Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 84

CA GREEN BOOKS

CA ARCserve®
Media
Management
LEGAL NOTICE
This publication is based on current information and resource allocations as of its date of publication and
is subject to change or withdrawal by CA at any time without notice. The information in this publication
could include typographical errors or technical inaccuracies. CA may make modifications to any CA
product, software program, method or procedure described in this publication at any time without
notice.

Any reference in this publication to non-CA products and non-CA websites are provided for convenience
only and shall not serve as CA’s endorsement of such products or websites. Your use of such products,
websites, and any information regarding such products or any materials provided with such products or
at such websites shall be at your own risk.

Notwithstanding anything in this publication to the contrary, this publication shall not (i) constitute
product documentation or specifications under any existing or future written license agreement or
services agreement relating to any CA software product, or be subject to any warranty set forth in any
such written agreement; (ii) serve to affect the rights and/or obligations of CA or its licensees under
any existing or future written license agreement or services agreement relating to any CA software
product; or (iii) serve to amend any product documentation or specifications for any CA software
product. The development, release and timing of any features or functionality described in this
publication remain at CA’s sole discretion.

The information in this publication is based upon CA’s experiences with the referenced software
products in a variety of development and customer environments. Past performance of the software
products in such development and customer environments is not indicative of the future performance of
such software products in identical, similar or different environments. CA does not warrant that the
software products will operate as specifically set forth in this publication. CA will support only the
referenced products in accordance with (i) the documentation and specifications provided with the
referenced product, and (ii) CA’s then-current maintenance and support policy for the referenced
product.

Certain information in this publication may outline CA’s general product direction. All information in
this publication is for your informational purposes only and may not be incorporated into any contract.
CA assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information. To the extent
permitted by applicable law, CA provides this document “AS IS” without warranty of any kind, including,
without limitation, any implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, or
non-infringement. In no event will CA be liable for any loss or damage, direct or indirect, from the use
of this document, including, without limitation, lost profits, lost investment, business interruption,
goodwill or lost data, even if CA is expressly advised of the possibility of such damages.

COPYRIGHT LICENSE AND NOTICE:

This publication may contain sample application programming code and/or language which illustrate
programming techniques on various operating systems. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary
contained in this publication, such sample code does not constitute licensed products or software under
any CA license or services agreement. You may copy, modify and use this sample code for the
purposes of performing the installation methods and routines described in this document. These
samples have not been tested. CA does not make, and you may not rely on, any promise, express or
implied, of reliability, serviceability or function of the sample code.

Copyright © 2007 CA. All rights reserved. All trademarks, trade names, service marks and logos
referenced herein belong to their respective companies.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Principal Authors

Mid-Market and Storage BU


Contents
Chapter 1: Media Management and CA ARCserve Overview 5
Tape History.................................................................................................................. 6
Tape Technology............................................................................................................ 6
Tape Media ................................................................................................................ 7
Tape Drives................................................................................................................ 7
Tape Libraries............................................................................................................. 8
Virtual Tape Libraries ..................................................................................................... 9
Advantages of using VTLs .......................................................................................... 10
Disk History ................................................................................................................ 10
Disk Technology .......................................................................................................... 11
Disk Terminology ......................................................................................................... 11
Backup Utilities............................................................................................................ 12
CA ARCserve Architecture ............................................................................................. 13
CA ARCserve Components............................................................................................. 14
CA ARCserve Backup Manager .................................................................................... 14
CA ARCserve Backup Server....................................................................................... 14
CA ARCserve Agent ................................................................................................... 15
Command Line Interface ............................................................................................ 15

Chapter 2: Disk and Tape Usage 17


Media Capacity ............................................................................................................ 17
Tape Media Performance ............................................................................................... 18
Media Operations ......................................................................................................... 18
How Devices Interact with Operating Systems ................................................................. 20
Windows Operating System........................................................................................ 20
UNIX and Linux Operating Systems ............................................................................. 20

Chapter 3: CA ARCserve Tape Management 23


Bar Code Support ........................................................................................................ 23
Import and Export ....................................................................................................... 23
Inventory.................................................................................................................... 23
Encryption .................................................................................................................. 24
How a Backup Operation Works .................................................................................. 24
How a Restore Operation Works.................................................................................. 24
Compression ............................................................................................................... 25
Media Magazines.......................................................................................................... 25
How to Manage Media Magazines ................................................................................ 25
Cleaning Media ............................................................................................................ 25
Offsite ........................................................................................................................ 26
Certified Devices List .................................................................................................... 26

Chapter 4: File System Devices 29


How File System Device Configuration Works .................................................................. 29
Configure File System Devices ....................................................................................... 29
Configure Remote File System Devices ........................................................................... 35
Add Multiple File System Devices to a Common Device Group............................................ 40

CA ARCserve Media Management 3


Chapter 5: Disk Staging in CA ARCserve Backup for Windows 41
Disk Staging Requirements ........................................................................................... 41
How Disk Staging Works ............................................................................................... 41
Configure Disk Staging ................................................................................................. 42

Chapter 6: Media Pools and Tape Rotation 47


Media Pools ................................................................................................................. 47
Save Sets ................................................................................................................... 47
Scratch Sets................................................................................................................ 48
Media Pool Attributes.................................................................................................... 48
Types of Media Pools .................................................................................................... 49
GFS Media Pools ....................................................................................................... 49
Rotation Media Pools ................................................................................................. 52
User-Defined Media Pools........................................................................................... 53
Media Pool Manager ..................................................................................................... 53
Scenario ..................................................................................................................... 54

Chapter 7: Vaulting 59
Terminology ................................................................................................................ 60
Scenario ..................................................................................................................... 61
Tapecopy with Media Management ................................................................................. 63
How To Put Tapecopy Tapes into the Vault in Media Management Administrator .................. 63
Vaulting in UNIX .......................................................................................................... 64
Create an MMO Vault................................................................................................. 64
Create a Schedule ..................................................................................................... 64
Create a Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD) ...................................................................... 65
Create a Rotation Schedule ........................................................................................ 66
MMO Schedule Setup Completed................................................................................. 67
Vaulting in Windows ..................................................................................................... 67
Media Management Administrator ............................................................................... 67
Create an MMO Vault................................................................................................. 68
Create a Schedule ..................................................................................................... 69
Create a Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD) ...................................................................... 69
Create a Rotation...................................................................................................... 70
Start the Vaulting Process .......................................................................................... 71
Media Management Reports ....................................................................................... 72
FAQs .......................................................................................................................... 73

Appendix A: Tape Devices 77


Tape Technologies ....................................................................................................... 77
Advanced Intelligent Tape (AIT).................................................................................. 77
Digital Linear Tape (DLT) ........................................................................................... 78
Linear Tape-Open (LTO) ............................................................................................ 78
Tape Library Technologies............................................................................................. 79
Media Device Sharing ................................................................................................... 79

Appendix B: Understanding RAID 81

Index 83

4 Contents
Chapter 1: Media Management
and CA ARCserve Overview
Storage management is a gigantic task that every company in the industry is grappling with
today. The storage requirements for small to enterprise-level companies range from
anywhere between gigabytes to petabytes. The primary concern of all the modern
enterprises today is to ensure that the data necessary to drive critical business processes is
backed up timely and properly. In addition to storage and retrieval capabilities, companies
also need to comply with government rules and regulations to preserve and maintain data.

Though there are many storage devices available in the market today, tapes and disks are
the most commonly used media for storing data. Tapes are most commonly used due to
their portability, low cost, and high reliability. Conversely, disks and virtual tape libraries
(VTL) are mostly used where speed is critical to drive the business.

The purpose of the CA ARCserve Media Management Green Book is to provide detailed
information pertaining to media management. The first part of this book gives you an
overview of tape media, tape libraries, virtual tape libraries (VTLs), and disks. The latter
part of this book discusses tape management and media management in CA ARCserve.

CA ARCserve media management supports Recovery Time Objective (RTO) and Recovery
Point Objective (RPO) to manage data. RTO indicates how quickly you can recover data in
case of a disaster. RPO indicates how far back in time you can go to recover data, whether
it's a week, a month, or a year.

For information about using Tapecopy, see the chapter "Disk Staging in CA ARCserve
Backup for Windows."

For information on how CA ARCserve achieves RPO, see the chapter "Media Pools and Tape
Rotation."

For information on how CA ARCserve achieves RTO, see the chapter "Vaulting."

CA ARCserve Media Management 5


Tape History

Tape History

The introduction of the IBM 726 Tape Unit in 1952 marked a historic shift between the
mechanical, punch card-based calculators of the time, and the electronic computers of
today.

Source: IBM Archives

Improvements in tape technology have provided superior performance, functionality, and


storage capacity. The physical size of tape units has also decreased over time.

Despite other improved technologies, tape media remains the backbone of many
storage-related strategies, from data archiving to legal requirements. Tapes fit the storage
management requirements because of their desirable features. Tapes can be stored off-site
for disaster recovery; more tape drives and cartridges can be added for scalability. Tapes
are generally faster and reliable. Tapes meet compliance requirements and have a lower
cost of ownership.

Tape Technology

A tape is a long thin plastic strip magnetically coated with iron oxide. Data is stored or
written to tape for retrieval at another point in time.

Tape technology can be divided into the following main areas:

■ Tape Media (tape cartridges)

■ Tape Drives (physical drives)

■ Tape Libraries (multiple tape drives)

6 Media Management and CA ARCserve Overview


Tape Technology

Tape Media

Media refers to objects that are capable of storing data, such as hard drives, USB drives,
CDs, DVDs and tapes.

Tape media refers to a magnetically coated, continuous plastic strip used to store data for
later retrieval.

Tape media is sealed into specially designed media cartridges that protect the tape from
varying environmental conditions such as dust or smoke that could damage or potentially
erase the data stored on the tape. These media cartridges are used in tape drives to store
and retrieve data.

Media cartridges are designed for different tape drive architectures. Each architecture has
different storage capacities and access/mount times. The throughput speed for read/write
varies across these different tape drive technologies.

The appendix "Tape Devices" provides information on various types of backup media.

Tape Drives

Tape drives are devices that read data from and write data to tape. Tape drives have
varying technology architectures that address the differing needs for size, capacity,
performance, cost and reliability.

Typically, tape drive technologies comprise of the types of tapes:

Helical Scan Tapes

Helical scan tapes interact with tape drives consisting of a rotating head that is
positioned at a certain angle to the tape. Data is read or written in diagonal stripes
across the width of the tape.

Linear Tapes

Linear tapes use a stationary head to read or write data along the length of the tape.

Helical tape drives include the following devices:

CA ARCserve Media Management 7


Tape Technology

Digital Data Storage (DDS)

Reads or writes data to 4mm wide digital audio tape (DAT) cartridges. There are five
generations of DDS format capable of storing 2 GB, 8 GB, 24 GB, 36 GB, or 72 GB of
data to a single DAT cartridge (with compression).

Advanced Intelligent Tape (AIT)

Reads or writes data to 8mm wide AIT tape cartridges. AIT cartridges can store up to
400 GB of data (compressed), while AIT tape drives can transfer data up to 48 Mbps
(with compression).

Travan

Standardized by the Quarter Inch Cartridge (QIC) Consortium, Travan offers several
iterations. The latest Travan media capacities include 20 GB and 40 GB (compressed)
storage capacities.

Linear head tape drives include the following devices:

Digital Linear Tape (DLT)

Records data along a series of 128 or 1280 data tracks; uses a specific compression
technology—DLZ1—to store data on the tape. DLT cartridges can hold up to 160 GB of
uncompressed data; SuperDLT (DLT-S) cartridges can support to 800 GB of
uncompressed data. DLT drives can transfer data up to 60 Mbps.

Linear Tape-Open (LTO)

This open-standard linear tape technology is continuously evolving with existing and
planned future generations. For example, LTO third generation (LTO-3) tape media
capacity can store up to 400 GB of uncompressed data with transfer rates of 80 Mbps
(up to 160 Mbps compressed).

Tape drives require routine maintenance. This is due to the fact that the tape comes into
direct contact with the tape drive head. Over time, the tape drive head will accumulate
some magnetic material from either the tape itself or from dirt and dust.

Tape drives are sequential-access devices and as such, to read a particular block of data, all
the preceding blocks of data must also be read. This makes the tape drive a particularly
slow device for reading data, a disadvantage which causes businesses to consider data
storage solutions other than tape.

Note: CA ARCserve has an extensive list of supported tape libraries and tape library
vendors available from the ARCserve Certified Devices List (CDL).

Tape Libraries

Tape drives can only read or write to a single media cartridge at a time. Usually, when the
tape cartridge in the tape drive has reached the storage capacity of the media cartridge,
the tape media is ejected and a new tape cartridge is inserted.

8 Media Management and CA ARCserve Overview


Virtual Tape Libraries

To overcome such a physical task, especially if that task is repeated many times, you can
automate such cartridge "swapping" using a physical device called a tape library.

A tape library is a physical device with multiple tape drives and tape cartridges arranged in
media slots. A tape library not only automates the media cartridge swapping but also
extends the total capacity available for data storage.

The media cartridge swapping is enabled with the use of a robotic mechanism. The robot
can find and select specific tape cartridges, insert and remove media cartridges to and from
media slot locations and tape drives, import and export media cartridges from the tape
library and perform an inventory of the media cartridges and tape drives in the tape library.

These tape libraries also have specific media utilities to assist in the management,
reporting, and logging of the media activities in the tape library.

Virtual Tape Libraries

Virtual Tape Libraries (VTL) are dedicated appliances that consist of a CPU, application
software, and a RAID-based array of disk drives. These components are usually bundled by
a vendor into a single VTL, however, you can also purchase them separately.

The purpose of each component is as follows:

CPU

A central processing unit (CPU) consisting of hardware combined with an operating


system to run the application software.

Application Software

The Application software emulates a tape library and tape drives.

Disk Array

A disk array is the location where the data is stored.

The main reason for a VTL's existence is to emulate a tape library and tape drives. To
achieve this, the VTL can be either installed as a "default Tape Library" or configured to
emulate certain libraries, drives, or both, drives before installing the VTL into the CA
ARCserve environment. After the installation is complete, the CA ARCserve Tape Engine
detects and configures the VTL as a normal tape library. Because of this, CA ARCserve
media management is as for a normal tape library. However, the administrator must
understand that the media management being performed by CA ARCserve is, in fact, taking
place on a RAID-protected disk array.

CA ARCserve Media Management 9


Disk History

Advantages of using VTLs

VTLs are designed and developed to optimize your existing backup environment and
increase efficiency. The advantages of VTLs are as follows:

■ The VTL is much faster, though it looks and behaves like a tape library.

■ Adding capacity to a VTL is simple and inexpensive.

■ Tape drives wear out more frequently and with more impact than disk. VTLs are set up
in RAID configurations, so if a disk goes bad, data is not lost. When tapes go bad, the
data is normally lost. This results in two positive gains—less data loss and zero chances
of tape failure.

■ VTLs meet the RTO and RPO requirements better than tape drives.

■ You can restore from disk (depending on the capacity) for a timeframe even when the
tape is offsite.

■ Using VTLs helps reduce tape administration and expense.

■ VTLs offer high success rate for backups. Also, data from disk is quicker and more
efficient to restore.

Disk History

Over the past 50 years, the hard disk has evolved from 24-inch diameter disks that stored
what was considered at that time, a large amount of data. For example, in 1956, a disk
stored 5,000,000 bytes, or 5 MB of data. Today's 2.5 inch drive can store from 400 MB to
500 GB of data.

Since the development of the first hard disk, engineers have strived to improve the
reliability, capacity, speed, power consumption, compression technologies, and form
factors.

There are a number of resources and references on the history of disk, how a hard disk
works, key components, operations, technologies and developments. These can be obtained
from Internet searches, such as Google, public domain, such as Wikipedia, and the
Computer Museum History Center to public libraries. One such source available on the
Internet is the PC Guide.

http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/op/media.htm
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/op/media.htm

We encourage you to refer to these sources for more information.

10 Media Management and CA ARCserve Overview


Disk Technology

Disk Technology

Though there are many disk technologies available in the market, this green book will focus
only on the generic types of disk.

Stand-alone Disks

Stand-alone disks are simple, non-array disks that do not use Redundant Array of
Independent Disks (RAID) technologies at the hardware level. Combined simple disks in
storage towers or racks are known by the acronym of JBOD (just a bunch of disks). The
individual disks do not have their own Small Computer System Interface (SCSI)
connector; there is a shared path and one controller. Stand-alone disks are usually the
least expensive storage devices, as there are usually no provisions for fault tolerance or
redundancy. Mirrored JBODs are possible with vendor hardware and software solutions.

Disk Arrays

Disk arrays are more than a collection of disks. While residing in common enclosures,
each disk has its own controller. Typically, RAID is implemented with disk arrays, either
at the hardware or software level.

The result is that each disk array can appear to the operating system as one large disk,
or by using SCSI LUNs (Logical Unit Number), as several large disks.

Solid State Disks

Solid state disks are storage devices that use non-volatile or volatile, solid state
memory to store data. Solid state disks are often used as alternatives for hard disk
drives, but have a significantly smaller capacity than that of hard disk drives.

Disk Terminology

This section discusses the basic hard disk terminology:

Rotation

Describes how the disks spin.

Low-level Formatting

Establishes the tracks and sectors on platters.

CA ARCserve Media Management 11


Backup Utilities

Platter-Individual Disk

Refers to a disk drive that consists of several platters.

Track

Refers to the circle of recorded data on a single recording surface.

Sector

Tracks are further divided into sectors.

Cylinder

In a multi-head drive, all the tracks under the heads for a given arm position can be
read without seek delay. The operating system treats the contents of those tracks as a
single cylinder.

Head

Refers to the device that reads and writes the information. The head can read data
using either magnetic or optical technology.

Arm

Refers to the mechanical assembly that supports the heads as they move in and out.

Seek Time

Refers to the average time needed to move the heads to a new track.

Rotational Delay

Refers to the average time required to position the head on the desired track and
sector.

Backup Utilities

As tape media, disks, drives and libraries are generally used to store data, so the backup
utilities perform the task of transferring the data from a source to a destination. Backup
software assists the storage administrator with automating backup tasks, speedy file-level
restores, and disaster recovery.

There are two types of backup utilities available—hardware and software.

Hardware backup utilities are often vendor-specific and generally work best with the
hardware equipment and physical devices from the same vendor.

Software backup utilities generally work with any physical tape media, disks, drive, library,
or optical media. Extensive tests are often carried out by the backup software vendors to
ensure compatibility and error-free backup and restore operations.

12 Media Management and CA ARCserve Overview


CA ARCserve Architecture

CA ARCserve is a software-based backup utility that greatly assists and improves a storage
administrator's daily tasks by automating and scheduling backups, monitoring and alerting
on backup events and providing reporting on all backup events.

CA ARCserve Architecture

The following diagram depicts the CA ARCserve high-level architecture. At the top is the CA
ARCserve Manager, which controls all GUI operations. From the manager you can schedule
jobs and options, configure devices, run reports, look at logs and manage media. The CA
ARCserve Manager can be installed on a Windows 200x host, or a Windows XP host to aid in
remote administration.

The CA ARCserve Server is the heart of the system. It controls all the major communication
between the software API layer and the hardware layer. The three main services are:

CA ARCserve Media Management 13


CA ARCserve Components

Job Engine

The Job Engine or Job Queue handles all the job scheduling.

Tape Engine

The Tape Engine controls all the hardware communication between the API and the
Tape Device, or File System Device.

Database Engine

The Database Engine is where all of the backup jobs' history is recorded. This allows
you to view a previous backup job and browse through an OS file system, database and
Groupware recovery points.

CA ARCserve Components

CA ARCserve consists of the following main components:

■ CA ARCserve Backup Manager

■ CA ARCserve Backup Server

■ CA ARCserve Agent

■ Command Line Interface

The following sections describe each of these components.

CA ARCserve Backup Manager

Use the CA ARCserve Backup Manager (GUI) to submit your backup and restore jobs,
manage your database, and search reports. You can install the CA ARCserve Backup
Manager on the same machine as the CA ARCserve Backup Server, or on a different
machine, such as a Windows 2000 or Windows XP workstation.

Note: For more information, see the CA ARCserve Backup for Windows Administrator
Guide.

CA ARCserve Backup Server

The CA ARCserve Backup Server schedules backup and recovery options. It manages the
transfer of data to, from, and between backup devices (CD-R, DVD-R, tape drives, disks,
tape libraries, and hard drives). Data from servers and applications can be backed up to
any of these devices. Data can also be copied between any of the media types to allow the
following scenarios:

■ Back up to disk (fast restore) and copy to tape (disaster recovery, regulatory
compliance, and so on)

14 Media Management and CA ARCserve Overview


CA ARCserve Components

■ Back up to tape (keep a local copy) and copy or consolidate to another tape (disaster
recovery, regulatory compliance, and so on)

Note: For more information, see the CA ARCserve Backup for Windows Administrator
Guide.

CA ARCserve Agent

The CA ARCserve Agent works with the CA ARCserve Backup Server to back up data in files,
databases, Exchange servers, and so on. This agent runs on the machine on which the
application or the data to be backed up resides. There is a specific agent for each of the
clients (such as UNIX, Windows, and NetWare) and applications.

Command Line Interface

CA ARCserve has a rich set of command line utilities that can be run either locally or
remotely to perform different operations like submitting backup jobs, managing the queues,
querying the database, and so on.

CA ARCserve Media Management 15


Chapter 2: Disk and Tape Usage
This chapter introduces you to disk and tape terminology and the operations that you can
perform using disks and tapes. The operating system support for interacting with the tapes
is also discussed briefly at the end of this chapter.

Media Capacity

The following terms describe the media capacity of disks and tapes:

Tapes

Most tape formats support some level of compression. Most of the tape formats support
a 2:1 compression ratio whereas others support 2.6:1 or other ratios. For information
on the capacities of the tape formats supported by CA ARCserve, see the table in the
section "Tape Media Performance (see page 18)."

Disk Arrays

Typical hard disk arrays might have up to 15 disks; each disk having a typical capacity
of 500 GB. That equates to a disk array capacity of 7.5Tb, generally considered suitable
for different types of data protection required by businesses. With this type of capacity
to handle, the array could be broken up into two manageable LUNs of 3.5Tb each. One
LUN might be put to use to protect user data, the other LUN might be to protect a
database or email system.

Disk capacities continue to grow to meet the demand by businesses for increased
online capacity.

CA ARCserve Media Management 17


Tape Media Performance

Tape Media Performance

The following table lists the capacities of the tape formats supported by CA ARCserve.

Media Operations

The following are the most commonly performed media operations and commands.

Back up Data

Refers to the process of archiving source data to tape media, disk, or optical media for
the protection of business processes.

Restore Data

Refers to the process of retrieving archived data from the backup media, usually to
recover lost or corrupted data.

18 Disk and Tape Usage


Media Operations

Format Media

Refers to the process of formatting backup media for use with backup software.
Formatting erases any pre-existing data on the media.

Merge Data

Refers to the process of importing backup session information to the ARCserve


database. If session information is not imported into the ARCserve database at the end
of the backup job, you can optionally merge the session details before you restore the
data. With the merge operation, you can merge a single session, all sessions, or a
range of sessions from the selected media.

Erase Media

Refers to the process of removing backup data from storage media. Write-protected
media will be indicated in the backup application and cannot be erased. A slot that is
defined to contain cleaning media will not appear at all.

Note: In Windows, this slot is defined as a cleaning slot. If a cleaning tape is in the
library and is not identified either in the library or in CA ARCserve, then it will be listed
as Unreadable Media.

Retension Media

Refers to the process of ensuring that a tape is evenly wound and properly tensioned.
Tape tends to become uneven and lose on the spools after multiple uses. A tape which
is not properly tensioned can be prone to errors; for example, the tape may jam or
break.

Compress Media

Refers to the process of reducing the size of the data on the media. With compressed
data, you save space on media and reduce transmission time through your network.
The compression ratio is determined by the technology and the type of data being
backing up. For example, database files are usually highly compressible. However,
documents and multimedia files (for example, audio files, videos, and images) usually
have some native compression already built in, so they will not compress further when
written to compressible media.

Tapecopy Utility

Refers to the CA ARCserve utility that lets you make logical, media-to-media copies at
the session level, or of two different types of media. You can use the Tapecopy utility to
copy sessions to write once, read many (WORM) media.

Eject Media

Refers to the process of removing media from a drive, which prevents further writing.
You can also set an option within the backup job to automatically eject the media at the
end of the job.

CA ARCserve Media Management 19


How Devices Interact with Operating Systems

How Devices Interact with Operating Systems

The following sections discuss the device interaction in the Windows, UNIX, and Linux
operating systems.

Windows Operating System

After the miniport driver is installed, Windows operating systems use the SCSI port driver
that comes with Microsoft Windows. The Microsoft SCSI port driver covers common
functionality shared by all SCSI drivers, so that SCSI card vendors can concentrate on
implementing the features relevant to their own hardware.

Clients may have installed the Storport drivers for such benefits as redundancy to hard
drives. Backup software should be able to either use the Storport drivers or use
pass-through commands to communicate directly with the miniport, if necessary.

One characteristic of the SCSI architecture is that it was designed for optimal throughput
for operations that involve large data transfers (such as mass file copies, video/audio
capture, data backup, and so on). For this reason, the SCSI cards have their own processor
to move the data without requiring OS involvement. There is minimal to no use of the
server's CPU to preserve CPU cycles for important applications such as the mail system and
databases.

UNIX and Linux Operating Systems

On the UNIX or Linux operating systems, CA ARCserve uses the standard operating system
drivers with a few exceptions:

■ The process of finding and accessing the tape devices and changers requires that the
server can see all devices in a library at all times.

■ All communication with tape drives and tape libraries will use a SCSI pass-through
technology after locking the device from system use. This means that you cannot use
these devices with system commands like tar and dd while CA ARCserve is running.

■ The SAN option extends this same idea but can cause problems as we do not use SCSI
persistence to lock drive on a SAN. This means that only CA ARCserve servers in a SAN
can access these devices to avoid issues with sharing these devices across a SAN.

Camediad is a CA ARCserve application, or daemon, that handles the transfer of data to and
from media. It is responsible for communicating with the tape devices to perform various
device operations (for example, creation, modification, deletion of groups, assignment of
media to a group, and so on), media operations (for example, format, erase, import,
export, and so on), and backup and restore operations to tape media, FSDs (file system
devices), optical devices, and so on.

To know the background process in the camediad application better, you can run the
cstatus command and view the actual PID’s used for media access. The number of PID’s

20 Disk and Tape Usage


How Devices Interact with Operating Systems

will vary based on the number of tape devices (both physical tape drives and file system
tape devices) registered with ARCserve. The first two PID’s are used for the main and
callback processes. The remaining PID’s are used for each individual tape device. For
example, if you have four real tape devices and two file system tape devices, you will see a
total of eight PID’s for camediad after it is fully initialized. Each of these tape device PID’s
will be used during tape drive actions such as backup or restore.

The following list identifies the proper method for accessing tape and library devices for
each operating system:

AIX

CA ARCserve uses the AIX standard tape driver for all tape devices on the IBM AIX
platform.

The AIX driver creates an rmt device file. The numbers after the letters rmt identify
additional descriptions like the low-level format of the drive or if compression should be
enabled. If the IBM Atape driver is used with an IBM tape library, then these devices
may also contain an additional extension that relates the drive to its specific library. For
example, .smc0 would point a drive to the first library in the system.

For accessing tape libraries, CA ARCserve uses the IBM Atape driver provided the driver
supports that tape library. If the library is not an IBM library or if the fiber card it
connects with does not have an IBM BIOS, then the CA ARCserve cha driver must be
used and the Atape drive must not be present on the system.

HP-UX

CA ARCserve uses the sctl HP driver for all tape devices on the HP-UX platform.

Note: Previous versions of CA ARCserve allowed the spt driver when the tape drive was
attached to an older on-board SCSI card.

Linux

CA ARCserve uses the sg driver for all tape drives and libraries on a Linux machine. You
must ensure that the sg driver is installed and can view all tape and library devices. To
verify that all devices are seen properly, use the command:

cat /proc/scsi/scsi

Solaris

CA ARCserve used the Solaris st driver to access tape devices and tape libraries on the
Solaris platform. The only time manual manipulation of configuration files may be
required is if the sgen driver is installed and used to access tape devices in a SAN
environment. For more information, contact CA Technical Support
(http://www.ca.com/support).

CA ARCserve Media Management 21


Chapter 3: CA ARCserve Tape
Management
This chapter explains the various options that can be performed on tape and tape libraries
with regard to CA ARCserve. These options help you figure out how to clean the drives and
how to use compression and encryption. This chapter also explains how you can add and
remove tapes from a tape library.

Bar Code Support

CA ARCserve supports the use of bar codes on tapes used for backups. All large libraries,
and most small libraries, consist of a robot, also known as a bar code reader, that scans all
tapes in the library slots. The bar code information is relayed to and stored in the CA
ARCserve database. CA ARCserve uses the bar code data to identify the location of tape
media. This information becomes critical as the life of the tape progresses through multiple
backup and restore events.

The data stored in the tape is directly associated with the bar code number of the tape.
When tapes are vaulted offsite, the bar code numbers are used for ongoing tracking.
Restore operations reference the bar code number of a tape.

Import and Export

Many libraries have Cartridge Access Ports (often referred to as the CAP) which are used to
add and remove tapes from a library. As tapes are used, exporting can be automated such
that the tapes to be taken offsite are automatically exported to the CAP, and are removed
by the tape management team the following morning. The next logical step would be for
the same person to import new tapes to be inducted into the media management cycle.

In the best case scenario, the administrator would always use the CAP to import and export
tapes to and from the library. However, this is often not the most timely or efficient means
available, which brings us to the next section—Inventory.

Inventory

The ability to inventory a library is essential, as many administrators do not have the time
to import and export tapes the correct way. Rather than using the CAP to pull 10 tapes out
at a time, the administrator might open the library door and manually remove and insert
tapes. When this happens (as is quite common), the CA ARCserve database does not know
about the tapes that have been manually removed and inserted. The database, therefore, is
in an inconsistent state.

CA ARCserve Media Management 23


Encryption

When the database is in an inconsistent state, you may encounter many errors. You can
avoid these by performing a library inventory. By inventorying the library, CA ARCserve
scans all bar codes in the library and updates its internal database accordingly.

Encryption

The intelligent client-to-server data encryption feature of CA ARCserve enhances your


network security by encrypting data packets transported during a backup job with a session
password. This feature ensures that transported or archived data is secure and password
protected, and assures both the privacy of data transmitted over the network and the
security of your backup media. Tapes cannot be misused or restored by users who do not
have the encryption key.

When you choose this feature, your backup data is encrypted. This includes data packets
that are transported between the client and the server, data that resides on the local server
and data that has been moved to backup media. When you specify data encryption, CA
ARCserve uses 168-bit 3DES encryption to back up files.

The following sections describe how backup and restore operations work when encryption is
utilized.

How a Backup Operation Works

The following steps describe how a backup operation works:

■ To encrypt your backup data, select Backup Media from the Options tab of the backup
job.

■ Select the Encrypt option and add a Session/Encryption Password that will be used as
the unique encryption key.

■ CA ARCserve encrypts the backup data at the client agent machine before transferring
the data to the backup server. The data will be written to tape in the same encrypted
format.

Encrypted data cannot be compressed by the tape drive, so if you need to compress the
encrypted data you must select the compression option as well. To use software
compression you need to format the tape without compression. For more information, see
Compression (see page 25).

How a Restore Operation Works

The following steps describe how a restore operation works:

■ After selecting the sessions that you want to restore, you must enter the encryption
password. CA ARCserve verifies the session password with the one that was provided
during the backup encryption.

24 CA ARCserve Tape Management


Compression

■ When the job starts running, CA ARCserve reads the job file and decrypts the
encryption password for each backup session. All sessions from a single backup use the
same encryption password.

■ If the backup session is restored through a client agent, the data traversing the
network is still encrypted until decrypted by the client agent.

Compression

If the compression global option is selected, CA ARCserve checks the target backup media
to see if hardware compression is enabled. If hardware compression is enabled, the
compression option flag in the job script is turned off, and CA ARCserve allows the
hardware to take care of the data compression. If hardware compression is not enabled,
the backup module uses software compression (using a GNU algorithm) to compress the
data before sending it to the backup media.

Media Magazines

Small Tape Library/Auto Loaders are usually equipped with removable tape magazines. The
size and number of the magazines can vary from vendor to vendor depending on how many
slots the unit is configured with. This feature allows easy media addition, removal, storage
and transport.

How to Manage Media Magazines

Use the Mount/Dismount option to load or remove a magazine from the library. Mounting a
magazine initiates an inventory of the slots in the magazine. Dismounting a magazine
returns all media to their home slots and prepares the magazine for removal. The time
taken by this process will vary according to the number of media in the magazine you are
mounting or dismounting.

Note: Magazines must be mounted before library operations can start. You must dismount
magazines before you physically remove them.

Cleaning Media

A contaminated tape drive is usually discovered when you are running a backup job. A
significant number of tape drive and media errors can be resolved by cleaning the tape
drive. If a cleaning tape is installed in the tape cleaning slot specified during setup, CA
ARCserve can perform drive cleaning during a job.

You can also specify a cleaning schedule. If no schedule is specified, CA ARCserve defaults
to a 100-hour period between scheduled tape cleaning operations.

CA ARCserve Media Management 25


Offsite

When CA ARCserve detects a contaminated tape drive during a backup job, and a cleaning
slot is configured, CA ARCserve automatically performs the following actions:

■ If CA ARCserve detects a write error during a backup, and the symptoms relate to a
contaminated tape drive or media, a second attempt is made to write to the tape drive.

■ If the second write attempt fails, the tape drive is cleaned if one or more of the
following conditions exist:

> The tape drive has never been cleaned.

> DLTSage™ detected the need to clean the tape drive, and drive usage exceeds
one fourth of the scheduled cleaning.

> The tape drive usage exceeds one-third of the cleaning.

> The ForceClean tape drive option is specified.

■ If CA ARCserve then determines that a tape drive must be cleaned to continue a job,
the following actions take place:

> CA ARCserve pauses the job.

> The library returns the tape to its home slot and locks the tape drive.

> CA ARCserve directs the cleaning operation.

> The library reloads the tape into the cleaned drive and aligns the tape with the
buffer.

> CA ARCserve resumes the job.

Offsite

The term offsite refers to the act of removing tapes from the backup facility and
transporting them to a secure location. From this location, they can be retrieved in the
event of an emergency or even a disaster recovery exercise. The process of tracking the
tapes while they are offsite is called vaulting. An entire chapter is devoted to this subject in
this book.

Certified Devices List

The CA ARCserve Certified Device List (CDL) is where you can check that your backup
devices are certified to work with CA ARCserve. The CDL contains an extensive list of
devices that have been specifically certified to work with different components within CA
ARCserve.

If you have specific hardware issues, check the CDL to verify that the device you have is
certified. Devices can usually be verified by their model and firmware revision. You can find
the CDL on the CA Support site at http://ca.com/support (http://www.ca.com/support).

26 CA ARCserve Tape Management


Certified Devices List

Note: Since the CDL is updated often, see the copy on the CA Support site whenever you
are verifying devices.

CA ARCserve Media Management 27


Chapter 4: File System Devices
A File System Device (FSD) is a storage space on the spindle which can be used as a
staging device or final destination. An FSD provides the benefit of using a large disk or disk
array as a backup resource. Alternately, a local hard disk or a local disk array or a SAN
attached disk array can be used as a file system device. Using an FSD has multiple
advantages. The prominent ones being reduction of the backup window, faster and more
reliable restores, elimination of the tape media challenge, co-existence with the existing
media strategy and using disk-based backups with offsite tape media for long term or
disaster recovery policies.

This chapter discusses the creation of file system devices in CA ARCserve.

How File System Device Configuration Works

To take advantage of disks made available for the purpose of data protection, you must
configure the FSDs based on the hardware vendor specifications, before you add or mount
the FSDs to the operating system.

After FSDs are ready for use by the operating system, you must configure the FSDs for
backup and restore operations using Device Configuration.

The following section describes how to configure FSDs for backup and restore operations.

Configure File System Devices

The following section describes how to configure file system devices for backup and restore
operations.

To configure file system devices

CA ARCserve Media Management 29


Configure File System Devices

1. Start Device Configuration.

2. Click Next.

3. Select the File System Devices radio button and click Next.

30 File System Devices


Configure File System Devices

If the Tape Engine service is currently running, Device Configuration will ask if it can be
stopped to continue.

If you are sure that you have no backup or restore jobs in progress, click Yes to
continue and stop the tape engine.

When the tape engine has stopped you will be presented with the screen below, where
you can configure File System Devices.

CA ARCserve Media Management 31


Configure File System Devices

4. Click Add to configure a new File System Device.

32 File System Devices


Configure File System Devices

Complete the following fields.

File Device Name

This is the device name that will appear in the Device Manager GUI.

Note: The File Device Name cannot contain spaces.

Description

A Description of the file system device (can be anything you choose).

Location

Click the arrow (>) and specify the location for the file system device:

CA ARCserve Media Management 33


Configure File System Devices

Specify the location for the file system device:

You can select an existing directory or create a new one using the dialog above.

After you create or select the location for the file system device, click Select to
continue.

34 File System Devices


Configure Remote File System Devices

5. Click Finish, or you can add more file system devices depending on the type of Jobs you
are going to set up. There are different requirements for GFS and non-GFS, rotation
and non-rotation jobs. See the CA ARCserve Backup for Windows Administrator Guide
for further details.

Configure Remote File System Devices

You can add remote file system devices using a UNC path as the location, such as
\\machinename\sharename

To configure remote file system devices

1. Start Device Configuration.

2. Click Next.

3. Select the File System Devices radio button and click Next.

If the Tape Engine service is currently running, Device Configuration will ask if it can be
stopped to continue.

4. If you are sure that you have no backup or restore jobs in progress, click Yes to
continue and stop the tape engine.

When the tape engine has stopped, you will be presented with the screen where you
can configure File System Devices.

If you attempt to use a mapped drive with the most recent versions, it will be
converted to a UNC Path.

CA ARCserve Media Management 35


Configure Remote File System Devices

5. Click the Security button to specify credentials to connect to the remote share.

By default the BrightStor System account will be used. If this is not appropriate,
uncheck the checkbox to specify alternative credentials.

6. Click OK to save and verify the details. If the details are incorrect, you will receive a
pop-up warning similar to the one below:

36 File System Devices


Configure Remote File System Devices

If the credentials provided are correct, you will be returned to the File System Device
Configuration Screen.

7. Click Finish to complete configuration.

CA ARCserve Media Management 37


Configure Remote File System Devices

Now that you have completed the configuration of the File system device, you can start the
Tape Engine, either by opening the BrightStor Manager and going into Job Status, or by
starting the engine in Services or Server Admin.

In the Device Manager, you will see a new board 'CA FSAdapter'. In this, you will see the
File System Device(s) you created. This is highlighted in the following two illustrations.

38 File System Devices


Configure Remote File System Devices

Enlarged view:

A new device group should be automatically created for the File System Devices.

The more File System Devices you create, the more jobs you can run at one time.

CA ARCserve Media Management 39


Add Multiple File System Devices to a Common Device Group

File System Devices are used just like tape drives or individual tapes, but remember that
the hard drive will be used up fast, so please check the free space available.

Add Multiple File System Devices to a Common Device


Group

When you create an individual FSD, it will belong to its own Device Group. If you would like
to add multiple FSD under a common Device Group then simply add them under a common
"File Device Name" (which is the first field when defining an FSD).

40 File System Devices


Chapter 5: Disk Staging in CA
ARCserve Backup for Windows
Tape technology is the media of choice for most of today's backups because of its good
price-capacity ratio. However, retrieving data from tapes can be time-consuming.

Conventional hard disks can also be used as a backup target. The biggest advantage of
backing up to disk is fast data restore. The price of hard disks has gone down dramatically
in recent years, however, it is still not practical to use it for secondary storage. CA
ARCserve can take advantage of low cost storage and quick data retrieval, by combining
the two technologies using the disk staging mechanism. Data is first staged to disk for quick
backup or restore and can later be archived to tape to free up disk space.

Now that the data is residing on the file system devices, many businesses have a need to
migrate this backup data to tape media, whether it is for archival, legal, or longevity
reasons. To achieve this goal, CA ARCserve uses a tapecopy feature.

As the data on the disk is already in same format that CA ARCserve uses while writing to
tape media, the tapecopy command is used as a means for copying this data to the tape
media. When completed, the data on the tape is identical to the data that resided on the
disk, including the encryption if used.

Disk Staging Requirements

To configure CA ARCserve for disk staging, you need the following hardware and software:

Software

> BrightStor ARCserve Backup Host server

> BrightStor ARCserve Backup Tape Library Option (if using a library with more
than one drive)

Hardware

> Tape drive and/or Library

> Hard disk storage sufficient to stage backup data for the user-specified number
of days

How Disk Staging Works

Disk staging involves the following two steps:

CA ARCserve Media Management 41


Configure Disk Staging

> Creating the FSDs using BrightStor Device Configuration. For information on
creating FSDs, see chapter 4 "File System Devices".

> Configuring CA ARCserve for disk staging

Configure Disk Staging

After checking the requirements and creating the FSDs, you are now ready to configure CA
ARCserve for disk staging.

To prepare and configure Disk to Disk to Tape (D2D2T) in CA ARCserve

1. Select the Staging tab in the Backup Manager.

2. Click Configure File System Device Groups.

42 Disk Staging in CA ARCserve Backup for Windows


Configure Disk Staging

The File System Device Group Configuration dialog opens.

3. In the File System Device Group Configuration dialog, check Enable Staging on any
group to make that a staging group.

Selecting Enable Staging enables the rest of the staging group parameters.

4. The configured staging group is visible under the Staging tab.

CA ARCserve Media Management 43


Configure Disk Staging

Note: Non-staging groups are not visible under the Staging tab.

When Staging is enabled, you can choose the number of simultaneous streams for this
job. Also note that the Policy button is now enabled. Clicking the Policy tab opens the
Staging Policy dialog.

5. In the Full Backup tab of the Staging Policy dialog, specify the staging policies such as
when you want to copy data, when to purge data, and SnapLock capability.

44 Disk Staging in CA ARCserve Backup for Windows


Configure Disk Staging

6. In the Differential/Incremental Backup tab, specify the staging policies such as when to
copy data, when to purge data, and SnapLock capability.

7. In the Miscellaneous tab, select the policies as required.

CA ARCserve is now configured for disk staging.

CA ARCserve Media Management 45


Chapter 6: Media Pools and
Tape Rotation
CA ARCserve provides media options to manage backup data by grouping them into
different pools. These media pools provide a method of grouping media having related uses
or management needs. A tape can only belong to one media pool at a time. Media pools
can be configured for various purposes by changing their attributes as needed.

Media Pools

A media pool is a collection of media (typically, tapes) managed as a unit. Media pooling
allows network administrators to manage large numbers of media on the shelves.

A media pool is further sub-grouped into a save set and a scratch set.

The save set holds tapes whose information is not to be overwritten; you can only append
to tapes in a save set. For a tape to be eligible for vaulting, it must reside in the media
pool’s save set (if media pool is used as a criterion for vaulting).

The scratch set holds tapes whose information can be overwritten; its tapes are
reformatted before use. Tapes can be assigned to a media pool and to either its scratch or
save set as needed. At the execution of a backup to a tape that belongs to a media pool’s
scratch set, that tape is automatically moved to the media pool’s save set.

Save Sets

The media pool save set is a set of media that cannot be overwritten until the media pool's
retention requirements have been met. You can modify save set information for all custom
backup jobs; move media from the save set to the scratch set; and move media from one
media pool save set to another media pool save set.

You define the minimum number of media that must be contained in the save set and the
retention period (in days). These settings determine how long media will be held. After both
of these criteria have been satisfied, CA ARCserve releases the oldest media in the save set
back into the scratch set, where it can be overwritten.

The retention period is the number of days in which a media has not been used (written to)
before it is moved into the scratch set. For example, if you specify a retention period of 14
days, a media remains in the save set if it has been used within that specified time. If the
media has not been used for 14 days, it is moved to the scratch set.

The minimum number of media contained within the save set is the number of media that
must be retained in the save set before the older media are recycled to the scratch set. This

CA ARCserve Media Management 47


Scratch Sets

is a safeguard for preventing data loss in case backups are not done for extended periods of
time.

Note: You will receive a warning if you attempt to format or erase media that is contained
in a save set.

Scratch Sets

The media pool scratch set is a set of media that has been recycled from the save set after
its specified retention criteria has been satisfied. The media from the save set that can be
re-used and overwritten are placed in the scratch set after they have met the specified
criteria (the minimum number of media to save, and the retention period). The oldest
media in the scratch set (those that have not been used for the longest period of time) are
used first.

Each time a media in the scratch set is used, it moves from the scratch set to the save set.
The media moves back to the scratch set once the specified retention criteria have been
met. If the media meets these retention criteria, CA ARCserve prompts for a blank tape or
accepts media from the scratch set.

CA ARCserve performs media pool maintenance at the beginning of a job, and will not allow
media in the save set to be moved to the scratch set until the two retention criteria are
met. When you select a media pool scratch set in the left pane of the Media Pool Manager,
the right pane displays the media pool name, the set name, the owner name, and the date
the scratch set was created.

Media Pool Attributes

The attributes of the media pool that affect media pool membership are as follows:

Minimum Save Set Copies

Indicates the minimum number of media to keep in the save set. Media are
automatically moved back to the scratch only if this attribute continues to hold true.

Retention Period (Days)

When a tape is moved back to the scratch set, it is available for reformat. The
Retention Period (Days) refers to the number of days the tapes must be kept in the
save set before being automatically moved back to the scratch set. This attribute
effectively controls the period of time that tapes are to be protected from reformat.

If a tape is vaulted and is a member of the scratch set, it will still be protected against
formatting (and appending) until such time as it is no longer vaulted.

48 Media Pools and Tape Rotation


Types of Media Pools

Types of Media Pools

There are three types of media pools available for rotation schemes:

■ GFS Media Pools

■ Rotation Media Pools

■ User Defined Pools

GFS Media Pools

The GFS (Grandfather-Father-Son) rotation scheme automatically creates three media


pools—daily, weekly, and monthly—when you schedule a backup. These pools are named
according to the Media Pool Prefix that you enter in the Schedule dialog box. Each media
pool has its own scratch set and save set, with a default retention period and a minimum
number of media to save.

The GFS rotation scheme contains the following components:

Grandfather

Last full monthly backup

Father

Last full weekly backup

Son

Daily backup

CA ARCserve provides several GFS configuration options that help customize the rotation
scheme. These options are:

■ Rotation Rules

■ Calendar View

■ Exceptions

■ Media

The GFS rotation scheme automatically creates three media pools:

CA ARCserve Media Management 49


Types of Media Pools

Daily pool

Holds the daily media. The default retention period is six days, and the number of save
set media is one less than the number of daily media in the GFS rotation.

Weekly pool

Holds the weekly media. The default retention period is the number of weekly media,
times seven, minus one [(# of weeklies * 7) - 1]. The number of save media is one less
than the number of weekly media in the GFS setup.

Monthly pool

Holds the monthly media. The default retention period is the number of monthly media,
times 29, minus five [(# of monthlies * 29) - 5]. The number of save media is one less
than the number of monthly media in the GFS setup. This is automatically created
when a GFS job is submitted.

The default GFS rotation scheme schedule requires 21 tapes as follows:

■ 4 daily tapes

■ 5 weekly tapes

■ 12 monthly tapes

The formulas used to calculate the minimum save tapes and the retention period for a GFS
job are as follows:

Example:

When you create or modify a GFS Media Pool, you must note the following issues:

50 Media Pools and Tape Rotation


Types of Media Pools

■ Based on the GFS naming convention, the names of the GFS tapes will constantly
change.

■ The GFS daily log will indicate the tape required for your next backup.

NAMING GFS MEDIA

Naming GFS media helps prevent mistakes when replacing media during backup. CA
ARCserve automatically formats GFS media and names it using a standard naming
convention.

BackupType-SetName-WeekDay-Date

where the backup type can be:

F = Full Backup

I = Incremental Backup

D = Differential Backup

W = Weekly Backup

M = Monthly Backup

Example:

F-LABS-FRI-10/05/07

This media name indicates that a Full backup (F) is scheduled for the set name LABS on
Friday, October 5, 2007.

CA ARCserve Media Management 51


Types of Media Pools

Rotation Media Pools

When a Rotation job is submitted, a media pool is automatically created.

Keep the following issues in mind when working with Rotation Media Pools:

■ The nature of a Rotation job is a one-week backup rotation.

■ When you run a new Rotation job, you must first transfer the used tapes into the
Rotation media pool, or start with blank tapes without serial numbers on them.

52 Media Pools and Tape Rotation


Media Pool Manager

User-Defined Media Pools

Using CA ARCserve, you can create a media pool that you can then use in a rotation job.

Media Pool Manager

The Media Pool Manager allows you to create and maintain media pools. The Media Pool
Manager lets you perform the following tasks:

■ Create a new media pool—To assign media to a media pool, you must first create the
media pool. A media pool name can have up to 16 uppercase characters.

■ Delete an existing media pool—To delete a media pool, you must first re-assign the
media to another media pool.

■ Move media in a pool—You can move media from one set to another. You can also
move media from a scratch set to a save set and vice versa by using the Assign Media
and Remove Media options.

■ Perform location maintenance—You can enter information about a new location,


modify information about an existing location, or assign media to a location.

■ Assign media to a media pool—You can assign existing media either to a save set or
scratch set of an existing media pool using the Media Pool Manager or you can assign
media to a media pool during the process of formatting using the Device Manager.

■ Remove media from a media pool—You can remove media from a media pool.

Note: The WORM (Write Once Read Many) media does not support media pool
operations, backup jobs (using the overwrite option), backup jobs (involving media
pools such as GFS rotation jobs), and tape erase operations. These operations are
either blocked or disabled in WORM support updates.

CA ARCserve Media Management 53


Scenario

■ View the Media Pool and GFS Rotation Profile Reports

■ Reconfigure media pool properties

■ View the following media properties for any media in a media pool:

> Media name, serial number, and random ID number

> Name of the media pool to which media belongs

> Expiration date of the media

> Date the media was first formatted

> Date the media was last formatted

> Date the media was sent

> Date the media was last read

When you format media using the Device Manager, you define certain media pooling
information that will be associated with the media. You can define the following media pool
information when you format the media:

■ New Media Name—If the media inserted in the storage device is named, that name
will be displayed. If the media is blank, you can assign a media name. If the media is
blank, but has an assigned serial number, it can be assigned to any existing media
pool.

■ Expiration Date—You can set an expiration date for the media to be formatted. On
the expiration date, CA ARCserve will remind you that the media has reached
expiration.

■ Media Pool—You can select any existing media pool previously created using the
Media Pool Manager.

■ Serial Number—The serial number is the current serial number, bar code label, or the
next available serial number (based on predefined rules).

Scenario

Let's now take an example of how you can format media using the Device Manager; assign
the media to a media pool using the Media Pool Manager; and then see how the media
moves to a save set.

54 Media Pools and Tape Rotation


Scenario

1. The tape is first loaded onto a drive serviced by a CA ARCserve tape server. The Device
Manager is used to format this tape. At this point, the tape does not belong to any
specific media pool.

2. Click Assign Media in Media Pool Manager to open the Assign Media window.

CA ARCserve Media Management 55


Scenario

On this window, you can add unassigned tapes to selected media pools. When a tape is
added to a media pool, it is automatically assigned to the media pool's scratch set,
making it available for reformat and use by backups to that media pool.

3. At any time, you can manually move a tape between scratch and save sets by clicking
Move. You must then fill the fields in the Move window.

Following the successful execution of a backup to a tape in the scratch set, the tape is
automatically moved to the save set. After a tape is moved to the save set, it remains there
until it qualifies to be moved back to the scratch set. To qualify to be moved back to the
scratch set, the tape must have been in the save set longer than the media pool's values
for Retention Period (Days), and Minimum Save Set Copies must remain true. Tapes are
checked for automatic movement to the scratch set at the execution of backups to the
media pool or at the execution of the ca_dbmgr -mediapool applyRetention command.
When a backup executes to a media pool, only that media pool is checked for tapes to be
moved the scratch set. The ca_dbmgr command, however, will check all media pools in the
system.

56 Media Pools and Tape Rotation


Scenario

To change a media pool's Retention Period or Minimum Save Set Copies, click Modify in the
Media Pool Manager GUI and change the fields in the Modify Media Pool window as
appropriate.

CA ARCserve Media Management 57


Chapter 7: Vaulting
Vaulting is a mechanism that involves moving tapes that contained backed-up data outside
of the tape library and storing them in some safe location. The location can either be local
to the data center or can be a remote location. The offsite location can also come from a
third-party vendor. Administrators usually opt for vaulting due to the following reasons:

■ To protect tapes containing crucial backup data from a disaster (such as an earthquake
or a fire) that may affect a given location.

■ If the backup data needs to be protected for a couple of weeks/months/years based on


retention criteria then instead of keeping the tapes in the tape library, they are moved
outside of the library and stored locally or remotely.

■ For regulatory and other compliance reasons, certain data needs to be retained for
extended periods of time.

Administrators might also want to keep tapes containing backup data outside a library at a
local location for a couple of weeks, so they can serve any restore requests immediately
and then send them off-site to retain them for a couple of months or years. Some
administrators may also need to move tapes to different remote locations one after
another.

Based on the above criteria, a media management system should have ways to track the
following:

■ What data is on which tape

■ Which tape is sent to which location, and for how long

■ How to bring a tape back to the main location to fulfill certain restore requirements

■ How to trigger the rotation of tapes among different sites and then back to the library

■ How to select which media to move to an offsite location and apply a retention period

Modern tapes are tracked by their bar code numbers, also known as serial numbers. This
makes it easier to figure out where a particular tape with a particular serial number is
stored.

CA ARCserve achieves all these things and more through the Media Management
Administrator interface. It also provides a command line interface (ca_mmo) to achieve the
same.

The following sections talk about how the system can be used to fulfill the above
requirements.

CA ARCserve Media Management 59


Terminology

Note: To use all these features of MMO (Media Management Option), the Enterprise Option
must be installed.

Terminology

The following section explains the terms used by the Media Management system in CA
ARCserve.

Note: There might be slight differences between the functionality provided by CA ARCserve
for UNIX and CA ARCserve for Windows, but the concepts and functionality are basically the
same.

■ Vault—Any identifiable storage area or location that you define.

■ Slot—A slot is used to store a tape. A virtual slot in a vault is assigned when a tape is
vaulted. By default, CA ARCserve creates a vault with 32000 slots. This is the
maximum number of tapes that you can have in one storage location at any point. To
keep more tapes in that location, designate a different maximum number of slots when
you create the vault.

■ Schedule—A policy containing the criteria for selecting tapes for vaulting; information
on how to rotate these tapes across different vaults (storage locations); and when to
bring them back to the library if required.

■ Rotation—A sub-policy (part of Schedule) that determines when to move tape volumes
from a given vault.

■ Hold Days—The number of days past the Last Write Date to hold the tapes in this
rotation. Remember that this is based on the tape's Last Write Date and not the logical
vault entrance date.

■ Keep for Cycles—The number of vault cycles the tapes are held in this rotation.

■ Days Elapsed from First Format Date—The number of days that have elapsed since
the tapes were first formatted to hold in this rotation.

■ Date—Tape volumes remain in this rotation until the specified date has passed.

■ Tape Expiration Date—Tape volumes remain in this rotation until the tape expiration
dates have passed.

■ Permanent—Tape volumes remain in this rotation permanently.

■ Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD)—A sub-policy (part of a Schedule) that defines the
criteria that should be used to select a given tape for vaulting from tape library. It can
be a media pool name (encompassing all tapes in the save set of a media pool), or any
tape containing a given file name or a tape that is assigned by the user (using the mmo
command line utility) while running the cycle.

■ Vault cycle—Defines the actual movement of tapes. You must create a Schedule
containing the Vault Criteria Descriptor and Rotations associated with the VCD. Running

60 Vaulting
Scenario

a vault cycle will make CA ARCserve go through the policy and update its database
records accordingly and generate reports that help in moving tapes manually across the
tape library and different vaults.

■ Reports—Each time you execute a vault cycle or an estimated vault cycle, CA


ARCserve generates several reports before another vault cycle can be initiated. The
Vault Selection Report contains a list of tape volumes to be selected for moving into the
vaults through the VCD. The Shipping Report and Receiving Report provide a reliable
record of the result of the vault cycle and the current location of your tapes. An
Inventory report that can be generated at any time is also available.

Scenario

The following section explains the process using a "use case". Consider a scenario where an
administrator sets up a full backup job to run on a weekly basis and generates tapes going
into a media pool named MYDEPT_POOL (containing tape backups grouped for a given
department). As soon as the backup finishes, the administrator might want to move these
tapes outside of the library and keep them locally (say, in New York) in one vault for four
weeks, and then move them to a remote location (say, Los Angeles) for 12 months. Those
tapes need to come back to the library after that period.

This operation involves:

■ Creating a Media Pool named MYDEPT_POOL and creating a full backup job to run on
a weekly basis to protect the data on all machines in a given department.

■ Creating two vaults referring to two different locations where the


administrator wants to keep the tapes. Create two vaults named New York and Los
Angeles. Leave the maximum number of slots as 32,000, as there may not be so many
tapes created and retained in a single year.

■ Creating a Schedule. Create a policy containing sub-policies that specify the criteria
to select tapes and rotation policies to rotate them across Library, New York and Los
Angeles vaults as created above. In this step, just create a schedule and name it
MYDEPT_Tapes_LifeCycle.

■ Creating a Vault Criteria Descriptor. In continuation of the above policy, create a


VCD. Specify the media pool name MYDEPT_POOL as the selection criteria. This would
mean that whenever a vault cycle is run, all the tapes that are present in the save set
of the MYDEPT_POOL become candidates for vaulting.

■ Creating a Rotation. Create a rotation named NYRotation by specifying the


Retention Hold Days as 28 (four weeks). Then, create a second rotation named
LARotation by specifying the Retention Hold Days as 365 (one year).

■ Executing the Vault Cycle periodically. Now that a schedule is created along with
the associated VCD and rotations, run the Vault Cycle to generate reports for the
movement of tapes. Usually, a vault cycle is kept inline with the backup cycle. In this
example, as there is just one backup job running weekly, a vault cycle needs to be

CA ARCserve Media Management 61


Scenario

initiated weekly. The vault cycle can be run in simulation mode to see what tapes and
locations get affected.

You can run the cycle in the MMO Administrator, or initiate it using ca_mmo -init
command. Doing so generates reports for the tapes that need to be moved across the
tape library and vaults in New York and Los Angeles. ca_mmo -export can be used to
export the tapes outside of the library into the export slot, but may require enough
export slots to automate it. In this example, we manually export the tapes outside of
the library based on the Shipping report.

CA ARCserve internally stores the information about vaults, schedules, VCDs and rotations
in its own MMO database. Ensure that you protect this database periodically. A corrupted
MMO database may result in incorrect information about the location of the tapes and their
retention periods in different vaults.

For example, in the above scenario, if the administrator wants to bring a tape from Los
Angeles in its first year and perform a restore, the administrator must first find the location
of the media using the Find Media feature of MMO Admin. The administrator can perform a
search either using the Tape Name or Serial Number (BarCode), and then do a Temporary
Check In after bringing the tape from off-site vault.

Important! All tapes that are vaulted have a status of Checked Out. The Temporary Check
In option must be used to keep track of tapes while they are temporarily being used for a
restore job. When you finish the restore and run the next vault cycle, the shipping report is
generated to move the tape back to its original vault location and change the status to
check out. This way, once the tape goes back to its original slot in the offsite vault, it
continues in its retention period as though the temporary move never happened. If you do
not use the Temporary Check In option and bring a tape from its offsite vault, perform a
restore operation and return the tape back, this can result in a tape location and status
discrepancy in the MMO database.

If the administrator wants to bring a tape permanently back to the library in the middle of
its rotation cycle, it can be done by using the Manual Check In feature of the MMO
manager.

If the administrator wants to bring a tape permanently back from offsite and retire, it can
be done by using the Manual Check In and Retire feature of the MMO manager.

The commands to initiate the vaulting cycle, or exporting the tapes, can be automatically
scheduled as batch jobs using the JobScheduler wizard in CA ARCserve Backup for
Windows. When the tapes are being shipped to offsite locations, there is a chance that
someone may steal those tapes to gain access to someone's personal information about a
company's business. Thus, we recommend that you use the data encryption feature of CA
ARCserve for tapes that need to vaulted to remote sites.

62 Vaulting
Tapecopy with Media Management

Tapecopy with Media Management

One of the most powerful features of media management is the ability to combine media
management with the tapecopy utility. You can duplicate tapes and send the copied tapes
offsite.

There are two types of tapecopy:

■ Exact Tapecopy—Duplicates the tape exactly.

■ Consolidation Tapecopy—Consolidates all the sessions that are backed up previously


to one tape based on different query criteria. For example, you can consolidate all the
sessions that have been backed up from the past 24 hours onto one tape. Those
sessions can be retrieved from different tapes. The target tape will span if necessary.

How To Put Tapecopy Tapes into the Vault in Media


Management Administrator

Tapecopy is a command line utility that is configured through different switches. At the
command prompt, enter tapecopy in the CA ARCserve Home Directory to open an HTML
page that shows the command usage and provides some examples.

The example given here is specific to tapecopy in a vaulting environment.

tapecopy -d GROUP0 -m VAULT_DAILY -qPastTime 2 -qMediaPool G1*_DLY -g -v DAILY


-k

This command copies all the sessions for the past two days (-qPastTime 2) to GROUP0 (-d
GROUP0) device group from all the media pools that match G1*_DLY (-qMediaPool
G1*_DLY). It assigns the tapecopy tape to the media pool VAULT_DAILY (-m
VAULT_DAILY). It also kicks off a merge job of the tapecopy tape (-g). This is a regular
consolidation tapecopy job.

Keep the following points in mind when vaulting a tapecopy tape:

■ The tapecopy tape will be vaulted (-k) and assigned to the vault called DAILY (-v
DAILY).

■ Make sure you use the -k and -v switches to send the tapes to MM Admin. When a
vault cycle starts, the tape will show up. To vault tapecopy tapes, the vault criteria in
VCD has to be “assigned by user.”

■ Similar to automating the vault cycle, you can save this tapecopy command as a batch
file and schedule the job through the Job Scheduler Wizard. Timing is very important
here. You need to make sure that there are no backup jobs running when tapecopy
kicks off. Otherwise, you may witness some abnormal behavior. You can then schedule
the vault cycle after tapecopy is finished.

CA ARCserve Media Management 63


Vaulting in UNIX

Note: The copied sessions are marked with a “Replicated” flag in the database so that
subsequent tapecopy jobs will not copy these sessions again. To copy the replicated
sessions, use the -qIgnoreRep switch in the tapecopy command.

Vaulting in UNIX

The following section discusses vaulting in the UNIX environment.

Create an MMO Vault

MMO vault objects need to be created before rotation schedules can be set up to reference
these vaults. To do this, you must first open the Media Management GUI.

To create an MMO vault

1. Click Media Management Administrator in the CA ARCserve GUI.

The Media Management GUI opens.

2. Expand Media Management, right-click Vault, and select Create.

The Create Vault window opens.

3. Fill in the window appropriately and click OK.

This creates a vault object that can be used by vaulting schedules.

Create a Schedule

To create a schedule

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

64 Vaulting
Vaulting in UNIX

The Media Management GUI opens.

2. Right-click Schedule and select Create.

The Create Schedule window opens.

3. Enter the schedule name and click OK.

The schedule is created.

Create a Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD)

To create a Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD)

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

2. Expand Schedule and open a particular schedule item.

3. Right-click Vault Criteria Descriptor, then Click Create.

CA ARCserve Media Management 65


Vaulting in UNIX

The Create VCD window opens.

4. Select the Media Pool that you want to associate with this schedule and click OK.

Create a Rotation Schedule

To create a rotation schedule

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

2. Expand Schedule and open a particular schedule item.

3. Right-click Rotation and click Create.

66 Vaulting
Vaulting in Windows

The Create Rotation window opens.

4. Select the vault that this new rotation item will refer to and the duration period
(number of days) that tapes are to be kept at this vault. Do this for each vault that a
tape is to be vaulted in for this schedule.

MMO Schedule Setup Completed

The MMO setup is now complete for the specified vaulting requirements. When a vault cycle
is run, any tapes in the save sets of the media pools referenced by the VCDs of this
schedule will be marked for vaulting. Tapes that are already vaulted will be checked to see
if they need to be moved to another vault or back onsite.

Vaulting in Windows

The following section discusses vaulting in the Windows environment.

Media Management Administrator

CA ARCserve Media Management Administrator is the component you use to configure and
manage the vault. It comes installed with the base product. You can access it either from:

CA ARCserve Media Management 67


Vaulting in Windows

Start, Programs, Computer Associates, BrightStor, ARCserve Backup, Media Management


Administrator

Or, from:

BrightStor ARCserve Backup Manager, Manager, MM Admin.

After you open up the Media Management Administrator, expand the BrightStor AB Media
Server on the right pane. Double-click the Current Server node. You may be prompted to
enter the caroot password. Make sure the Database Engine is running, otherwise, you will
be prompted for the caroot password repeatedly. For more information, see the CA
ARCserve Backup Administrator Guide.

Create an MMO Vault

The first step of setting up the vault is to create a vault.

To create an MMO vault

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

2. Right-click Vault and click Create.

3. Enter the name of the vault in the dialog box and click Add.

4. Close the dialog box.

68 Vaulting
Vaulting in Windows

Create a Schedule

Next, you need to create a schedule for the vault.

To create a schedule

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

2. Right-click Schedule and click Create.

3. Enter the name of the schedule in the dialog box and click Add.

4. When finished, close the dialog box.

5. Double-click the schedule you just created. You will see two items in the Schedule
node—Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD) and Rotation.

Create a Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD)

To create a Vault Criteria Descriptor (VCD)

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

2. Right-click Vault Criteria Descriptor and click Create.

CA ARCserve Media Management 69


Vaulting in Windows

3. The Create Vault Criteria Descriptor dialog appears.

4. Choose the appropriate criteria using the three radio buttons—Media Pool Name, File
Name, and Assigned By User.

5. Click Add. You can add multiple criteria.

6. When you are finished, click Cancel.

Create a Rotation

To create a rotation

1. Open the Media Management GUI.

2. Right-click Rotation and click Create.

70 Vaulting
Vaulting in Windows

The Create Rotation dialog appears.

3. In the dialog box, using the scroll down box, choose the vault that you want the
rotation to apply to. Then choose the retention methods.

Note: All the retention methods apply if you enter multiple values. Whichever the first
condition hits will be the retention method. For example, if you set 30 Hold Days and 2
Keep for Cycles and you run Vault Cycle daily, tapes will get recycled on the third day
because that passes two cycles.

Start the Vaulting Process

Now that you have all the vaults and their schedule set up, you are ready to go.

CA ARCserve Media Management 71


Vaulting in Windows

To begin the vaulting process, start a vault cycle.

Note: You can also start a vault cycle using the command line, ca_mmo.exe.

The most commonly used command is ca_mmo -start -export, which exports all the
vaulting tapes in the library to the import or export bin.

To automate and schedule the vault cycle, you can save the command in a batch file and
submit it through the Job Scheduler Wizard. Once you submit the batch file through the Job
Scheduler Wizard, it will appear in the Job Queue as a generic job. You must schedule to
start the vault cycle the morning you plan to physically ship the tapes out.

Media Management Reports

The Media Management Administrator generates seven reports. These reports are
generated when a vault cycle is started.

72 Vaulting
FAQs

Vault Selection Report

Contains a list of tape volumes selected for removal to the vaults through the Vault
Criteria Descriptor (VCD).

Shipping Report

Contains a list of tape volumes to be pulled from each of the vaults. It tells the offsite
vault what tapes have reached its retention and should be shipped back to the library
for reuse.

Shipping Content Report

Contains a list of tape volumes and sessions in each tape volume to be pulled from
each of the vaults.

Receiving Report

Contains a list of tape volumes to be distributed to the vaults. It tells the offsite vault
what tapes are expected to receive to be vaulted.

Receiving Content Report

Contains a list of tape volumes and sessions in each tape volume to be distributed to
the vaults.

The Inventory Report, By Vault

Lists tape volumes grouped by the vault where they reside.

The Inventory Report, By Media

Lists tape volumes grouped by vault and shows the media name.

To read or print the reports, click the type of reports in the left pane. A list of reports sorted
by date will be shown in the upper right pane. The report detail is shown in the lower right
pane when a specific dated report is chosen. You can print the reports by selecting
Configuration, then Print.

These reports are stored as text files in <BrightStor AB Home Directory>\log.

FAQs

This section discusses some frequently asked questions and answers.

CA ARCserve Media Management 73


FAQs

Where is the log for MMO?

The mmo log, mmo.log, is located at <BrightStor AB Home Directory>\log.

Where is the log for tapecopy?

The tapecopy log, tpcopyXXXX.log, is located at <BrightStor AB Home Directory>\log.

I cannot access my server in MM Admin. It keeps asking me for the caroot


password.

Check the database engine. It has to be running for MM Admin to log in.

How do I start all over again with a clean MM database?

To start all over again with a clean Media Management database:

1. Check in the tapes manually. For each vault, right-click each tape in the upper
left pane and choose Manual Check In.

2. After you have manually checked in all the tapes, start a vault cycle to clean
out the tape entries.

3. Select Vault Cycle, Start.

4. Delete all the MMO reports in the <BrightStor AB Home Directory>/log


directory. The logs are:

„ MMO_*.log

„ Shipping*.log

„ Receiving*.log

5. Initialize the MM database by selecting Configuration, then Initialize MM


Database in Media Management Administrator. Close all other CA ARCserve
applications to perform this.

How can I manually assign a tape to the MM database?

You can assign a tape to the Media Management database in the following two ways:

> By the three tape properties (tape name, tape ID, and sequence number).

Example:

ca_mmo.exe -assign -tapename <Tape name> -tapeid <Tape id #>


-seqnum <Tape seq #> -vaultname <Vault Name>

> By the tape's serial number.

74 Vaulting
FAQs

Example:

ca_mmo.exe -assign -serialnum <Tape serial #> -vaultname


<Vault Name>

Run one of the above commands in a command line from the BrightStor AB Home
Directory.

Note: To see other usages for the ca_mmo.exe command, simply type ca_mmo.exe
at the command prompt.

Why is tapecopy performance in a NAS environment so poor?

Tapecopy is not supported in a NAS environment, that is, when the tape library is
connected through a NAS device.

CA ARCserve Media Management 75


Appendix A: Tape Devices
Any device driver that can handle pass-through commands should not pose a problem for
ARCserve.

If a client wishes to use Storport drivers (Microsoft's 5 year-old standard), it is best to have
it Microsoft-certified.

Note: Vendors are free to write their own Storport drivers according to Microsoft
specifications, but they may not receive certification for those drivers from Microsoft. If the
driver has not gone through Microsoft's certification process, the driver may cause problems
with pass-through commands.

In-house testing has proven that direct communication with the SCSI mini-port is more
efficient than communicating via the Storport driver.

If there is a Storport driver that is not Microsoft-certified on the box, and is causing
communication problems between ARCserve and the tape library, then the administrator
must either disable the driver or, if the driver is absolutely essential to proper server
function (such as disk array communication), use another SCSI controller strictly for tape
drive communication.

Tape Technologies

This section discusses three of the most popular tape formats. For specifications, review the
Tape Media Performance section or browse the vendors' web sites.

Advanced Intelligent Tape (AIT)

AIT has two characteristics that set it apart from other solutions—a small form factor (3.5”)
and support for a 2.6:1 compression ratio. AIT uses Advanced Metal Evaporated (AME)
material for recording. According to vendor information, this material is capable of delaying
the buildup of contamination.

Current Generations:

■ AIT-5 (Original Technology)

■ SAIT-1 (New Technology)

Features:

■ Drives are backward-compatible with older AIT Media

■ Self-cleaning mechanism

CA ARCserve Media Management 77


Tape Technologies

■ Memory-In-Cassette (MIC) to improve data access speeds

Digital Linear Tape (DLT)

The DLT tape family uses half-inch metal particle (MP) single-reel cartridge. The technology
also has improved error detection/correction with multi-track redundancy. A gentle tape
path and adaptive mechanisms in the drives minimize wear and optimize head-to-tape
contact.

All DLT systems are designed to have backward compatibility. This facilitates movement to
newer generations of the technology.

Current Generations:

■ SDLT 600A* (New Technology)

■ DLT-S4A* (Original Technology)

■ DLT-V4* (Value Line)

Features:

■ Half-inch Metal Particle (MP) Tape which is known for durability

■ Adaptive Cache Buffering and multi-track redundancy

■ Advanced Binder System allows for over 1,00,000 tape passes

Linear Tape-Open (LTO)

LTO technology was developed jointly by HP, IBM and Seagate. Since LTO technology is an
"open format", consumers have the option of selecting where to buy drives and tapes from.
This technology includes compatibility between the different vendors' hardware and media.

Originally, there was an LTO Accelis tape type featuring two reels that was noted for its
speed. However, the single-reeled Ultrium, known for higher capacity, proved to be more
popular and became the standard for the technology.

The current model of the LTO is LTO-4 with at least two more generations planned for the
technology's roadmap.

Current Generation:

■ LTO-4

Features:

■ Supports up to 1,000,000 passes

78 Vaulting
Tape Library Technologies

■ Mean time between failures can be up to 250,000 hours

■ Support by multiple vendors for media and hardware

Tape Library Technologies

Tape Library technology has automated an important aspect of the backup; movement of
the tapes. For mid-range and larger businesses, it is essential to be able to backup large
amounts of data in the smallest time possible. Libraries can facilitate efficient backups and
restores because of the following characteristics:

■ SAN support to allow access by multiple servers

■ Support for reading from or writing to multiple drives at once

■ Robotics that handle the movement of tapes between drives

■ Bar Code technology is included with many libraries to automatically generate serial
numbers for tapes and to easily keep track of tapes in the CA ARCserve database.

■ External Slot where Storage Administrators can remove or insert tapes as necessary for
vaulting purposes

An important benefit of libraries is that they can be scaled to fit the purposes of your
business. Depending on the vendor, you can expand the total storage capabilities by either
adding more drives and slots or even connecting multiple libraries together.

Media Device Sharing

Media sharing allows for hosts from UNIX to share a library with Windows. This functionality
is traditionally implemented to provide data movement over the SAN. In most cases it is
used in a library type configuration. The library is usually virtualized and carved up. For
example, a 750-slot library can be split up in a way that X amount of slots could be
assigned X amount of drives. These drives are then zoned in and assigned to X servers.

In CA ARCserve, the SAN Option would then need to be installed on each server that is
requesting access to the tape library. The SAN Option strictly acts as a traffic cop between
all of these servers vying for access to these resources. Another benefit of the SAN Option
is that it allows for movement of data between the backup server and the archival device to
remain off the LAN.

When configuring the SAN option, UNIX ARCserve server must be the primary server for
the SAN. The Windows primary server would then be assigned as one of the UNIX primary's
distributed servers. None of the other Windows servers should be included as distributed
servers for the UNIX primary server since CA ARCserve SAN option will handle all
communication between the UNIX primary and all servers.

CA ARCserve Media Management 79


Appendix B: Understanding
RAID
RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) is a category of disk drives that employs two
or more drives in combination for fault tolerance and performance. RAID disk drives are
used frequently on servers but aren't generally necessary for personal computers.

The various RAID levels are as follows:

RAID Level 0

No check disk, no parity, block striped across a group of disks

RAID Level 0/1

Mirrored disks with block striping. Also known as RAID 10.

RAID Level 1

Mirrored disks

RAID Level 2

Mirrored disks using Hamming Code

RAID Level 3

Single check disk using parity; byte striped

RAID Level 4

Single check disk using parity; block striped

RAID Level 5

Parity and data striped across all disks; block striped

CA ARCserve Media Management 81


Index
A L
Advanced Intelligent Tape (AIT) • 7, 77 linear tape drives • 7
DLT • 7, 78
LTO • 7, 78
B Linear Tape-Open (LTO) • 7, 78

backup utilities • 12
M
C media • 7
capacity • 17
CA ARCserve • 13 magazines • 25
Agent • 15 operations • 18
architecture • 13 pools • 47
Backup Manager • 14 sharing • 79
Backup Server • 14 Media Management Administrator
command line interface • 15 Reports • 72
Media Management Administrator • 59, media pool • 47
60, 63 attributes • 48
CDL • 26 types • 49
certified devices list • 26 Media Pool Manager • 53
CLI • 15 media pool types • 49
GFS • 49
rotation • 52
D user-defined • 53

Digital Data Storage (DDS) • 7


Digital Linear Tape (DLT) • 7, 78 R
disk staging • 41
configuring • 42 RAID • 81
requirements • 41 remote file system devices • 35
working • 41 rotation • 60
disks
technology • 11
terminology • 11 S
save set • 47
F schedule • 60, 64, 69
scratch set • 48
FAQs • 73 slot • 60
file system devices • 29 Storport drivers • 77
adding to a device group • 40
configuring • 29
working • 29 T
tape • 6
H drives • 7
libraries • 8
helical scan drives • 7 media • 7
AIT • 7 media performance • 18
DDS • 7 technology • 6
Travan • 7 tape devices • 77
Hold Days • 60 tape drives • 7
helical scan • 7

CA ARCserve Media Management 83


linear • 7
types • 7
tape library • 8, 79
tapecopy • 41
media management • 63
vaulting • 63
tapes
history • 6
overview • 5
usage • 17
Travan • 7

V
vault criteria descriptor • 60, 65
vault cycle • 60
vaulting
cycle • 60
reports • 60
scenario • 61
UNIX • 64
Windows • 67
virtual tape libraries • 9
advantages • 10

84 Index

Оценить