Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 97

Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

April 2010

Contents
1 Oracle Service Bus Examples ............................................................................................... 2
2 Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus Tutorials.................................................................. 5
3 Getting Started with the Oracle Service Bus Tutorials ....................................................... 11
4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application ............................................................................... 16
5 Tutorial 2. Transforming a Loan Application ...................................................................... 46
6 Tutorial 3. Validating a Loan Application............................................................................ 74
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

1 Oracle Service Bus Examples


This chapter describes the Oracle Service Bus examples that you can install with the
product.

The installed examples provide the following:

A preconfigured domain that lets you run the examples and modify input
parameters in a Web application.
A set of example source files for reference and for using to reconstruct the
examples in the tutorials.

Note: Oracle Service Bus version 11.1.1.3 does not include the example source
files. To complete the tutorials, you must download the required files. For download
information, see “Before You Begin” in 2 Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus
Tutorials.

This chapter includes the following sections:

What are Oracle Service Bus Examples?


Examples Description
Prerequisites to Running the Examples
Running the Examples
What the Examples Illustrate

What are Oracle Service Bus Examples?


The Oracle Service Bus examples provide you with a quick and easy way to
experience the run-time capability of using Oracle Service Bus services in your
design environment. The examples are preconfigured, user-driven scenarios that use
Oracle Service Bus to communicate with business services. The examples are based
on typical business scenarios that benefit from using proxy services to communicate
between clients and business processes. You can run the examples to see how
Oracle Service Bus operates in the run-time environment, or you can use the
tutorials build the examples in the design environment to get more in-depth
knowledge of how to configure the services.

2
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Examples Description
Oracle Service Bus provides the following examples:

Routing a Loan Application

A primary mortgage company uses Oracle Service Bus to route loan


applications to appropriate business services based on the interest rate
requested by the customer. An application containing a request for a rate less
than 5% requires management approval and is routed to an appropriate
business service for processing.

All other loan applications are routed to another business service for
processing. The target business service responds, indicating whether the loan
application is approved or rejected.

Transforming a Loan Application

A primary mortgage company uses Oracle Service Bus to identify and re-route
loan applications that are easy to sell to secondary mortgage companies. A
loan application with a principal request of $25,000,000.00 can be sold to a
secondary mortgage company. For such a loan application, a Web service
lookup is performed to retrieve the customer's credit rating.

The credit rating information is added to the loan application and the
application is then forwarded to the secondary mortgage company's Web
service to be processed. All other loan applications are routed to another
business service for processing. The target business service responds
indicating whether the loan application is approved or rejected.

Validating a Loan Application

A primary mortgage company uses Oracle Service Bus to route loan


applications to appropriate business services and to validate the loan
applications. When an application is invalid (due to missing or incorrect data),
an error message is returned to the client and the error is reported in the
Oracle Service Bus Console.

A complete application is routed to a selected business service for review. If


approved, the business service returns a message indicating whether the loan
is accepted or rejected.

3
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Prerequisites to Running the Examples


When installing Oracle WebLogic Server, you must install the Examples, which sets
up a sample database.

When installing Oracle Service Bus, you must select the custom installation option
and select the Oracle Service Bus Examples to install.

The example and tutorials are based on using an Admin-only domain with Oracle
Service Bus running on an Admin server.

Running the Examples


You can run the examples from the Windows Start menu, or by running the domain
start script in MW_HOME/user_projects/samples/domains/servicebus/.

When the domain starts, the examples page automatically appears in a browser.
Click Load the Examples to deploy the examples. Click Reload the Examples
only if you have changed your domain.

What the Examples Illustrate


The Oracle Service Bus examples are based on a loan application request scenario,
in which Oracle Service Bus is used to manage message routing in the enterprise
environment.

Running the examples introduces the routing, transformation, and validation


capabilities of Oracle Service Bus. You can see how the proxy service manages the
interaction between the client and the business services to route messages, based
on the information from the loan application.

Running an example invokes an application that uses the proxy service to


communicate with the client and the business services. When you run an example,
you are prompted to change the parameter setting, which in turn, changes the
behavior of the proxy services defined in Oracle Service Bus. The fields that you can
change for a given example are highlighted on the examples page. Each page also
provides basic instructions for executing the examples successfully.

4
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

2 Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus


Tutorials
Before You Begin – The Oracle Service Bus 11.1.1.3 examples do not include the
sample source files needed to complete the tutorial. To complete the tutorials,
download the “OSB Tutorial WSDLs” at
http://www.oracle.com/technology/sample_code/products/osb/samples/osb11113_s
ample_wsdls.zip. After you download the ZIP file, extract the WSDLs to a temporary
location on your computer for use in the tutorials.

Oracle Service Bus is a market-leading enterprise service bus built from the ground
up for Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) life cycle management. It provides
foundation capabilities for service discovery and intermediation, rapid service
provisioning and deployment, and governance. This service-infrastructure software
adheres to the SOA principles of building coarse-grained, loosely coupled, and
standards-based services, creating a neutral container in which business functions
may connect service consumers and back-end business services, regardless of
underlying infrastructure. Figure 2-1 illustrates the role of Oracle Service Bus as a
service intermediary in an enterprise SOA architecture.

Figure 2-1 Oracle Service Bus Intermediary

The Oracle Service Bus design-time tooling lets you configure a proxy service to suit
your needs and to manage Web services by controlling the service and policy
configurations and by monitoring system and operations tasks. Oracle Service Bus
relies on Oracle WebLogic Server run-time features.

5
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

This topic includes the following sections:

Oracle Service Bus Concepts


Overview of the Tutorials
How to Use the Tutorials

Oracle Service Bus Concepts


Oracle Service Bus allows you to manage Web services and deliver authentic
message brokering through the configuration of proxy services in the Oracle Service
Bus design-time environment. The underlying concepts of Oracle Service Bus are
briefly described in this section. Oracle Service Bus manages the routing and
transformation of messages in an enterprise system to promote seamless application
integration. The following diagram illustrates key functional components of Oracle
Service Bus. Oracle Service Bus provides additional features and protocol support
not shown in the diagram.

Figure 2-2 Oracle Service Bus Architecture

6
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Proxy Services and Business Services


Oracle Service Bus provides intelligent message brokering between business services
(such as enterprise services and databases) and service clients (such as
presentation applications or other business services) through proxy services that you
can configure using Oracle Service Bus development and run-time tooling. Proxy
services are Oracle Service Bus definitions of intermediary Web services that Oracle
Service Bus implements locally on Oracle WebLogic Server. With Oracle Service Bus
message brokering, service clients exchange messages with an intermediary proxy
service rather than working directly with a business service.

Oracle Service Bus lets you implement proxy services independently and configure
them dynamically, as driven by your business needs, without requiring costly
infrastructure development and re-deployment efforts. The configuration functions
are separated from the management functions in Oracle Service Bus.

A proxy service can route messages to multiple business services; you can choose to
configure a proxy service with an interface that is independent of the business
services with which the proxy service communicates. In such cases, you can
configure a proxy service message flow definition to route a message to the
appropriate business service and map the message data into the format required by
the business service interface.

Business services are Oracle Service Bus definitions of the enterprise services that
exchange messages during business processes. A business service and its interface
can be defined and configured using the Oracle Service Bus design-time tooling. To
configure a business service, you must specify its interface, the type of transport it
uses, its security requirements, and other characteristics.

A business service definition is similar to that of a proxy service, but it does not have
pipelines (a message flow).

Message Flows and Pipelines


In Oracle Service Bus, a message flow is the implementation of a proxy service. You
configure the logic for the manipulation of messages using proxy service message
flow definitions. This logic includes such activities as transformation, publishing, and
reporting, which are implemented as individual actions within the stages of a
pipeline.

Pipelines are one-way processing paths that include no branching. A pipeline is a


named sequence of stages containing actions, representing a non-branching one-
way processing path. It is used to specify the message flow for service requests and
responses. A stage is a user-configured processing step. Messages fed into the

7
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

pipelines are accompanied by a set of message context variables that contain the
message contents. They can be accessed or modified by actions in the pipeline
stages.

Pipeline Pairs
Pipeline pairs are request and response pipelines. The request pipeline definition
specifies the actions that Oracle Service Bus performs on request messages to the
proxy service before invoking a business service or another proxy service. The
response pipeline definition specifies the processing that Oracle Service Bus
performs on responses from the business or proxy service that the proxy service
invokes before returning a response to a client.

Each pipeline consists of a sequence of stages, each stage containing actions.


However, a single service-level request pipeline might optionally branch out into
operational pipelines (you can configure one default operational pipeline at most one
per operation). The determination of the operation is done through user-selected
criteria. The response processing starts with the relevant operation pipeline which
then joins into a single service-level response pipeline.

The following figure illustrates sample operation pipelines in a proxy service.

8
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 2-3 Example of Operation Pipelines in a Proxy Service

Overview of the Tutorials


The tutorials show how Oracle Service Bus is used to route a loan application to
appropriate business services based on the configurations set in the proxy service.

You will use the Oracle Service Bus Console design-time tooling in the tutorials,
though you can perform similar tasks in the Oracle Service Bus IDE.

In the tutorials, you will use the console to create the proxy services that interact
with the service clients and business services. As you work through the tutorials, you
will:

Learn how to configure proxy services to process the input and output
messages in a message flow.
Create, read, and update configuration objects, such as proxy services and
Web Services Description Language resources (WSDLs).
See how Oracle Service Bus uses session management to allow configuration
changes locally, and then instantiate the changes in the core environment.
Configure resources such as WSDLs, Service Callouts, XQueries, and business
services.

9
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Route messages according to XQuery-based policies or callouts to external


Web services.
See how Oracle Service Bus manages synchronous and asynchronous
messages.
Define a transformation on an XML message, based on XQuery, supporting a
callout to a Web service to gather additional data for the transformation.
See how message processing by Oracle Service Bus is driven by metadata
specified as the message flow definition for a proxy service in the Oracle
Service Bus Console.
Test proxy services and business services.
Gain a better understanding of the concepts underlying Oracle Service Bus.
Learn how to navigate through the Oracle Service Bus Console and
demonstrate the capabilities of the console.
Perform the basic tasks that will help you to configure specific scenarios.

How to Use the Tutorials


The tutorials represent typical use case scenarios for Oracle Service Bus. You will
learn how to configure and use Oracle Service Bus to resolve the business scenarios
presented in the specified use cases.

After you complete the Getting Started steps for the tutorials, complete the first
tutorial, Routing a loan application, to become familiar with Oracle Service Bus, then
proceed to the other tutorials in any order. The tutorials include:

3 Getting Started with the Oracle Service Bus Tutorials describes the task to
complete before starting the tutorials.
4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application is based on scenarios that
demonstrate how Oracle Service Bus facilitates the routing of messages
within an enterprise.
5 Tutorial 2. Transforming a Loan Application describes how a proxy service is
configured with a routing node, transformations, and a Web service callout
(Service Callout) to allow content-based routing and message enrichment
through Oracle Service Bus.
6 Tutorial 3. Validating a Loan Application describes how a Oracle Service Bus
proxy service can be configured to validate a message passing from a client
to a business service.

10
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

3 Getting Started with the Oracle Service


Bus Tutorials
The Oracle Service Bus tutorials are based on a typical Web services scenario that
uses Oracle Service Bus for configuring business services and adaptive message
routing. This section describes the tasks required to configure the Oracle Service Bus
and Oracle WebLogic Server environment to deploy the business cases used in the
tutorials. The Oracle Service Bus example suite is used as a basis for instruction in
the following tutorials.

This topic consists of the following sections:

Scenarios in the Tutorials


Setting Up the Tutorials

After completing this section, you will know how to deploy a typical Oracle Service
Bus environment in which you can define resources and design Web services. You
must complete all the tasks in this section before you start the tutorials.

Scenarios in the Tutorials


The tutorials are based on a mortgage broker scenario describing a typical loan
application process. A primary mortgage company uses Oracle Service Bus to route
loan applications to appropriate business services. The loan applications are routed
to different business services depending on qualifying criteria, such as the requested
interest rate and the requested principal amount. The applicant's credit rating
information is required to complete the loan application when the principal amount
is greater than US $25 million.

In the first tutorial, you will become familiar with the basic functionality of Oracle
Service Bus that facilitates Web service mediation, including message routing and
Web service resource creation. In subsequent tutorials you will develop and
customize Web services for routing, transforming and validating a loan application.

Setting Up the Tutorials


Do the following to set up and run the tutorials:

1. Create an Oracle Service Bus Domain


2. Start Oracle Service Bus
3. Load the Client Application

11
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

4. Log in to Oracle Service Bus Console

The files (including pre-built business services) that support the building of the
tutorial solutions are located in the following directory:

OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples

Note: Oracle Service Bus version 11.1.1.3 does not include the example source
files. To complete the tutorials, you must download the required files. For download
information, see “Before You Begin” in 2 Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus
Tutorials.

The tutorial files contain properties that you must set to run the tutorials. In the
tutorial, you can use four different business services. Each business service also has
a set of files associated with it. The structure for each of the business services is the
same.

The directory structure for one of the business services–the NormalLoan business
service, is described in Table 3-1 and Table 3-2. You can explore the other
directories as an exercise.

Table 3-1 Sample Files Provided in Support of the Tutorials

Filename/Location Description
/src/setEnv.cmd/.sh This file sets the environment properties.
/src/examples.properties This file contains business service build and deployment
properties.

Table 3-2 Sample Files Provided for Business Services the Tutorials

Filename/Location Description
OSB_ORACLE_HOME\ The files contained in this directory are those required
samples\servicebus\ by the normalLoan business service. The same file
examples\src\examples\ structure exists for the other three business services
webservices\jws_basic\ used in this tutorial (ManagerLoanReview,
normal LoanSaleProcessor, and CreditRating).
SimpleBean.java The jws-181 Web service definition.
/client/LoanStruct.java The definition of the message.
build.xml The build script that is used to build each of the
services using ant.

12
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Filename/Location Description
*.wsdl A Web service Definition Language (WSDL) file defines
each of the services.
/client/Main.java The Java client with which
each of the business
services interacts.

Create an Oracle Service Bus Domain


To develop and run the Oracle Service Bus tutorials, you must create an Oracle
Service Bus domain using the Oracle Fusion Middleware Configuration Wizard.
Create an “Oracle Service Bus Extension – Single Server Domain Topology” domain
called ServiceBusTutorial with a Listen Port of 7001.

Note:
The example and tutorials are based on using an Admin-only domain. If
the tutorial domain you create includes managed servers, you may need
to change the port numbers in the services you create to the correct
managed server ports.

Start Oracle Service Bus


You can start Oracle Service Bus using one of the following methods:

On Windows systems, from the Windows Start menu in the Oracle


WebLogic > User Projects group, or running startWebLogic.cmd in the
new domain.
On UNIX systems, run startWebLogic.sh from the root of the new domain.

Load the Client Application


To test the loan application using the test console, you must first deploy the client
jars in the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console, which are available at
OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples\build\webservices. The following
client jars are available:

creditLoan_jws_basic_ejb
largeLoan_jws_basic_ejb

13
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

manager_jws_basic_ejb
normalLoan_jws_basic_ejb

To deploy creditLoan_jws_basic_ejb client jar:

1. Go to the Oracle WebLogic Server Administration Console:


http://localhost:7001/console.

2. On the Home page, click Deployments to go to the Summary of


Deployments page (see Figure 3-1).

Figure 3-1 Summary of Deployments

3. Click Install.

14
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

4. Navigate to
OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples\build\webservices.

5. Select creditLoan_jws_basic_ejb. Click Next to choose the targeting


style.

6. Accept the remaining defaults by clicking Next, then click Finish. The
application is deployed automatically.

Repeat the previous steps to deploy largeLoan_jws_basic_ejb,


manager_jws_basic_ejb, and normalLoan_jws_basic_ejb in the Oracle
WebLogic Server console.

Log in to Oracle Service Bus Console


Oracle Service Bus Console is a Web services management dashboard that allows
you to monitor Web services and servers and perform service management tasks.
The console enables you to perform operational tasks such as configuring proxy and
business services, setting up security, managing resources, and capturing data for
tracking or regulatory auditing. It provides views to monitor current state and health
of the Oracle Service Bus environment by displaying detailed statistics about servers,
services, and alerts. The Oracle Service Bus Console also enables you respond
rapidly and effectively to changes in your service-oriented environment.

To log in to Oracle Service Bus Console


Open a browser window and enter the following URL to open the Oracle Service Bus
Console for the ServiceBusTutorial domain:

http://localhost:7001/sbconsole

Log in if necessary with Oracle Service Bus Console the user name and password
that you specified when you created the domain.

Where to Go from Here


After you complete the tasks required to set up the tutorials, you can proceed to 4
1

Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application which describes how you can configure Oracle
Service Bus with the resources required for the loan application routing scenario.
Each of the tutorials include instructions to design and configure the Oracle Service
Bus resources, and procedures you can use to test the completed configurations.

15
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application


Oracle Service Bus enables adaptive message routing between business services in
an enterprise environment. Messages can be routed from a client through the Oracle
Service Bus intermediary, to the appropriate business service. Oracle Service Bus
routes messages to one or more destinations, based on the actions configured in the
message processing logic. These routing actions are configured using Oracle Service
Bus Console. Routing provides an efficient alternative to building a multitude of
static point-to-point Web service connections between pairs of systems.

This section includes the following topics:

Prerequisites
Tutorial Objectives
Definition of the Scenario
Tasks in This Tutorial

Prerequisites
You must complete 3 Getting Started with the Oracle Service Bus Tutorials before
1

beginning this tutorial.

Tutorial Objectives
The objective of this tutorial is to create and test a routing scenario using the
graphical environment provided in Oracle Service Bus Console. It includes the
following tasks:

Importing Web Service Definition Language (WSDL) files


Registering business services
Creating a proxy service
Configuring content-based routing

This tutorial introduces you to:

Using Oracle Service Bus Console


Implementation details of proxy services: message flows and actions
Editing XQuery expressions using the XQuery Expression Editor
Working with context variables to manipulate the content of the message

16
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Definition of the Scenario


A primary mortgage company uses Oracle Service Bus to route loan applications to
appropriate business services based on the interest rate requested. An application
containing a request for a rate less than 5% requires management approval and is
routed to an appropriate business service for processing. All other loan applications
are routed to the appropriate business service for processing.

Figure 4-1 summarizes the logical architecture to support this scenario. It illustrates
how Oracle Service Bus mediates the messaging between the clients and the
business services in your enterprise.

Figure 4-1 Expose a Loan Application Request Web Service via Oracle
Service Bus

Overview of the Run-Time Process in Oracle Service


Bus
A client sends a loan application to a proxy service named LoanGateway1. The
default proxy service has a conditional routing stage that checks the value of the
requested interest rate in the loan application document. If the interest rate is less
than 5%, the loan application is routed to the ManagerLoanReview business service;
otherwise it is routed to the NormalLoan business service. The target business
service returns a response similar to that shown in Figure 4-31.

Note:
If the loan application is processed by the NormalLoan business service,
MANAGER is replaced with NORMAL in the generated response.

17
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Required Resources
The following table lists the resources required to develop and run this tutorial.

Resource Name Description


normalLoan This is the WSDL resource.
NormalLoan This is business service used by Oracle Service Bus.
ManagerLoanReview This is business service used by Oracle Service Bus.
LoanGateway1 This is the Oracle Service Bus proxy service.

Tasks in This Tutorial


In this tutorial, Oracle Service Bus is used to route a loan application within a
mortgage company to a target a Web service depending on the interest rate
requested. Perform the following tasks to design and configure a proxy service and
the associated resources in Oracle Service Bus to implement this use case scenario.

Prepare the Environment


Ensure that Oracle Service Bus is running in the domain that you have created for
the tutorial and that you have completed the tasks described in Setting Up the
1

Tutorials.

Create a Session and Set up a Project


Using Oracle Service Bus Console, you can monitor resources and configurations in
Oracle Service Bus environment. You can perform system monitoring without
initiating a session. However, you must first create an session in the Oracle Service
Bus Console to update or delete resources and modify their configuration properties.

The Change Center in the console allows you to create and manage sessions. All
updates to the system configuration during the current session are saved as
temporary files. These changes effective only when the current session is activated.
Figure 4-2 illustrates the Change Center pane available on Oracle Service Bus
Console.

18
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-2 Manage Sessions Using Change Center

In addition to creating and activating sessions, the Change Center allows you to
perform the functions summarized in the following table.

Table 4-1 Change Center Options

Click To
Create Create a new session. You must create a session to make changes to the
configuration. You can exit this session using the Exit function, then re-
enter it by clicking Edit. Once in the session, you can continue to modify
the resources.
Edit Enter a session that you previously created and exited. You must activate a
session before you can use Edit.
Exit Discontinue the session and save the session state. Click Edit to re-enter
the discontinued session.
Discard End the current session without saving the changes.
Activate Save the current session's configuration to the run time.

When you click Activate, the Activate Session page is displayed. In this
page, the user and session name of the session are displayed. If required,
you can add a description. Click Submit to save the current session's
configuration to the run time.

Note:
It is recommended that you click Create before modifying any system
configuration settings on the console. It is a good practice to save your
configuration changes incrementally and enter comments for those
changes. To save and activate configuration changes in the current
session, you must click Activate after you have completed making a set
of changes.

19
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

To create the MortgageBroker Project and File Folders


In the Oracle Service Bus system environment, system configuration entities are
grouped into user-defined projects. On Oracle Service Bus Console, the Project
Explorer page displays a default project and the various user defined projects under
the Projects folder. This page allows you to perform all project configuration tasks.
Each project is represented by a project folder on the console. You can add new
project folders and navigate the project trees. You can collapse and expand folders
as required by clicking them.

There are pre-defined resources types in the Oracle Service Bus system
environment. Each resource type is represented as a sub folder within the Project
folder. You can create and configure resources of different types within the resource
type folders.

This section describes the tasks to start a session and create a MortgageBroker
project under the Projects folder. For this scenario, you will create three resource
folders in the MortgageBroker project to hold each of the following pre-defined
resource types:

ProxyService
BusinessService
WSDL

To Start a Session and Create a Project

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console Change Center click Create to create a
new session.

2. In the Oracle Service Bus Console navigation pane, select the Project
Explorer.

The project explorer opens in the navigation pane and a Project page is
displayed on the console.

3. In the Enter New Project Name field in the Projects section, type
MortgageBroker as shown in Figure 4-3.

Figure 4-3 Create a Project

20
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

4. Click Add Project.

The MortgageBroker project is created and listed in the Project Explorer under
Projects.

You must create a project folder WSDL first, and add a WSDL resource to it. The
WSDLs are the basis on which you create the business services and the proxy
service. You subsequently create other folders and resources for this scenario.

To Create a Project Folder

1. In the project explorer, click the MortgageBroker project to open the


associated project page.

2. On the Project page, in Folders, enter the folder name in the field provided.
In this case, enter WSDL as displayed in Figure 4-4.

Figure 4-4 Create a Folders

3. Click Add Folder.

The WSDL folder is displayed in the list of project folders for the
MortgageBroker project.

4. Repeat the previous steps to create the following additional folders:


ProxyService and BusinessService.

5. When all three folders are created, click Activate, enter a description of the
changes you just made, and click Submit to save the project directory
structure.

Create the WSDL Resources


Oracle Service Bus resources are configured using configuration wizards. Each
configuration wizard includes a sequence of pages that prompt you for information
about the resource and provide property configuration options.

21
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

To Create the normalLoan WSDL Resource


A WSDL defines the public contract (interface specification) between a client and a
service, whether the service is a proxy service or a business service. It is the formal
description of a Web service. A WSDL is used to describe what a Web service's
interface is, where it resides, and how to invoke it. You create the WSDL resource
first since subsequent service registration tasks depend on it. The WSDL is
subsequently used to register the business service with the proxy service.

To Import a WSDL

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console Change Center click Create to create a
new session.

2. In Oracle Service Bus Console navigation pane, select the Project Explorer.

3. In the project explorer, click the WSDL folder you created.

4. In the Resources pane, from the Select Resource Type list, select WSDL.

Figure 4-5 Select a Resource Type

The Create a New WSDL Resource page is displayed.

22
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

5. Enter the following information in the Create a New WSDL Resource page
(see Figure 4-6):
a. Enter normalLoan as the resource name.
b. Click Browse. Select the WSDL associated with the normal loan
process:

OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples\src\examples\web
services\jws_basic\normal\NormalLoanApprovalService.wsdl

Note: In Oracle Service Bus 11.1.1.3, get the WSDL from the location
where you extracted the downloaded resources as described in “Before
You Begin” in 2 Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus Tutorials.

c. Optionally, enter information in the Resource Description field to


describe the resource.

The resource is now displayed in the resources pane, as shown in


Figure 4-6.

d. Click Save to create the WSDL resource.

e. Click Activate in the Change Center to activate the session.

Figure 4-6 Create a WSDL Resource

This step completes the creation of the normalLoan WSDL resource in the WSDL
folder. Activate the session.

Create the managerApproval WSDL Resource


Complete the steps in the Create the managerApproval WSDL Resource section to
create a WSDL resource associated with the ManagerApproval Service. To import
the ManagerApprovalService WSDL resource, use the configuration

23
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

parameters listed in the following table to create the resource in the project’s /WSDL
folder.

Configuration
Parameter Value
WSDL Resource Name managerApproval
ManagerApprovalService OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples\src\examples\we
WSDL bservices\jws_basic\manager\ManagerApprovalService.wsdl

Note: In Oracle Service Bus 11.1.1.3, get the WSDL from the location
where you extracted the downloaded resources as described in
“Before You Begin” in 2 Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus
Tutorials.

Create a Proxy Service


In this section, you will create a proxy service. The proxy service is used to route
the loan application to the appropriate business service.

To Create the Proxy Service

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console Change Center click Create to create a
new session.

2. In the Project Explorer, select the MortgageBroker project. The project


folder is expanded to show the directory structure of the project.

3. Select the ProxyService folder.

4. In the Select Resource Type list, select Proxy Service.

The Create a Proxy Service - General Configuration page is displayed as


shown in Figure 4-7.

24
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-7 Create a Proxy Service

5. Give the proxy service a Service Name of LoanGateway1.

6. In Service Type, select WSDL Web Service, then click Browse.

The Select a WSDL page is displayed. The proxy service is based on the
WSDL resource that you originally created, hence you must reference the
resource here.

7. Select the normalLoan WSDL. The Select WSDL Definitions pane is


populated with the content categories of the WSDL.

25
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-8 Select WSDL Definition

8. In Select WSDL Definitions pane, from the Ports category, Click helloPort,
which is the WSDL port for the normalLoan WSDL (helloPort).

9. Click Submit. The port name is displayed in the WSDL port text field as
shown in Figure 4-9.

26
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-9 LoanGateway1 Proxy Service

10. Click Next to continue configuring the proxy service.

11. Accept the default protocol, http.

Note:
The protocol you select on this page determines the format for the
endpoint URI that you will specify in the next step. The assumed default
protocol is http since it is used by most services.

12. Set the Endpoint URI to /loan/gateway1. This is the URI to which the
client will send its messages.

13. Accept the default for the Get All Headers option (No), and click Next. The
Create a Proxy Service-HTTP Transport Configuration page is displayed.

14. Click Next.

15. On the Operation Selection Configuration page, accept the default selection
algorithm (SOAP Body Type). Click Next.

27
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

16. On the Message Handling page, click Next.

17. The Create a Proxy Service – Summary page is displayed. This page shows a
summary of configuration settings for the proxy service.

Note:
The default service is an RPC Web service. As a result, the SOAP body
contains the service operation selection information. An operation in a
Java Web service WSDL corresponds to a public method in the Java Web
service. If there are multiple public methods accessible to a client, each
public method type will have an operation definition in the WSDL. For a
SOAP based RPC service, the SOAP body indicates the operation
(method) selected by the client. The SOAP header can also specify the
operation. However, by convention, the SOAP body defines this.

Before registering the proxy service, you can review the configuration
settings and change them if necessary, by clicking Edit icon.

18. After reviewing the proxy service configuration settings, click Save to register
the service.

19. Click the LoanGateway1 link in the Resources pane of


MortgageBroker/ProxyServices to go the View a Proxy Service page. The View
a Proxy Service page is displayed.

The Operational Settings tab, as shown in Figure 4-11, has options to enable
monitoring for the proxy service.

28
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-11 Monitoring Configuration of Proxy Service

To enable monitoring:

1. Click the Operational Settings tab.

2. Select the Enable Pipeline Monitoring check box for the Monitoring
setting.

3. Choose an aggregation interval for the service. The aggregation interval is


the period over which aggregated statistics related to the service are
computed for display in the Oracle Service Bus Console dashboard. You can
also accept the default value for the Aggregation Interval, which is set to five
minutes.

29
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

4. Click Update.

5. Activate the session.

This step completes the configuration of the LoanGateway1 proxy service in Oracle
Service Bus Console.

Create the Business Services


In the routing a loan scenario, when the interest rate requested on a loan
application is greater than or equal to 5%, then the loan application is routed to the
normal loan processing service for approval. If the interest rate requested on a loan
application is less than 5%, then the loan application must be approved by a
manager, therefore it is routed to a manager approval service.

Create the NormalLoan Business Service

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console Change Center click Create to create a
new session.

2. In the Project Explorer, select the BusinessService folder.

3. In the Select Resource Type list, select Business Service.

The Create a Business Service - General Configuration page is displayed as


shown in Figure 4-12.

30
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-12 Create Business Service

4. Enter a name for the service. In this case, enter NormalLoan.

5. For Service Type, select WSDL Web Service, then click Browse. Select the
WSDL and port on which to base the business service:
a. In the WSDL Browser, select the normalLoan WSDL
b. Select the port (helloPort) for the WSDL.
c. Click Submit.

The text field for the WSDL port service type is populated with the value
selected on the Create a Business Service - General Configuration page.

6. Click Next.

The Create a Business Service - Transport Configuration page is displayed as


shown in Figure 4-13.

31
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-13 Transport Configuration of a Business Service

7. Accept the default protocol, http.

8. Select none for the Load Balancing Algorithm, since load balancing is
relevant only when a service specifies multiple end points.

When you specify multiple end points and a load balancing algorithm, if one
end point is overloaded or not available at run time, the message can be sent
to the next service in the list of end point URIs. In this case, there is only one
service, therefore accepting the default behavior or selecting none does not
affect the behavior of the proxy service at run time.

9. The End Point URI of the business service is the endpoint URI on the server
on which the service is deployed. Ensure that the pre-populated value for the
End point URI in the “Existing URIs” field is
http://<host:port>/njws_basic_ejb/NormalSimpleBean.

The host and port values specified for <host:port> represent the machine
and port on which your Oracle Service Bus server is running.

Note:
Delete any invalid endpoint URI in the existing URI list.

10. Accept the default settings for the remaining options on the page and click
Next.

32
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

11. In the Create a Business Service-HTTP Transport Configuration page, accept


the default settings on this page, then click Next.

12. In the Create a Business Service-SOAP Binding Configuration page, accept


the default settings and click Next.

13. In the Message Handling page, click Next.

The Create a Business Service-Summary page is displayed. You can now


check if all the settings of the business service have been implemented
correctly.

14. Click Save to accept the configuration settings.

To turn on monitoring for the NormalLoan business service, click the


NormalLoan business service in the Resources pane. The View a Business
Service page is displayed. The Operational Settings tab on this page has
options to enable monitoring for the business service.

To enable monitoring:

a. Click the Operational Settings tab.


b. Select the Enabled check box for the Monitoring field.
c. Choose an aggregation interval for the service. The aggregation
interval is the period over which aggregated statistics related to the
service are computed for display in the Oracle Service Bus Console
dashboard. You can also accept the default value for the Aggregation
Interval, which is set to five minutes.
d. Click Update.
e. Activate the session.

You have completed the configuration of the NormalLoan business service on Oracle
Service Bus Console.

Create the ManagerLoanReview Business Service


To create the business service to which a loan application is routed when the
interest rate requested in that loan application is less than 5%.

Follow the same tasks as described in the previous section on creating the
ManagerLoanReview business service, but use the configuration parameters in the
following table.

33
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Configuration
Parameter Value
Business Service Name ManagerLoanReview
ManagerApprovalService managerApproval
WSDL
helloPort
Load Balancing Algorithm none
Endpoint URI http://<host:port>/mjws_basic_ejb/ManagerSimpleBean (this
should already be populated in the “Existing URIs” field.)

Summary
You have created two business services (NormalLoan and ManagerLoanReview), a
proxy service (LoanGateway1) and two WSDL resources (normalLoan and
ManagerApprovalService) that are the resources required for this tutorial.

Once you have configured the proxy service with a base configuration you can
proceed to the next task (Configure the LoanGateway1 Proxy Service) to complete
the configuration of the proxy service by adding the routing behavior for the loan
application in the proxy service message flow.

Configure the LoanGateway1 Proxy Service


Oracle Service Bus Message Flows define the implementation of proxy services.
Message flows can include zero or more pipeline pairs: request and response
pipelines for the proxy service (or for the operations on the service) and error
handler pipelines that can be defined for stages, pipelines, and proxy services.
Pipelines can include one or more stages, which in turn include actions.

Configure the Routing Behavior of the Message Flow

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console Change Center click Create to create a
new session.

2. In the Project Explorer, select the ProxyService folder from the


MortgageBroker project tree.

3. In the Actions column associated with the LoanGateway1 proxy service, click
the Edit Message Flow icon . The Edit Message Flow page for the proxy
service LoanGateway1 is displayed as shown in Figure 4-14.

34
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-14 Edit Message Flow for LoanGateway1 Proxy Service

4. Click LoanGateway1, and select Add Route from the menu options.

RouteNode1 is added in the configuration page as shown in Figure 4-15.

Figure 4-15 Add a Route Node

5. Click RouteNode1 and select Edit Route from the menu options.

The Edit Stage Configuration: Route Node page is displayed as shown in


Figure 4-16. This page contains a single Add an Action link.

Note:
A stage is an element of a pipeline and also a container for actions
defined in a pipeline. Actions are the elements of a pipeline stage that
define the handling of messages as they flow through a proxy service at
run time.

35
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-16 Add an Action Link

6. Click the Add an Action link, and select Communication > Routing
Table.

The Edit Stage Configuration page changes to display routing table


configuration page, as shown in the following figure.

Figure 4-17 Routing Table Configuration Page

You must configure the routing table to route messages to business services
based on the value of the interest rate element in the incoming message. You
can configure content-based routing by creating an XQuery expression, using
the XQuery Expression Editor.

7. In the Routing table, click <Expression>. The XQuery Expression Editor is


displayed.

8. In the left pane, click Variable Structures.

9. The Variable Structures pane is displayed. Select body from the Select
Structure list.

36
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-19 Variable Structures Pane

A structural representation of the body element is displayed in the Variable


Structures pane.

10. Click + to expand $body - processLoanApp (request) > processLoanApp >


loanRequest.

A graphical representation of the structure of the loanRequest document is


displayed. At run time, the proxy service makes its routing decision based on
the value in the Rate element of the message.

Figure 4-21 loanRequest Element

11. Click the Rate element. The property appears below the XQuery editor in the
Property Inspector field. Click in the XQuery text box and click Copy
Property in the lower right of the XQuery Expression text box. The following
XQuery expression is written in the text box:

37
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

$body/exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/java:Rate

Note:
In Internet Explorer (IE) browsers, you can simply drag the icon next to
the Rate element into the XQuery text editor.

12. Click Validate to validate the XQuery. It is a good practice to do this before
you submit the expression. The expression is validated for syntax. If there are
errors in the expression, they are displayed directly above the Validate
button.

Figure 4-23 XQuery Validation

13. Click Save. The routing table is displayed on the Edit Stage Configuration
page. <Expression> is replaced by the expression that returns the value of
the Rate element in the message.

Figure 4-24 Routing Table View - Expression

14. In the Operator list, select <. In the associated text field enter the number 5.

38
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

The routing table now contains an expression that determines the routing
behavior. If the value in the rate element is less than 5, you must route
according to the routing table configuration.

15. Click the Service link to define the service to which you want to route
messages when the rate is less than five. The Select Service page is
displayed.
a. Select the ManagerLoanReview business service.
b. Click Submit.

16. In the Routing Table Operation list, select the processLoanApp operation.
This is the operation on the ManagerLoanReview business service that is
invoked at run-time if the rate requested in the loan application is less than 5.

Figure 4-25 Routing Table View - Routing Condition

You have now defined the case to route the loan application to the
ManagerLoanReview business service. If the rate specified in the loan application is
equal to or greater than five percent, then the message is routed to the NormalLoan
business service. The next section describes how you can add a condition to the
routing table to account for this case (which is the default case).

Add a Default (Else) Condition to the Routing Table


Follow these steps:

1. Click the Case icon (below the Routing Table label), then select Insert
Default Case. The else condition (default case) is added to the routing
table.

39
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-26 Routing Table Default Condition

2. In the Default (else) condition, click the Service link. The Select Service page
is displayed.
a. Select the NormalLoan business service.
b. Click Submit.

3. In the Operation list, select the processLoanApp operation for the service.

This step completes the configuration of the message flow in the route node:
RouteNode1.

4. Click Validate to validate the RouteNode1 routing configuration.

5. Click Save on the Edit Stage Configuration page to save the configuration
and return to the Edit Message Flow page.

40
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-28 LoanGateway1 Proxy Service Message Flow Map

6. Click Save on the Edit Message Flow page and return to the
MortgageBroker/ProxyServices page.

7. In the Change Center, Activate the session.

Summary
Configure the LoanGateway1 Proxy Service completes the configuration of the run-
time message routing behavior in the LoanGateway1 Routing Table. A message is
routed to the ManagerLoanReview business service if the rate specified in the loan
application is less than 5. Otherwise the message is routed to the NormalLoan
business service.

Test Your Loan Application Routing Configuration


Using the Test Console
After you have configured Oracle Service Bus to work with the client and the target
business services, you can test the configuration. The routing behavior for the proxy
service LoanGateway1 in this scenario is based on the interest rate requested in the
loan application message. A change in the value of the interest rate results in a
change in the routing behavior as follows:

A value of 4.9 or less causes the message to be routed to the


ManagerLoanReview business service.
A value of 5.0 or greater causes the message to be routed to the NormalLoan
business service.

To test the Routing of the Loan Application ManagerLoanReviewService

1. In Oracle Service Bus Console, make sure the current session is activated.

41
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

2. Select Resource Browser > Proxy Services in the left panel.

3. Click on Launch Test Console icon in Actions column for LoanGateway1


to launch the test console (see Figure 4-29).

Figure 4-29 Test Console for LoanGateway1

4. Replace the default payload in loanRequest field with the following code:

42
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

<loanRequest xmlns:java="java:normal.client">
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Name>Smith</java:Name>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:SSN>1234567</java:SSN>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Rate>4.1</java:Rate>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Amount>9000000</java:Amount>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:NumOfYear>10</java:NumOfYear>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Notes>Manager Loan Application Review
Service</java:Notes>
</loanRequest>

5. Accept other default settings and click Execute. The response as in Figure 4-
30 is obtained.

Figure 4-30 Response from the ManagerLoanApplicationReview


Service

The Invocation Trace section of the test console indicates that the proxy
service routed the request to ManagerLoanReview business service because
the interest rate requested is 4.1 (less than 5).

43
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

To test the Routing of the Loan Application Through


normalLoanProcessor

1. In Oracle Service Bus Console, make sure the session is activated.

2. Click on Resource Browser > Proxy Services in the left panel.

3. Click on Launch Test Console icon in Actions column for LoanGateway1 to


launch the test console.

4. Replace the default payload in loanRequest field with the following code:

<loanRequest xmlns:java="java:normal.client">
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Name>Smith</java:Name>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:SSN>1234567</java:SSN>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Rate>5.3</java:Rate>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Amount>9000000</java:Amount>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:NumOfYear>10</java:NumOfYear>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Notes>Manager Loan</java:Notes>
</loanRequest>

Accept other default settings and click Execute. The response as in Figure 4-31 is
obtained.

44
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 4-31 Response From NormalLoanProcessor

The Invocation Trace section of the test console indicates that the proxy service
routed the request to NormalLoan business service because the interest rate
requested is 5.3 (greater than 5).

Where to go From Here


After completing Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application proceed to 5 Tutorial 2.
Transforming a Loan Application.

45
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

5 Tutorial 2. Transforming a Loan


Application
Data transformation is the mapping of data from one format to another, to make
information compatible in heterogeneous system environments. Oracle Service Bus
can be configured to route and transforms messages when necessary, based on
specific proxy service configurations.

This section includes the following topics:

Prerequisites
Tutorial Objectives
Definition of the Scenario

Prerequisites
You must complete 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application before beginning this
1

tutorial.

Tutorial Objectives
This tutorial provides the tasks to create and test a routing and transformation
scenario developed using the graphical environment provided in Oracle Service Bus
Console. Using the Oracle Service Bus Console you will build on what you learned in
4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application to perform the following tasks:
1

Configure content-based routing.


Use an XPath expression to change the content in the message body.

Definition of the Scenario


A primary mortgage company uses Oracle Service Bus to identify and re-route loan
applications that can be sold to secondary loan companies. Loan applications with a
principal request of greater than US $25 million are candidates for sale to a
secondary loan company. When Oracle Service Bus receives a loan application
meeting these criteria, the applicant's credit rating information is retrieved (by
making a callout to a Web service).

The credit rating information is added to the loan application. The application is then
forwarded to the secondary mortgage company Web service to be processed. Loan
applications with a principal request equal to or less than US $25 million are routed

46
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

to a different business service for processing. The target business services respond
indicating whether the loan application is approved or rejected.

Figure 5-1 illustrates where Oracle Service Bus fits in your enterprise to mediate the
messaging between the enterprise services and the business services.

Figure 5-1 Expose a Loan Application Processing Web Service via Oracle
Service Bus

Overview of the Run-time Process in Oracle Service


Bus
A primary mortgage company receives a loan application. It is routed through the
Oracle Service Bus proxy service, LoanGateway2, to determine the target business
service to process the application. If the loan amount is greater than US $25 million,
the application is routed to the LoanSaleProcessor business service. If the amount is
less than or equal to US $25 million, the application is routed to the NormalLoan
business service.

When the loan amount is more than US $25 million, the request pipeline makes a
service callout to the CreditRating business service and receives the credit rating of
the applicant using the $creditRating variable. To fulfill the interface requirements of
the secondary loan company service, the message body is transformed by adding
the credit rating details. The transformed message ($body) is routed to a business
service that handles applications for large loan amounts. The service returns a
response similar to the following:

47
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Loan Application Response: CREDIT RATING: AA: LOAN


PURCHASED BY THE <i><b>LARGE</b></i> LOANS SERVICE

Required Resources
You will use the MortgageBroker project folder and the directory structure you
created in the previous tutorial to hold the project artifacts. The resources required
for this scenario are described in the following table.

Resource Name Description


creditRating, loanSale These are the WSDL resources.
NormalLoan, LoanSaleProcessor, These are the external business services used by
CreditRating Oracle Service Bus.
LoanGateway2 This is the Oracle Service Bus proxy service.

Tasks in This Tutorial


In this tutorial, you will perform the following tasks:

Import additional WSDL resources


Register new business services and proxy services
Configure the routing behavior for the proxy service, by executing the
following tasks:
o Adding a Service Callout to get a credit rating
o Changing the namespace and inserting a new <CreditRating> element
in the outbound (request) message
o Reverting the namespace change and removing the <CreditRating>
element on the response message.

Prepare the Environment


Ensure that Oracle Service Bus is running in the domain that you created for the
tutorial and that you have completed the tasks described in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a
1

Loan Application.

Create a Session
For this tutorial, you need to use the MortgageBroker project folder, and the
directory structure that you created in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application to
1

hold the project artifacts.

48
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console Change Center click Create to create a
new session.

2. In the Oracle Service Bus Console navigation pane, select the Project
Explorer.

The project explorer pane is opened in the navigation pane and a project
page is displayed in the console.

3. In the project explorer, expand the MortgageBroker project tree to


expose the subfolders containing the project artifacts:
o BusinessService
o ProxyService
o WSDL
4. Complete the following steps to create the necessary resources. Be sure to
Activate your session after creating the resources.

Create the WSDL Resources


You must create the WSDL resources (loanSale and creditRating) before creating the
other resources required for this scenario. WSDL resources are the building blocks
for creating the business and proxy services. To import the appropriate WSDLs and
create the WSDL resources, follow the tasks described in To Create the normalLoan
1

WSDL Resource section in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application. However, for this
1

instance, name your resources and base them on the WSDLs listed in the following
table.

Resource
Name Location of the WSDL
loanSale OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples\src\examples\webservices\jws_basic
\large\LargeLoanPurchasingService.wsdl
creditRating OSB_ORACLE_HOME\samples\servicebus\examples\src\examples\webservices\jws_basic
\credit\CreditLoanApprovalService.wsdl

Note: In Oracle Service Bus 11.1.1.3, get the WSDLs from the location where you
extracted the downloaded resources as described in “Before You Begin” in 2
Introduction to the Oracle Service Bus Tutorials.

When you complete this task, the MortgageBroker/WSDL folder contains the WSDL
resources created in this tutorial and in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application as
1

shown in Figure 5-2.

49
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-2 WSDL Resources

Create a Proxy Service


In this task, you will create a proxy service. The proxy service is used to route the
loan application to the appropriate business service. It also calls a look up service to
obtain the credit rating of the requestor if the loan amount requested is greater than
US $25 million.

Note:
No units are assigned to the loan amount, but units can be any currency
such as US dollars.

To create a new proxy service, LoanGateway2, follow the tasks described in


Create a Proxy Service For this instance, use the proxy service name and the
1

endpoint URI listed in the following table.

Proxy Service
Name LoanGateway2
Service Type Select the WSDL Web Service (port or binding) option.

Select the normalLoan WSDL in the Select a WSDL page.

Select the helloPort port in the Select a WSDL Definition page.


Endpoint URI Click Next to proceed to the Create a Proxy Service - Transport
Configuration page.

Enter /loan/gateway2 as the endpoint URI.

50
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

After you complete this task, a summary of the configuration settings for the proxy
service is displayed.

When you complete this task, the MortgageBroker/ProxyService folder contains the
proxy services that you created in this tutorial and in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan
1

Application as shown in Figure 5-3.

Figure 5-3 Proxy Service Resources

Create a Business Service


In this scenario, the proxy service is configured to route to one of several different
business services, depending on the business requirements as follows:

NormalLoan (you have already created this) – The secondary mortgage


company's business service. This service is invoked when a loan application is
submitted for an amount of US $25 million or less.
CreditRatingService – Returns the customer's credit rating when a loan
application meeting specified criteria is received. This is implemented using a
Web service callout (Service Callout).
LoanSaleProcessor – The secondary mortgage company's business service.
This service is invoked when a loan application is submitted for amounts
greater than US $25 million.

You created the NormalLoan service in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application.


1

To create the LoanSaleProcessor and CreditRatingService business services for


this scenario, follow the tasks described in Create the Business Services. You must
1

configure your services using the names, service types, and endpoint URIs listed in
the following two tables.

51
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Business
Service
Name LoanSaleProcessor
Service Select the WSDL Web Service as the Service Type option.
Type
Select the loanSale WSDL in the Select a WSDL page.

Select the helloPort port in the Select a WSDL Definition page.


Load none
Balancing
Algorithm
Endpoint Ensure that the pre-populated value for the Endpoint URI in the “Existing URIs”
URI field is http://<host:port>/ljws_basic_ejb/LargeSimpleBean where
<host:port> represents the machine and port on which the Oracle Service Bus
server is running.

Business
Service
Name CreditRating
Service Select the WSDL Web Service as the Service Type option.
Type
Select the creditRating WSDL in the Select a WSDL page.

Select the helloPort port in the Select a WSDL Definition page.


Load none
Balancing
Algorithm
Endpoint Ensure that the pre-populated value for the endpoint URI in the “Existing
URI URIs” field is
http://<host:port>/crejws_basic_ejb/CreditSimpleBean.

where <host:port> represents the machine and port on which your


Oracle Service Bus server is running.

When you complete this task, the MortgageBroker/BusinessService folder contains


the business services that you created in this tutorial and in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a
1

Loan Application as shown in Figure 5-4.

52
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-4 Business Service Resources

Summary
Upon completing all the tasks from Prepare the Environment to Create the
Resources you have created the resources required for this scenario. You have also
configured the proxy service with a base configuration. In the following three tasks
you will configure the proxy service by adding the routing, transformation, and
Service Callout behavior for the loan application messages.

Configure Routing for LoanGateway2 Proxy Service


A proxy service is implemented in Oracle Service Bus as a message flow, which
includes request and response pipelines. Complete the following tasks.

Create a Routing Table

1. In the Oracle Service Bus Console navigation pane, select Resource


Browser.

The Resource Browser pane is opened in the navigation pane and the
Summary of Proxy Services page is displayed in the console.

2. In the Actions column associated with the LoanGateway2 proxy service, click
the Edit Message Flow icon.

3. Click LoanGateway2, then select Add Route from the menu. In the
configuration dialog, RouteNode1 is added.

53
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-5 Edit Message Flow - LoanGateway2 RouteNode1

4. Click RouteNode1 and select Edit Route from the menu. The Edit Stage
Configuration page is displayed and contains a single link, Add an Action.

Figure 5-6 Add an Action Link

5. Click Add an Action, then select Communication > Routing Table from
the menu.

The Edit Stage Configuration page changes to display the routing table
configuration information.

Figure 5-7 Routing Table Configuration Page

54
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

To configure the routing table to route messages to business services based on the
amount element of the incoming message, you must create an XQuery expression
using the XQuery Expression Editor.

Configure the Routing Expression

1. In the Routing Table, click the <Expression> link. The XQuery Expression
Editor is displayed.

2. In the Namespace Definitions pane, click Variable Structures.

3. Select body from the Select Structure list in the Variable Structures pane.

4. A structural representation of the body element is displayed in the Variable


Structures pane. Click + to expand $body – processLoanApp (Request)
> processLoanApp > loanRequest.

A graphical representation of the structure of the loan application document


is displayed. At run time, the proxy service makes its routing decision based
on the value in the amount element of the message.

5. Click the Amount element. The property appears below the XQuery editor in
the Property Inspector field. Click in the XQuery text box and click Copy
Property in the lower right of the XQuery Expression text box. The following
XQuery expression is written in the text box:

$body/exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/java:Amount

Note:
In Internet Explorer (IE) browsers, you can simply drag the icon next to
the Rate element into the XQuery text editor.

6. Click Validate to validate the XQuery.

7. Click Save.

The routing table is displayed on the Edit Stage Configuration page.


<Expression> is now replaced by the expression that returns the value of the
amount element in the message.

8. In the Operator list, select > and in the associated text field, enter the
number 25000000 (twenty-five million, without commas).

55
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

The routing table now contains an expression that determines the routing
behavior. If the value in the Amount field is greater than US $25 million, then
messages are routed according to the routing table configuration.

9. Click the Service link to define the service to which you want to route when
the amount is greater than US $25. Select LoanSaleProcessor, and click
Submit.

10. In the Operation list, select the processLoanApp operation.

This is the operation on the LoanSaleProcessor business service that is


invoked at run-time if the amount of the loan requested in the loan
application is greater than US $25 million.

You have now defined the case for routing the loan application to the
LoanSaleProcessor business service as shown in Figure 5-8.

Figure 5-8 Routing the Loan Application to LoanSaleProcessor

When a loan application with a loan amount greater than US $25 million is
identified, a Web service callout (Service Callout) is performed to retrieve the
customer's credit rating. The credit rating information is added to the loan
application. The application is then forwarded to the secondary mortgage company's
business service to be processed.

Configure Routing Request Actions for LoanGateway2


Proxy Service
This section describes how to configure the proxy service to do the Service Callout
and transform the message appropriately for the target service.

56
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Configure the Service Callout Input Parameter


A Service Callout is used to send the loan application to the CreditRating business
service, which returns the credit rating of an applicant. Before adding the Service
Callout action, you must configure the Service Callout input parameter by
performing the following tasks:

Delete the "xsi:type" attribute from the message


Assign an input parameter for the Service Callout action
Rename the namespace for the Service Callout input parameter

Add a Delete Action

You must delete the "xsi:type" attribute from the message by adding and
configuring a Delete action as follows:

1. In the Routing Table “Request Actions” pane, select Add an Action >
Message Processing > Delete.

The Delete action is added to the Routing Table Request Action pipeline.

2. Click <XPath>. The XPath Expression editor is displayed.


a. In the XPath Expression text box, enter the following expression:

./exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/@xsi:type

b. Click Validate, then Save. You will return to the Edit Stage
Configuration page.

3. Enter body in the variable text field of the <XPath>.

The configuration for the Delete action is therefore:

Delete ./exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/@xsi:type in
variable body as shown in Figure 5-9.

57
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-9 LoanGateway2 Routing Request Delete Action

Assign a Service Callout Input Parameter for the Service Callout

1. In the Request Actions pane of the Routing Table, click the Delete icon to
bring up the menu, then select Add an Action > Message Processing >
Assign.

The Assign action is added to the Request Action pipeline in the Routing
Table.

2. Click the <Expression> link. The XQuery Expression editor is displayed.

3. Navigate to the Variables Structures pane. Select body from the Variables
Structures list.

4. Expand the request element list and copy the loanRequest element into the
XQuery expression text box. The following XQuery expression is written in the
text box:

$body/exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest

5. Click Validate to validate the XQuery, then Save. The routing table is
displayed on the Edit Stage Configuration page. <Expression> is now
replaced by the expression that returns the content of the message to be
sent to the Service Callout service.

6. Enter loanRequestVariable in the variable text box as shown in Figure 5-


10.

58
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-10 LoanGateway2 Routing Request Assign Action

This task completes the assignment of value returned by the XQuery expression
($body/exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest) to the loanRequestVariable
variable.

Rename the Namespace of the Input Parameter you Assigned for the
Service Callout

1. In the Request Actions pane of the Routing Table, click the Assign icon to
bring up the menu, then Add an Action > Message Processing >
Rename. The Rename action configuration fields are added to the Request
Actions pane.

2. In the Rename statement, click the <XPath> link. The XPath Expression
Editor is displayed.

3. In the XPath Expression text box, enter the following XPath expression:

.//java:*

This expression identifies every instance of a namespace with a prefix of java.

4. Click Validate and Save to save the XPath expression and return to the Edit
Stage Configuration page.

5. In the variable text box, enter loanRequestVariable.

You have completed creating a condition in which the XPath expression finds
all the namespaces with the java prefix in the loanRequestVariable context

59
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

variable. The next task specifies the namespace to replace the namespaces
identified by the XPath expression.

6. Select the namespace option and enter the following fully qualified new
namespace to be substituted in the message: java:credit.client.

Note:
The default namespace that you are replacing in this case is
java:normal.client.

The Rename action is displayed as shown in Figure 5-11.

Figure 5-11 LoanGateway2 Routing Request Rename Action

Add a Service Callout Action


This section describes how you can configure the Service Callout action to send the
loan application to the CreditRating business service, that returns the credit rating of
an applicant.

60
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

1. In the Request Actions pane of the Routing Table, click the Rename icon,
then Add an Action > Communication > Service Callout.

The Service Callout action is added to the Request Action pipeline in the
Routing Table.

2. Click the Service Callout to <Service> link. The Select Service page is
displayed.
a. In the Select Service page, select CreditRating.
b. Click Submit.

The service callout action is displayed.

3. From the Operation list, select processLoanApp. The fields that allow you to
configure the request and response parameters for the service callout are
displayed as shown in Figure 5-12.

Figure 5-12 Service Callout Action - Configured Operation

4. In the service callout “Request Parameters” section, set the loanRequest


parameter to loanRequestVariable (the message context variable you
defined in the previous section).

5. In the service callout “Response Parameters” section, set the return


parameter name to creditRating as shown in Figure 5-13.

61
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-13 Service Callout Action - Configured Parameters

This task completes the service callout configuration to invoke the creditRating Web
service. The credit rating returned by this Web service is assigned to the
$creditRating context variable.

Configure Message Transformation


In this section, you will configure the message transformation to match the public
contract (interface requirements) of the LoanSaleProcessor business service. You
will configure the proxy service to:

Rename the namespace for the message to the namespace required by the
target service using XPath expressions, described in this section.
Insert an new element into the message by adding an element action in the
configuration, described in this section.

Rename the Message Namespace

1. Click the Service Callout icon to bring up the menu, and select Add an
Action > Message Processing > Rename. The Rename action
configuration fields are added to the Request Actions pane.

2. In the Rename statement, click the <XPath> link. The XPath Expression
Editor is displayed.

3. In the XPath Expression text box, enter the following XPath expression:

.//java:*

This expression identifies every instance of a namespace with a prefix of java.

4. Click Validate and Save to save the XPath expression and return to the Edit
Stage Configuration page.

62
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

5. In the variable text box, enter body. The body context variable contains the
body of the message.

You have completed creating a condition in which the XPath expression finds
all the namespaces with the java prefix in the body context variable. The next
task specifies the namespace to replace the namespaces identified by the
XPath expression.

6. Select the namespace option and enter the fully qualified new namespace to
be substituted in the message. The new namespace you must enter is
java:large.client.

Note:
The default namespace that you are replacing in this case is
java:normal.client.

The Rename action is displayed as shown in Figure 5-14.

Figure 5-14 Message Namespace Rename Action

Insert a New Element in the Message

1. Click the Rename icon to bring up the menu, and select Add an Action >
Message Processing > Insert.

The Insert action configuration fields are added to the Request Actions pane.

2. In the Insert action, click <Expression>. The XQuery Expression editor is


displayed. You will add a new namespace on this page in the subsequent
tasks.

3. In the Namespace Definitions palette, navigate to the User Defined


Namespaces area.

63
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

a. Click Add Namespace.


b. In the Prefix field, enter lg.
c. In the URI field, enter java:large.client.

d. Click Add.

The new namespace is displayed in the User Defined Namespaces area


in the Namespace Definitions palette as shown in Figure 5-15.

Figure 5-15 User Defined Namespace

4. In the XQuery Expression text box, enter the following expression to specify
how the new element is constructed:

<lg:CreditRating>{data($creditRating)}
</lg:CreditRating>

where:

o lg: is the namespace of the element that you add to the message that
should be associated with the java:large.client namespace.
o {} indicates to the XQuery engine that the content between the {} is
not XML and must be interpreted.

At run time, the $creditRating variable is assigned a credit rating value by the
CreditRating business service. (This is the business service to which we
configured a Service Callout action in section Add a Service Callout Action).

5. Click Validate, then Save.

6. In the Insert action, select after from the list.

7. Click the <XPath> link. The XPath Expression Editor is displayed.


.

64
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

a. Click Variable Structures. The Variable Structures pane is displayed.


b. In the Select Structure list in the Variables Structures pane, select
body.
c. Expand the request element copy the Notes element into the XPath
Expression text box.

The following XPath expression is written to the text box:

./exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/java:Notes

8. In this statement, replace the namespace java with the namespace lg.

./exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/lg:Notes

9. Click Validate, then Save to return to the Edit Stage Configuration page.

10. Enter body in the variable text field (the last field in the expression). This is
the context variable into which the new <CreditRating> element is inserted at
run time.

The Insert action will be displayed as shown in Figure 5-16.

Figure 5-16 Insert New Element into Message

11. Click Save in the Edit Stage Configuration page.

This task completes the configuration of the outbound message. You have added a
credit rating element to the message and changed the message namespace so that
the message complies with the public contract (interface) of the target service.

The next task describes how you can configure the response actions for the
LoanGateway2 proxy service.

Configure Routing Response Actions for


LoanGateway2 Proxy Service
This section describes how you can configure the response actions in the Routing
Table so that the message that is returned by the proxy service to the client

65
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

complies with the client's public contract (WSDL). You can configure the proxy
service to:

Remove the <CreditRating> element from the response message, described


in this section.
Revert the namespace to the namespace in the original message:
java:normal.client, described in this section.

Delete an Element

1. Ensure that the Edit Stage Configuration page for the routing table that you
created and configured in the preceding tasks is open in the Oracle Service
Bus Console. (Click RouteNode1 > Edit Route in the proxy service's Edit
Message Flow page).

2. In the routing table Response Actions pane, select Add an Action >
Message Processing > Delete.

The Delete action configuration fields are added to the Routing Table
Response Actions.

3. Select the <XPath> option. The XPath Expression Editor page is displayed.
a. In the XPath Expression text box, enter the following expression:

./exam:processLoanAppResponse/return/lg:CreditRa
ting

where <processLoanAppResponse> is the WSDL operation that was


invoked with the string Response appended to it, and return is the
WSDL part name.

b. Click Validate, then Save.

4. Enter body in the variable text field of the <XPath> in variable option in the
Delete action.

The configuration for the Delete action is therefore:

Delete ./exam:processLoanAppResponse/return/lg:CreditRating in variable


body as shown in Figure 5-18.

66
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-18 Response Delete Action

You have configured Oracle Service Bus to remove the <CreditRating> element
from the response message, when the message is processed in the response
pipeline.

Add a Rename Action

This section describes how you can rename the namespace to the namespace that
the client requires, that is java:normal.client.

Note:
Recall that you configured the request message to the LoanSaleProcessor
business service to change the namespace to that required by that
service. (See Configure Message Transformation).

1. Click the Delete icon to bring up the menu, then Add an Action >
Message Processing > Rename.

The Rename action configuration fields are added to the Response Actions
pipeline.

2. In the Rename statement, click <XPath>. The XPath Expression Editor is


displayed.
a. In the XPath Expression text box, enter the following expression:

.//lg:*

This XPath expression finds every namespace with a prefix of lg:

b. Click Validate and Save. The Edit Stage Configuration page is


displayed.

3. In the Rename action's variable text field enter body.

67
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

4. Select the namespace option, and in the text field associated with the
namespace, enter java:normal.client.

When these tasks are completed, you have specified that Oracle Service Bus
replaces all namespaces with the prefix lg: in the response message with
java:normal.client as shown in Figure 5-19.

Figure 5-19 Add Rename Action

The last task in the configuration of the routing table for the LoanGateway2 proxy
service is to add a default routing case (an else condition) to the case expression.

Add a Default Routing Case


This section describes how you can configure a default routing case for the routing
table of the LoanGateway2 proxy service. At run time, if none of the conditions
configured in the Routing Table are met, Oracle Service Bus routes messages
according to the configuration of this default case.

1. Click the Case icon at the top of the Routing Table, then select Insert
Default Case.

The default case is added to the bottom of the routing table.

2. Click <Service> in the default case to display the Select Services page.
a. Select the NormalLoan business service.
b. Click Submit.

3. In the default case configuration operation list, select the operation


processLoanApp as shown in Figure 5-21.

68
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-21 Add Default Routing Case

4. Click Save to save the route node configuration and return to the Edit
Message Flow page for the LoanGateway2 proxy service.

5. Click Save.

6. Click Activate, and then Submit to save the session configuration


information.

The message flow map of the proxy service is displayed.

Test the Loan Application Routing Configuration


Using the Test Console
This section describes how to test the loan application using the test console. To
test the loan, you must first deploy the client jars in the Oracle WebLogic Server
console. For more information see, Load the Client Application.
1

To test the Routing of the Loan Application Using LoanSaleProcessor


Service

1. In Oracle Service Bus Console, make sure the session is activated.

2. Select Resource Browser > Proxy Services in the left panel.

3. Click the Launch Test Console icon in Actions column for LoanGateway2 to
launch the test console (see Figure 4-2).

4. Replace the default payload in the loanRequest field with the following code:

69
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

<loanRequest xmlns:java="java:normal.client">
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Name>Smith</java:Name>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:SSN>1234567</java:SSN>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Rate>5</java:Rate>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Amount>900000000</java:Amount>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:NumOfYear>10</java:NumOfYear>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Notes>Large Loan Processing</java:Notes>
</loanRequest>

Accept other default settings and click Execute. The response as in Figure 5-22.

Figure 5-22 Response From LoanSaleProcessor Business Service

The Invocation Trace indicates that the proxy service LoanGateway2 routes the
application to LoanSaleProcessor because the amount of the loan requested is
greater than US $25 million.

70
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Test the NormalLoan Business Service

1. In Oracle Service Bus Console activate the current session.

2. Click on Resource Browser > Proxy Services in the left panel.

3. Click on Launch Test Console icon in Actions column for LoanGateway2 to


launch the test console (see Figure 4-2).

4. Replace the default payload in loanRequest field with the following code:

<loanRequest xmlns:java="java:normal.client">
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Name>Smith</java:Name>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:SSN>1234567</java:SSN>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Rate>5</java:Rate>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Amount>2000000</java:Amount>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:NumOfYear>10</java:NumOfYear>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Notes>Normal Loan</java:Notes>
</loanRequest>

Accept other default settings and click Execute. The response as in Figure 5-23.

71
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 5-23 Response from NormalLoanProcessor

The Invocation Trace indicates that the proxy service LoanGateway2 routes the
application to NormalLoan business service because the amount of the loan
requested was less than US $25 million.

Best Practices
In this tutorial, you configured the transformation and replaced the namespaces in
the Route node. Alternatively, it is possible to configure the same logic in the
request pipeline in a pipeline pair. The work you must do to accomplish the
transformation and namespace replacement is the same regardless of the model
that you choose.

In the case of the tutorial scenario, it is easier to add the actions to the request and
response actions of the existing route node rather than create a separate pipeline
pair, add a stage, and then add the transformation actions to that stage.

72
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

The following scenario describes a situation in which the choice of the


implementation is important:

A route node routes messages to five different services. Each service requires the
same transformation. In this scenario, it is a good practice to add a single
transformation to a request pipeline rather than configure five identical sets of
transformations for each routing configuration of every route node. The run-time
execution cost is the same, but the cost of maintaining, configuring, and
understanding the latter implementation is higher and requires greater effort.

73
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

6 Tutorial 3. Validating a Loan Application


Oracle Service Bus proxy services can be configured to validate messages passed
between clients and business services. Validation actions can be configured at any
stage in the message handling pipeline. However these actions are usually
configured in the early stages to eliminate erroneous messages. XQuery conditional
expressions can be used to perform explicit validation during message processing.

You can configure message validation logic in the following ways:

By validating elements selected by an XPath expression against a top level


XML schema element or WSDL resource.
By validating the message and reporting errors.

This tutorial includes the following topics:

Prerequisites
Tutorial Objectives
Definition of the Scenario
Tasks in This Tutorial

Prerequisites
You must complete 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application and 5 Tutorial 2.
1

Transforming a Loan Application before beginning this tutorial:

Tutorial Objectives
The objective of this tutorial is to provide tasks to configure Oracle Service Bus
resources that implement message validation and error handling, in Oracle Service
Bus Console. This tutorial includes the following:

Demonstrates a common message validation and error handling pattern using


an Oracle Service Bus proxy service.
Validates a request pipeline message against a schema type definition in a
WSDL.

Features Highlighted
This tutorial exposes you to the following features of Oracle Service Bus:

Configuration of a request-response pipeline

74
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Use of the validate action to raise a validation exception


Illustration of how a stage error handler can trap an error and return a
customized error message

Definition of the Scenario


A primary mortgage company routes every loan application through an Oracle
Service Bus proxy service that validates the message. If the application is:

Incomplete, it is written to an error directory and an error message is


returned to the client.
Complete, it is routed to a business service for review.
Approved, the service returns a message indicating whether the loan is
accepted or rejected.

Figure 6-1 summarizes the logical architecture to support this scenario and
illustrates how Oracle Service Bus is positioned in the enterprise system environment
to mediate the messaging between the client and the business services.

Figure 6-1 Validating a Loan Application Using Oracle Service Bus

Overview of the Run-Time Process in Oracle Service


Bus
In this scenario, you can configure Oracle Service Bus to validate an incoming
message in the message flow against a schema definition in a WSDL resource. Every
field is checked for valid content. All elements must be populated for the application
to be valid. When the value of the loan duration field is not an integer, the validate
action raises an error. The context variable, $fault, is populated with the error
details.

75
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

The error is trapped by a stage error handler which replaces the body context
variable <Notes> field value with the text of the $fault <reason> element. A Report
action then saves the error code and the message body, for later viewing and
searching in the console. The Reply action returns the body context variable to the
client.

In this scenario, the message routing is as follows:

Returned by the response pipeline to the client along with the validation error
message

or

Forwarded to the NormalLoan business service, which returns the following


reply:

The loan application was accepted.

Required Resources
Use the MortgageBroker project folder and the directory structure that you created
in the previous tutorial to hold the project artifacts. The resources required for this
scenario are described in the following table.

Resource Name Description


normalLoan The WSDL resource.
NormalLoan The external business service used by Oracle Service Bus.
LoanGateway3 The Oracle Service Bus proxy service.

Tasks in This Tutorial


In this tutorial, Oracle Service Bus is used to route a loan application within a
mortgage company to a target Web service. The loan application has to be
completed correctly for the application to be processed. If there is an error in the
application, Oracle Service Bus raises a validation exception, and returns an error
message to the client.

You will create a proxy service, LoanGateway3, and configure it to route a message
to the NormalLoan business service. You will configure the behavior of the proxy
service by performing the following tasks:

76
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Creating a proxy service and edit the request pipeline to include a validate
action
Using the context variable, $fault, to hold the error
Trapping the error using a stage error handler to write the context variable
element $fault<reason> to the value of the body context variable <Notes>
field.

Prepare Your Environment


Ensure that Oracle Service Bus is running in the domain you created for the tutorial
and that you have completed the tasks described in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan
1

Application.

Create a Session
For this tutorial, use the MortgageBroker project folder and the directory structure
you created in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application to hold the project artifacts.
1

1. Click Create in the Change Center to create a new session.

2. In the Oracle Service Bus Console navigation pane, select the Project
Explorer.

The Project Explorer pane is opened in the navigation pane and a project
page is displayed in the console.

3. In the Project Explorer expand the MortgageBroker project tree to expose


the subfolders containing the project artifacts:
o BusinessService
o ProxyService
o WSDL

4. Perform the steps in the following sections.

Create the Resources


In this section, you will create the proxy service, LoanGateway3. You will use the
existing normalLoan WSDL resource to validate the content of the message. If the
loan application is valid and meets the expected criteria it is routed to the existing
NormalLoan business service. The normalLoan WSDL resource and the NormalLoan
business service were created in To Create the normalLoan WSDL Resource section
1

in 4 Tutorial 1. Routing a Loan Application.


1

77
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Create a Proxy Service


In this task, you create a LoanGateway3 proxy service that is used to route the
loan application to the appropriate business service. For creating this proxy service
instance, follow the tasks described in Create a Proxy Service, and use the proxy
1

service name and the endpoint URI specified in the following table.

Proxy Service Name LoanGateway3


Service Type Select normalLoan WSDL, helloPort
Endpoint URI /loan/LoanGateway3

While configuring the proxy service, accept the default settings for the remaining
pages. When the Create a Proxy Service - Summary page is displayed, review the
summary of configuration settings before to registering the proxy service, and click
Save.

When you complete this task, the MortgageBroker/ProxyService folder must contain
the following proxy services you created in this tutorial and the previous tutorials:

LoanGateway1
LoanGateway2
LoanGateway3

Configure the LoanGateway3 Proxy Service


The proxy service is implemented in Oracle Service Bus as a message flow. Oracle
Service Bus message flows define the implementation of proxy services using
request and response pipelines. Message flows can include zero or more of the
following pipeline pairs:

Request and response pipelines for the operations on the proxy service
Error handler pipelines defined for stages, pipelines, and proxy services

Each pipeline can include one or more stages, which in turn include actions.

To configure the behavior of the LoanGateway3 proxy service, you must complete
the following tasks.

Create a Pipeline Pair

1. Create a new session in the Oracle Service Bus Console.

78
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

2. Select Project Explorer.

The Project Explorer pane is opened in the navigation pane.

3. In the Actions column associated with the LoanGateway3 proxy service, click
the Edit Message Flow icon.

The Edit Message Flow page for the proxy service LoanGateway3 is displayed.

4. Click the LoanGateway3 node, then select Add Pipeline Pair.

The PipelinePairNode1 is created and placed in the message flow. Request and
response pipelines are displayed for this node as shown in Figure 6-2.

Figure 6-2 Add Pipeline Pair

Configure the Request Actions for the LoanGateway3 Proxy Service

1. Click the Request icon, then select Add Stage.

2. Click Stage1, then select Edit Name and Comments.

3. Enter validate loan application in the Name field and click Save.

Configure an Action to Perform Message Validation

1. To edit the stage, click validate loan application, then select Edit Stage.
The Edit Stage Configuration page is displayed.

2. Click the Add an Action link, then select Message Processing > Validate
from the list. The Validate action is added to the stage.

79
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

3. In the Validate statement, click the <XPath> link to edit the XPath
expression. The XPath Expression Editor is displayed.

4. Click Variable Structures. The Variable Structures pane is displayed.

5. In the Variables Structure pane, from the Select Structure list, select body.

A structural representation of the body element is displayed in the Variables


Structure pane.

a. Expand the processLoanApp request element to expand the element.


b. Click + to expand the loanRequest element.
6. Expand the $body – processLoanApp (request) > processLoanApp element.

A graphical representation of the structure of the loan application document


is displayed.

Figure 6-3 Variable Structures Pane

7. Copy the loanRequest element into the XQuery Expression text box.

./exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest

Figure 6-4 XQuery Expression Editor

80
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

8. Click Validate to validate the XQuery, then Save.

The Edit Stage Configuration page displays <XPath> which is replaced by the
XQuery expression.

9. In the variable text field, enter body.

10. Click <Resource> and select WSDL from the list. The Select a WSDL page
is displayed.

You must validate the message against the resource since the proxy service is
based on the WSDL resource that you originally created.

11. In the Select a WSDL page, select the normalLoan WSDL resource.

The Select WSDL Definitions pane is populated with the content categories of
the WSDL.

a. In the Select WSDL Definitions pane, from the Types category, select
the WSDL type for this WSDL as loanStruct.
b. Click Submit to complete the selection.

12. Select the Raise Error on validation failure option. The Validate action will
be displayed as shown in Figure 6-5.

Figure 6-5 Configured Message Validate Action

13. Click Save to save the configuration.

Note:
Message validation must be done as early as possible in a message flow.
This prevents unnecessary processing of invalid message content. By
raising an exception, further message processing is stopped and an error
response is immediately returned to the client.

81
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Messages can be validated at the route node or using a separate


Validate action (as in this case). When you create a Validation
stage, message processing is more modular since the configured
validate actions logically break down the message flow. If multiple
validations are performed on a message, the validate action is
logically expanded.

Add Stage Error Handler Element

1. Click the validate loan application stage, then select Add Stage Error
Handler. The Edit Error Handler page is displayed.

2. Click Error Handler, then select Add Stage. The stage1 node is displayed.

Figure 6-6 Add Stage Error Handler

3. Click stage1 and select Edit Name and Comments.

4. Change the stage name to Reply, then click Save.

The Edit Stage Configuration page is displayed.

5. To edit the stage, click Reply, then select Edit Stage.

Add an If. . .Then. . . action to the Stage Error Handler

1. Select Add an Action > Flow Control > If... Then...

The If...Then action is added to the Reply stage.

82
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

2. Click the If . . .Then . . . action <Condition> link to specify the expression


that needs to be validated. The XQuery Condition Editor page is displayed.
a. Select the Builder link above the XQuery editor.
b. In the Comparison Expression “Operand” pane, enter
$fault/ctx:errorCode.
c. Select the = Operator from the list.
d. Enter "BEA-382505" (including double quotes) in the Value pane.
e. Select the And option for the Conjunction.

The Expression Builder pane displays as in Figure 6-7:

Figure 6-7 Conditions in the Expression Builder

3. Click Add to add expression to the Expressions textbox.

Figure 6-8 Expressions Textbox

4. Click Validate and Save to save the expression and return to the Edit Stage
Configuration page.

Add a Replace Action to the Stage Error Handler

1. To add a Replace, click Add an Action in the “then” section, and select
Message Processing > Replace within the then . . . portion of the If . . .
Then action.

83
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Note:
When adding multiple actions on a page, click the action preceding the
placement of the new action and select the action to be added from
there. Actions are added in sequence.

The replace statement is displayed as shown in Figure 6-9.

Figure 6-9 Replace Statement

2. In the Replace statement, click the <XPath> link to edit the XPath
expression. The XPath Expression Editor page is displayed.

3. In the Variable Structures pane, select body from the Select Structure list.

A structural representation of the body element is displayed in the Variable


Structures pane.

4. Expand $body – processLoanApp (request) > processLoanApp >


loanRequest, and copy the Notes element to the XQuery text editor.

./exam:processLoanApp/loanRequest/java:Notes

Figure 6-10 Replace Statement XPath Expression

5. Click Validate and Save.

6. In the variable text field, enter body.

84
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

7. Click the <Expression> link to display the XQuery Expression Editor page.

8. In the XQuery Text pane, enter: $fault/ctx:reason/text()

Figure 6-11 Replace Statement XQuery Expression

9. Click Validate and Save.

10. Select Replace node contents option. You need not replace the entire
node.

The Replace action is displayed as shown in Figure 6-12.

Figure 6-12 Add Error Handler Using Replace Action

Add a Report Action to Report the Error

Next, you must add a Report action and configure it to report the body context
variable as detailed context, and set a key name of errorCode and the key value to
the actual error code found in the fault context variable.

1. Click the Replace icon and select Add an Action > Reporting > Report.
The report action is added to the page.

2. In the Report statement, click the <Expression> link. The XQuery


Expression Editor page is displayed.

85
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

3. In the Variables Structures pane, select body from the Select Structure list.

Copy the $body - ProcessLoanApp (request) element into the XQuery


Expression text box.

The $body XQuery expression is entered in the text box.

Click Validate, then Save.

The Edit Stage Configuration page is displayed.

4. In the key-value pair table, click the Add a Key link.

Enter a Key Name of errorCode.

Figure 6-13 Report Action Expression Key

5. In the Key Value field, click <XPath> link. The XPath Expression Editor is
displayed.

6. In the Variable Structures pane, select fault from the Select Structure list.

86
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 6-14 Fault Variable Structure

7. Expand $fault and copy the errorCode in the XPath Expression text box.

Type ./ctx:errorCode expression in the text box.

This step enables you to index the reporting data by error code. The keys are
a convenient way to identify a message. You can use the error code to search
for reporting entries in the reporting module.

8. Click Validate and Save.

9. In the variable text field, enter fault.

The Report action must be displayed as shown in Figure 6-15.

Figure 6-15 Configured Report Action

The Edit Stage Configuration page is displayed as shown in Figure 6-16.

87
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 6-16 Request Actions for LoanGateway3 Proxy Service

Add an Else Action to the Stage Error Handler

1. Click the If . . . Then. . . icon.

2. Select Add else Condition to add an Else action to the stage error handler.

Add a Replace Action Within the Else Action

1. Select Add an Action > Message Processing > Replace.

2. Execute the steps in the Add a Replace Action to the Stage Error Handler
section.

Add a Log Action Within the Else Action

1. Click the Replace icon within the Else action.

2. Select Add an Action > Reporting > Log.

The Log action is displayed.

88
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 6-17 Reporting Log Action

3. Click the <Expression> link to display the XQuery Expression Editor page.
Enter $fault/ctx:reason/text() in the XQuery Text page.

4. Click Validate and Save to validate and save the expression and return to
the Edit Stage Configuration page.

5. Enter Other than validation error in the "with Annotation" text box.

6. Select Error from the "at severity level" list.

The completed Else condition must be displayed as shown in Figure 6-18.

Figure 6-18 LoanGateway3 Proxy Service Request Else Actions

89
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Add a Reply Action to Reply with a Failure Code

1. Click the Report icon under the If...Then action, and select Add an Action
> Flow Control > Reply. The reply action is added to the page.

2. Select With Failure option. The Report Reply action is displayed as shown in
Figure 6-19.

Figure 6-19 Report Reply Action with Failure Code

3. Click Save to save the stage configuration and return to the Edit Error
Handler page.

4. Click Save to save the error handler configuration. You are returned to the
Edit Message Flow page.

90
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Add a Default Routing Case


You must now add a Route Node to the Pipeline pair and configure it to enable
default routing to the NormalLoan business service.

Configure the Route Node


1. Click PipelinePairNode1, then select Add Route.

The Edit Message Flow page is displayed.

2. Click RouteNode1, then select Edit Route. The Edit Stage Configuration
page is displayed.

3. Click Add an Action, then select Communication > Routing.

The Route to action is displayed in the Edit Stage Configuration page as


shown Figure 6-20.

Figure 6-20 Route to Statement

4. In the route statement, click the <Service> link to define the service to
which you want to route messages. The Select Service page is displayed.

Select the NormalLoan business service, then Submit.

5. In the Operation list, select processLoanApp.

6. Click Save.

91
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

This is the operation on the NormalLoan business service that is invoked at


run time. You have now defined the case for routing the loan application to
the NormalLoan business service. The Edit Message Flow page is displayed as
shown in Figure 6-21.

Figure 6-21 LoanGateway3 Proxy Service Message Flow

7. Click Save to save the configuration and return to the


MortgageBroker/ProxyService page.

8. Click Activate, then Submit.

To Test the Loan Application Routing Configuration


Using Test Console
Now that you have configured Oracle Service Bus to work with the client and the
target business services, you must test the configuration. To test the routing
configuration, you must change the value of the Loan duration (in years). Then you
must test the routing logic by verifying whether the proxy service behavior changes
for different loan values.

If the loan value entered is a non integer, an exception must be triggered and an
error message displayed in the Notes field of the message. If the loan value entered
is an integer, the message must be routed to the NormalLoan business service. The
message returned in the command window indicates whether a validation exception
occurred or the message was routed to the appropriate business service.

92
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Testing Prerequisites
To test the loan application using the test console, be sure you have deployed the
client JARs in the Oracle WebLogic Server console in the earlier section, Load the
1

Client Application, in “Setting Up the Tutorials.”

To test the Validation of the Loan Application by


LoanGateway3
Choose from one of the following scenarios to test the loan application.

Scenario One

Follow these steps:

1. In Oracle Service Bus Console, make sure the session is activated.

2. Select Resource Browser > Proxy Services in the left panel.

3. Click the Launch Test Console icon in Actions column for LoanGateway3 to
launch the test console.

4. Replace the default payload in loanRequest field with the following code:

<loanRequest xmlns:java="java:normal.client">
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Name>Smith</java:Name>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:SSN>1234567</java:SSN>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Rate>5</java:Rate>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Amount>900000000</java:Amount>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:NumOfYear>10.1</java:NumOfYear>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Notes>Large Loan Processing</java:Notes>
</loanRequest>

Accept other default settings and click Execute. The response as in Figure 6-22.

93
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Figure 6-22 Response from Error Handler

This response message indicates that a validation exception occurred because the
loan duration specified was not an integer.

Scenario Two

Follow these steps:

1. In Oracle Service Bus Console, make sure the current session is activated.

2. Click on Resource Browser > Proxy Services in the left panel.

3. Click on Launch Test Console icon in Actions column for LoanGateway3 to


launch the test console.

4. Replace the default payload in loanRequest field with the following code:

94
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

<loanRequest xmlns:java="java:normal.client">
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Name>Smith</java:Name>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:SSN>1234567</java:SSN>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Rate>4</java:Rate>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Amount>300000000</java:Amount>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:NumOfYear>10</java:NumOfYear>
<!--Optional:-->
<java:Notes>Normal Loan</java:Notes>
</loanRequest>

Accept other default settings and click Execute. The response as in Figure 6-23.

Figure 6-23 Response From Normal Loan Processor

The response message indicates that the NormalLoan business service processed
the loan application because the loan duration value was an integer.

95
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Step 7: Using Reporting and Monitoring


Now that you have tested the proxy service, you can explore the reporting and
monitoring features of the Oracle Service Bus Console.

Note:
You must have run the tests in To Test the Loan Application Routing
Configuration Using Test Console multiple times (at least five times) to
generate data to enable you to explore the reporting and monitoring
features.

Reporting
Oracle Service Bus includes a JMS Reporting Provider for message reporting. The
Reporting module in the Oracle Service Bus Console displays the information
captured from this reporting provider. You can create your own reporting provider
using the Reporting Service Provider Interface (SPI) if you do not wish to use the
out-of-the-box reporting provider.

The Operations area of Oracle Service Bus Console contains reporting features that
are presented in a drill-down format. When you explore the links presented, the
information is made available to you.

Monitoring and Alerts


Oracle Service Bus can monitor and collect run-time information for both systems
operations and business auditing purposes. Oracle Service Bus aggregates run-time
statistics that you can view on a customizable Dashboard in the Oracle Service Bus
console. The Dashboard allows you to monitor the health of the system and alerts
you to problems in your messaging services. With this information, you can quickly
and easily isolate and diagnose problems as they occur.

You can add SLA and pipeline alerts to the services you created in the tutorials. To
add alerts, be sure to Create a new session in the Oracle Service Bus Console. Also
be sure to create a simple Alert Destination resource.

SLA Alerts

To add SLA alerts to services, click the service name and add alert rules on the SLA
Alert Rules page. The aggregation interval on each alert determines how
frequently alerts appear in the Dashboard after you execute services.

96
Oracle Service Bus Examples and Tutorials

Pipeline Alerts

To add pipeline alerts:

1. In the User Preferences, change the Dashboard Refresh Rate to the


desired rate and the Alert History Duration to the amount of time you
want to keep pipeline alerts in the Dashboard.

2. On the Operational Settings page for a proxy service, Enable Pipeline


Monitoring and set a desired Aggregation Interval.

3. Edit an existing proxy service message flow to add them. For example, in the
LoanGateway3 message flow, edit the Reply stage in the Error Handler to add
a Reporting > Alert action to a specific location.

4. Execute the proxy service to generate alerts.

Be sure to define alert rules so that when you execute the services in the Test
Console, the alerts are guaranteed to fire.

97