Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 2

Interview with Frank Bidart

They say that you can tell a lot about a person by looking at his living space, his room, his
house. And the fact that Mr.Bidart’s house is filled from floor to ceiling with an endless
collection of books, DVD’s and CD’s is testament to the boundless breadth of his literary and
creative interests that are so varied. It shows his worldly knowledge and an insatiable creative
appetite.
He does not shy away from being exposed and draw from his personal life. This is evidenced
by the fact that he has allowed the interviewee into his home but mostly by the fact that he
has written a book about his parents separation when he was five. This also shows his self
exploratory side, as most cannot even remember their memories from when they were five
years old, let alone writing an entire book about memories drawn from that age. He also must
not be very social, because it is near impossible to invite guests when there is no space to
even walk in the narrow path created by his collection!
He is clearly a man whose creativity is born from chaos.

Interview with Pat Barker

The Silence of the Girls, when we met at her home in April, and was with some trepidation
looking forward to the publicity events. “I do feel that part of the process of promotion that
makes it”—she paused, her voice dropping dryly—“worthwhile, just about, is that you get
ideas back from audiences or discussions that you have. Somebody always has a take on
something that you haven’t seen.”
She writes every day, and traditionally has considered breaks from work, even when it’s not
going well, to be “skiving,” but now fewer of her days are long ones. “These days I think
even if I am skiving a little bit, perhaps I should do it.”
But reading at school is probably not enough—I had the public library as well. The libraries
are suffering badly today, but from that kind of background, without the public library it
would have been difficult to become a writer. Just by visiting the library and picking things at
random, I read an enormous lot of all kinds of things, a lot of good stuff and a lot of
nonsense, and I think both were valuable.
I’m interested in the idea of the medium as a sort of analogue for the novelist, especially the
historical novelist. I read something by Alice Walker, and I can see that she sees herself as a
medium—she is actually hearing voices.
I’m interested in the idea of the medium as a sort of analogue for the novelist, especially the
historical novelist. I read something by Alice Walker, and I can see that she sees herself as a
medium—she is actually hearing voices.
Interview with Henri Cole
A confessional poem is more diary-like and confined to the here and now and without much
aesthetic dignity. When I am writing, there is no pleasure in revealing the facts of my life.
Pleasure comes from the art-making impulse, from assembling language into art.
Some people speak of poetry as therapy, but I don’t have this experience. For me, the therapy
is in finding the right words and getting them in the right order. There is not any therapy in
personal revelation.
In the beginning, I used nature as a mask for writing about private feelings. Oscar Wilde says
somewhere that man is least himself when writing in his own person. But give him a mask
and he will tell you the truth.