growing power demand of DISCOs, particularly QESCO.

 This improvement in system will help to bridge the demand supply gap to eliminate the sever
load shedding of the country.

 Improvement and enhancement in overall power system efficiency, reliability and power
supply position in QESCO area, particularly in the vicinity of Zhob and Sherani districts of
Baluchistan.

 Improvement in voltage profile of 132 kV Grid stations in QESCO area.

Design Aspects

Design Standards for Grid Station & Transmission Line

97. The layout plan of a substation which involves various installations of equipment, control room
and ancillary facilities are standardized by NTDC. NTDC has developed design parameters for
the planning and design of transmission systems in Pakistan. The design parameters are based
on standard NTDC’s existing specifications and practices for the existing as well as proposed
Grid stations and transmission lines. The parameters considered for the system and human
safety are described below in detail. The interconnection scheme for NTDC existing network
Figure 3.1, NTDC planned network Figure 3.2 and planned Electrical network QESCO Figure
3.3 are shown below.

20 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 3.1: Interconnection Schemes of existing NTDC Network

21 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 3.2: Planned NTDC Network

22 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 3.3: Planned QESCO Network

23 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Climatic Consideration

98. Local climatic conditions, i.e. the temperature, wind velocity, thunder storm levels, relative
humidity, etc., control the selection of materials to be used. The following climate parameters
were considered in the design criteria.
Maximum Temperature 41.5oC
Minimum Temperature 2.1oC
Annual Mean temperature 29.6oC (maximum) to 14.6oC (minimum)
Maximum Rainfall 420 mm/month
Annual Relative Humidity 60.1%

Civil Works and Other Facilities

99. Civil works will need to be conducted to develop the foundations for installation of grid station
equipment and erection of towers will be required for construction of 220 kV double circuit
transmission line and extension at 220 kV D.I Khan. Necessary provision has been made in the
cost estimates accordingly.

Equipment & Machinery

100. Detail of equipment and machinery required for construction of 220 kV substation at Zhob & 220
kV double circuit transmission line and extension at 220 kV D.I Khan substation is tabulated
below.
Table 3.1 Equipment and machinery 220 kV Zhob Grid Station:

Sr. Item Unit Qty.


No.
220 kV equipment

1. Circuit Breaker Set 6

2. Bus Isolator Set 14

3. Line Isolator Set 2

4. C.T No. 24

5. CVT No. 10

6. Lightning arrestor No. 12

7. Autotransformer 220/132 kV No. 2

132 kV equipment

24 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

1. Circuit Breaker Set 10

2. Bus Isolator Set 20

3. Line Isolator Set 6

4. C.T No. 36

5. PT No. 12

6. Lightning arrestor No. 9

7. Aux.T/F 132/11kV, 6.3 MVA No. 1

Table 3.2 Equipment and machinery 220 kV Dera Ismail Khan – Zhob T/Line

Sr. Item Unit Qty.


No.
1. TOWERS

Light angle (DA1) No. 83

Heavy angle (DD1) No. 80

Suspension (DS1) No. 534

Total 667

2. Conductor (Rail) kms 2772

4. OPGW kms 231

5. INSULATORS

Suspension 100 kN No. 52983

Tension 100 kN No. 79191

Total 132174

6. HARDWARE Lot 1

25 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Table 3.3 Equipment and machinery of Extension at 220 kV D.I Khan Grid Station

Sr. Item Unit Qty.


No.
220 kV equipment

1. Circuit Breaker Set 3

2. Bus Isolator Set 6

3. Line Isolator Set 2

4. C.T No. 12

5. CVT No. 6

6. Lightning arrestor No. 6

Governance Issues of the Sector Relevant to the Project

101. There is no major governance issue in execution of the project.

Tower Structures for Transmission Line

102. All the towers shall be self-supporting type, lattice steel structures, fabricated from galvanized
structural steel shapes. The steel employed will be in accordance with the latest edition of the
standards. All towers will be equipped with danger plates, number plates and anti-climbing
devices.
103. The normal foundations (inverted T shaped) as shown in Figure 3.4 would be laid/
applied for the erection of new towers which would be placed on plain field. The tower height will
be 5 to 10 meters higher and the foundation span will be changed 1 to 5 meters wider.

104. The choice of foundation is usually influenced by the type of terrain encountered and the
underlying geotechnical conditions. The actual size and type of foundation to be installed will
depend on the soil bearing capacity (actual sub-soil conditions).

105. All towers will be equipped with danger plates, number plates and anti-climbing devices.
The other tower designs to be used are provided as Figures 3.5 and 3.6 below.

Safety Parameters

106. For EHV lines, safety considerations are of two types. One is related with the safety of the system,
while others are those that are related to the public. It is for this reason that NTDC (WAPDA) has

26 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

adopted a 50 m wide (25 m either side from the centerline) corridor as the ROW for the allied
500 kV transmission line and 30 m for 220 kV Transmission line in this project. The aspects are
to be considered in this regard are as follows:
(a) System Safety
107. Conductor to Tower Clearance: For the safety of the system, it is imperative that any factor that
may interrupt the power supply should be considered in the design. The clearance of the
conductor from tower legs and trusses is of prime importance. Therefore, in the design, a
minimum clearance of 1.55 m has been adopted under extreme wind conditions. This is based
on regulations of GOP/WAPDA and minimum requirements of National Electric Safety Code
(ANSI C2). With this clearance, there is 99% probability of withstanding switching surge of 3-
sigma margin due to maximum over voltage under adverse climatic conditions.
108. Earthing of the System: Every tower is connected to an earthing system. This is to keep tower
footings resistance at a level lower than 10 ohms. For this, two earth electrodes of copper-clad
steel rods are sunk vertically into the ground to a minimum depth of 3 meters and the locations
where the required resistance not achieved crow footing will be done.
109. Lightning Performance: The tower geometry, clearance and insulation of the system are
designed to perform safely within the permitted lightning intensities. In this respect, consideration
has been given to the tower footing resistance and Isokeraunic level of the area. The accepted
level is one trip out/ 100 km/ year due to lightning.
110. Security Arrangements: Given the prevailing law and order and security position in the area
around the proposed project area, necessary armed security staff is necessary. Reinforced
security will be required at work base, labor camp, material depot, equipment yard and the
locations where work is in progress.
111. Work Uniform and Health and Safety Equipment: Grid Station and allied transmission line
construction is a special job and the labor working on such works requires special protective
uniform and personal protection equipment to cope up with safety and health requirements. It will
be ensured that the labor engaged in handling rough construction materials, mixing of concrete
and handling transmission lines etc. shall have long boots, overall dresses, goggles, gloves and
safety hats. They will invariably have their company identity cards worn around their necks with
the help of a ribbon. As an overall Safety, Health and Environment measure, any one going into
the construction area will also wear safety helmet and safety shoes. Special arrangements must
be made for fire protection by way of providing appropriate type of fire extinguishers with
firefighting training to concerned personnel.

(b) Public Safety

112. General Aspects: In view of public safety, NTDC has adopted a policy such that the existing
orchards having fruit trees with a height of not exceeding 2.5 meters are allowed to remain under
the lines. Similarly, open wells, including Persian wheels, are allowed to remain under the

27 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

transmission lines. However, tube wells and peter pumps are not permitted under the high
voltage conductors. This is for the reason that piping and cranes used to refurbish such wells
could come in contact with the lines.
113. No residential or other public buildings like factory, school, hospital, etc. are permitted within the
corridor. However, farm buildings, which are not used for residential purposes are allowed to
remain under the high voltage lines, provided a 7.0 m minimum clearance is maintained. The
height of the towers can be increased to accommodate such buildings.
114. Conductor to Ground Clearance: The conductor to ground clearance is desirable to be worked
out based on over voltage due to switching surge. In this consideration, safe clearance is required
to be provided for moving objects under the line with a height of 4.5 m, withstanding switching
surge of 3-sigma margin with 99.7% probability under adverse atmospheric conditions. This
should keep the maximum voltage gradient at ground level and maximum current induced in a
person less than the internationally allowable values. As such, the total conductor to ground
clearance shall in no way be less than 7.0 meters. This is in accordance with the regulations of
Government of Pakistan (GOP) and NTDC practice.

Tower Erection and scale of the project

115. Tower erection is carried out on the concreted pile pad locations with the help of derrick poles or
cranes. The required working area for this activity is about 500 m 2 for each tower. The tower is
erected in panels. The panels are assembled on the ground, lifted in parts with the help of derrick
poles/crane and then joined together with nuts and bolts, which are tightened at the specified
torque.
116. In aligning the high-voltage transmission line the design aims to avoid cultivated fields and pass
through the area as thinly populated as possible. As such, the accessibility will not be a problem.
There are tracks and katcha ways and the contractor may have to develop a few tracks for
transporting the materials. This should result in very little, if any, damage to the vegetation or
disruption of the farmland in the vicinity of the route of transmission line. The TL route is easily
accessible mostly through metalled road or by kacha tracks or village roads. Almost all the village
tracks are linked to the metalled roads and are thus accessible to vehicles. The contractor is
unlikely to need to transport the materials manually. In any event, care will be taken that the
disruption to the vegetation is kept to a minimum.
117. The environmental impacts are likely to be localized near the supporting tower construction at
most places and impacts are reviewed in the environmental impact section of the report. The
impacts will need to be reviewed and amended if necessary if the locations change and when
the detailed designs are available.
118. The whole project tract is flat and no considerable elevation difference exists except a small
depression is present at some locations.

Analysis of Alternatives

28 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

119. The sub-project of Tranche-II of MFF will contribute to the improvement of the overall
performance of the power transmission sector, improving transmission efficiency, broadly
widening access to power to drive economic opportunities. The beneficiaries of the sub-project
will be people, companies, and government and non-government agencies in Pakistan that use
power transmission services. Power users will benefit in terms of secure power and improved
power safety and potentially increased productivity.

‘Do Nothing’ Scenario

120. Based on the available information, the predictions have indicated that without the tranche-II
power transmission sub-projects, the supply will not be reliable. This sub-project is a part of an
overall strategic improvement to the system.
121. In the absence of the sub-project, the potential for interruptions to power supply will increase and
socio-economic development of the province could be affected in the short to medium term. In
an un-enhanced state, the wear and tear on existing facilities will rise. In the short term, the power
supply would improve and more reliable access to secure power would be available.

Alternative Construction Methods

122. The feasibility and constructability of the transmission line towers is well established locally and
installation of equipment is well practiced in the international context (even if some types of
equipment are new to Pakistan). The process basically includes the transportation of equipment
to site and the assembly of pre-fabricated units’ in-situ. Thus, the impacts from construction
activities are very manageable from the environmental viewpoint.

Alternative Geometry

123. The design and route of transmission line is as short as it can be and avoids the local villages by
erecting angle towers. The settlements have been avoided by passing the line through cultivated
and semi forested land. Some further detailed surveys may be carried out for the detailed design
to determine the exact construction methods and locations but no land acquisition is envisaged
to be involved in this sub-project from private people.
124. The present assumption is that the transmission line will be completed as planned on the defined
alignment and site. The detailed design and surveys are yet to be carried out.

Proposed Schedule for Implementation

125. The Project Proponent (NTDC) plans to have the tranche-II completed within 2 to 3 years, after
completing the necessary arrangements, which shall be completed on fast track. There will not
be any significant land acquisition or compensation process except for the crop compensation of
the transmission line towers. Designs, power transmission arrangements, access, review of
environmental management and construction processes will need to be completed in about three

29 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

months. When the detailed designs are completed, tendering and award of contract will take
place over about three to six months. The construction period will follow and best estimates
indicate about eighteen months to two years.

Figure 3.4: Inverted ‘T’ Type Tower Foundation

30 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 3.5: Proposed Elevation of Strain Tower

31 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Figure 3.6: Proposed Elevation of Suspension Tower

32 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Description of Environmental and Social Baseline Conditions


126. The 220 kV double circuit single conductor transmission line from Dera Ismail Khan to Zhob. (220
km) and the 220 kV Grid station to be constructed at Zhob is located in District D I Khan of Khyber
Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province, F R D.I Khan of Federal Tribal area and Zhob district of
Baluchistan. The Grid station sites to be linked coordinates are:
Zhob Grid Station: E 54 5 000 N 34 67 236
D I Khan Grid Station E 67 2589 N 35 45 700
127. The transmission line route passes mostly through agricultural land of D I Khan district and
rocky/barren land of FR D.I Khan areas. The villages on the way are Pusha, Muddy (Kolachi
Road), Hassani, kot Essakhel, Darraban Kalan, Derazanda and Mandi Zai Kelay. It has been
learnt by surveys and Investigation (S&I) department of NTDC that the route of the transmission
line is selected in a way that no structure requires relocation or demolishing. Only tree removal
and crop damages are expected to occur during the construction phase of project. The
transmission line will mostly cross rocky/barren areas except some limited part in the agricultural
land. Moreover, by using angled towers and by locating the line, as per alignment provided by
NTDC, on the agriculture cultivated fields, there are no locations where the line is immediately
adjacent to any residential or school property (sensitive receptor).
128. Erection of each tower may require working room up to 500 m2. However, there is plenty of room
in the agriculture fields. Provisions have been made in the LARP to compensate damage to trees
and crops. Access to the transmission line will be from the tracks and katcha roads adjacent to
the fields. There should be no need to disturb any existing roads and water courses, based on
the current alignment subject to reconfirmation after detailed designs are complete.
129. As already depicted in the report, the project corridor lies within the jurisdiction of three provinces
i.e. KP, FATA and Baluchistan. For the purpose of baseline conditions and identification of
potential social impacts of the project, the following definitions have been taken into
consideration:
130. “ROW refers to a limit of 30 meters wide strip, i.e. 15 m from either side of the center line of
transmission line along the project route and has been considered for identifying the potential
social impacts of the proposed project”
131. This chapter gives an overview of the environmental and social baseline information of project
area, with special reference to impacts on Project Corridor. The information has been compiled
from secondary and primary resources. Major environmental components are:
 Physical Environment
 Biological Environment
 Socioeconomic Environment

33 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Physical Environment

132. Baseline studies on the physical parameters including land resources, topography, climate,
geology, seismicity, soils, water resources etc. are indicative of the following information.
Topography, Geography, Geology, and Soils

133. At the start of the project area lies in the fertile alluvial plains of Dera Ismail Khan, while rest of
the area FR D.I Khan and Zhob are almost rugged rocky/barren areas. It is composed of the
Sulaiman mountains, which are of considerable height. It also has comparatively lower hills on
the entire eastern side. The line passes at eastern direction upon the lower hills. A number of
peaks in this range are over 2,750 meters high. Takht-e-Sulaiman is the highest point of the
Sulaiman Range, with a height of 3,441 meters. This uphill’s western range is covered by
coniferous forest. Average height of the hills along the eastern border is around 700 meters.
Important streams in this part are; Tangi khwar and Rangharar Khwar. They are the main
tributaries of the Khora River. These rock outcrops are medium to lower height and can be used
as range land.
134. The greater part of the area consists of extensive series of calcareous sandstones and shale.
135. With the exception of these rocks, the area is mostly alluvial plain. The surface soils are grey to
brown in color and medium textured i.e. silty clay/ clay loamy or sandy loam at the site, at all the
locations and generally continues up to depth of 3-10 feet. This sub stratum contains fine sand
or rocky material. Topographically the area is mixed nature i.e plain, undulating and hilly/rocky.
Seismology

136. Geological survey of Pakistan has divided Pakistan into five seismic zones. The project area, a
part of Zhob district lies in seismic Zone 3 (slightly high hazard), while the rest of the falls in FR
D.I Khan and DI Khan district are in seismic zone 2B (moderate hazard) corresponding to peak
ground acceleration (PGA) values of 0.0.24 g to 032 g and 0.16g to 0.24g respectively. Figure
4.1 shows seismic map of the project location.
Climate, Temperature and Rainfall

137. The climate of the Zhob district is dry during summer and cold in winter. June is the hottest month
with mean maximum and minimum temperatures of about 37C and 23oC respectively. January
is the coldest month with mean maximum and minimum temperatures are 13oC and -10 oC
respectively. The average annual rainfall is about 285mm.
138. The climate of the FR D.I Khan and D I Khan district is dry and hot. In general, the areas are
hottest with maximum temperature ranges between 46°C and 50°C. Temperatures in summer
are quite oppressively hot, whilst in winter; however, this region is both warmer and generally
drier than the rest of KP. Nights, however, can still be quite cold during the winter. The project
area experiences little and very erratic monsoonal rains, averaging around 114.30 mm in July
and August and almost nothing in June or September; whereas the average annual rainfall varies
from 295 mm to 1048 mm.

34 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Groundwater Resources

139. Irrigation is largely dependent on the canals only in the D.I Khan district, while rest of the project
area is mostly barren or some dry farming. Tube wells have also been sunk in the areas where
water is fit for irrigation. The chemical quality of ground water in the district varies area wise and
depth wise. Irrigation supplies are perennial in irrigated areas and tube wells have been installed
to make up the deficiencies. The strata near the transmission line route are mixed nature that
contains water bearing and alluvial deposits, rocky and range lands.
140. The water table is near the surface at 30 to 45 feet in D.I Khan district but the remaining areas
the water table is deep. The water table is not seasonal and dug wells do not generally run dry,
because the ground water aquifer is recharged by rivers and canals. The local population is
generally reliant on installed hand pumps, electric motors and supply from tube wells. Generally,
the ground water quality parameters i.e. chemical and biological are within the permissible limits.
Surface Water Resources

141. River Indus and related Chashma Right Bank Canal are the major surface water sources of
project area in D.I Khan district while the water bodies in rest of the project area are River Khora
with its tributaries i.e. Spinkai Ghasha, Kharmeri Nala, Tangi Khwar, Mandi river, Khamistani river
and Zhob river tributaries.. Most of these water bodies are perennial and flows throughout the
year. It also causes floods in the monsoon season, when it receives excessive rainfall water from
upstream.
Ambient Air Quality

142. Air quality in the project area is fairly clean. The other major source of air pollution is vehicular
emissions on the road, dust arising from construction and other ground or soil disturbance, during
dry weather, and from movement of vehicles on poorly surfaced or katcha access roads. There
are no Industries and/or commercial areas in the project corridor. Domestic sources of air
pollution, such as emissions from wood and kerosene burning stoves as well as small diesel
standby generators in some households, are a minor source of air pollution.
Noise

143. Apart from the noise generated from vehicles moving on the main road, no major source of noise
is present in the project vicinity. There are also the occasional calls to prayer from loud speakers
in the local mosques but there are no significant disturbances to the quiet rural setting.

35 | P a g e
IEE Report for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Project Area Zhob – D.I Khan T/L & GS

Figure 4.1: Seismic Zoning Map of Pakistan and Project Area

36 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Biological Environment

Flora

144. Flora of the sub-project area has been greatly modified by human agency of the old open forests
of small trees and shrubs. There remain only a few Rakhs or portions of forests which are kept as
grazing grounds for cattle etc. Amongst trees, the most important are Kikar (Acacia Arabica)
Shisham or Tahli (Delbergiasissoo), Beri (Zizyphus jujube), Toot (Morus alba), Sharin
(Albizzialebbek), Dherek (Meliaazeharach), Phulai(Acacia modesta), Pipal (Ficusreligiosa) and
Bohr (Ficusbengalansis) are planted for shade. The growth in Rakhs is composed mainly of three
kind of trees, Jand (Prosopisspicigera), Karir (Capparisaphylla) and Wan (Salvadoraoleoides).
Occasionally, Rero (Acacia ieucophhloea) and Farash (Tamarixarticulata) are also found. Pilchhi
(Tamarixdioica) is found on moist sandy soil along the river and is used for wicker work, basket
making etc. The habitat is mostly modified due to human interventions in the area for many
decades.

145. There is wild growth of Mesquite bushes and some Eucalyptus trees in the areas along the canals,
roads and barren land but there is no natural forest cover in the area. The fruit trees in the project
area also rare and include citrus fruits, mango, guava and date palm.
Fauna

146. There is no wildlife except jackals, dogs and snakes etc. Common species of birds found in the
project area are sparrows, crows, pigeon, dove, tiliar (starling), lalmena, parrot, quail, pintail, and
humming bird etc. Chishma Right Bank Canal and perennial rivers are the sources of freshwater
fishes. The most commonly seen animals in the project area are hog deer, ravine deer, black buck
and blue bull. Fox, jackals, hares, wild boars, porcupines, mongoose, arks, owls and hawks are
also found which are critical habitat triggers in the project area, as listed in the IBAT report.
Protected Areas/ National Sanctuaries

147. In Pakistan, there are several areas of land devoted to the preservation of biodiversity through the
dedication of national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. There is no protected area or national
sanctuary near the area of works and sub-project area.
Wetlands and Aquatic Biology

148. River Khora with its tributaries i.e Spinkai Ghasha , Kharmeri nala, Tangi Khwar, Mandi river,
Khamistani river and Zhob river. Tributaries are wetlands in the project area, which will require
special measures during construction of towers.
Game Reserves & Wildlife Sanctuaries

149. No game reserve or wildlife sanctuaries are found in the project corridor.

Socioeconomic Environment

37 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

150. This Section of the report provides the information on socio-economic environment existing in and
around the Study area including methodology, administrative setup, demographic characteristics,
educational and institutional facilities, transportation, water supply, income sources, common
diseases, religious/archeological and historical sites (if any) existing in the area. The socio-
economic survey was carried out at and nearby the location of sub project. The questionnaire
used for socioeconomic and village profile survey has been attached in Annex II.
Political and Administrative Setup

151. The Project area falls in jurisdiction of D. I. Khan district of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, FR D.I
Khan in FATA and Zhob district in Baluchistan province. As per provincial local Government
Ordinances, 2001, Union Council is the lowest tier of the local government system. It is constituted
of selected council normally representing five to ten villages depending upon population, while
four to five union councils form the next higher tier of governance, viz., Tehsil Council.
152. Tehsils are sub-units of a district, which is the highest tier of local government system and deals
with the administrative and revenue matters. District is normally constituted of three to five tehsils,
and is governed by District Council. In the existing local government system of the project area,
the union councils consist of members directly elected through open competition, who also form
the Electoral College for the selection of members of the next higher tiers. In this way, it has also
been ensured that the councils have a sizeable representation from the vulnerable groups
particularly the labor and female members of communities.
153. District D.I.Khan is spread over an area of 7,326 square kilometers and comprises of five tehsils
Dera Ismail Khan, Kulachi, Darabin, Paroa, Paharpur which are sub divided into 47 Union councils.
The project area falls in D.I Khan and Kulachi tehsils. The Frontier Region Dera Ismail Khan (often
abbreviated as F.R. D.I. Khan) is a small administrative unit in the Federally Administered Tribal
Areas (FATA) of Pakistan. The region is named after Dera Ismail Khan District which lies to the
east and also borders South Waziristan Agency to the north, Dera Ghazi Khan and Musa Khel to
the south and Zhob to the west. It is administered by the Deputy Commissioner (DC) of Dera
Ismail Khan District. The overall administration of the Frontier Regions is carried out by the FATA
Secretariat based in Peshawar, the capital of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) province. The main
village of the frontier region is Darazinda, which is also in the border of South Waziristan. Zhob is
spread over 20,297 square kilometers and comprises three tehsils and five sub tehsils. The tehsils
are Lower Zhob, Sherani and Kakar Kharasan.
Demographic Analysis

154. According to the 1998 District Census Report, total population of D.I Khan, FR D.I Khan and Zhob
Districts are 853,000, 38,990, and 275,000 persons respectively. Population density of D.I Khan
is 116.4 persons per sq. kilometer, FR D.I Khan 19.4 and Zhob 13.6 persons per sq. kilometer.
The population of all the districts is predominantly Muslims i.e. > 99 percent. The next higher
percentage is of Christians 0.5 percent. While other minorities like Christians, Ahmadis, Schedule
Castes etc. are very small in number.

38 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

a) Gender Ratio

155. The number of males for every 100 females was 111.1 in D.I. Khan , 110.8 in FR D.I Khan and
119.5 Zhob District in 1998.
b) Ethnicity/Tribes and Languages

156. D.I. Khan has in addition to the Pathan tribes of Koh-e-Sukh, a large mixed population of Baloch
and Jatt tribes. Other major castes are Ali zais, Sado zais, Khwajak zais, Khakwanis and Barak
zais. The predominant language of D.I. Khan is Saraiki spoken by 72.47% of the population and
22.02% of the people speak Pusto. The remaining 4.28% of the people speak Balochi, Urdu and
Sindhi. In FR D.I Khan the major Pashtun tribes are Wazir, Battani, Gandapur and Sherani. All the
population speaks Pushto language in FR D.I Khan and Zhob districts, while the major castes of
Zhob dDistrict are Mandokhel, Kakar, Sherani, Harpals, Babers, Lowoons, Khosty and Syeds.
c) Literacy Level

157. In district D.I. Khan male literacy ratio is 43.19%, which is significantly higher than female literacy
ratio at 17.86% in 1998 census. Literacy ratio of FR D.I Khan was 17.42 % in 1998, where literacy
ratio for males is 29.5% as against 3.0% for females. The literacy ratio in Zhob district was 16.78,
where literacy ratio for male is 24.53 against 6.9 for females.
Employment

158. The major proportion of total population in both districts is self-employed; others are private
employees and government employees. The difference in proportions of employed population is
significant between the genders and urban and rural residences. The major occupation in project
area is agricultural farming, livestock raring, small businesses and service in public and private
sectors.
159. The main occupation of women in rural areas including project area is house-keeping which
includes attending to the cattle, extracting butter and ghee from milk, weaving and sewing of family
clothes. In addition, they generally help their men-folk on farms with the lighter duties like
transplanting of seedlings, threshing and winnowing of grains and sometimes they also help in
harvesting. In city, women are house-wives or work as professionals; such as doctors, nurses,
teachers, private jobs etc.
Income Sources and Expenditure

a) Agriculture and Livestock

160. The agriculture is by far the main economic activity in the in the project area. The main crops
during Rabi are wheat, gram, rape, mustard, barley and oil seeds. In Kharif, cotton, jawar,
sugarcane, bajra, maize and rice are grown. In addition, there are subsidiary crops known as Zaid
Rabi like Kharbooza, tobacco and potatoes and ZaidKharif like potatoes and chilies. The main
fruits grown are mangoes, date, Malta, orange, water and musk melon, guava, citrus, falsa, jaman
and pomegranate. In the beginning of the cultivation era, the inhabitants used to eat Pilu and Bair,
the only wild fruits that grows intermittently. With the introduction of canal irrigation Date palm and

39 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

other fruits are being grown on commercial basis. The vegetables are grown in abundance as the
water and soils are suitable for cultivation. Potato, carrot, lady finger, chilies, onion and
cauliflowers are grown. Bitter gourd, turmeric and garlic are grown to meet the public demand.
Other vegetables i.e. Radish, Tinda (apple gourd), Bringal is also grown.
161. Livestock breading is one of the main pursuits and means of livelihood of rural and urban
population of the whole project tract. The area is very famous for livestock production. The sheep,
goats, cows and camels are common livestock animals and serve as an important source of
income.
b) Industry

162. In the project area, except D I Khan, there is no any industry. In D I Khan, with one or two
exceptions, industrial activity is restricted primarily to small, owner-financed units, operating
without government oversight. These include stone processing, textile weaving, and furniture
manufacture. In DI Khan, the total numbers of industrial units are 73 out of which 33 units are
running while 40 are closed.

Economic Infrastructure

a) Roads and Railway Structure

163. The entire project area is well connected with various cities in Pakistan. The city D.I. Khan has its
own airport, which connects the southern districts of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa with other parts of the
country. D.I. Khan Airport links the city with various Pakistani cities. The project site is accessible
from both sides; one from Indus Highway (N-55) and other is with with Quetta and other cities of
Baluchistan.. There is a network of metalled and un-metalled roads in the area.
164. There are no airports or airfields located in a distance of over 50 kilometers from the transmission
line corridor. Thus, there is no risk to any aircrafts from the proposed transmission lines.
b) Electricity

165. The electricity supply is available to almost all the villages and settlements along the line route.
QESCO in Zhob region, TESCO in FR D.I Khan and PESCO in D.I. Khan region are responsible
for electricity distribution in project area.
c) Telecommunication

166. All the villages along the project corridor are connected with the Pakistan telecommunication
network. Mobile coverage exists in the project area which enables people to use mobile phones
for communication.
d) Post Offices and Banks

167. Postal, money order and bank facilities exist throughout the vicinity of the project area.

Social Infrastructure

40 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

a) Water Supply

168. In project area, the public water supply is available and people are dependent on local water
supply system to meet the drinking as well as household use requirements.
b) Health

169. The Government hospital of Dera Ismail Khan was established during the British regime. There
are also many other hospitals and basic health units in the district which provide health facilities
to the public. District headquarter Hospital Zhob and Hospital Drazanda in FATA area are major
hospitals in the project area.

Religious, Archaeological and Historical Sites

170. There are no officially protected heritage sites or historic, religious or archaeologically important
sites located in the sub-project work areas. There are no major historic or archaeological features
of note but there are a few places of worship within about 500 meters of the works. It is envisaged
that there will be no impact on such places.

Women Participation in Different Activities

171. Participation rate of women in various socio-economic activities in the project area is generally of
moderate nature. Women are mostly employed in the fields and play a vital role in sowing and
harvesting of the crops.

Village Profiles

172. Various villages located along the project corridor were visited to establish village profile. The
village wise abstract is elaborated as below.

i) Pusha (G/S Site)

173. The population of this area constitutes of Wazir, Mehsud, Bango and Aka Khel tribes. Languages
spoken here are Pushto, Saraiki and Urdu. There are no educational facilities. A Mosque is
situated in the area. Public transport is available for local and inter-city travel. Civic facilities in this
village include electricity, grocery shops and road-side restaurants.

ii) Muddy (Kolachi Road)

174. The population of this village is around 4000 people with 450 houses and main caste is Gandapur.
Languages spoken here are Pushto, Saraiki and Urdu. Educational facilities include 01 Govt. Girls
Middle School & 01 Govt. Boys High School and 03 Mosques as institutional facility. Public
transport is available for local and inter-city travel. Civic facilities in this village include electricity
and grocery shops. There is 01 graveyard in the village vicinity.

iii) Hassani (Kolachi Road)

41 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

175. The population of this village is around 2,500 people with 230 houses and main caste is Gandapur.
Languages spoken here are Saraiki, Pushto and Urdu. Educational facilities include 01 Govt. Boys
Primary School & 01 Govt. Girls Primary School and a mosque. Public transport is available for
local travel. Civic facilities in this village include electricity, a few grocery shops and a public water
supply. There is 01 graveyard in the village.

iv) Kot Essa Khel (D.I Khan)

176. The population of this village is around 2,000 people with 250 houses and main castes are Mian
Khel Baludi and Kumbhar. Languages spoken here are Saraiki and Urdu. Educational facilities
include 01 Govt. Girls Middle School & 01 Govt. Boys Primary School. Public transport is available
for local and inter-city travel. Civic facilities in this village include a Basic Health Unit, electricity, a
few grocery shops, 01 Medical Store and a public water supply. There is 01 graveyard in the
village vicinity.

v) Draban Kalan (D.I Khan)

177. The population of this village is around 5,000 people with 550 houses and main castes are Mian
Khel and Sherani. Languages spoken here are Pushto, Saraiki and Urdu. Educational facilities
include 01 Govt. Girls Primary School, 01 Govt. Boys Primary School and 03 Mosques as
institutional facility. Civic facilities in this village include a Basic Health Unit, electricity, telephone
and a grocery shops and restaurants. There is 02 graveyard for the village.

vi) Darazinda (F.R D.I Khan)

178. The main caste of this village is Sherani. Languages spoken here are Pushto. Educational facilities
include 01 Govt. Girls Primary School, 01 Govt. Boys Prmary School, 01 Govt. Girls College and
a Madrassah and a Mosque. Public transport is rarely available for local and inter-city travel. A
Basic Health Unit and electricity are present. There is 01 graveyard in vicinity.

vii) Manday Zai Killi (Zhob)

179. The population of this village is around 1500 people with 250 houses and main caste is MAndo
Khel. Languages spoken here are Pushto Approximate area of this village is 1 km2. Educational
facilities include 01 Govt. Boys High School and 01 Govt. Girls Primary School. There is 01
Mosque. Public transport is available for inter-city travel. Civic facilities in this village include
electricity and a few grocery shops. There is also a Basic Health Unit for the village. There is 01
graveyard in the village vicinity.

42 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Assessment of Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures

Subproject Location

Impact Assessment and Mitigation

180. This MFF Tranche - II sub-project will involve the construction of 220 KV Zhob Grid Station along
with extension of 220 kV D.I Khan Grid Station and new Transmission Line (220 km).
181. The location and scale of the works are very important in predicting the environmental impacts.
Therefore, it is essential that a proper analysis is carried out during the subproject planning
period. This process of impact prediction is the core of the IEE process and it is critical that the
recommendations and mitigation measures are carried out according to, and with reference to
the conditions on the ground in the affected areas in the spirit of the environmental assessments
process.
182. In this section the potential environmental impacts are reviewed. Where impacts are significant
enough to exceed accepted environmental standards, mitigation is proposed in order to reduce
residual impact to acceptable levels. In this regard, the impact prediction plays a vital role as
these predictions are used for developing mitigation measures and any alternative options, if
appropriate. When the detailed designs are completed, the impacts and mitigation measures will
need to be further reviewed to take account of how the contracts are set up and in the light of
any fine tuning of the subproject proposals.
183. The environmental management plan has been prepared based on the assessment and shall be
reviewed in due course at subproject inception and through construction in order to provide a
feedback on any significant unpredicted impacts. It is based on the analysis of impacts, primarily
to document key environmental issues likely to arise from subproject implementation, to prescribe
mitigation measures to be integrated in the subproject design, to design monitoring and
evaluation schedules to be implemented during subproject construction and operation, and to
estimate costs required for implementing subproject mitigation measures. The EMP must be
reviewed in the subproject inception by the subproject management and approved before any
construction activity is initiated, to take account of any subsequent changes and fine tuning of
the proposals.

General Approach to Mitigation

184. Based on professional experience on heavy transmission line and grid station projects,
contractors have put emphasis on the financial compensation for nuisances. This may be
acceptable for some social impacts where evacuation is necessary or where structures have
been accidentally damaged, however, it is not best international practice to accept payment for
environmental impacts. An approach whereby the subproject contractor pays money for
nuisances rather than control impacts at source will not be acceptable. This practice should not

43 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

be allowed and financial compensation shall not be allowed as mitigation for environmental
impacts or environmental nuisance.
185. During the preparation for the subproject construction phase the future contractors must be
notified and prepared to co-operate with the executing and implementing agencies, subproject
management, construction supervising consultants and local population in the mitigation of
impacts. Furthermore, the contractor must be primed through bidding stages and the contract
documentation to implement the EMP in full and be ready to engage or train staff in the
management of environmental issues and to audit the effectiveness and review the mitigation
measures as the subproject proceeds. The effective implementation of the EMP will be audited
as part of the loan conditions and the executing agency (NTDC) must be prepared for this. In this
regard, the NTDC must fulfill the requirements of the law and guidance prepared by Pak-EPA on
the environmental aspects of power subprojects and the recommendations already made for
subproject in this IEE and under Pakistan’s PEPA 1997 and KPK and Balochistan Environmental
Acts.
186. The location of the residences, mosques, schools, hospitals and civic, cultural and other heritage
sites has been reviewed. A few residences at the start of line in D I Khan district close enough to
the subproject on which there could be some potential impacts in the construction stage from
disturbance and significant noise and dust. The line route was selected in way that minimum
disturbance to human settlements occur and the alignment is along cultivated and barren land
and has no human settlements and structures in its ROW of 30 meters.
187. The grid station construction activities will be with the boundary wall. Work on the tower sites
could cause some generation of air borne dust, but any nuisance from this is likely to be very
localized and temporary. Other project activities, e.g. movement of heavy vehicles on unpaved
tracks during the works, could generate considerable dust. Water is available in the study area,
although surplus water may not always be available to suppress dust at vulnerable locations in
the dry season.
188. Therefore, as a general approach it is recommended that where works are within 25 m of any
residential sensitive receivers, the contractor should install segregation between the works and
the edge of the sensitive receivers. The segregation should be easily erectable 2.5 m high
tarpaulin sheet and designed to retain dust and provide a temporary visual barrier to the works.
Where dust is the major consideration the barrier can take the form of tarpaulins strung between
two poles mounted on a concrete base. These can be moved along from tower base to tower
base as the work proceeds. In order to mitigate high noise levels, temporary acoustic barriers
shall be used, wherever felt necessary.

189. Noise from the construction of the towers should not be a major consideration unless very close
to schools or hospitals where construction should be avoided at sensitive times. In addition to
the physical effect of mitigating dust and noise with barriers installation of such measures should
be discussed with the local population and serve as a vehicle for further public consultation at
the implementation stage to assist in public relations.

44 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Cultural Heritage, Mosques, Religious Sites, and Social Infrastructure

Impact Analysis
190. The location of mosques and other cultural and other heritage SR sites has been reviewed. There
is no mosque, graveyard, tomb or any other religious/archaeological site in the ROW of
transmission line, therefore, no impact on such site is expected.
191. The clinic / hospitals are all more than 100m from the center of line and there will be sufficient
buffer distance between the works and the SR such that no significant impact would be expected
from the works.
192. The location of schools is more than 100m from the sub-project. There will be sufficient buffer
distance between the works and all the SR such that no significant impacts can be expected.
Public consultation should be undertaken at the implementation stage to ensure nuisances are
not allowed to escalate.
Mitigation measures
No measures required.

Impacts During Pre-Construction Stage

Impact due to Land Acquisition


Impact Analysis

193. The proposed project will not involve the acquisition of land on permanent basis for construction
of Transmission line as per NTDC practice. Only the crop & trees compensation will be made.
But for 220 kV Zhob Grid Station, the land will be acquired permanently by applying Land
Acquisition Act 1894.
Mitigation Measures
No measures required.
5.4.1.1 Encroachment, Landscape and Physical Disfiguration
Impact Analysis

194. The extent of the proposed power expansion is moderate and will not extend beyond the power
corridor created by the subproject. No significant landscape impacts are expected from
construction of the transmission line and Grid station. The grid station extension will not pose any
encroachment as it will be constructed in a boundary wall.
Mitigation Measures
195. Disposal of surplus materials will be negotiated through local authority approvals prior to the
commencement of construction, so that no toxic or hazardous material is included in the scrap.

45 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

5.4.1.2 Loss of Crops


Impact Analysis

196. The grid station area is free of any crops or agricultural resources. However, the transmission
line will pass across cultivated lands and orchards. For construction of the Transmission line and
tower stringing, approximately 2,500 acres of crops will be lost.
Mitigation Measures
197. Compensation of crops to be paid to the owners will be estimated in the LARP, which is presently
is under preparation.

Impacts during Construction Stage

Physical Impacts

5.5.1.1 Ambient Air Quality


Impact Analysis

198. Air quality will be affected by the fugitive dust and emissions from the construction machinery,
and vehicular traffic during the construction phase. Emissions may be carried over long
distances, depending on wind speed and direction, the temperature of the surrounding air, and
atmospheric stability. These air emissions may contain Particulate matter (PM), Smoke, Dust,
CO, SOx, NOx. The critical sources of air pollution during the construction phase are listed below:
i. Earth haulage trucks that generate dust, particularly during transportation, loading and
unloading processes.
ii. Noxious gases emission by Construction equipment and vehicles.
Mitigation Measures
i. Concrete batching plants will be equipped with dust control equipment such as fabric filters or
wet scrubbers to reduce the level of dust emissions and will be located at a minimum distance
of 500 meters from residences.
ii. The NEQS applicable to gaseous emissions generated by the construction vehicles,
equipment and machinery will be enforced during the construction works. Contractor shall
make sure that all equipment and vehicles are tested for emissions. Regular maintenance of
equipment and vehicles will also control the incomplete combustion.
iii. Where dust emissions are high, katcha tracks will be overlain with shingle or surface treated.
Where necessary, dust emissions will be reduced by a regular sprinkling of water for keeping
the dust settled, at least twice a day.
iv. Haul-trucks carrying sand, aggregate and other materials will be kept covered with tarpaulin to
help contain construction materials being transported within the body of each carrier between
the sites.
v. NTDC will set up a system to monitor the air quality along the project corridor in accordance
with the accepted international standards. The system will cover protocols for sampling and
analysis, assessment of air quality at sensitive locations, reporting, and information sharing.

46 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

vi. Ensure proper tuning of the construction vehicles.


vii. Implementation of plantation plan for trees & plants
viii. The construction material will be stored in the boundary wall and no disturbance to surrounding
areas is expected. The contractor will be, however, required to provide a traffic management
plan before commencement of work at site.
ix. The need for large stockpiles should be minimized by careful planning of the supply of materials
from controlled sources. Stockpiles (if required) should not be located within 50 meters of
schools, hospitals or other public amenities such as wells and pumps and should be covered
with tarpaulins when not in use and at the end of the working day to enclose dust.
5.5.1.2 Noise Level
Impact Analysis

199. It is anticipated that powered mechanical equipment and some local labour with hand tool
methods will be used to construct the subproject works. No blasting is anticipated. Powered
mechanical equipment can generate significant noise and vibration. The cumulative effects from
several machines can be significant. Noise and vibration from the construction of the towers
would not be a major consideration as there are no schools or hospitals present nearby the
construction site.
Mitigation Measures
i. To minimize such impacts, the contractor for subproject should be requested by the construction
supervision consultants (engineer) to provide evidence and certification that all equipment to be used
for construction is fitted with the necessary air pollution and noise dampening devices to meet EPA
requirements.
ii. Noise will be controlled by monitoring at a distance of at least 3 m from the boundary wall of any
residential unit and while following the NEQS of 55dB (A) during day time and 45dB (A) during night
time.
iii. Noise from construction of substations is not covered under any regulations. However, in order to
keep in line with best international practice, it is recommended that construction should not be allowed
during nighttime (9 PM to 6 AM).
iv. All noisy equipment should be located within DGS or far away from sensitive receptors as possible
to prevent nuisances to dwellings and other structures from operation. However, if the noise still
exceeds NEQS, then noise barriers will be installed around the equipment to reduce the effects of
the noise. Mitigation measures such as barrier installation should be discussed with the local
population.
v. Vibration from construction of piles to support pads may be required for some tower construction and
may pose a significant impact, but this shall be for a short duration. Where vibration could become a
major consideration (within say 100m of schools, religious premises, hospitals or residences), a
building condition survey shall take place prior to construction. The physical effect of piling shall be
assessed prior to construction and measures should be discussed with the local population as well
as timing of the works to serve as a vehicle for further public consultation at the implementation stage
and to assist in public relations. At nearby schools, the contractor shall discuss with the school

47 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

principals the agreed time for operating these machines and completely avoid machine use near
schools during examination times, if such a need arises.
vi. Noise level from construction activity can be reduced by regular maintenance of machinery. Noise
can be controlled through engineering control e.g. hammering actions can be substituted by
hydraulic. Ensure that the workers are wearing PPE’s (ear plugs, ear muffs etc.) where engineering
control is not applicable to reduce the impact of noise.
5.5.1.3 Soil Erosion
Impact Analysis
200. Soil erosion may occur in the workshop areas as a result of improper runoff drawn from the
equipment washing-yards and improper management of construction activities.
Mitigation Measures
201. Good engineering practices will help control soil erosion both at the construction sites and in
peripheral areas, particularly at substation site, tower foundations and along the haul tracks.
Controlled and well-managed vehicular movement, excavation, vegetation and regular water
sprinkling will reduce the chances of soil erosion.
5.5.1.4 Drainage
Impact Analysis

202. No impact is anticipated on the natural drainage by the implementation of the project. However,
temporary drainage system for toilets and workshop effluents needs to be developed.
Mitigation Measures
203. Design engineer will ensure appropriately sized drainage to avoid negative impacts due to
sewage effluent. During construction phase, temporary drains and embankments would be
necessarily made to channel the runoff appropriately which will be located a minimum of 100
meters from groundwater well or any surface water source.
5.5.1.5 Soil Contamination
Impact Analysis

204. Lands may get contaminated from the spillage of chemicals like fuels, solvents, oils, paints and
other construction chemicals and concrete. This normally happens when these materials are
transported in open or loosely capped containers. Unmanaged sewage can also contribute to
contamination of soil.
205. The possible contamination of soil by oils and chemicals at camp sites, workshop areas, and
equipment washing-yards may limit the future use of land for vegetation purposes.
Mitigation Measures

i. Control measures will be needed for oily residues such as transformer oil and lubricants in the case
of accidental or unexpected release. Transformer oil is supplied in drums from an imported source
and tap tanks are topped up as necessary on site. There are facilities in some subproject DGS

48 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

maintenance yards for recycling (dehydrating) oil from breakers. However the areas upon which
these recycling facilities are located have no dedicated drainage which can capture run-off. Oily
residues and fuel and any contaminated soil residues should be captured at source and refueling
and maintenance should take place in dedicated areas with impervious surface away from surface
water resources. Contaminated residues and waste oily residues should be disposed at a site agreed
with the local authority. It shall be ensured that no PCB containing transformer oil is used.

ii. Transformer oil has a long life (typically over 15 years, which depends upon the level of load the
transformer serves). Oil spills are very rare and are preempted by routine maintenance. Good
housekeeping techniques should be used to control oil spillage. Responsible authority should ensure
that the maintenance schedule of each piece of hardware is adhered to by ensuring transformers are
placed on an impermeable surface bunded to 110% of capacity in case of oil spill or leak.

iii. Solid waste generated at the campsites will be properly segregated, treated and safely disposed of
only in the demarcated waste disposal sites.

iv. Proper drainage and wastewater treatment system as suggested in section 7.5.4 will ensure proper
disposal of sewage which will offset any impact on soil. Sewage will be connected to sewage network
for offsite treatment or will be connected to septic tank.

5.5.1.6 Cut and Fill and Waste Disposal


Impact Analysis

206. Disposal of surplus materials must also be negotiated through local authority approvals prior to
the commencement of construction. The subproject work does not involve any significant cutting
and filling but the excavations (down to 4m) and piling may be required to create the foundations
for some towers (if required). It is envisaged (depending on the mode of contract) that the surface
under the towers will need to be scrabbled to remove unstable materials, or to stockpile topsoil.
Mitigation Measures
i. If surplus materials arise from the removal of the existing surfaces from specific areas, these should
be used elsewhere on the subproject before additional soil, rock, gravel or sand is brought in. The use
of immediately available material will generally minimize the need for additional rock based materials
extraction from outside. Moreover, it will also save the cost of bringing the material from some other
locations.
ii. The subproject detailed designers have so far estimated that no substantial additional materials will
be required subject to confirmation at the detailed design stage.
iii. Contractual clauses should be included to require each contractor to produce a materials management
plan (one month before construction commences) to identify all sources of cement and aggregates
and to balance cut and fill. The plan should clearly state the methods to be employed prior to and
during the extraction of materials and all the mitigation measures to be employed to mitigate nuisances
to the local residents. Financial compensation shall not be allowed as mitigation for environmental
impacts or environmental nuisance. Mitigation measures shall seek to control the impacts at source
in the first place. The engineer shall be responsible to update the subproject cut and fill estimates and
create Materials Master Plan to facilitate materials exchange between the different contract areas
along the power line and sub-contractors on the power line and to provide an overall balance for
materials and minimize impacts on local resources.

49 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

iv. Any oil contaminated gravel/sand left after the construction activity will be handed over to a pre-
approved third party that shall be responsible for incineration and/or disposal of this material in
accordance with NEQS and international best practices.
v.

5.5.1.7 Use of Local Water Supplies/Spring Water


Impact Analysis

207. Project lies in an agriculturally rich area, where there is no scarcity of water. Still use of local
water supplies for construction purpose can create a big issue. As acknowledged during the
public consultation, locals may not want to share their water supplies as they were concerned
that sharing will disturb their agricultural activities and water will get contaminated.
Mitigation Measures
208. The following measures will be carried out to mitigate the impacts of tapping local community
water resources, where required:
i. Approval from the local administration and representatives of the concerned
departments will be obtained before using local water resources.
ii. Camps will be located within the project boundary to prevent the contamination of
community-owned water resources.
iii. The contractors will be required to maintain close liaison with local communities to
ensure that any potential conflicts relating to the common resource utilization for the
project purposes are resolved quickly.
iv. Guidelines will be established to minimize the wastage of water during the construction
activities and at campsites.
5.5.1.8 Contamination of Surface and Ground Water
Impact Analysis

209. River Khora with its tributaries i.e Spinkai Ghasha , Kharmeri nala, Tangi Khwar, Mandi River,
Khamistani River and Zhob River Tributaries Chishma Right Bank Canal to be crossed or pass
nearby the Transmission Line. Other than that small drains are present in AOI. It is anticipated
that the project activities will not cause any impact on these surface water bodies as these are
not near campsite, which lies within the GS boundary, and no construction activity will be done
near them.
210. Subsurface water resources may be contaminated by fuel and chemical spills, or by unmanaged
solid waste and effluents generated by the kitchens and toilets at construction campsites.
Mitigation Measures
211. Good management practices will be adopted to ensure that fuels and chemicals, raw sewage
and wastewater effluent are disposed of in a controlled manner to reduce the risk of
contamination. These measures are as described below:

50 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

i. Best engineered drainage channels will be established in the construction camps in


order to facilitate the flow of the treated effluents.
ii. Soakage pits and septic tanks will be established for the treatment of sewage effluents.
iii. Wastewater effluent from the contractors’ workshops and equipment washing-yards will
be passed through gravel/sand beds to remove oil/grease contaminants before
discharging into the natural streams. According to the local laws, the BOD5
concentration in sewage must be brought down to less than 80 mg/l before being
discharged into a natural stream with a capacity to dilute the effluent further by 10 times.
Furthermore, since the national regulation of 80 mg/l is quite lenient, thus in
spirit all efforts shall be made to minimize the pollution load to meet the
standard of 30 mg/l.

Biological Environment

212. This section describes impacts on flora and fauna and corresponding mitigation measures.
5.5.2.1 Flora, Trees, Ecology and Protected Areas
Impact Analysis

213. There is no protected area, as per identification of National Conservation Strategy, inside or
anywhere near the project. Around 5500 forest trees and 500 fruit trees and some shrubs will
have to be removed from the project land and along Transmission line. Wood trees include Jungli
Kikar (Wild Acacia nilotica), Sufaida (Eucalyptus), Aak (Calotropis), Sheesam (Dilbergia Sisso)
and Jandh (Prosopis cineraria). Fruit trees include Citrus, Gauva and Date palms. Dust during
the construction phase will also cause an adverse impact on surrounding orchards and crops.
The trees to be removed are not part of a fragmented forest.

Mitigation Measures
214. Trees will be enumerated species wise and compensatory plantation will be arranged along roads
and paths within the campus or outside the campus through forestry. To replace the removed
trees sufficient areas will be identified to allow plantation of trees at a rate of 3:1. Moreover,
owners of the affected trees will be paid compensation for their loss. An approximate sum of PKR
5.00 million is estimated for compensation of trees.
215. In addition to this, the contractor will be requested to spray water twice or thrice a day (as per
needed) to avoid dispersal of dust on the adjacent flora.
5.5.2.2 Wildlife and Fauna
Impact Analysis

216. Mammals, amphibians, birds and reptiles will be disturbed with the clearance of flora and leveling
of land. Birds can easily fly away to trees outside the campus or to the trees which are retained
from original flora. Moreover grazing activity of animals will also be disturbed.

51 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

217. During construction stage noise and movement of heavy machinery for road construction, shall
disturb the fauna of the area as the reptiles like lizard and snakes may get killed or move to the
adjoining areas. Similarly, avifauna shall be disturbed and scared away due to disturbance of
habitat. Trees provide resting and nesting places to the birds. Their removal shall have a negative
effect on the fauna. Movement of vehicles near corridors of grazing cattle/slow moving animals
may cause danger to their lives and require special attention by provision of sign boards and
educating the drivers of construction vehicles. As there are no endangered species present near
the project area so there is no potential impact on the endangered species by the execution of
the project.
Mitigation Measures
i. While constructing boundary wall around the project campus, outlets near the ground surface will
be provided at suitable intervals in order to facilitate the mammals and reptiles to migrate out of the
disturbed campus. As far as possible, some parts of original habitat should be retained.
ii. Moreover vehicle speed will be controlled to avoid incidental mortality of small mammals and
reptiles.
iii. Staff working on the project will be given clear orders, not to shoot or trap any bird.
iv. Lights used in the camps, during construction of towers will be kept to the minimum requirement.
Upward scattering lights will preferably be used.
v. There will be adjacent areas available for grazing; hence the grazing activity of animals will not be
affected.
Socioeconomic and Cultural Environment

218. This section describes the impact of the proposed project on local communities, construction
workers, and other people as well as on structures or sites of cultural and religious significance.
5.5.3.1 Impacts on Local Communities/Workforce
Impact Analysis

219. The area’s surrounding communities will be affected during the construction phase as follows:
i.
During the construction phase the general mobility of the local residents and their
livestock in and around the project area is likely to be hindered.
ii. Unmonitored construction activities, e.g. excavation, equipment movement etc. may
create accident risks.
iii. Usage of community’s common resources like potable water, fuel wood etc. by
contractor’s workforce may create conflicts between the community and the contractor.
iv. Induction of outside workers in the contractor labor may cause cultural issues with the
local community.
v. Theft problems to the community by the contractor workers and vice versa.
Mitigation Measures
220. The presence of migrant construction workers inevitably causes some degree of social unease
and even active disputes with the local community as a result of cultural differences. Potential
social conflict will be contained by implementing the measures listed below:

52 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

i. Temporarily and for short duration, the contractor has to select specific timings for
stringing so as to cause least botheration to the local population considering their peak
movement hours.
ii. Approval from the local administration will be obtained before using the local resources
such as wood and water.
iii. The contractors will be required to maintain close liaison with the local communities to
ensure that any potential conflicts related to common resource utilization for the project
purposes are resolved quickly.
iv. Contractor will take care of the local community and sensitivity towards the local customs
and traditions will be encouraged.
v. Effective construction controls by the contractor to avoid inconvenience to the locals due
to noise, smoke and fugitive dust.
vi. Haul-trucks carrying concrete, aggregate and sand fill materials will be kept covered with
tarpaulin to help contain construction materials being transported between the sites.
vii. Good relations with the local communities will be promoted by encouraging contractors
to provide opportunities for skilled and unskilled employment to the locals, as well as on-
the-job training in construction for young people. Contractor will restrict his permanent
staff to mix with the locals to avoid any social problems.
viii. Local vendors will be provided with regular business by purchasing campsite goods and
services from them.
ix. The Contractor will warn the workers not to get involved in any theft activities and if
anyone found guilty of such activities, he will have to pay heavy penalty and would be
handed over to police. Similarly, at the time of employing, Contractor has to take care
that the workers should be of good repute. The Contractor camp will be properly fenced
and main gate will be locked at night with a security guard to check the theft issues from
community side.
5.5.3.2 Indigenous, Vulnerable and Women Headed Households
Impact Analysis

221. During the social field survey of the project, no indigenous group of people was identified, which
comes under the definition of “Indigenous People”. So, no impact on the indigenous people is
envisaged due to the implementation of the project. No woman headed household was identified
during the social survey of the Project.
Mitigation Measures
222. As referred earlier, no indigenous people and women headed households have been identified
in or along the Project corridor, so no mitigation is required.
5.5.3.3 Public Health and Safety Hazards
Impact Analysis

223. During the construction and operation stage Of the project, the public health and safety issues
are:

53 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

i. Construction of Transmission line and Grid Station extension will require large number of
workers who will obviously be accommodated in congested temporary camps. This scenario
may lead to spreading of diseases like Malaria, Cholera, Typhoid, Hepatitis A, B and C etc.
ii. Occurrence of accidents/incidents during the construction stage is a common phenomenon as
evident from previous experience of NTDC.
iii. During the operation stage, people believe that they will be prone to danger due to the current
flows from towers, breaking of conductors, etc.
iv. Safety of general public at construction sites.
v. During the operational stage electric current (induction) may travel into the substation and will
become a hazard to the public/animals.
Mitigation Measures
i. In construction camps, amenities of life including clean food, water and sanitation facilities must
be provided. Contractor will arrange first aid boxes in the temporary camps. Routine medical
check-ups of all the field staff including unskilled labor needs to be conducted by an MBBS
doctor.
ii. The other source of pollution from the camps will be from garbage and waste. Apparently, there
are no solid waste disposals facilities in the villages located in the vicinity of the road and solid
waste will have to be disposed of at safe site.
iii. Complying with the safety precautions for construction workers as per International Labor
Organization (ILO) Convention No. 62, as far as applicable to the project contract.
iv. Workers should be trained in construction safety procedures and environmental awareness.
Proper handling of combustibles, and flammable material and good housekeeping practices
will be required to avoid fire hazard. Prohibit smoking at or around work areas where fire
hazards are present. Put up signs, saying NO SMOKING or OPEN FLAMES.
v. Equipping all construction workers with PPEs such as safety boots, helmets, gloves, and
protective masks, and monitoring their proper and sustained usage.
vi. Contractor will ensure the provision of medicines, first aid kits, vehicle, etc. at the camp site.
vii. Safety lookouts will be built to prevent people and vehicles from passing at the time of
excavation and other activities of such sort.
viii. Cordon off the work areas where necessary.
ix. It is recommended that NTDC at the planning stage of the project shall plan necessary
arrangements in the form of earthing system to avoid accidents.
x. Adequate facilities shall be provided in terms of drinking water that meets standards,
number of toilets per worker with running water, stocked first aid kit and trained first aider
at each tower location etc.
xi. Solid and hazardous waste generated shall be disposed to a suitably licensed landfill,
potentially transporting it outside the project area, if felt necessary.

5.5.3.4 Religious, Cultural and Historical Sites


Impact Analysis

54 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

224. The location of mosques and other cultural and other heritage SR sites has been reviewed. There
is no mosque, graveyard, tomb or any other religious/archaeological site within 100m boundary
from the edge of the Subproject; therefore, no impact on the site is expected. There will be
sufficient buffer distance between the works and all the SR such that no significant impacts can
be expected.
225. In case any archaeological discovery is made, Chance find procedures are provided as Annexure
VI.
Mitigation Measures
No measures required.
5.5.3.5 Sanitation, Solid Waste Disposal, Communicable Diseases
Impact Analysis

226. The main issues of concern are uncontrolled or unmanaged disposal of solid and liquid wastes
into watercourses and natural drains, improper disposal of storm water and black water and open
defecation by construction workers.
Mitigation Measures
i. In order to maintain proper sanitation around construction sites, access to the nearby lavatories
will be allowed or provision of temporary toilets will be made. Construction worker camps will be
necessary, based on the scale of the works needed. The construction camp will be provided with
toilets with soakage pits or portable lavatories or at least pit latrines.
ii. Toilets will be self contained or shall be disposed off to a septic tank and no toilets will be
located within 100 meters of any surface water body or any groundwater well.
iii. Disposal of surplus materials must also be negotiated through local authority approvals prior to
the commencement of construction. The Subproject work will not involve any significant cutting
and filling but minor excavations (down to 4m) and piling may be required to create the
foundations for the new transformers and for some towers (if required). It is envisaged
(depending on the mode of contract) that the surface under the towers will need to be scrabbled
to remove unstable materials, or to stockpile topsoil.
iv. If surplus materials arise from the removal of the existing surfaces from specific areas, it will be
used elsewhere on the subproject before additional soil, rock, gravel or sand is brought in. The
use of immediately available material will generally minimize the need for additional rock based
materials extraction from outside.
v. Contractual clauses will require the contractor to produce a materials management plan (one
month before construction commences) to identify all sources of cement and aggregates and to
balance cut and fill. The plan should clearly state the methods to be employed prior to and during
the extraction of materials and all the mitigation measures to be employed to mitigate nuisances
to local residents. Financial compensation shall not be allowed as mitigation for environmental
impacts or environmental nuisance.
vi. Contractual clauses will require the contractor to produce a solid waste management plan so that
proper disposal of waste can be ensured.

55 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

5.5.3.6 Disease Vectors


Impact Analysis

227. Wherever water is allowed to accumulate, in temporary drainage facilities, due to improper storm
water management, or improper disposal of wastewater generated from the site, it can offer a
breeding site for mosquitoes and other insects. Vectors such as mosquitoes may be encountered
if open water is allowed to accumulate at the construction camp site.
Mitigation Measures
228. Temporary and permanent drainage facilities should therefore be designed to facilitate the rapid
removal of surface water from all areas and prevent the accumulation of surface water ponds.

Impacts During Operational Stages

Air Pollution and Noise from the Enhanced Operations


Impact Analysis

229. The subproject works will extend the power distribution lines. No houses, mosques or schools
are close to the new GS in the operational phase. The operation of the facility is not likely to
cause any appreciable increase in the noise level already generated by the existing equipment.
However, it is recommended that an acoustical check be made on the detailed design to
determine of any noise barriers are required. There is no source of atmospheric pollution from
the subproject. In the operational phase any nearby industrial facilities with fuel powered
mechanical equipment will be the main polluters.
Mitigation Measures
i. All the emissions will be very well dissipated in the open terrain and there will be no cumulative
effect from the subproject.
ii. Noise impacts from the operation of the DGS equipment will be reviewed at the detailed
design stage. The NEQS for noise close to residential areas will be complied with 45 dB(A)
Leq (at exterior, boundary of DGS).
iii. The specifications of the new equipment that shall be installed shall follow international
standards and best practices to avoid use of chemicals causing Green House Gas (GHG)
emissions. All equipment procured shall be free from Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). If
SF6 (Sulfur Hexaflouride), a highly non-toxic greenhouse gas (GHG) based equipment is
installed, a proper maintenance management program will have to be implemented to avoid
leakage beyond international norms for GHG to the atmosphere.

Pollution from Oily Run-Off, Fuel Spills and Dangerous Goods

Impact analysis
230. Impacts from spillage of oily residues such as transformer oil and lubricants are expected to arise
in this subproject. However control measures will be needed in the case of accidental or
unexpected release.
Mitigation Measures

56 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

231. Transformer oil is supplied in drums from an imported source and tap tanks are topped up as
necessary on site. There are facilities in some subproject DGS maintenance yards for recycling
(dehydrating) oil from breakers. However the areas upon which these recycling facilities are
located have no dedicated drainage which can capture run-off. Oily residues and fuel and any
contaminated soil residues should be captured at source and refueling and maintenance should
take place in dedicated areas with impermeable surfaces away from water resources.
Contaminated residues and waste oily residues should be disposed at a site agreed with the local
authority.
232. Transformer oil has a long life (typically over 15 years, which depends upon the level of load the
transformer serves). Oil spills are very rare and are preempted by routine maintenance. Good
housekeeping techniques should be used to control oil spillage. Responsible authority should
ensure that the maintenance schedule of each piece of hardware is adhered to.
Impacts on Ecological Resources

233. No more tree cutting is to take place, during the operation stage .On the other hand, tree
plantation, on the ratio of 5:1 will improve the ecological habitat and environmental conditions of
the project area and thus enable the scared away avifauna to return to this area. New plantations
will not only compensate for the loss of trees, but will also add to the aesthetics of the area. There
will be healthy and positive impacts on flora and fauna during the operation stage. Substation
operation will enhance the risks for reptiles, amphibians and mammals and they will prefer not to
return to the area, thus causing a minor negative impact. Sufficient funds will be allocated to
maintain the trees at operation stage and the local communities would be also involved for the
maintenance of these plants. This will ultimately have a positive impact.
ENHANCEMENTS
234. Environmental enhancements are not a major consideration within the subproject site. However
it is noted that it is common practice to create some local hard and soft landscaping and
successful planting of fruit trees at such sites. This practice should be encouraged as far as
practicable. Other opportunities for enhancements can be assessed prior to construction and
proposed enhancements will be discussed with the local population to serve as a vehicle for
further public consultation at the implementation stage and to assist in public relations.
Environmental and Social Risk Assessment

Impact Analysis
235. The common environmental risks as assessed on the basis of consultations with the stakeholders
are as under:
i. The local people believe that their movement will be restricted in the project area due to
Electro Magnetic Field (EMF), and it may have adverse impacts on their health. EMF due to
EHV can cause the risk of leukemia, which is a disease in which white blood cells mutate and
become cancerous before maturity. These cells are important in fighting against infection in

57 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

the body. Leukemia also slows down the production of red blood cells that are needed to
carry oxygen in the second leading cause of death for children ages 2-15 years.
ii. People have to bear an excessive noise due to the current flow in the conductors especially
in rainy season.
iii. The electronic devices/equipment may fail to work when passing under the EHV transmission
lines.
iv. The allied transmission line may become a danger to the movement of birds.
Mitigation
236. The proposed mitigation measures for the above environmental risks are as under:
Effect of Electro Magnetic Field (EMF)

i. Different studies are carried out in Britain to find out the effects of EHV on children
particularly with reference to leukemia. British study suggested that children who live close
to high voltage overhead power lines may be at an increased risk of leukemia. Although
the researchers have made efforts to identify the effects of EHV related to leukemia but
there is no panic because the researchers cannot prove that the power lines are the cause
of leukemia. They have admitted that their findings may be due to some chance.

ii. Since the project has been planned in the least populated area, even if some effects due
to EMF are envisaged, these will be minimal due to safe distance since no residences are
located within a distance of 100 meters along the transmission line alignment. Similarly,
a vertical clearance required as per international standards will also be maintained
especially near the populated areas. During operation stage check will be kept by the
NTDC that no construction will be allowed within 100 m of the substation and transmission
line.

Excessive Noise Problem

237. Due to the EMF around the substation, noise is generated during the ionization of the ambient
air. Such a situation occurs with more severity in the rainy season when moisture in the air is
relatively high. It may generate discomfort due to the noise generated during the ionization
process. To overcome this problem, the route has been selected passing through the least
populated area. Construction of houses within the project corridor will be prohibited and NTDC
will make sure to check such type of construction during the operation stage. NTDC is providing
vertical and horizontal clearances in accordance with national and international standards . This
will also reduce the noise intensity.
Failure to Work of Electronic Devices/Equipment

238. The failure of electronic devices/equipment to work under the EHV transmission line is a common
apprehension of the stakeholders. To avoid this risk, NTDC has planned to keep excessive
clearance as compared to international standards. If proper required clearance is provided, the
severity of the risk is minimized, for which observations were made in the field under the existing
EHV transmission lines deliberately. Secondly, as the selected route will not pass close to the
settlements, the risk is also minimized.

58 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Danger to Bird Movements


Impact Analysis

239. There is a possibility of birds either being electrocuted by sitting on transmission lines or by
colliding with the towers. The necessary mitigation measures for minimizing the possibility of
either of these two scenarios are presented below.
Mitigation Measures
(i) Mitigating for Electrocution:

240. Electrocution mitigation can be more easily achieved than collision mitigation. The problem is at
a smaller physical scale, whereby a bird bridges energized wires or wires and grounded hardware
on a pole structure. The solution is relatively straightforward and involves ensuring that a bird
cannot touch the relevant components using appropriate design. It is cost effective to carry out
electrocution mitigation in the building phase of new medium voltage power lines as retrospective
fitting (i.e. mitigate for electrocution on an already operational network) of dangerous poles is
very expensive.
241. Also the impact upon migratory soaring birds (MSBs) in the interim period could be highly
significant, especially in terms of cumulative impact if occurring at multiple locations across the
flyway. Furthermore, retrofitting normally requires an outage (line switched off) with subsequent
customer issues, and is principally changing a previously approved engineering design, with
additional materials and complications.

 Pole and line design or configuration

242. This is relatively easily achieved through the technical design of the pole top. The design can
take one or a combination of two approaches:
 Ensuring that the likely preferred perching space for a bird on the pole top is well clear of
dangerous components;
 Ensuring that the dangerous components are sufficiently separated by space to ensure that
the bird cannot touch them.
 The second option, whilst more foolproof, can result in significantly larger pole tops with
consequent significantly increased costs, which is why a combination of the two approaches
is often employed.
 Line design modifications for mitigating bird casualties should include sufficient spacing
between different conductors and between conductors and grounded wires or hardware.
Short distances between conductors often occur at switch towers, at junctions and dead
ends of distribution systems.

 Insulation
 Where poles or pylons or substation hardware pose a risk of electrocution to birds by virtue
of the insufficient clearances between critical hardware, it is possible to adjust the situation

59 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

with add-on mitigation. This usually takes the form of insulating materials that are fitted
onto critical components of the structure, in order to render those components neutral.
In some cases this insulation takes the form of custom designed products for insulating
certain components, and in other cases more universal, generic material is used, which can
be adapted on site to insulate varying components. A feature of most of these products is
that they often do not provide full insulation, and should not be considered safe for humans.
In fact, these materials often only cover the dangerous components, reducing the likelihood
of electrocution but not fully eliminating it.

(ii) Mitigating for Collisions:

243. Employing mitigation measures already during the development of new lines is
more cost-effective and may ensure a substantially reduced number of
casualties from the onset of the operation of the power line. Once infrastructure
exists, line modification in various forms is the most widely used approach.
Modification of existing lines can be broadly divided into measures that:

 Make power lines less of an ‘obstacle’ for birds to collide with;


 Keep birds away from the power line
 Make the power lines more visible.

 Line design or configuration

244. Although different bird species fly at different heights above the ground, there is general
consensus that:

 Power line cables lower to the ground are better for preventing bird collision;
 Less vertical separation of cables is preferred, as it poses less of an ‘obstacle’ for birds
to collide with. Horizontal separation of conductors is therefore preferred;
 Construction of self-supporting towers, which do not require stay wires, is preferred, as bird
collisions have been recorded with the guy or stay wires of towers;
 moving or designing power lines without earth or shield wire (the thinnest wire at the top
of the power line structure) can take away the obstacle birds most often collide with.

 Line marking
 Since the assumption is that birds collide with overhead cables because they cannot see
them, fitting the cables with devices in order to make them more visible to birds in flight is
the preferred mitigation option.
 Besides thickening, coating or coloring the often least visible thin ground wires, a wide
range of potential ‘line marking’ devices has evolved over the years, including: spheres,
swinging plates, spiral vibration dampers, strips, swan flight diverters, Firefly Bird Flight
Diverters, bird flappers, aerial marker spheres, ribbons, tapes, flags, fishing floats, aviation
balls and crossed bands

 Devices should be installed on the earth wire (also-called ground or shield wire), wherever
possible. On lines without an earth wire, devices should be installed on the conductors.
Although installation of these devices on higher voltage conductors is problematic, lines of
higher voltage would typically have an earth wire anyway. Guidance is available on spacing
between line markers.

60 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

5.8. Cumulative impacts


245. Cumulative impacts would mainly be from other projects, particularly other transmission line
projects being constructed concurrently with the construction stage of this sub-project.
246. There is no other transmission line project or any other infrastructure projects being planned in
the project area alone the transmission line alignment. Thus, no cumulative impacts are
expected.

Environmental and Social Benefits of the Project

247. Although there will be some insignificant and temporary negative effects of the Project during
implementation and operation stage, but a large number of positive effects on environment and
social settings of the area are also expected. Load Shedding is a serious issue these days due
to huge difference in production and demand of electricity. The major positive impacts of the
proposed Project on environment and social settings of the Project area include:

i. Availability of the electricity will be ensured as per demand of the area.

ii. Expansion of industries expected due to availability of electricity.

iii. Better quality of life will be available to the citizens.

iv. Grid station will open new employment opportunities for locals.

61 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Information Disclosure, Public Consultation and Participation

Approach to Public Consultation

248. The public consultation process with various stakeholders has been approached so as to involve
public and other stakeholders from the earliest stages. Public consultation has taken place during
the planning and design stage and viewpoints of the stakeholders have been taken into account
and their concerns and suggestions for possible improvements have been included where
appropriate. Much of the public consultation process to date has revolved around concerns for
the mitigation of construction impacts and the possible side effects from the proximity of the
proposed subprojects.

Public Consultation Process

249. The public consultation process has commenced in the initial feasibility stages (prior to
construction) in order to disclose the project information to the stakeholders and record feedback
regarding the proposed sub-project and preferences. The stakeholders involved in the process
were the interested folks; the local people, village leaders and school teachers.
250. Prior to the implementation of the consultation, feedback has been carried out to support this IEE
and recorded. The focus of attention has been the population near the proposed route of the T/L
and existing grid station. The level of engagement varied from the stakeholder to stakeholder
with some registering no major comment but it is noted that none registered any outright
opposition to sub-projects.
251. The disclosure of subproject works in advance and subsequent consultation with stakeholders
has advantages in the environmental assessment and mitigation of impacts. Public consultation
can also provide a conduit for the improvement of the project implementation to serve the
stakeholders in better way.
252. The environmental assessment process under the PEPA 1997, requires the disclosure to the
public after the statutory IEE/EIA has been accepted by the relevant EPA, to be in strict
adherence to the rules. In this IEE, the consultation process was performed to satisfy the ADB
requirements Social Safeguard Policy (SPS), 2009 and PEPA guidelines.

Results of Public Consultation

253. The consultations identified some potential environmental and social impacts and perceptions of
stakeholders. The public consultation carried out in March, 2016 & July, 2016 (Summary of the
Public Consultation is provided in Annex-III). The Community members along the project corridor
were generally supportive of the proposed project. The local poor people predominantly
requested for employment of unskilled and semi-skilled jobs on priority basis with the contractors
during implementation of the project. No private land acquisition and resettlement is involved in
this project. On the basis of the consultations so far, it appears that the project will have no

62 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

environmental and social impacts but the proponent will have to make sure that skilled and
unskilled employment should be preferably made from local people, where possible.

Social Framework Agreement

254. The project proponent has committed that they will work hand-in-hand with the community for the
successful completion of the project.
255. SFA shall be considered as a “follow up” of the public consultation process and indicates that
NTDC and the communities are mutually facilitating the construction process of the sub-project.
6.4.1 Parties to Agreement

256. The local villagers/representatives and the project proponent will sign the SFA through mutual
consent. At least two leaders/elders will be chosen from each of the villages situated adjacent to
the area where construction activity will be based. These leaders/elders will constitute a villagers’
committee, which will choose a Chairman amongst themselves.
257. SFA shall be signed by NTDC Resident Engineer (RE) representing the project proponent and
by the Chairman of villagers’ committee representing the local community prior to two months
from commencement of the construction work.
6.4.2 Agreement Contents

258. SFA shall be prepared in the form of a legal agreement in Urdu language on a stamp paper
to be provided by RE at the project cost. Three copies of the agreement shall be signed by
both parties. All the mitigation measures described in EMP which are relevant to SFA shall
be included in the agreement. The obligations of the NTDC and those of the community shall
be listed clearly. Signed copies of SFA shall be kept by both parties and the Executive
Engineer in charge of this TL project.

63 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan

General

259. This chapter provides an overall approach for managing and monitoring the environment related
issues and describes the institutional framework and resource allocations proposed by NTDC to
implement the EMMP for 220 kV Transmission line from Zhob to D.I Khan and Zhob Grid Station.
The main objectives of the EMP are to:
 Provide the details of the project impacts along with the proposed mitigation measures, and
a corresponding implementation schedule.
 Define the responsibilities of the project proponent, contractor, supervisory consultants and
other role players, and effectively communicate environmental issues among them.
 Define a monitoring mechanism, reporting frequency, auditing and identifying monitoring
parameters to ensure that all the mitigation measures are completely and effectively
implemented.
 Identify the resources required to implement the EMP and outline the corresponding financing
arrangements.

Environmental Management Plan (EMP)

260. The environmental protection and enhancement are achieved in various ways. These approaches
should begin right at the embryonic stage, i.e. i) project location, ii) design, specifications and
tender/contract documents, iii) construction activities and iv) post completion activities i.e. operation
and maintenance stage. Appropriate environmental management measures are required to be
exercised in a cascade order by NTDC at each stage of the project.
261. In this way, it is envisaged that the Project will achieve maximum ongoing cost-effectiveness,
environmental sustainability and social soundness, far beyond the end of implementation of the
Project. All the stages of the Project have to be managed by adopting the proposed environmental
mitigation measures, where, besides engineering aspects, due importance is to be accorded to
mitigation measures which make a perfect blending with the surrounding ecosystem. The key
environmental and social issues, which have already been discussed in previous as under:
i. Impacts on Crops and Trees
ii. Contamination of air, water and soil during the construction activities
iii. Borrowing of aggregate materials
iv. Soil erosion and soil contamination
v. Impact of noise generated by vehicles, machinery and equipment during the construction
activities
vi. Impact on community and work force safety as a result of accident hazards during the
construction and operation of the project
vii. Vegetation clearing for tower foundations and establishment of camp facilities

64 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

262. An Environmental Management Plan is provided in Table 7.1 below, which establishes the linkages
between the environmental and social impacts, mitigation strategy and the agencies responsible for
execution.

65 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Table 7.1: Environmental Management Plan

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
DESIGN STAGE
1. NTDC to select the route in
a way that minimum impact
on trees and crops occur.
2. Assessment of losses of tree
and crops damages (if any)
due to construction of
transmission line towers.
Before the
3. Preparation of LARP for the construction of the
To ensure that the proposed project before Affected Persons
transmission line
adverse impacts on commencement of will be
and all other MC and
crops and trees are construction activities. compensated by
1. Social Impacts structures, the APs NTDC / LAOs External
mitigated according NTDC through its
4. All the payments / should be given Monitors
to the LARP land acquisition
entitlements are paid sufficient time and
provisions. officers.
according to the Entitlement compensation to
Matrix, prepared according satisfy them.
to the LARP.
5. All the impacts identified by
the IEE are incorporated in
to the project as well as the
LARP and relevant
entitlements included into
the Entitlement Matrix.
Before the NTDC with
2. Hydrological To minimize 1. Hydrological flow in areas Considered
commencement of the Design NTDC
Impacts hydrological and where it is sensitive, such as locations are as
construction Consultant

66 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
drainage impacts water courses or bridges activities/during in the design
during constructions. and culverts. designing stage. report.
2. Adequate culverts should be
provided where any water
channel is needed to be
crossed for transmission line
construction activities.
1. Conduct detailed acoustic
assessment for all
residential buildings,
schools, (other sensitive NTDS and
Ensure cumulative During detailed Noise sensitive
structures) within 50m of NTDC with Construction
noise impacts are design stage, and locations to be
3. Noise Barriers RoW. the design Supervision
acceptable in in include in the identified after
2. If noise at sensitive receiver consultant Consultant
operational phase. contract. detailed design.
exceeds the permissible (CSC if any)
limit, the construction
activities should be
monitored and controlled.
1. Identify sufficient locations
for disposal of transformer
oils, unsuitable soils, scrap 1. During
metal “cradle to grave”. designing stage Locations
Ensure adequate
2. Include in contracts for unit no later than approved by ADB and
disposal options for
rates for re-measurement for pre-qualification ADB and NTDC NTDC with NTDC and
4. Waste Disposal all waste including
disposal. or tender and waste the design CSC
unsuitable soils,
3. Designate disposal sites in negotiations. disposal local consultant
scrap metal.
the contract and cost unit 2. Include in the authorities.
disposal rates accordingly. contract.
4. Prepare a PCB spill handling
procedure and equip such

67 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
teams with special clothing,
steel containers and
solvents.
1. Identify locations where
Include mitigation in drainage or irrigation
During designing Locations based
5. Temporary Preliminary and crossing RoW may be NTDC and
stage no later than on drainage or NTDC and
Drainage and detailed designs for affected by works. Design
pre-qualification or irrigation CSC
Erosion Control erosion control and 2. Include in protection works Consultant
tender negotiations. crossing RoW.
temporary drainage. contract as a payment
milestone(s).
The sitting of
transmission facilities When sitting in such areas
must seek to avoid to cannot be avoided During designing
6. Avoidance of the maximum extent altogether, the area of NTDC and
stage no later than Locations based NTDC and
Sensitive and possible areas of disruption should be Design
pre-qualification or on crossing RoW CSC
High Value Areas high ecological, minimized and the impacts Consultant
tender negotiations
cultural, economic, mitigated.
and aesthetic value
and sensitivity.
Although the health • Raising conductor height
effects of chronic above the ground, typically
exposure to EMFs by increasing tower height.
from AC transmission • Reducing conductor
lines remain spacing.
7. EMF Reduction scientifically • Arranging phases so that Design Stage Project Area NTDC NTDC
uncertain, many fields tend to cancel.
utilities and • Increasing transmission
regulatory authorities voltage (since magnetic
employ EMF field intensities are a
reduction practices function of current, and

68 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
as a precautionary increased voltage, all things
measure, usually being equal, will result in
within the limit of a reduced current).
few percent of overall • Reducing loads (and
project cost. Utilities therefore, currents).
seek to keep annual • Increasing right-of-way
average magnetic widths or buffer zone
field intensities at the widths, to move people
edge of the right-of- further from transmission
way below about 10 lines.
mG (milli-Gauss).

To ensure all health


• Ensure seismic design
and safety aspects
requirements are
8. Health & Safety are considered Design Stage Project Area NTDC NTDC
incorporated in the project
during the project
design.
design phase.
CCONSTRUCTION STAGE
1. Prepare a 1. Locations of
1. Consideration of weather
thorough plan each
To ensure the proper conditions when particular
to be approved construction
implementation of construction activities are
by SC one activity to be CSC or
any requirements undertaken.
month prior to a listed by the NTDC to
1. Hydrology and mentioned in EPA 2. Limitations on excavation
commencement engineer. actively NTDC
Drainage Aspects conditions of depths in use of recharge
of construction. 2. Special supervise and
approval letter in areas for material
2. Proper locations are enforce
relation to Hydrology exploitation or spoil disposal.
timetable identified
of the project. 3. Use of landscaping as an
prepared in along the
integrated component of
consideration RoW by the

69 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
construction activity as an with the climatic contractor to
erosion control measure. conditions of minimize
4. Minimizing the removal of each area, the disturbance.
vegetative cover as much as different 3. A list of
possible and providing for its construction locations of
restoration where activities irrigation
construction sites have been mentioned here channels/
cleared of such areas. to be guided. drains to be
compiled by
the
contractor.
1. NTDC to engage
environmental specialist in
the PMC to monitor and
progress all environmental Induction of all
statutory and recommended relevant staff
To ensure that the All staff members
obligations. required for
CSC, contractor and in all categories.
2. Conduct special briefing for implementation of
workers understand Monthly NTDC &
managers and / or on-site EMP. Contractor
2. Orientation for and have the induction and six CSC to
training for the contractors and the CSC
Contractors, and capacity to ensure month refresher observe and
and workers on the At early stages of and record
Workers the environmental course as record
environmental requirement construction for all details
requirements and necessary until success
of the project. Record construction
implementation of contractor
attendance and employees as far
mitigation measures. complies.
achievement test. as reasonably
3. Agreement on critical areas practicable.
to be considered and
necessary mitigation
measures, among all parties

70 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
who are involved in project
activities.
4. Continuous progress review
and refresher sessions to be
followed.
1. Compile temporary drainage
management plan one
month before
commencement of works.
2. Proper installation of
Temporary Drainage (TD) 1.Contractor
To prevent adverse and Erosion Control (EC) CSC to
water quality impacts before works within 50 m of enforce
due to negligence water bodies.
and ensure 3. Proper construction of TD Prior to 2. Contractor
Relevant
unavoidable impacts and EC measures, construction, 50 m has to check
locations to be NTDC
are managed maintenance and from water bodies. water quality
3. Water Quality determined in the review
effectively. Ensure management including Timing will depend and report to
detailed project results
adverse impacts on training of operators and on the construction NTDC.
design
water quality caused other workers to avoid timetable.
by construction pollution of water bodies by 3. CSC
activities are the considerate operation of supervises
minimized. construction machinery and monitoring
equipment. activities.
4. Storage of lubricants, fuels
and other hydrocarbons in
self-contained dedicated
enclosures >50m away from
water bodies.

71 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
5. Proper disposal of solid
waste from construction
activities and labor camps.
6. Cover the construction
material and spoil stockpiles
with a suitable material to
reduce material loss and
sedimentation and avoid
stockpiling near to water
bodies.
7. Topsoil stripped material
shall not be stored where
natural drainage will be
disrupted.
8. Borrow sites (if required)
should not be close to
sources of drinking water.
1. Control all dusty materials at
source.
2. All heavy equipment and A list of locations Contractor
To minimize machinery shall be fitted in to be included in should
effectively and avoid full compliance with the All construction contract and maintain
complaints due to the national and local sites within 100 m other sensitive acceptable
4. Air Quality NTDC/CSC
airborne particulate regulations. (Relevant of sensitive areas identified standard
matter released to regulations are in the Motor receivers. by the CSC CSC to
the atmosphere. vehicles fitness rules and along the ROW supervise
Highway Act). during works. activities.
3. Stockpiled soil and sand
shall be slightly wetted

72 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
before loading, particularly in
windy conditions.
4. Fuel-efficient and well-
maintained haulage trucks
shall be employed to
minimize exhaust emissions.
5. Vehicles transporting soil,
sand and other construction
materials shall be covered.
6. Limitations to speeds of
such vehicles necessary.
Transport through densely
populated area should be
avoided.
7. To plan to minimize the dust
within the vicinity of orchards
and fruit farms.
8. Spraying of bare areas with
water.
9. Concrete plants to be
controlled in line with
statutory requirements
should not be close to
sensitive receptors.
Maximum allowable During Contractor
To minimize noise 1. All heavy equipment and
noise levels should construction should
5. Noise / Ground level increases and machinery shall be fitted in
be below 75 dB (A) stage, the most maintain the NTDC /
Vibration ground vibrations full compliance with the
LEQ at the boundary sensitive acceptable CSC
during construction national and local
of the construction locations need standards
operations. regulations and with
site. special attention.

73 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
effective silencing apparatus CSC to
to minimize noise. supervise
2. As a rule, the operation of relevant
heavy equipment shall be activities.
conducted in daylight hours.
3. Hammer- type percussive
pile driving operations shall
be not be allowed at night
time.
4. Construction equipment,
which generates excessive
noise, shall be enclosed or
fitted with effective silencing
apparatus to minimize noise.
5. Well-maintained haulage
trucks will be used with
speed controls.
6. Contractor shall take
adequate measures to
minimize noise nuisance in
the vicinity of construction
sites by way of adopting
available acoustic methods.
Prevent adverse Because the area 1. Locations
1. Schedule works in sensitive
water quality impacts can be subject to based on
areas (e.g. rivers) for dry
due to negligence un seasonal heavy history of
6. Soil Erosion/ season Contractor NTDC/
and ensure rain plan before and flooding
Surface Run-off 2. Temporary erosion control and CSC CSC
unavoidable impacts during construction problems.
plan one month before
are managed (cut and fill, land 2. A list of
commencement of works.
effectively. reclamation etc.) sensitive

74 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
3. Proper installation of TD and while considering areas during
To minimize soil EC before works within 50m the climatic construction
erosion due to the of water bodies. conditions. to be
construction activities 4. Meaningful water quality prepared by
of towers, stringing of monitoring up and the detail
conductors and downstream at any tower design
creation of access site within a river or stream consultant in
tracks for project during construction. Rapid consideration
vehicles. reporting and feedback to with the cut
CSC. and fill, land
5. Back-fill should be reclamation,
compacted properly in borrow areas
accordance with design etc.
standards and graded to 3. Locations of
original contours where all culverts,
possible. irrigation
6. Cut areas should be treated channels,
against flow acceleration road and
while filled areas should be highway.
carefully designed to avoid
improper drainage.
7. Stockpiles should not be
formed within such
distances behind excavated
or natural slopes that would
reduce the stability of the
slopes.
8. In the short-term, either
temporary or permanent
drainage works shall protect

75 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
all areas susceptible to
erosion.
9. Measures shall be taken to
prevent pounding of surface
water and scouring of
slopes. Newly eroded
channels shall be backfilled
and restored to natural
contours.
10. Contractor should arrange to
adopt suitable measures to
minimize soil erosion during
the construction period.
Contractor should consult
concerned authorities in the
area before deciding
mitigation measures.
11. Clearing of green surface
cover to be minimized during
site preparation.
12. Replanting trees to be done
before the site is vacated
and handed back to NTDC
with appropriate trees (other
vegetation cover as
appropriate) to ensure
interception of rainwater and
the deceleration of surface
run-off.

76 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
1. In order to minimize and or
1. List of borrow
avoid adverse environmental
areas to be
impacts arising out of
prepared one
construction material
month prior to
exploitation, handling,
construction.
transportation and storage
2. List of routes
measures to be taken in line
of transport of
with any EPA
construction
conditions/recommendations
material is to be
in approval.
prepared for the
2. Conditions that apply for
contract and
To minimize selecting sites for material
agreed one
7. Exploitation contamination of the exploitation.
month prior to
Handling, surroundings 3. Conditions that apply to Contractor
construction.
Transportation timing and use of roads for and CSC to
Update monthly 3. Report of NTDC/CSC
and Storage of (Due to material transport. agree format
vehicle
Construction Implementation of 4. Conditions that apply for of reporting
conditions is
Materials works, concrete and maintenance of vehicles
available.
crushing plants). used in material transport or
4. Map of
construction.
locations of
5. Conditions that apply for
storage is
selection of sites for material
prepared by the
storage.
contractor.
6. Conditions that apply for
5. Environmental
aggregate production.
accident
7. Conditions that apply for
checklist and a
handling hazardous or
list of banned
dangerous materials such as
substances are
oil, lubricants and toxic
included in the
chemicals.

77 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
contractor’s
manual.
1. Waste management plan to
be submitted to the CSC
and approved by MC one
month prior to starting
works.
2. Estimating the amounts and
types of construction waste
Contractor
to be generated by the
and
project.
CSC should
3. Investigating whether the A list of
supervise and
waste can be reused in the temporary
take action to
project or by other interested stockpiling areas
complete
parties. and more
Minimize the impacts contractor’s
8. Construction 4. Identifying potential safe permanent NTDC/
from the disposal of Update monthly relevant
Waste Disposal disposal sites close to the dumping areas to CSC
construction waste. activities
project or those designated be prepared at
according to
sites in the contract. the contract
EIA/IEE/
5. Investigating the stage for
EMP
environmental conditions of agreement
requirement &
the disposal sites and
environmental
recommendation of most
standards.
suitable and safest sites.
6. Piling up of loose material
should be done in
segregated areas to arrest
washing out of soil. Debris
shall not be left where it may
be carried by water to

78 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
downstream flood plains,
dams, lagoons etc.
7. Used oil and lubricants shall
be recovered and reused or
removed from the site in full
compliance with the national
and local regulations.
8. Oily wastes must not be
burned. Disposal location to
be agreed with local
authorities/EPA.
9. Machinery should be
properly maintained to
minimize oil spill during the
construction.
10. Solid waste should be
disposed at an approved
solid waste facility, open
burning is illegal and
contrary to good
environmental practice
1. Identify location of work
To ensure that the camps in consultation with
operation of work local authorities. The
9. Work Camp camps does not location shall be subject to Location Map is
Update once a NTDC/
Operation and adversely affect the approval by the NTDC. If prepared by the Contractor
month MC
Location surrounding possible, camps shall not be Contractor.
environment and located near settlements or
residents in the area. near drinking water supply
intakes.

79 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
2. Cutting of trees shall be
avoided and removal of
vegetation shall be
minimized.
3. Water and sanitary facilities
(at least pit latrines) shall be
provided for employees.
Worker camp and latrine
sites to be backfilled and
marked upon vacation of the
sites.
4. Solid waste and sewage
shall be managed according
to the national and local
regulations. As a rule, solid
waste must not be dumped,
buried or burned at or near
the project site, but shall be
disposed off to the nearest
sanitary landfill or site
having complied with the
necessary permission of
local authority permission
5. The Contractor shall
organize and maintain a
waste separation, collection
and transport system.
6. The Contractor shall
document that all liquid and
solid hazardous and non-

80 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
hazardous waste are
separated, collected and
disposed of according to the
given requirements and
regulations.
7. At the conclusion of the
project, all debris and waste
shall be removed. All
temporary structures,
including office buildings,
shelters and toilets shall be
removed.
8. Exposed areas shall be
planted with suitable
vegetation.
9. NTDC and Supervising
Engineer shall inspect and
report that the camp has
been vacated and restored
to pre-project conditions.
1. Land holders will be paid A list of
To avoid several compensation for their Locations with a
10. Loss of negative impacts due standing trees in Rerouting and site Map to be
Trees and to removing of accordance with prevailing identification during compiled by the Design
Vegetation Cover landmark, sentinel market rates (LARP). The design stage and design consultant,
of the Areas for NTDC/CSC
and specimen trees land holders will be allowed other matters consultant during Contractor
Towers and as well as green to salvage the wood of the during construction detailed design and CSC
Temporary Work- vegetation and affected trees. They will of relevant activities and CSC to
space surface cover. also be encouraged to plant update as
suitable new trees outside necessary.

81 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
the 30 meter corridor of the
transmission line in lieu of
tree removed.
2. The contractor’s staff and
labor will be strictly directed
not to damage any
vegetation such as trees or
bushes.
3. In order to save the
affected orchards (if any),
Transmission Line route will
need to be changed.
However, if unavoidable,
use of towers with
maximum height will be
resorted to.
4. Clearing of green surface
cover for construction, for
borrow of for development,
cutting trees and other
important vegetation during
construction should be
minimized.
5. Landscaping and road
verges to be re-installed on
completion.
6. Compensatory planting of
trees/shrubs/ornamental
plants (at a rate of 3:1) to
contribute to the aesthetic

82 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
value of the area and
compensate for the lost
capability of the area to
absorb carbon dioxide in
line with best international
practice.
7. At completion all debris and
waste shall be removed.
8. All temporary structures,
including office buildings,
shelters and toilets shall be
removed.
1. Providing adequate warning
signs.
2. Providing workers with skull
guard or hard hat.
3. Contractor shall instruct his
Prior to Location to be
11. Safety workers in health and safety
To ensure safety of commencement identified by the Contractor NTDC/
Precautions for matters, and require the
workers and during CSC with and CSC CSC
the Workers workers to use the provided
construction contractor.
safety equipment.
4. Establish all relevant safety
measures as required by law
and good engineering
practices.
Minimize disturbance 1. Submit temporary haul and The most
of vehicular traffic access routes plan one Prior to and important
12. Traffic Contractor NTDC/CSC
and pedestrians month prior to start of works. throughout the locations to be
Condition and Engineer
during haulage of 2. Formulate and construction. identified and
construction implementation of a plan of listed. Relevant

83 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
materials, spoil and alternate routes for heavy plans of the
equipment and vehicles. Contractor on
machinery, blocking 3. Vicinity of schools and traffic
access roads during hospitals to be considered. arrangements
works 4. Installation of traffic warning are available.
damage/maintenance signs, and enforcing traffic
problems for roads regulations during
and bridges used by transportation of materials
the haulage trucks, and equipment and
dust nuisance to machinery. Conditions of
school and hospitals. roads and bridges to be
considered.
5. Provision of culverts on
water channels and drains.
6. Widening/upgrading of
access paths/roads
To ensure minimum
1. Potential for spread of vector
impacts from Complaints of APs
borne and communicable
construction labor to be solved as
diseases from labor camps
force. soon as possible.
shall be avoided (worker
To ensure minimum
awareness orientation and
impacts on public Necessary The whole
appropriate sanitation should
13. Social health. evacuations to be alignment route Contractor NTDC/
be maintained).
Impacts To ensure minimum done as when of transmission and the CSC CSC
2. Claims/complaints of the
effects of indirect necessary if line.
people on construction
impacts of construction
nuisance/damages close to
constructions to the impacts are of
ROW to be considered and
people who are living significant duration
responded to promptly by the
close to the and close to APs.
Contractor.
boundaries of ROW;

84 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
Dust, Noise, 3. Contractor should organize
Vibration and Rock temporary means of access
blasting effects etc. and make alternative
To minimize access arrangements to avoid local
problems for local community impacts and to
population during avoid such short-term
construction. negative impacts.
Capacity building activities were
taken by Environmental Officer
in Tranche 1 and 2.
Environmental and Social Impact
Cell (ESIC) was setup within Awareness
NTDC under GM (Projects) in training for all
Tranche 1. These capacity management
To ensure that NTDC Initiate
14. Institutional officials are trained to building exercise will be continue preconstruction and and senior staff
NTDC &
Strengthening and understand and to for Tranche subprojects. in NTDC at NTDC
continue beyond ADB
Capacity Building appreciate EMP. senior engineer
project completion
Trainings and provisions of and above in
proper monitoring facilities to PMU and related
ESIC are recommended. units.

OPERATIONAL STAGE
Employ landscaping contractor
1. Compensatory Maintain survival of to monitor, water, feed and
All Project sites NTDC NTDC
Tree Planting trees planted replace dead specimens as
necessary.

85 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
 Track growth of large trees
under the conductors.
 Tree planting shall be
conducted at suitable
locations in project area, as
Monitor impacts from near as possible from
2. Crops and maintaining tree locations where any trees
might be uprooted, if All Project sites NTDC NTDC
Vegetation clearance under necessary.
transmission lines
 Required measures for
vegetation management shall
be taken such as minimizing
use of chemicals, avoiding
invasive plant species, risk of
forest fires etc.
Ensure no Necessary signboards with
encroachments/ limits of height clearances to
3. Social safety construction under be placed properly.
All Project site NTDC NTDC
Impacts the transmission line. Identify and prevent any
No violation of illegal encroachments under
clearances spaces. the transmission line.
 Align transmission corridors to
avoid critical habitats (e.g.
To minimize nesting grounds, heronries,
potential risk to rookeries, bat foraging corridors
birds of getting and migration corridors).
4. Danger to bird All Project site NTDC NTDC
electrocuted or  Maintain 1.5 meter (60 inch)
movement
colliding in the spacing between energized
transmission lines. components and grounded
hardware or, where spacing is
not feasible, covering energized
parts and hardware

86 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental Mitigation Measures (MM) Timing to Location to Implementation Monitoring


Objectives
Concern Recommended Implement MM Implement MM Responsibility Responsibility
 Retrofitting existing transmission
or distribution systems by
installing elevated perches,
insulating jumper loops, placing
obstructive perch deterrents
(e.g. insulated ‘V’s’), changing
the location of conductors,
and/or using raptor hoods.
 Installing visibility enhancement
objects such as marker balls,
bird deterrents or diverters.

FLAGGING
Some other social impacts during construction phase, particularly from local socio-cultural perspective, if required, will be reviewed at the
implementation stage according to the existing Land Acquisition criteria.

1. During the construction phase, the general mobility of the local residents and their livestock in and around the project area is likely to be
hindered.

2. Usage of Community’s common resources like potable water, fuel wood etc. by Contractor workforce may create conflicts between the
community and the Contractor.

3. Community will have to face the noise and dust problems during the construction activities.

4. Induction of outside workers in the Contractor labor may cause cultural issues with the local community.

5. Theft problems to the community by the Contractor workers and vice versa.

6. During the construction activities of tower foundations, erection, and conductor stringing people will lose their annual income due to the loss of
crops, trees, etc.
87 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

7. The land under the towers during the operation stage may restrict its current use for agriculture purpose.

8. The restriction of plantation of trees above 2.5 m height during the operation stage may also cause the reduction of income of the farmers.

9. Due to the erection of towers and passing of the transmission line, the value of land may depreciate in the long term.

10. As the project route is passing through the rural areas and rural community, women activities in the field may become affected due to the
construction activities.

11. The rural women normally use the open field latrines and their privacy may suffer due to the project activities.

12. The induction of outside labor may create social and gender issues due to the unawareness by them of local customs and norms. It will also
cause hindrance to the mobility of local women.

13. Disturbance to the privacy of the local women when workers will work on the erection of towers

88 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Environmental and Social Monitoring Plan

263. This section provides a monitoring plan that identifies the roles and responsibilities of the project staff involved
in environmental and social monitoring under the proposed Project, and list the parameters that will be used
in the monitoring process.

Objectives

264. The main objectives of the pre-construction and construction phase monitoring plans will be:
i.
The compensation for loss of assets will be monitored during the pre-construction
activities as per latest rates announced by the government as every year rates have to
be revised by the government. This aspect will be strictly monitored.
ii. Monitor the actual impact of the construction activities on the project corridor’s physical,
biological and socio-economic receptors. This will indicate the adequacy of the IEE.
iii. Recommend mitigation measures for any unexpected impact or where the impact level
exceeds that anticipated in the IEE.
iv. Ensure compliance with legal and community obligations including safety at construction
sites.
v. Monitor the impacts on land, water resources, air quality, noise level and cutting of trees
in the project area as described in the EMP.
265. The main objectives of environmental monitoring during the operation phase will be to:
i. Appraise the adequacy of the IEE with respect to the project’s predicted long-term impact
on the corridor’s physical, biological and socio-economic environment.
ii. Evaluate the effectiveness of the mitigation measures proposed in the EMP, and
recommend improvements, if necessary.
iii. Compile periodic accident data to support analysis that will help to minimize the future
risks.
Role and Responsibilities of Project Management Consultants (PMC)

266. A Supervisory Consultant appointed by NTDC will be designated as the “Engineer/Project


Manager”. The Consultant will be responsible for:

 Supervising the Project’s Contractors and ensuring that all the contractual obligations related
to the design and construction, as well as environmental and social compliance are met;
 Ensuring that the day-to-day construction activities are carried out in an environmentally and
socially sound and sustainable manner; Developing ‘good practices’ construction
guidelines to assist the Contractors and NTDC staff in implementing the EMMP; and
 Assisting the Chief Engineer (EHV-II) in coordinating with the EPAs, provincial agriculture,
forest and Wildlife departments, NGOs/CBOs and other public/private sector organizations.

Role and Responsibilities of Contractor

267. For the proposed Project, NTDC will appoint Contractor(s) for construction and other project activities. The
Contractor(s) will be responsible for the physical execution / implementation of EMMP, or adherence to all the

89 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

provisions of the EIA and EMMP and any environmental or other code of conduct required by Balochistan
and KPK EPAs. Overall responsibility for the Contractor’s environmental performance will rest with the NTDC.

268. The project contractor will also responsible for following items:

 Implementation of, or adherence to, all provisions of the IEE/EIA and EMP;
 Contractor should prepare and submit the SSEMPs required according to the EMP, which should be
approved at least ten days before for the start construction activity.
 Contractor’s environmental performance will rest with the person holding the highest management
position within the contractor’s organization. Reporting to their management, the contractor’s site
managers will be responsible for the effective implementation of the EMP.

Institutional Structure for Implementation and Operation of the Project

269. The proposed project will be administered by NTDC during the implementation stage as described
in detail below, and the existing institutional setup of NTDC for implementation of the project is
illustrated in Figure 7.1 below. The existing organizational setup of NTDC for all the stages of the
project (design, construction and operation) is fully integrated with handling of environment and
social issues.

90 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Managing Director
(NTDC)

General Manager (GSC)

Chief Engineer (EHV-I)

Project Director (EHV-I)

Executive Engineer (S&I) Executive Engineer (TL)

SDO SDO SDO SDO

Figure 7.1: NTDC’s Institutional Setup for Project Implementation

270. The NTDC federal headquarter is based in Lahore, and is responsible for managing the project at the policy
level. At the highest level, the Chief Engineer (EHV-I) will be responsible for day-to-day project management
at project implementation stage. He will report directly to the General Manager (GSC), who will have ultimate
responsibility for planning and managing implementation of the projects.

271. The Chief Engineer (EHV-I) will be assisted by Project Director, who will have overall responsibility for
ensuring the project compliance with the EMP. The Project Director (PD) will be supported by two Executive
Engineers i.e. Survey and Soil Investigations (SI) and Transmission Line Construction (TLC) who, will further
be assisted by the concerned Sub-Divisional Officers and their teams.

272. After completion of the Project, the Project will be handed over to the GSO Division of NTDC, which is working
under the Chief Engineer (GSO). He reports to the General Manager (GSO) for operation and maintenance
of grid stations and transmission lines. The Chief Engineer GSO will be supported by the Superintending

91 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Engineer for the proposed project, who will also be assisted by Executive Engineer, Sub-Divisional Officer
and his field team.

273. To ensure the community participation and to provide the environmentally and socially viable conditions, the
Environment and Social Impact Cell of NTDC will extend its services and support the field teams. The
Organogram of ESIC for the implementation of EMP is depicted in following Figure 7.2.
ADB (Coordination)
NTDC

Project PMU
Management (GM Projects)
Consultants
(PMC)

Contractor

Environmental &Social
External Monitor/ Impact Cell
EMA (E&SIC)

- Manager (E&SIC)
- DM (Environment)
- AM (Social Safeguards)
- AM (Environment)
- Surveyor

District Level Coordination


Project Implementation Unit (PIU)
(At Field Level) Grievance Redress Committee
- Executive Engineer (NTDC) (GRC)
- DO (R)/ LAC
- DO (Revenue)/ LAC - Executive Engineer (NTDC)
- Executive Engineer (NTDC)
- Representatives of E&SIC - Representatives of E&SIC
- DO (Agri.)
- Assistant Manager (SM) - AM (Social Mobilization)
- Directorate (Horticulture)
- Contractor - Representative of Contractor
- DFO
- PMC-Safeguard Implementation - Representative of CSC
- C&W Department
Specialist - 3 Representatives of APC
- WAPDA - Patwari
- PHED
- Representative of APC
- Other concerned (PHE)

Affected Persons Committee (APC)

ADB: Asian Development Bank


AM: Assistant Manager Affected Party
AP: Affected Party (AP)
C&W: Communication & Works
DFO: District Forest Officer
DM: Deputy Manager
DO: District Officer
EMA: External Monitoring Agency
GM: General Manager
LAC: Land Acquisition Collector
PHE: Public Health Engineering
PMC: Project Management Consultants

Figure 7.2: Organogram of NTDC Environment and Social Impact Cell

92 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

274. The EMP was prepared taking into account the capacity of the NTDC to conduct environmental
assessments of the subprojects. But it is envisaged that the NTDC’s Environmental and Social
Impact Cell (ESIC) will conduct monitoring of subproject to check the compliance of EMP provisions
and will obtain environmental approval from Balochistan and KPK EPAs. The ESIC is composed of
one Manager, one Deputy Manager, and two Assistant Managers (refer to Figure 7.2). Most of the
environmental work is delegated to consultants. Specific areas for immediate attention are in EMP
auditing, environmentally responsible procurement, air, water and noise pollution management,
Social and ecological impact mitigation. It is recommended that an environmental specialist should
be made part of team of supervisory consultants for effective monitoring of EMP provisions.
275. The duties of the ESIC include but not limited to followings:

i. Provide review and technical support to PMU, including review of papers, feasibility studies,
appraisal reports and other relevant documents from the perspective of environment and land
acquisition and resettlement management, on assignment basis.
ii. Supervise and scrutinize the consultants hiring process for environmental and social
documents preparation.
iii. Oversight of construction contractors for monitoring and implementing mitigation measures.
iv. Preparing and implementing environment policy guidelines and environmental good practices.
v. Liaising with the PIUs and seeking their help to solve the environment related issues of project
implementation.
vi. Providing awareness training workshop on environmental and social issues related to power
transmission to PIU staff.
vii. Preparation of monthly/quarterly progress report on environmental and social safeguards for
submission to financing agencies.
viii. Conduct seminars / local training workshops on environment safeguards matters with the help
of NGOs / PIU / IFIs, etc.
ix. Prepare EIAs/IEEs of new projects.
x. Seek environmental approvals (NOCs) from respective EPA

Environmental and Social Monitoring by ESIC

276. The general monitoring responsibilities of the NTDC Environment and Social Impact Cell will consist
of:
o Assist in valuation of the trees, crops etc., and negotiation with the owners.
o Assist in checking genuine ownerships of the claimants, in consultation with the Revenue staff
for prompt payment to the affectees.
o Assist the Contractor for the timely payments of negotiated price.
o Check that the Contractor backfills, compacts, and leaves the ground in the original condition
after excavation of pits for subsurface investigations, and for the tower footings.
o Keep checks and controls so that the pollution of land and water resources due to the spills of
lubricants, fuel, chemicals, and other wastes does not take place.
o Monitor, that pollution of wetlands is not excessive during the excavation for the tower footings.

93 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

o To see that the Contractor keeps the damages to the minimum during the substation
construction especially while making tracks for accessibility and that the damage is rectified
properly.
o All the existing tracks, roads, water courses are left in the original shape after completion of
the construction activities.
o Monitor that the Contractor uses such working methodology so as not to cause disturbance to
the communities by fugitive dust, noise, fumes, etc.
o Monitor that the Contractor adjusts his working hours during the stringing activities in such a
manner that it causes least inconvenience to the local population.
o To ensure that the Contractor keeps first aid kits, medicines, safety gadgets at site for taking
care of possible mishaps to the workers or other persons.
o To keep the working site/camps tidy so as to avoid unhealthy impacts on the work force.
277. The pre-construction Environmental Monitoring Plan is provided as Table 7.2 and the Environmental
Monitoring Plan is provided as Table 7.3 below.

Environmental Training

6.1.1. Capacity Building and Training

278. Capacity building and training programs are necessary for the project staff in order to
control the negative impacts resulting from the project construction and during its
operation phase. They will also require trainings on monitoring and inspecting of such
a project for environmental impacts and for implementation of mitigation measures.

279. The details of this capacity building and training program are presented in the Table 7.4
below.

94 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Table 7.2: Pre-Construction Environmental Monitoring Plan for Baseline Development

Parameter to be Objective of Parameters to be Measurements Location Frequency Responsibility


measured Monitoring Monitored
To establish CO,NOx & PM10
baseline air quality (particulate matter
levels smaller than 10 At any three random
Ambient Air Quality 1-hr concentration levels Once ESIC
microns) project sites
concentration at
receptor level
To establish Ambient noise level
At any three random
Ambient Noise baseline noise near receptors at 1-hr concentration levels Once ESIC
project sites
levels project site
To minimize risk of Review and verify
hazards and profiles of workers to
accidents by be engaged for
ensuring only project and ensure
trained and they possess relevant
Safety of Workers
certified personnel credentials and Verification of relevant At time of hiring of
and Community Once ESIC & Contractor
with experience of experience skills and experience staff
members
high voltage and
working at height
are employed to
undertake this
work.

95 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Table 7.3: Environmental Monitoring Plan


FOR TRANSMISSION LINE
Performance Frequency to Locations to Implementation Supervision
Environmental concern Timing to check
indicator monitor implement Responsibility Responsibility
Construction Phase for TL
Landscape
1. Encroachment and Once (update
Conditions, One Month after All NTDC’S
Physical monthly as Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
Baseline Construction Work alignment
Disfiguration necessary)
Environment
Soil Compression,
Once (update
Land Clearing, Prior to construction. All NTDC’S
2. Soil Erosion monthly as Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
Vegetation Update monthly alignment
necessary)
Removal
Fuels Spillage,
All NTDC’S
3. Soil Contamination Chemicals Weekly During Construction Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
alignment
Containers
4. Ecological Land Clearing, All NTDC’S
Monthly Update monthly Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
Resources Habitat destruction alignment
Number of People
affected due to Once (update
All NTDC’S
5. Loss of Barani Crops unavailability of monthly as During Construction Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
alignment
Opportunistic necessary)
Agriculture
Disturbance due to
Once (update
6. Local Community Stringing, Good All NTDC’S
monthly as Update monthly Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
Work Force engineering alignment
necessary)
practices adopted
Zero near miss,
All NTDC’S
7. Safety Hazards minor, major and Monthly Update monthly Contractor NTDC, ESIC cell
alignment
fatal accidents

96 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Performance Frequency to Locations to Implementation Supervision


Environmental concern Timing to check
indicator monitor implement Responsibility Responsibility
Most stringent
Once every three At any three Contractor’s
noise standards at 1-hr concentration
8. Noise months on a typical random project Environmental NTDC, ESIC
nearest receptor to levels
working day sites officer
works.
Operational Phase for TL
Earthing of the NTDC, ESIC Cell
Towers, Safety
All NTDC’S
1. Electric Current Plan by the Monthly During Operation Contractor
alignment
contractor to be
followed
Frequency of NTDC, ESIC Cell
Conductors
2. Breaking of Throughout the All NTDC’S
Tripping, Quarterly Contractor
Conductors Project alignment
Complaints
reported
Soil Geology, NTDC, ESIC Cell
Climatic Conditions, During
All NTDC’S
3. Towers Collapse Records on Six Monthly Implementation Contractor
alignment
displacement (if Phase
any)
Reported death of NTDC, ESIC Cell
After Transmission All NTDC’S
4. Avifauna Movement Birds, Audit Report Quarterly Contractor
Line is erected alignment
by the ESIC cell
Security Plan, NTDC, ESIC Cell
Good Engineering
During Operational All NTDC’S
5. Safety Practices, Quarterly Contractor
Phase alignment
Complaints on the
Register

97 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Performance Frequency to Locations to Implementation Supervision


Environmental concern Timing to check
indicator monitor implement Responsibility Responsibility
No over exposure NTDC, ESIC Cell
6. Monitoring of EMF to EMF by Once every three
During Operational All NTDC’S
levels post optic fiber community months on a typical Contractor
Phase alignment
installation members or working day
workers

Note: LAFC = Land Acquisition Compensation Fixation Committee. RAP, SIA and other engineering considerations may change, EIA=environmental impact
Assessment. EPA= Environmental Protection Agency. ADB * = ADB checks that processes have been completed and signed off by NTDC’s before moving to
construction stage. MoFSC = Ministry of Forest and Soil Conservation.
ESIC = Environmental and Social Impact Cell (NTDC)

Table 7.4: Capacity Development and Training Programme for Project Contractor(s)

Provided by Organized by Contents Target Audience Venue Duration

Pre-construction Phase Short seminars and courses on:


One day long
NTDC offering specialized services in Environmental Management Plan and NTDC ESIC
Project Director Contractor staff training
environmental management and Environmental Monitoring Plan Office
seminar
monitoring

Construction Phase Short seminar on Environmental risks


NTDC offering specialized services in associated with construction phase.
One day long
social management and monitoring Development of Environmental NTDC ESIC
Project Director Contractor staff training
Performance Indicators Office
seminar
Occupational Health and Safety
(OHS) issues

98 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

99 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Estimated Environmental and Social Management Costs

280. The following Table provides the estimated costs for the compensation of crops and trees damages and
implementation of EMP. The compensation costs include the costs for cutting of trees due to construction of
subproject. It should be noted that as referred earlier that the project is at a preliminary stage and detailed
surveys including tower spotting is to be carried out for the project showing the actual position of the towers,
so at this stage only tentative and lump sum amount has been allocated for the expected losses and is based
on the environmental and social field surveys. The actual cost will be earmarked in the Land Acquisition and
Resettlement Plan (LARP)

281. The cost for implementation of mitigation measures prescribed in Environmental Management Plan (EMP)
has also been given. The mitigation measures include; water sprinkling, provision of PPEs to workers,
arrangement of first aid kits at site, waste management etc.

282. The total estimated cost for the environmental and social management comes to about PKR 4.13 million. This
includes the cost of environmental implementation of mitigation measure. Cost estimates of mitigation and
other environmental management measures are summarized in following Table.

Table 7.5: Estimated Environmental and Social Management Costs

Particulars Details Total Cost (PKR)

Contractor environment
Staffing, audit and 1 person for 2 years1 1,440,000
monitoring
Monitoring activities As detailed under EMP2 1,000,000
As prescribed under EMP and
15,00,000
IEE3
Mitigation measures
(i) Water sprinkling 800,000
(ii) Tree replanting 700,000
Contingency 5% contingency 197,000
Note: Total 4,137,000
1 @
rate of PKR 60,000/month

2 Laboratory charges for: testing of construction materials; water quality tests; ambient air tests; emissions
measurements; and noise measurements.
3 Includes; Compensatory tree plantation under supervision of forest department and training on counterpart

staff.

100 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Grievance Redress Mechanism

283. This section describes mechanism to receive and facilitates the resolution of affected party including women’
concerns and grievances. A grievance mechanism will be available to allow an AP appealing any disagreeable
decision, practice or activity arising from land or other assets compensation. APs will be fully informed of their
rights and of the procedures for addressing complaints whether verbally or in writing during consultation,
survey, and time of compensation.

284. APs/ local community will enter their complaints/ concerns and issues formally including the information of
date, name and address of complainant, description of complain. The Assistant Manager (social mobilization)
at PIU will maintain a register named as “community complaint register (CCR)”. The register will include the
information as date, name and address of complainant, description of complaints, and will enter the complaints
in a date covering the minimum information of name and address of complaint, description of complaints,
action taken, status of redress of complaints and reasons in case issue not resolved.

285. GRC will work at field level, while unsettled issues will be referred to the PMU at sub-project level. The field
level PIU (AM Environment) will inform the affected persons about GRC and its mechanism by passing the
information at known places.

286. Efforts will be made to avoid the APs/ community concerns by implementing the sub-project in accordance
with the EMP, i.e. proper information disclosure, community consultations, payments as per entitlements and
coordination with APs/ APC, PIU and PMU. However, a Grievance Redress Committees (GRC) will also be
established to redress the unresolved issues.

287. The composition of GRC will as below:

GRC at PIU Level


i). Executive Engineer (NTDC)
ii). Representative of E&SIC(Assistant Manager (Social Mobilization)
iii). Representative of CSC
iv). Representative of Contractor
v). 3 Representatives of Affected Person Committee (APC) including Nazim/Village Notable person

a) A comprehensive grievance redress process regarding land compensation and other


compensation is described below:

Table 7.1: Grievance Redress Process


Land / Crop Compensation Issues Other Environmental and Social Issues
 First, complaints will be redressed at field  First, complaints will be redressed at field level through
level through the involvement of PIU and the involvement of PIU and APC as well as other local
APC as well as other local committees. committees.
 If issue is unresolved, then it will be  If no solution is accomplished, then grievance will be
lodged to the DO (Revenue)/ LAC who will lodged to GRC.
have 14 day to make decision on it.  The GRC will provide the decision within 3 weeks. The
GRC decision must be in compliance with this EMP and
provisions given in the EMP.
 If issue still unsettled, then grievance will  If the grievance redress system does not satisfy the APs,

101 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

be forwarded to GRC. then, the grievance can be submitted to the GM Projects


 GRC will provide decision within 3 weeks, (PMU), where decision will be made in a period of 2
which should be in compliance with the weeks.
EMP and provisions given in the EMP.
 In case, the grievance redress system  If still APs are not satisfied, they can pursue their case to
does not satisfy the APs, then they can appropriate Court of law.
pursue by submitting their case to the
appropriate court of law.

288. The grievance redress procedure will comply with the requirements of ADB SPS (2009) in
addressing people’s concerns and complaints promptly and in a transparent manner as shown
in Figures 7.3 and 7.4.
7.7.1 GRM – Preconstruction Phase

289. During the pre-construction phase of the project, the most likely grievances that may be
encountered involve land acquisition and compensation.
290. The mechanism shall comply with land acquisition, land use right implementation, compensation,
allowances, resettlement sequences and procedures provided in the LARP of this project in
accordance with national and provincial laws and regulations. In general, the grievance redress
mechanism of the project during the pre-construction phase shall observe the following steps
and outlined in Figure 7.3:
Step 1: The project affected person informs the village head and NTDC about his/her
concerns on the project. A meeting at the commune level will be conducted to discuss
the concerns of the complainant.

Step 2: If the project affected person is not satisfied with the resolution of the complaint
at the commune level, he/she can submit a complaint to the district officer
Revenue/LAC at the district level.
Step 3: If the affected person does not agree with the administrative action or decision
of the district level, the affected person can elevate the complaint to the GRC.
Step 4: If the affected person is still not satisfied with the decision of the GRC, the
complaint is sent to the Court. The decision of the Court becomes the final legal basis
for the implementation of the compensation.

102 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Figure 7.3: Grievance Redress Procedure during the Pre-Construction Phase

7.7.2 GRM - Construction and Operational Phases

291. Grievances during construction may also include impacts related to physical construction works
on the towers and substation and the site clearing activities. During the operational phase of the
project, the complaints that may be anticipated are related to maintenance activities of the
connection lines and facilities.
Step 1: A complainant may send his/her concerns about the construction or operation of the
project to NTDS or the construction contractor and the head of the commune. Immediate
action on the complaint is expected from the contractor or the NTDC on the concern raised by
the complainant. The resolution of the complaint should be done within two weeks.
Step 2: When the complainant is not satisfied with the action or decision of the NTDS or the
contractor, the complainant can inform the head of the commune about the matter. The
commune head/authority through the Commune People’s Committee will then call a meeting
of the complainant, NTDS, and contractor to resolve the complainant.
Step 3: When the complainant is not satisfied with the action or decision on the complaint, it
the then elevated to the district level for resolution.
Step 4: Complaints not resolved at the district level is elevated to the People’s Committee at
the GRC level for resolution.

103 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Step 5: When the complaint is not resolved at the People’s Committee at the GRC, the
complaint is then elevated to the Court. The decision of the Court becomes the final legal basis
for the decision on the complaint

Figure 7.4: Grievance Redress Procedure during the Construction and Operational Phases

104 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

105 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

Conclusions and Recommendations

Conclusions

292. Based on the preliminary plans, environmental and social field surveys and impact assessment of
the proposed 220 kV Zhob Grid station and associated 220 km Transmission Line Zhob – D.I Khan,
there are insignificant, short term and reversible impacts of the project. The major impacts of the
project are summarized as follows:
i. No acquisition of permanent land will be involved for erection of towers for transmission line as
per Telegraphy Act, 1910. However, the payments for the loss of trees and crops will be made
as per market rates.
ii. All the other impacts like soil erosion, soil contamination, water contamination, air pollution, high
noise level, etc. are of temporary nature and can be controlled and mitigated.
iii. It is estimated that the implementation of project activities will cause cutting of about 6,000 trees.
iv. No protected forest area or wildlife sanctuary or any other environmentally sensitive site exists
along the Project corridor, which may be affected by the Project.
v. No indigenous people and women headed households have been identified in the Project.
vi. The other social issues like safety of general public and workers, security problems, risk of
communicable diseases, vector borne diseases etc. are of temporary nature.
vii. Most of the above impacts are of temporary nature and manageable through good engineering
practices and none of these are irreversible.
viii. A comprehensive EMP has been developed identifying the impacts, mitigation measures,
agencies responsible for implementation and monitoring of the proposed measures. EMP also
describes the environmental and social monitoring responsibilities of ESIC.
ix. The total estimated cost for the environmental and social management comes to about PKR 4.13
million.
293. In the light of the above discussions, it may be concluded that the proposed preliminary Project route
is environment friendly and will cause the least effects on the area’s existing social and
environmental settings.

Recommendations

294. Although comprehensive mitigation measures have been proposed in the report to minimize the
negative impacts and to enhance the positive impacts of the Project, however, major recommended
mitigation measures are summarized as follows:
i. Temporary labour camps shall be developed inside the grid station boundary and should be
facilitated with proper drainage facilities.

106 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

ii. Soil erosion and contamination, water contamination, air pollution and high noise levels shall be
controlled with the use of good engineering practices.
iii. Contractor shall develop different plans such as traffic management, Solid waste management
and material management etc. before starting the construction activities.
iv. Fair and negotiated compensation in accordance with the prevailing market prices shall be made
for loss of crops and trees during the construction activities of the Project.
v. Erection of towers in the water bodies shall be avoided as far as possible. However, at places
where realignment of the transmission line is unavoidable, towers with the maximum span shall
be used to minimize the number of towers in the water body.
vi. Contractor shall warn the workers not to hunt the water birds, fish resources, etc.
vii. The Contractor will have to adopt some suitable timing for the construction activities so as to
cause the least disturbance to the local community particularly women considering their peak
movement hours.
viii. Contractor shall take due care of the local community and its sensitivity towards local customs
and traditions.
ix. EMP proposed in the report should be implemented in the true letter and spirit.

107 | P a g e
IEE Report 220 KV Zhob Sub-Station and Associated Transmission Line

ANNEXURES

1|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Annexure I - REA CHECKLIST

2|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Instructions:

(i) The project team completes this checklist to support the environmental classification of a project. It is
to be attached to the environmental categorization form and submitted to Environment and Safeguards
Division (RSES) for endorsement by Director, RSES and for approval by the Chief Compliance Officer.

(ii) This checklist focuses on environmental issues and concerns. To ensure that social dimensions are
adequately considered, refer also to ADB's (a) checklists on involuntary resettlement and Indigenous
Peoples; (b) poverty reduction handbook; (c) staff guide to consultation and participation; and (d)
gender checklists.

(iii) Answer the questions assuming the “without mitigation” case. The purpose is to identify potential
impacts. Use the “remarks” section to discuss any anticipated mitigation measures.

220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line


Country/Project Title:

Sector Division:
Power Transmission

SCREENING QUESTIONS Yes No REMARKS


A. Project Siting

Is the Project area adjacent to or within any of the following


environmentally sensitive areas?

 Cultural heritage site No cultural heritage site near the project


corridor.
No protected site near the project corridor.
 Protected Area

 Wetland

 Mangrove

 Estuarine

 Buffer zone of protected area

 Special area for protecting biodiversity

B. Potential Environmental Impacts

Will the Project cause…

 encroachment on historical/cultural areas, disfiguration of No impact on historical site, but landscape


landscape and increased waste generation? will be disrupted and waste will be
generated. That will be managed by
implementation of EMMP
 encroachment on precious ecosystem (e.g. sensitive or
protected areas)?

 alteration of surface water hydrology of waterways The impact will be minimum and limited to
crossed by roads and resulting in increased sediment in the tower foundation sites. The
streams affected by increased soil erosion at the appropriate mitigation measures will
construction site? be built into the EMP to address this
impact.

 damage to sensitive coastal/marine habitats by Such activities are not involved in


construction of submarine cables? proposed project.

3|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

SCREENING QUESTIONS Yes No REMARKS


 deterioration of surface water quality due to silt runoff, As per EMP provisions, respective
sanitary wastes from worker-based camps and chemicals mitigation measure will be followed.
used in construction?
 increased local air pollution due to rock crushing, cutting Appropriate mitigation measure will be
and filling? adopted to minimize the impact.
 risks and vulnerabilities related to occupational health and The impacts will be short term and will be
safety due to physical, chemical, biological, and observed only in construction phase.
radiological hazards during project construction and Respective mitigation measures will be
operation? adopted to minimize the impact.
 chemical pollution resulting from chemical clearing of NTDC does not use any chemical for
vegetation for construction site? vegetation removal.
 noise and vibration due to blasting and other civil works? Blasting will not be involved, but the noise
and vibration will be generated during
construction phase by heavy machinery.
These impacts will be occur, even though
it will be mitigated by implementing the
Environment Management Plan.
 dislocation or involuntary resettlement of people?

 disproportionate impacts on the poor, women and


children, Indigenous Peoples or other vulnerable groups?

 social conflicts relating to inconveniences in living Contractors will be strictly advised not to
conditions where construction interferes with pre-existing interfere the local community resources.
roads?

 hazardous driving conditions where construction The drivers will be advised to keep the
interferes with pre-existing roads? speed below 30km/hr. and traffic planning
to avoid hazardous circumstances.
 creation of temporary breeding habitats for vectors of This impact can be minimized by proper
disease such as mosquitoes and rodents? waste management and other remedial
measures.
 dislocation and compulsory resettlement of people living
in right-of-way of the power transmission lines?

 environmental disturbances associated with the Properly control the vegetative growth
maintenance of lines (e.g. routine control of vegetative during operation phase with due
height under the lines)? consideration of environmental
protocols.
 facilitation of access to protected areas in case corridors There is no protected area in the vicinity
traverse protected areas? of the project corridor.

 disturbances (e.g. noise and chemical pollutants) if NTDC does not use any herbicide for
herbicides are used to control vegetative height? vegetation control or removal.

 large population influx during project construction and It may not likely be happened, as the line
operation that cause increased burden on social passes mostly away from population, more
infrastructure and services (such as water supply and over the contractor will advised for proper
sanitation systems)? care to avoid social conflict.

 social conflicts if workers from other regions or countries It will not likely be happened, as mostly the
are hired? local labor is hired.

 poor sanitation and solid waste disposal in construction These impacts willbe mitigated by proper
camps and work sites, and possible transmission of implementation of EMP provisions
communicable diseases from workers to local regarding health, safety, waste
populations? management and sanitation protocols.

 risks to community safety associated with maintenance of Community associated safety safeguards
lines and related facilities? are considered during operation phase.

4|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

SCREENING QUESTIONS Yes No REMARKS


 community health hazards due to electromagnetic fields, Al ready considered in the
land subsidence, lowered groundwater table, and feasibility/design stage.
salinization?

 risks to community health and safety due to the transport, Explosive material will not be used, but
storage, and use and/or disposal of materials such as other materials like fuel, oil etc. will be kept
explosives, fuel and other chemicals during construction in the construction camps only. Transport
and operation? and disposal of such materials will be
according to protective measures given in
EMP. Therefore, risk to community health
and safety is manageable by maintaining
H&S protocols.
 community safety risks due to both accidental and natural These impacts will be mitigated by
hazards, especially where the structural elements or implementing EMP provisions during all
components of the project (e.g., high voltage wires, and the stages of project implementation.
transmission towers and lines) are accessible to members
of the affected community or where their failure could
result in injury to the community throughout project
construction, operation and decommissioning?

5|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Annexure II - SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE

6|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

7|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

8|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

9|Page
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

10 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

11 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

12 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

13 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Annexure III - PUBLIC CONSULTATION

14 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Sr. No Participant Name Village Remarks/Concerns

 Abdul S/O Zingi Khan


Pusha (G/S Site)
1  Mumtaz S/O Jalil Residents did not raise many issues. Exceptions were the
 Mukarram Shah importance of providing information early and well before
 Hazrat Khan S/O Ghulam Khan Mehsud the start of work, targeting minimum wastage of crops,
compensation according to the appropriate shares in
2  Majid S/O Khan Doran crops, employment as labourer during installation of T/L,
 Ayub S/O Murad avoiding extensive tree cutting, advance payment should
be made before harvesting the crops, T/L should be
 Shah Baran S/O Umar Daraz
diverted to avoid houses, interested to become guard /
 Hassan S/O Badshah watchman during implementation of the TL, prompt
Muddy
 Salahuddin S/O Jahangir compensation and less wastage, payment should be
 Ibrahim S/O Qasim made to the affected person, not to the landowner only,
 Shahzad Khan S/O Badshah compensation should be through crossed check, early &
fairly compensation required.
3  Aziz ur Rehman (Hawaldar)
 M. Akram Due to cultural and traditional restrictions, many women
folks could not be consulted. The issues raised by a few
 Anayatullah S/O Sohrab Khan women included:
 Inamullah
Hassani i.Minimum wastage of crops & trees,
 Nasir S/O Muhammad Amir
4  Naimatullah S/O Jan Muhammad
Kot Essa Khel ii. Company workers should take care of our culture
 Abdus Salam S/O Jumma Khan during installation of T/L,
 Rehmat S/O Pir Ghulam
 Mushtaq S/O Abdur Razzaq iii. Employment should be given to local men,

Shah Behram S/O Adam Khan

15 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

5  Amanullah S/O M Hayat


Draban Kalan
 Ubaidullah S/O Abdul Sattar iv. Company works should not disturb us during field
 Asmatullah S/O Abdul Sattar work,
 Asmatullah S/O Abdul Sattar
 Abdul Sattar S/O Sarfaraz v. Project should offer jobs to the affected persons and
compensation should be according to shares in
 Najib Ullah S/O Ghulam Shah crops.
 Umer Khitab S/O Abdur Razzaq (Number
Dar)

6  Abdul Wajid Shah S/O Syed Gulbad Shah


Darazinda (F.R D.I
 Mohabat Shah S/O Ajab Shah Khan)
 Mashal Din S/O Mehr Din

 Nasir Ullah Jan S/O Abdulah Jan


 Akhtar Muhammad S/O Abdul Rehman
7  Sana Ullah S/O Badr ud Din
 Khurshid Khan S/O Aziz Ullah
Manday Zai Killi

16 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Annexure IV - PHOTOLOG

17 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Meeting with XEN Public Health (Distt. Zhob)

Meeting at Forest Office (Distt. Zhob)

18 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Meeting at Deputy Commissioner`s Office (Distt. Sherani)

19 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Meeting Deputy Director Agriculture (Distt. Zhob)

Meeting at Revenue Office (Distt. Sherani)

20 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Public Consultation at Pusha

Meeting at DFO`s Office (Distt. Sherani)

Public Consultation at Pusha

21 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Public Consultation at Muddy

Public Consultation at Muddy

Public Consultation at Kot Essa Khel


22 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Public Consultation at Darazinda

Public Consultation at Draban Kallan

23 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Public Consultation at Manday Zai Killi

River view along the route

24 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Proposed Grid Station Site near D.I Khan (Pusha)

25 | P a g e Pusha Town View


IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Crops at Muddy

Police Check Post near Muddy


26 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Draban Kalan View

Abandoned Building near Draban Kallan


27 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Livestock at Draban Kallan

28 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Govt. Girls College at Darazinda

Govt. Boys High School at Darazinda

29 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

A view of Darazinda (along the proposed route)

30 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Govt. Boys Degree College Zhob

Proposed Grid Station Site at Zhob


31 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

A view at Manday Zai Killi


Proposed Grid Station at Zhob

Govt. High School Manday Zai

32 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

A view of Zhob City from DC Office Zhob

33 | P a g e
IEE Report: 220 KV Zhob Grid Station and Associated Transmission Line Project

Annexure V - BROCHURE

34 | P a g e
35 | P a g e
36 | P a g e
Annexure VI – Archaeological Chance Find Procedures

37 | P a g e
Background
The purpose of this document is to address the possibility of archaeological deposits becoming
exposed during ground altering activities within the project area and to provide protocols to
follow in the case of a chance archaeological find to ensure that archaeological sites are
documented and protected as required.
The Antiquities Act, 1975, protects archaeological sites, whether on Government owned or
private land. They are non-renewable, very susceptible to disturbance and are finite in number.
Archaeological sites are an important resource that is protected for their historical, cultural,
scientific and educational value to the general public and local communities. Impacts to
archaeological sites must be avoided or managed by development proponents. The objectives
of this ‘Archaeological Chance Find Procedure’ are to promote preservation of archaeological
data while minimizing disruption of construction scheduling It is recommended that due to the
moderate to high archaeological potential of some areas within the project area, all on site
personnel and contractors be informed of the Archaeological Chance Find Procedure and
have access to a copy while on site.

Potential Impacts to Archaeological Sites


Developments that involve excavation, movement, or disturbance of soils have the potential
to impact archaeological materials, if present. Activities such as road construction, land
clearing, and excavation are all examples of activities that may adversely affect archaeological
deposits.

Relevant Legislation
It ensures the protection, preservation, development and maintenance of antiquities in the
entire country, including the province of KP and Balochistan. The Act defines “antiquities” as
ancient products of human activity, historical sites, or sites of anthropological or cultural
interest, national monuments, etc. The Act is designed to protect these antiquities from
destruction, theft, negligence, unlawful excavation, trade, and export. The law prohibits new
construction in the proximity of a protected antiquity and empowers the KP and Balochistan
provincial governments to prohibit excavation in any area that may contain articles of
archaeological significance. Under the Act, the subproject proponents are obligated to ensure
that no activity is undertaken in the proximity of a protected antiquity, report to the Department
of Archaeology, GoKPK and GoB, any archaeological discovery made during the course of
the project.

Remedies and Penalties


The Antiquities Act, 1975 provides for heritage inspection or investigation orders, temporary
protection orders, civil remedies and penalties to limit contraventions. These powers provide:

‘’A contravention of any provision of this Act or the rules shall, where no punishment has been

38 | P a g e
specifically provided be punishable with rigorous imprisonment for a term which may extend
to two years, or with fine up to rupees ten hundred thousand, or with both. ‘’

Archaeological ‘Chance Find’ Procedure


If you believe that you may have encountered any archaeological materials, stop work in the
area and follow the procedure below.
The following ‘chance-find’ principles will be implemented by the contractor throughout the
construction works to account for any undiscovered items identified during construction works:
(i) Workers will be trained in the location of heritage zones within the construction area and in
the identification of potential items of heritage significance.
(ii) Should any potential items be located, the site supervisor will be immediately contacted
and work will be temporarily stopped in that area.
(iii) If the site supervisor determines that the item is of potential significance, an officer from
the department of Archaeology (DoA), GoKPK & GoB will be invited to inspect the site and
work will be stopped until DoA has responded to this invitation.
(iv) Work will not re-commence in this location until agreement has been reached
between DoA and NTDC as to any required mitigation measures, which may include
excavation and recovery of the item.
(v) A precautionary approach will be adopted in the application of these procedures.

Detailed Procedural Steps

 If the Director, department of Archaeology receives any information or otherwise has the
knowledge of the discovery or existence of an antiquity of which there is no owner, he shall,
after satisfying himself as to the correctness of the information or knowledge, take such
steps with the approval of the Government, as he may consider necessary for the custody,
preservation and protection of the antiquity.
 Whoever discovers, or finds accidentally, any movable antiquity shall inform forth with the
Directorate within seven days of its being discovered or found.
 If, within seven days of his being informed, the Director decides to take over the antiquity for
purposes of custody, preservation and protection, the person discovering or finding it shall
hand it over to the Director or a person authorized by him in writing.
 Where the Director decides to take over an antiquity, he may pay to the person by whom it
is handed over to him such cash reward as may be decided in consultation with the Advisory
Committee.
 If any person, who discovers or finds any movable antiquity contravenes the provisions of
the Act, he shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to five (05)
years, or with fine not less than fifteen hundred thousand rupees or with both and the Court

39 | P a g e
convicting such person shall direct that the antiquity in respect of which such contravention
has taken place shall stand forfeited to Government.
 The Director or any officer authorized by him with police assistance may, after giving
reasonable notice, enter into, inspect and examine any premises, place or area which or the
sub-soil of which he may have reason to believe to be, or to contain an antiquity and may
cause any site, building, object or any antiquity or the remains of any antiquity in such
premises, place or area to be photographed, copied or reproduced by any process suitable
for the purpose.
 The owner or occupier of the premises, place or area shall afford all reasonable opportunity
and assistance to the Director.
 No photograph, copy of reproduction taken or made shall be sold or offered for sale except
by or with the consent of the owner of the object of which the photograph, copy or the
reproduction has been taken or made.
 Where substantial damage is caused to any property as a result of the inspection, the
Director shall pay to the owner thereof reasonable compensation for the damage in
consultation with the Advisory Committee.
 If the Director after conducting an inquiry, has reasonable grounds to believe that any land
contains any antiquity, he may approach the Government to direct the Revenue Department
to acquire such land or any part thereof and the Revenue Department shall thereupon
acquire such land or part under the Land Acquisition Act, 1894 (I of 1894), as for a public
purpose.

40 | P a g e