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Master of Technology

Department of
CE –Structural
Engineering
I to IV Semesters
Course Matrix & Syllabus

M.Tech (Structural Engineering)


Master of Technology in Structural Engineering is a 2-year post-graduate course offered by
department of Civil Engineering, JAIN UNIVERSITY. The Structural engineers are specialists in design,
construction, repair, rehabilitation and conservation. They are concerned with all aspects of a structure and its stability.
M.Tech in Structural Engineering involves Structural Mechanics, Finite Element Analysis, Structural Dynamics,
Structural Reliability and Optimization, Reinforced and Pre-Stressed Concrete, Steel Structures, Design for Wind and
Earthquake, Tall Buildings and Towers, Computer Applications in Structural Engineering, etc.

Industry Overview: Karnataka state is the 3rd largest FDI receiving state in the Country. The state is distinguished
as the Knowledge Hub of Asia. Karnataka also houses largest number of Research and Development Centers in
India. The World Economic Forum has identified Karnataka among the top 4 innovation hubs in the World. World
Bank‘s Investment Climate Index has ranked Karnataka first for a Healthy Business Climate and Attracting
Investments. The state has the distinction of having built a healthy eco system for Information Technology, Bio-
Technology, Aerospace, Semiconductor, Electronics and Hardware. Karnataka has been spearheading the growth of
Indian industry, particularly in terms of high-technology industries in the areas of electrical and electronics,
Infrastructure development, nanotechnology.

Contribution to Indian Economy:


 As per the Department of Economic Affairs, Govt. of India (As on
January 2018) a total 692-projects are sanctioned with total cost of
Rs 299,059 Crores.
 The real estate and construction sector in India is expected to be the
third largest globally by 2030, contributing over 15 per cent to the
country’s GDP, a joint report by KPMG and real estate body
NAREDCO has said.
 The 90 smart cities shortlisted by the Government of India have
proposed projects with investments of Rs 191,155 crore (US$ 30.02 billion) which include Projects Focusing on
Revamping an Identified Area (Area Based Projects) with investment of Rs 152,500 crore (US$ 23.95 billion).
 The Government of India is working to ensure a good living habitat for the poor in the country and has launched
new flagship urban missions like the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (Urban), Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and
Urban Transformation (AMRUT), and Swachh Bharat Mission (Urban) under the urban habitat model, according
to Mr Hardeep Singh Puri, Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing

Structure of M.Tech (Structural Engineering): The objective of the subjects offered in the program of M.Tech in
Structural Engineering is to study and understand the concepts of tall buildings, infrastructural requirements for
metro cities, soil behavior and mechanics of water-resources engineering, give overall knowledge about inter modal
transportation engineering, high performance concrete and environmental engineering. To study the equipment used
for different construction works and gain knowledge in handling of equipments and safety at site.
The students also study the equipment productivity and its management in the program and the various types of
construction contracts and their legal aspects and provisions. They are also taught contract laws and regulations so
that adequate knowledge on formulating and managing construction contracts is gained. Association with
professional societies like ICI, IGBC, ACCE, ISTE and take up live minor and major projects in the area of
Construction, Planning and in inter-disciplinary areas. To develop Structural Engineers having strong expertise in
onshore infrastructure and a sound background for specialized areas like Offshore Structure/ Management (General)/
Bridge Structure/Hydraulic Structure.
In the first year of study, students learn and get a complete knowledge on Structural engineering and additionally
they can specialize in one of the areas among Tall Structure/ Hydraulic Structure/ Offshore Structure as per interest of
students. In second year, Students will be sent for internship to private and government construction companies, design
consultant companies and in offshore companies to work and enrich their knowledge. In addition to this, students will be
introduced to structural fire through Fire Combustion Research Centre, Jain University.
Program Objectives: The course’s curriculum has been designed to suit modern. Engineers specializing in this field
design all kinds of structures from houses, theatres, sports stadia and hospitals, to bridges, oil rigs, and offshore
structures. The major objective of the course is to impart advanced learning

 In fundamental principles of Structural Analysis.


 Students are trained to solve and compare benchmark problems in Structural Engineering using standard
software, analytical & experimental methods.
 Apply modern tools and materials to industrial requirements like design, construction, repair, rehabilitation,
structural health monitoring, sustainable construction practices and maintenance of stability of structures
 Visit to national labs, research centres and field visits will improve their research competence.

Eligibility: the basic eligibility criteria for admissions to post–graduate engineering courses. A graduate degree in
Civil Engineering/ AMIE with minimum 50 % marks in aggregate.

Career Prospects: Students who completes this course will have career in the areas of Structural design and
construction, offshore design and construction, oil and gas sector, bridge design, construction management, hydraulic
structure design. The major recruiters include MECON, SERC-Chennai, Hindustan Prefab limited, EIL, Bridge
corporation of India, L&T, STUP consultants etc., They will become,

 Structural Consultant
 Structural Engineer
 Design Engineer
 Bridge Engineer
 Offshore Design Engineer
 Offshore Construction Engineer
 Structural Consultant
 Construction Manager
 Engineer in Public Sector, Govt. Sector and Private Sector
 Scientist

Faculty Profile:
The faculties in the Department are having rich field, research and academic experience. They are well versed with
latest tools required to mould young engineers like ANSYS, BIM, STAAD-Pro, Auto CAD3D. They are encouraging
students to do minor projects in consultation with professional societies ICI, IGBC and ACCE. The faculty list
include: Dr. Dushyanth V Babu (IIITH), Prof.C.P.Ramesh,Mr. Manu S E, Mr. Pavan P (NITK), S, Mr. Raghavendra
Prasad, Dr. Maqsood Ahmed (Adjunct Faculty).
School of Engineering and Technology
Jain Global Campus
Jakkasandra Post, Kanakapura Taluk, Ramanagara District
JAIN UNIVERSITY
Pin Code: 562 112 Declared as Deemed-to-be University u/s 3 of the UGC Act 1956

2018 - Onwards
Department of Civil Engineering
Course Matrix
M. Tech in Structural Engineering
I Semester

Internal End Semester


Assessment Examinations Minimum
Sl. Subject
Name of the Subject Credit L–T–P Passing
No. Code Max. Min. Max. Min. Marks
Marks Marks Marks Marks

1 18MTSE101 Structural Dynamics 3 3– 0 – 0 50 25 50 25 50

2 18MTSE102 Advanced Design of Concrete Structures 3 3– 0 – 0 50 25 50 25 50

3 18MTSE103 Repair and rehabilitation of structures 3 3 -0 – 0 50 25 50 25 50

4 18MTSE131 Elective-I 3 3 -0 – 0 50 25 50 25 50

5 18MTSE141 Elective-II 3 3– 0 – 0 50 25 50 25 50

6 18MTSE102L Structural Engineering Lab-I 1 0– 0 – 3 50 25 50 25 50

7 18MTRM01 Research Methodology and IPR 2 2– 0 – 0 50 25 50 25 50

Non
8 18MTMCC01 Mandatory Course-1 2– 0 – 0 - - - - -
Credit

Total (credits) 18 350 175 350 175 350

Elective- I Elective- II
Sl. No Subject Code Name of the Subject Sl. No Subject Code Name of the Subject
1 1
18MTSE131 Civil Engineering Smart Materials 18MTSE141 Theory of Elasticity
2 18MTSE132 Advanced Strength of Materials 2 18MTSE142 Urban Design & Landscape Design
3 3 18MTSE143
18MTSE133 Stability Analysis of Structures Structural Safety and Reliability
School of Engineering and Technology
Jain Global Campus
Jakkasandra Post, Kanakapura Taluk, Ramanagara District
JAIN UNIVERSITY
Pin Code: 562 112 Declared as Deemed-to-be University u/s 3 of the UGC Act 1956

2018 - Onwards
Department of Civil Engineering
Course Matrix
M.Tech in Structural Engineering
II-Semester

End Semester
Internal Assessment Minimum
Sl. Subject Examinations
Name of the Subject Credit L–T–P Passing
No. Code Max. Min. Max. Min.
Marks
Marks Marks Marks Marks
1 18MTSE201 Advanced Concrete Technology 3 3– 0 -0 50 25 50 25 50

2 18MTSE202 Finite Element Method 3 3– 0 -0 50 25 50 25 50

3 18MTSE203 Earthquake Analysis and Design of Structures 3 3– 0 -0 50 25 50 25 50

4 18MTSE231 Elective-III 3 3– 0 -0 50 25 50 25 50

5 18MTSE201 Elective-IV 3 3– 0 -0 50 25 50 25 50

6 18MTSE201 Structural Engineering Lab-II 1 0 – 0 -3 50 25 50 25 50

0– 0- 4
7 18MTSE201 Mini Project 2 50* 25 - - 25

Personality Development through life Enlightenment Non 2 – 0- 0


8 18MTSE201 50* 25 - - 25
Skills Credit
Total (credits)
18 400 200 300 150 350

*Continuous Assessment

Elective- III Elective- IV


Sl. No Subject Code Name of the Subject Sl. No Subject Code Name of the Subject
1 1
18MTSE231 Design concepts of Sub structures 18MTSE241 Design of Plates and Shells
2 18MTSE232 Design of Tall Buildings 2 18MTSE242 Wind Resistant Design of Structures
3 18MTSE233 Design of Offshore Structures 3 18MTSE243 Design of Industrial steel Structures
School of Engineering and Technology
Jain Global Campus
Jakkasandra Post, Kanakapura Taluk, Ramanagara District
JAIN UNIVERSITY
Pin Code: 562 112 Declared as Deemed-to-be University u/s 3 of the UGC Act 1956

2018-Onwards
Department of Civil Engineering
Course Matrix
M. Tech in Structural Engineering
III Semester

Internal End Semester


Assessment Examinations Minimum
Sl. Subject
Name of the Subject Credit L–T–P Passing
No. Code Max. Min. Max. Min. Marks
Marks Marks Marks Marks
1 18MTSE31X Elective-V 3 3-0-0 50 25 50 25 50

2 18MTOE32X Open Elective 3 3-0-0 50 25 50 25 50

3 18MTSE303P Project Phase 1/Internship 10 0 - 0 - 20 100 - - - 50

16 200 50 100 50 150

Elective-V
Sl.No Subject Code Name of the Subject
18MTSE311 Soil Dynamics
18MTSE312 Pre-stressed and Composite Structures
18MTSE313 Design of Masonry Structures

Open Elective

Sl.No Subject Code Name of the Subject


18MTOE321 Soil Dynamics
18MTOE322 Pre-stressed and Composite Structures
18MTOE323 Design of Masonry Structures
School of Engineering and Technology
Jain Global Campus
Jakkasandra Post, Kanakapura Taluk, Ramanagara District
JAIN UNIVERSITY
Pin Code: 562 112 Declared as Deemed-to-be University u/s 3 of the UGC Act 1956

2018 - Onwards
Department of Civil Engineering
Course Matrix
M. Tech in Structural Engineering
IV Semester

Internal End Semester


Sl. Assessment Examinations
Subject Minimum
No Name of the Subject Credit L–T–P
Code Passing Marks
. Max. Min. Max. Min.
Marks Marks Marks Marks

1 18MTSE403P
Project Phase-II & dissertation 16 0-0-32 100 50 400 200 250

Total (credits) 16 100 50 400 200 525


Course Structure for M.Tech (Structural Engineering)

Department Total
Semester Core SEC
Elective Credit
I 09 06 03 18
II 09 06 03 18
III 03 03 10 16
IV 00 - 16 16
Total 21 15 32 68

Proposed

Open Total
Semester Core SEC
Elective Credit
I to IV 21 15 32 68

SEC: Skill Enhancement Course


Master of Technology

Department of
CE –Structural
Engineering
I Semester
Syllabus
STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE101 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Objectives: The objective of this course is to make students to learn principles of Structural Dynamics. To implement these
principles through different methods and to apply the same for free and forced vibration of structures. To evaluate the dynamic
characteristics of the structures.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course, students are able to


• Achieve knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
• Understand the principles of Structural Dynamics
• Design and develop analytical skills.
• Summarize the Solution techniques for dynamics of Multi-degree freedom systems
• Understand the concepts of damping in structures.

1. Introduction: Introduction to Dynamic problems in Civil Engineering, Concept of degrees of freedom, D’Alembert’s
principle, principle of virtual displacement and energy principles Dynamics of Single-degree-of-freedom systems:
Mathematical models of Single-degree-of-freedom systems system, Free vibration response of damped and undamped systems.
Methods of evaluation of damping. 09 Hours

2. Response of Single-degree-of-freedom systems to harmonic loading (rotation unbalance, reciprocating unbalance) including
support motion, vibration isolation, transmissibility, Numerical methods applied to Single-degree-of-freedom systems -
Duhamel integral, principle of vibration-measuring instruments – seismometer and accelerometer. 09 Hours

3. Dynamics of Multi-degree freedom systems: Mathematical models of multi-degree-of-freedom systems, Shear building
concept, free vibration of undamped multi-degree-of-freedom systems - Natural frequencies and mode shapes – orthogonality
property of modes. 09 Hours

4. Response of Shear buildings for harmonic loading without damping using normal mode approach. Response of Shear
buildings for forced vibration for harmonic loading with damping using normal mode approach, condition of damping
uncoupling. 09 Hours

5. . Approximate methods: Rayleigh’s method Dunkarley’s method, Stodola’s method. Dynamics of Continuous systems: Free
longitudinal vibration of bars, flexural vibration of beams with different end conditions,. Stiffness matrix, mass matrix (lumped
and consistent); equations of motion for the discretised beam in matrix form. 09 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Dynamics of Structures – Theory and Application to Earthquake Engineering”- 2nd ed., Anil K. Chopra, Pearson Education.
2. Earthquake Resistant Design of Building Structures, Vinod Hosur, WILEY (India)
3. Vibrations, structural dynamics- M. Mukhopadhaya : Oxford IBH
4. Structural Dynamics- Mario Paz : CBS publishers.
5. Structural Dynamics- Clough & Penzien : TMH
6. Vibration Problems in Engineering Timoshenko, S, Van-Nostrand Co
Advanced Design of Concrete Structures

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE102 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Objectives: The objective of this course is to make students to learn principles of Structural Design. To design
different types of structures and to detail the structures. To evaluate performance of the structures.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course, students are able to,


• Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills
• Understand the principles of Structural Design
• Design and develop analytical skills.
• Summarize the principles of Structural Design and detailing
• Understands the structural performance.

1. Design of flat slabs. -09 Hours

2. Design of grid floors -09 Hours

3. Design of continuous beams with redistribution of moments - 09 Hours

4. Design of bins -09 Hours

5. Theory of Shells and folded plates -09 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. A Park and Paulay, “Reinforced Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete”


2. Lin TY and Burns N H, “Reinforced Concrete Design".
3. Kong KF and Evans T H “Design of Prestressed Concrete Structures
4. P.C.Varghese, "Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design”, Prentice-Hall of India, New Delhi, 2005.
5. Dr.B.C.Punmia, Ashok Kumar Jain and Arun Kumar Jain, “Comprehensive RCC Design”
REPAIR AND REHABILITATION OF STRUCTURES

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE103 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Objectives: The objectives of this course are to make students to investigate the cause of deterioration of concrete structures.
To strategize different repair and rehabilitation of structures. To evaluate the performance of the materials for repair.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course, students are able to


• Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
• Understand the cause of deterioration of concrete structures.
• Design and develop analytical skills.
• Summarize the principles of repair and rehabilitation of structures
• Understands the concept of Serviceability and Durability.

1. General: Introduction, Cause of deterioration of concrete structures, Diagnostic methods & analysis, preliminary
investigations, experimental investigations using NDT, load testing, corrosion mapping, core drilling and other instrumental
methods Quality assurance for concrete construction as built concrete properties strength, permeability, thermal properties and
cracking. 09Hours

2. Influence on Serviceability and Durability: Effects due to climate, temperature, chemicals, wear and erosion, Design and
construction errors, corrosion mechanism, Effects of cover thickness and cracking, methods of corrosion protection, corrosion
inhibitors, corrosion resistant steels, coatings, cathodic protection. 09Hours

3. Maintenance and Repair Strategies: Definitions: Maintenance, repair and rehabilitation, Facets of Maintenance importance
of Maintenance Preventive measures on various aspects. Inspection, Assessment procedure for evaluating a damaged structure
causes of deterioration - testing techniques. 09Hours

4. Materials for Repair: Special concretes and mortars, concrete chemicals, special elements for accelerated strength gain,
Expansive cement, polymer concrete, sulphur infiltrated concrete, Ferro cement, Fiber reinforced concrete. Techniques for
Repair: Rust eliminators and polymers coating for rebar during repair foamed concrete, mortar and dry pack, vacuum concrete,
Gunite and Shot Crete Epoxy injection, Mortar repair for cracks, shoring and underpinning. 10 Hours

5. Examples of Repair to Structures: Repairs to overcome low member strength, Deflection, Cracking, Chemical disruption,
weathering wear, fire, leakage, marine exposure, engineered demolition techniques for dilapidated structures - case studies

08 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Sidney, M. Johnson “Deterioration, Maintenance and Repair of Structures”.
2. Denison Campbell, Allen & Harold Roper, “Concrete Structures – Materials, Maintenance and Repair”- Longman Scientific
and Technical
3. R.T.Allen and S.C. Edwards, “Repair of Concrete Structures”-Blakie and Sons
4. Raiker R.N., “Learning for failure from Deficiencies in Design, Construction and Service”- R&D Center (SDCPL)
ELECTIVE-I

CIVIL ENGINEERING SMART–MATERIALS

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE131 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Objectives: To make students to learn principles of Composite materials, To identify the actuators and sensors. To characterize
smart materials.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course, students are able to


• Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
• Understand the principles of Composite materials
• Design and develop analytical skills.
• Summerize the smart materials and structures
• Understand the concepts of control systems.

1. Introduction: Introduction to Composite materials, classifications and applications. Anisotropic elasticity – unidirectional
and anisotropic laminae, thermo – mechanical properties, micro – mechanical analysis, characterization tests. -09 Hours

2. Classical composite lamination theory, cross and angle – play laminaes, symmetric, antisymmetric and general symmetric
laminates, mechanical coupling. Analysis of simple laminated structural elements ply-stress and strain, lamina failure theories
– first fly failure, vibration and buckling analysis. Sandwich structure face and core materials, secondary failure modes
environmental effects, manufacturing of composites. 09 Hours

3. Introduction to smart materials and structures – piezoelectric materials – coupled electromechanical constitutive relations
– depoling and coercive field – field – strain relation – hysterics – creep – strain rate effects – manufacturing. 09 Hours

4. Actuators and sensors: single and dual actuators – pure extension, pure bending – bending extension relations – uniform
strain beam model – symmetric induced strain actuators – bond shearing force – Bernoulli Euler (BE) beam model –
embedded actuators. 09 Hours

5. Assymetric induced strain actuators in uniform strain and Euler – Bernoulli models. Uniform strain model – energy principle
formulation – BE model – single and dual surface bonded actuators – Extension – bending and torsion model. Introductions to
control systems: Open loop and close loop transfer functions – stability criteria – deflection control of beam like structures –
using piezoelectric sensors and actuators – shape memory alloys. 09 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Mechanics of Composite Materials and Structures by M. Mukhopadhya- Universities Press 2009
2. Robart M.Jones, “Mechanical of Composite Materials”- McGraw Hill Publishing Co.
3. Bhagwan D Agarvalm, and Lawrence J Brutman, “Analysis and Performance of Fiber Composites”- John Willy and Sons.
ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE132 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Course Objectives:
 To familiarize the students with the approach to analysis of sections subjected to complex loading and geometric
conditions occurring in practice.
 To introduce concept of deciding criteria for assessment of section subjected to above conditions.

1. CURVED BEAMS: Introduction, Circumferential stress in a curved beam, Redial stresses in curved beams,
Correction for circumferential stresses in curved beams having I, T, or similar cross sections, Deflections of curved
beams, Statically indeterminate curved beams, Closed ring subjected to concentrated load. 09 Hours

2. NONSYMMETRICAL BENDING OF STRAIGHT BEAMS: Definition of shear center in bending, Symmetrical


and nonsymmetrical bending, Bending stresses in beams subjected to unsymmetrical bending, Deflections of straight
beams subjected to unsymmetrical bending, Sensitivity of deep I sections. 09 Hours

3. SHEAR CENTER FOR THIN-WALL BEAM CROSS SECTIONS: Approximation employed for shear in thin
wall beam cross sections, Shear flow in thin-wall beam cross sections, Shear center for a channel, I and angle
sections. 09 Hours

4. BEAMS ON ELASTIC FOUNDATIONS: General theory, Infinite beam subjected to concentrated load,
Boundary conditions, Infinite beam subjected to a distributed load segment, Semi-infinite beam subjected to loads at
its end, Semi-infinite beam with concentrated load near its end, Short beams. 09 Hours
5. STRESS CONCENTRATIONS: Basic concepts, Nature of stress concentration problems. Stress concentration
factors, Experimental techniques, Stress gradients due to concentrated load, The stationary crack, Crack propagation,
Stress intensity factor, Effective stress concentration factors and applications. 09 Hours

Text Books:
1. Boresi, A.P. and Sidebottom, O.M. (1985), Advanced Mechanics of Materials, Fourth Edition, John Wiley and
Sons, New York.
2. Junnarkar, S.B. and Shah, H.J. (1996), Mechanics of Structures, Vol. III, Charotar Publications, Char House,
Anand

STABILITY ANALYSIS OF STRUCTURES


SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE133 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Course objectives: The objective of this course is to make students to learn principles of stability of structures,
To analyse the structural elements for stability.
To evaluate the use of strain energy in plate bending and stability..

Course outcomes: On completion of this course, students are able to:


• Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
• Understand the principles of strength and stability
• Design and develop analytical skills.
• Appraise the Stability analysis by finite element approach.
• Understand the concepts of Lateral buckling of beams

1. Beam – column – Differential equation. Beam column subjected to (i) lateral concentrated load, (ii) several
concentrated loads, (iii) continuous lateral load. Application of trigonometric series, Euler’s formulation using fourth
order differential equation for pined – pined, fixed – fixed, fixed – free and fixed – pinned column. 09 Hours

2. Buckling of frames and continuous beams. Elastic Energy method: Approximate calculation of critical
loads for a cantilever. Exact critical load for hinged – hinged column using energy approach. Buckling of bar on
elastic foundation. Buckling of cantilever column under distributed loads. Determination of critical loads by
successive approximation. Bars with varying cross section. Effect of shear force on critical load. Column subjected
to non – conservative follower and pulsating forces. 09 Hours

3. Stability analysis by finite element approach – deviation of shape function for a two nodded Bernoulli –
Euler beam element (lateral and translation of) – element stiffness and element geometric stiffness matrices –
assembled stiffness and geometric stiffness matrices for a discretised column with different boundary condition –
calculation of critical loads for a discretised (two elements) column (both ends built in). Buckling of pin jointed
frames (maximum of two active DOF) – symmetrical single bay portal frame. 09 Hours

4. Lateral buckling of beams – differential equation – pure bending – cantilever beam with tip load – simply
supported beam of I section subjected to central concentrated load. Pure Torsion of thin – walled bars of open cross
section. Non – uniform Torsion of thin – walled bars of open cross section. 09 Hours

5. Expression for strain energy in plate bending with in plate forces (linear and non – linear). Buckling of
simply supported rectangular plate – uniaxial load and biaxial load. Buckling of uniformly compressed
rectangular plate simply supported along two opposite sides perpendicular to the direction of compression and
having various edge condition along the other two sides. 09 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. Stephen P.Timoshenko, James M Gere, “Theory of Elastic Stability”-2nd Edition, McGraw – Hill, New Delhi.
2. Robert D Cook et.al, “Concepts and Applications of Finite Element Analysis”-3rd Edition, John Wiley and Sons,
New York.
3. S.Rajashekar, “Computations and Structural Mechanics”-Prentice – Hall, India.
4. Ray W Clough and J Penzien, “Dynamics of Structures” - 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill, New Delhi
5. H.Zeiglar, “Principles of Structural Stability”-Blaisdall Publications
Elective-II

THEORY OF ELASTICITY
SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE141 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Objectives: The objectives of this course is to make students to learn principles of Analysis of Stress and Strain, To
predict the stressstrain behaviour of continuum. To evaluate the stress and strain parameters and their inter relations
of the continuum.

Course Outcomes: On completion of this course, students are able to


• Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
• Understand the principles of stress-strain behaviour of continuum
• Design and develop analytical skills.
• Describe the continuum in 2 and 3- dimensions
• Understand the concepts of elasticity and plasticity.

1. Theory of Elasticity: Introduction: Definition of stress and strain and strain at a point, components of stress and
strain at appoint of Cartesian and polar co-ordinates. Constitutive relations, equilibrium equations, compatibility
equations and boundary conditions in 2-D and 3-D cases. 09 Hours

2. Transformation of stress and strain at a point, Principal stresses and principal strains, invariants of stress and
strain, hydrostatic and deviatric stress, spherical and deviatoric strains, max. shear strain. 09 Hours

3. Plane stress and plane strain: Airy’s stress function approach to 2-D problems of elasticity, simple problems of
bending of beams. Solution of axi-symmetric problems, stress concentration due to the presence of a circular hole in
plates. 09 Hours
4. Elementary problems of elasticity in three dimensions, stretching of a prismatical bar by its own weight, twist of
circular shafts, torsion of non-circular sections, membrane analogy, Propagation of waves in solid media.
Applications of finite difference equations in elasticity. 09 Hours

5. Theory of Plasticity: Stress – strain diagram in simple tension, perfectly elastic, Rigid – Perfectly plastic, Linear
work – hardening, Elastic Perfectly plastic, Elastic Linear work hardening materials, Failure theories, yield
conditions, stress – space representation of yield criteria through Westergard stress space, Tresca and Von-Mises
criteria of yielding. 09 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. Timoshenko & Goodier, “Theory of Elasticity”, McGraw Hill


2. Srinath L.S., Advanced Mechanics of Solids, 10th print, Tata McGraw Hill Publishing
Company, New Delhi, 1994
3. Sadhu Singh, “Theory of Elasticity”, Khanna Publishers
4. Verma P.D.S, “Theory of Elasticity”, Vikas Publishing Pvt. Ltd
5. Chenn W.P and Hendry D.J, “Plasticity for Structural Engineers”, Springer Verlag
6. Valliappan C, “Continuum Mechanics Fundamentals”, Oxford IBH Publishing Co. Ltd.
7. Sadhu Singh, “Applied Stress Analysis”, Khanna Publishers 8. Xi Lu, “Theory of Elasticity”, John Wiley.
URBAN DESIGN & LANDSCAPE DESIGN

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE142 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Objective:  To expand the student’s knowledge on landscape within urban areas and open spaces in Urban context.

Outcomes:  Types, characteristics and elements of urban open spaces.


 Understanding of issues related to and design of Urban Landscape design.

Unit-I
Introduction: City and pattern – hierarchy of streets and squares – spatial organization and land use – road net works and basic
services. Open spaces with in urban environment. 09 Hours

Unit -2
Urban Spaces: Cultural, social and aesthetic value of urban spaces and its perception, Imageability, Townscape elements. Urban
space enhancement. 09 Hours

Unit-3
Open Space System: Open space development in urban design context. Evolution of Public Park as a major component of
urban landscape. Open space development in new towns. Park systems, water fronts. Green infrastructure. Urban ecology,
urban water sheds. 09 Hours

Unit-4
Elements in Urban Landscape: Design of public parks, roads, green ways, parkways, promenade and plaza. Public art. Plant
selection criteria, furnishings and lighting of public space, maintenance and management of public spaces and parks,
09 Hours
Unit-5
Case Studies: Contemporary urban landscape issues. Case studies-Study, understanding and analysis of known examples at the
national and international levels. 09 Hours

REFERENCES:
1. Garden Cullen, The concise Townscape, Architectural press, London.
2. Kevin Lynch, Image of City, Cambridge, MA, 1961.
3. Henry F. Arnold, Trees in Urban Design, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
4. Matthew Carmona, Tim Heath, Public places – Urban spaces, Architectural press,2003.
5. Michael Hough, Cities and natural process, Routledge, 1995
STRUCTURAL SAFETY AND RELIABILITY

SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE143 IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of hors . 45 Exam Marks : 100
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

COURSE OUTLINE: This introductory course on structural reliability is designed primarily for the postgraduate students,
including senior undergraduates.
The primary objective is to introduce the student to the basic concepts of structural reliability so that she/he can perform
reliability-based structural analyses/evaluations and reliability-based design code calibrations.

1. General introduction to structural safety and reliability and reliability, Concept of uncertainty in reliability-based analysis
and design. 09 Hours

2. Random variables, Probability axioms and probability functions, Conditional probability, Common probability distributions.
09 Hours
3. Monte Carlo simulation, Variation reduction techniques. 09 Hours

4. Concept of failure of a structure, Reduced variable space and basic definition of reliability index, First order second moment
index. 09 Hours

5. Reliability-based design code and its development, Load and resistance factor design format, Calibration of partial safety
factors, Uncertainty models for load and resistance 09 Hours
References:
1. Andrzej S. Nowak & Kevin R. Collins, "Reliability of Structures", McGrawHill.
2. R. Ranganathan, "Reliability Analysis and Design of Structures", Jaico.
3. Robert E. Melchers, "Structural Reliability Analysis and Prediction", John Wiley & Sons

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING LAB-1


SEMESTER-I

Subject Code : 18MTSE102L IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03

Total No. of hours . 45 Exam Marks : 50


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Course objectives:
The objective of this course is to make students to learn principles of design of experiments, To
investigate the performance of structural elements. To evaluate the different testing methods
and equipments.

Course outcomes:
On completion of this course, students are able to:
Achieve Knowledge of design and development of experimenting skills.
Understand the principles of design of experiments
Design and develop analytical skills.
Summarize the testing methods and equipments.

1. Testing of beams for deflection, flexure and shear -12 Hrs


2. Experiments on Concrete, including Mix design -12 Hrs
3. Experiments on vibration of multi storey frame models for Natural frequency and modes. -12 Hrs
4. Use of Non destructive testing (NDT) equipments – Rebound hammer, Ultra sonic pulse velocity meter
and Profometer. -09 Hrs
Master of Technology

Department of
CE –Structural
Engineering
II Semesters
Syllabus

ADVANCED CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY


SEMESTER-II

Course Code:18MTSE201 Total no of hors: 45


Credits : 03 Hours per Week: 4
IA Marks : 50 Exam Marks : 50
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COURSE OBJECTIVES
Objective of this course is to make students to learn

1. To impart knowledge on durable and sustainable cement and concrete, on the various mineral
additions and chemical admixtures to enhance the workability, strength, durability and sustainability of
concrete

2. To analyze the process of material selection, proportioning, mixing, transporting, placing and curing of
concrete in technology of admixtures use; green cements and concrete products

3. To understand the constituent materials, specification and production, concrete properties and
performance as well as basic practical applications

4. To explore in the context of various performance criteria with emphasis on durability and sustainability
of concrete

COURSE CONTENT

UNIT-1
Concrete Making Materials :Cement – Bogus Compounds – Hydration Process – Types of Cement –
Aggregates – Gradation Charts – Combined Aggregate – Alkali Silica Reaction – Admixtures – Chemical and
Mineral Admixtures. 09 Hours

UNIT-2
Fresh and Hardened Concrete: Fresh Concrete – workability tests on Concrete – Setting Times of Fresh
Concrete – Segregation and bleeding. Hardened Concrete: Abrams Law, Gel space ratios, Maturity concept –
Stress strain behavior – Creep and Shrinkage – Durability Tests on Concrete – Non Destructive Testing of
Concrete. 09 Hours

UNIT-3
High Strength Concrete –Microstructure – Manufacturing and Properties – Design of HSC Using Erintroy
Shaklok method – Ultra High Strength Concrete. High Performance Concrete – Requirements and Properties of
High Performance Concrete – Design Considerations
09 Hours

UNIT-4
Special Concretes: Self Compacting concrete, Polymer Concrete, Fibre Reinforced Concrete -Reactive Powder
Concrete – Requirements and Guidelines – Advantages and Applications. Concrete Mix Design: Quality Control
– Quality Assurance – Quality Audit – Mix Design Method – BIS Method – DOE Method – Light Weight
Concrete, Self Compacting Concrete. 09 Hours

UNIT-5:
Form work –materials – structural requests – form work systems – connections –specifications design of form
work – shores – removal for forms – shores – reshoring –failure of form work. 09 Hours
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES:

After Completion of the Course the Student Shall Be Able To

1. Identify Quality Control tests on concrete making materials


2. Understand the behaviour of fresh and hardened concrete
3. Design concrete mixes as per IS and ACI codes
4. Design form work

REFERENCES:
5. Special Structural concretes by Rafat Siddique, Galgotia Publications 2000.
6. Design of Concrete Mixes by N.Krishna Raju, CBS Publications, 2000.
7. Concrete: Micro Structure by P.K.Mehta, ICI, Chennai.
8. Properties of Concrete by A.M.Neville, ELBS publications Oct 1996.
9. Concrete Technology by A.R. Santha kumar, Oxford University Press Oct 2006.
10. Concrete Technology by M.S.Shetty, S.Chand& Co 2009.

FINITE ELEMENT METHOD


SEMESTER-II
Subject Code: 18MTSE202 IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Course Objectives:

 The objectives of this course is to make students to learn principles of Analysis of Stress and Strain,
 To apply the Finite Element Method for the analysis of one and two dimensional problems.
 To evaluate the stress and strain parameters and their inter relations of the continuum.

Course Outcomes:
On completion of this course, students are able to,
Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
Understand the principles of stress-strain behavior of continuum,
Design and develop analytical skills.
Describe the state of stress in a continuum,
Understand the concepts of elasticity and plasticity.

1. Basic concepts of elasticity – Kinematic and Static variables for various types of structural problems – approximate method of structural
analysis – Rayleigh – Ritz method – Finite difference method – Finite element method. Variation method and minimization of Energy
approach of element formulation. Principles of finite element method – advantages & disadvantages –Finite element procedure. Finite
elements used for one, two & three dimensional problems – Element aspect ratio – mesh refinement vs. higher order elements – Numbering
of nodes to minimize band width. 09 Hours

2. Nodal displacement parameters – Convergence criterion – Compatibility requirements – Geometric invariance – Shape function –
Polynomial form of displacement function. Generalized and Natural coordinates – Lagrangian interpolation function– shape functions for
one, two & three dimensional elements. 09 Hours

3. Isoperimetric elements - Internal nodes and higher order elements – Serendipity and Lagrangian family of Finite Elements–Sub
parametric and Super parametric elements – Condensation of internal nodes – Jacobian transformation Matrix. Development of strain –
displacement matrix and stiffness matrix, consistent load vector, numerical integration.
09 Hours

4. Application of Finite Element Method for the analysis of one & two dimensional problems - Analysis of simple beams and plane
trusses – Application to plane stress / strain / axisymmetric problems using CST & Quadrilateral Elements.
09 Hours

5. Application to Plates & Shells- Choice of displacement function (C0, C1 and C2type) –Techniques for Non –linear Analysis.
09 Hours

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. Krishnamurthy C S, “Finite Element Analysis”- Tata McGraw Hill


2. Desai C and Abel J F, “Introduction to the Finite Element Method”- East West Press Pvt. Ltd., 1972
3. Bathe K J, “Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis”- Prentice Hall
4. Rajasekaran. S, “Finite Element Analysis in Engineering Design”-Wheeler Publishing
5. Cook R D, Malkan D S & Plesta M.E, “Concepts and Application of Finite Element Analysis” - 3rd Edition,
John Wiley and Sons Inc., 1989
6. Shames I H and Dym C J, “Energy and Finite Element Methods in Structural Mechanics”- McGraw Hill,
New York, 1985

EARTHQUAKE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF STRUCTURES


SEMESTER-II
Subject Code : 18MTSE203 IA Marks : 50
No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Course objectives:
The objective of this course is to make students to learn principles of engineering seismology, to design the
reinforced concrete buildings for earthquake resistance. To evaluate the seismic response of the structures

Module -1
Introduction to engineering seismology, Geological and tectonic features of India, Origin and propagation of seismic
waves, characteristics of earthquake and its quantification – Magnitude and Intensity scales, seismic instruments.
Earthquake hazards in India, Earthquake Risk Evaluation and Mitigation. Structural behavior under gravity and
seismic loads, Lateral load resisting structural systems, Requirements of efficient earthquake resistant structural
system, damping devises, base isolation systems.
08 Hours
Module -2
The Response history and strong motion characteristics. Response Spectrum – elastic and inelastic response spectra,
tripartite (D-V-A) response spectrum, use of response spectrum in earthquake resistant design. Computation of
seismic forces in multi-storied buildings – using procedures (Equivalent lateral force and dynamic analysis) as per
IS-1893.
08 Hours
Module -3
Structural Configuration for earthquake resistant design, Concept of plan irregularities and vertical irregularities,
Soft storey, Torsion in buildings. Design provisions for these in IS-1893. Effect of infill masonry walls on frames,
modeling concepts of infill masonry walls. Behaviour of masonry buildings during earthquakes, failure patterns,
strength of masonry in shear and flexure, Slenderness concept of masonry walls, concepts for earthquake resistant
masonry buildings – codal provisions.
10 Hours
Module -4
Design of Reinforced concrete buildings for earthquake resistance-Load combinations, Ductility and energy
absorption in buildings. Confinement of concrete for ductility, design of columns and beams for ductility, ductile
detailing provisions as per IS- 1893. Structural behavior, design and ductile detailing of shear walls.
10 Hours
Module -5
Seismic response control concepts – Seismic demand, seismic capacity, Overview of linear and nonlinear procedures
of seismic analysis. Performance Based Seismic Engineering methodology, Seismic evaluation and retrofitting of
structures.
09 Hours
Course outcomes:
On completion of this course, students are able to
· Achieve knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
· Understand the principles of engineering seismology
· Design and develop analytical skills.
· Summarize the seismic evaluation and retrofitting of structures.
· Understand the concepts of earthquake resistance of reinforced concrete buildings.

Reference books:
1. Dynamics of Structures – Theory and Application to Earthquake Engineering- 2nd ed. – Anil K. Chopra, Pearson
Education.
2. Earthquake Resistant Design of Building Structures, Vinod Hosur, WILEY (India)
3. Earthquake Resistant Design of Structures, Duggal, Oxford University Press
4. Earthquake resistant design of structures - Pankaj Agarwal, Manish Shrikande - PHI India
5. IS – 1893 (Part I): 2002, IS – 13920: 1993, IS – 4326: 1993, IS-13828: 1993
6. Design of Earthquake Resistant Buildings, Minoru Wakabayashi, McGraw Hill Pub.
7. Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Buildings, T Paulay and M J N Priestley, John Wiley and
Sons

ELECTIVE-III

DESIGN CONCEPTS OF SUBSTRUCTURES


SEMESTER – II
Subject Code : 18MTSE231 IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Course objectives:
The objective of this course is to make students,
 To learn principles of subsoil exploration,
 To design the sub structures.
 To evaluate the soil shear strength parameters.

Course Contents:
Unit-1
Introduction, Site investigation, In-situ testing of soils, Subsoil exploration, Classification of foundations systems.
General requirement of foundations, Selection of foundations, Computations of Loads, Design concepts. 09 Hours

Unit-2
Concept of soil shear strength parameters, Settlement analysis of footings, Shallow foundations in clay, Shallow
foundation in sand & C-Ф soils, Footings on layered soils and sloping ground, Design for Eccentric or Moment
Loads. 09 Hours

Unit-3
Types of rafts, bearing capacity & settlements of raft foundation, Rigid settlements of raft foundation, Rigid
methods, Flexible methods, soil structure interaction, different methods of modeling the soil. Combined footings
(rectangular & trapezoidal), strap footings & wall footings, Raft-super structure interaction effects & general
concepts of structural design, Basement slabs.
09 Hours
Unit-4
Deep Foundations: Load Transfer in Deep Foundations, Types of Deep Foundations, Ultimate bearing capacity of
different types of piles in different soil conditions, Laterally loaded piles, tension piles & batter piles, Pile groups:
Bearing capacity, settlement, uplift capacity, load distribution between piles, Proportioning and design concepts of
piles.
09 Hours
Unit-5
Types of caissons, Analysis of well foundations, Design principles, Well construction and sinking. Foundations for
tower structures: Introduction, Forces on tower foundations, Selection of foundation type, Stability and design
considerations, Ring foundations – general concepts.

09 Hours

Course outcomes:
On completion of this course, students are able to:
 Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
 Understand the principles of subsoil exploration
 Design and develop analytical skills.
 Identify and evaluate the soil shear strength parameters.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Swami Saran – “Analysis & Design of Substructures”- Oxford & IBH Pub.Co. Pvt. Ltd., 1998.
2. Nainan P Kurian – “Design of Foundation Systems”- Narosa Publishing House, 1992.
3. R.B. Peck, W.E. Hanson & T.H. Thornburn – “Foundation Engineering”-Wiley Eastern Ltd.,Second Edition, 1984.
4. J.E. Bowles-“Foundation Analysis and Design”- McGraw-Hill Int. Editions, Fifth Ed., 1996.
5. W.C.Teng –“Foundation Design”- Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd., 1983.
6. Bureau of Indian Standards:IS-1498, IS-1892, IS-1904, IS-6403, IS-8009,IS-2950, IS-11089, IS-11233, IS-2911 and
all other relevant codes.Brothers, Roorkee, India.
6. M.F.Rubinstein “Matrix Computer Methods of Structural Analysis “Prentice–Hall.

DESIGN OF TALL STRUCTURES


SEMESTER – II
Subject Code: 18MTSE232 IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------
Course objectives:
The objective of this course is to make students to learn principles of stability of tall buildings,
To design the tall buildings for earthquake and wind resistance. To evaluate the performance of
tall structures for strength and stability.

Unit-1
Fundamental concepts: Static and Kinematic Indeterminacy, Concepts of stiffness and
flexibility. Energy concepts. Principle of minimum potential energy and minimum
complementary energy. Development of element flexibility and element stiffness matrices for
truss, beam and grid elements. 09 Hours
Unit-1
Analysis using Flexibility method: Force transformation matrix using Flexibility method,
Development of global flexibility matrix for continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid plane
frames (having not more than six co-ordinates–6x6flexibility matrix) Analysis of continuous
beams, plane trusses and rigid plane frames by flexibility method (having not more than 3
coordinates – 3x3 flexibility matrix). 09 Hours
Unit-3
Analysis using Stiffness Method: Displacement transformation matrix using Stiffness
Method, Development of global stiffness matrix for continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid
plane frames (having not more than six co-ordinates – 6x6 stiffness matrix)Analysis of
continuous beams, plane trusses and rigid plane frames by stiffness method (having not more
than 3 coordinates – 3x3 stiffness matrix). 09 Hours

Unit-4
Effects of temperature change and lack of fit: Related numerical problems by flexibility and
stiffness method as in Module 2 and 3.
09 Hours

Unit-5
Solution techniques: Solution techniques including numerical problems for simultaneous
equations, Gauss elimination and Cholesky method. Band width consideration.
09 Hours
Course outcomes:
On completion of this course, students are able to:
Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.
Understand the principles of Structural Analysis
Design and develop analytical skills
Summarize the Solution techniques
Understand the concepts of structural behavior.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Rajasekaran, “Computational Structural Mechanics”, PHI, New Delhi 2001.
2. F.W.Beaufait et al., “Computer methods of Structural Analysis”, Prentice Hall, 1970.
3. W.Weaver and J.H.Gere, “Matrix Analysis of Framed Structures”, Van Nastran, 1980.
4. H.Karde Stuncer, “Elementary Matrix Analysis of Structures”, McGraw Hill 1974.
5. A.K.Jain “Advanced Structural Analysis with Computer Application”Nemchand and
Brothers, Roorkee, India.
6. M.F.Rubinstein “Matrix Computer Methods of Structural Analysis “Prentice–Hall.

DESIGN OF OFFSHORE STRUCTURES


SEMESTER – II
Subject Code : 18MTSE233 IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------
Course objectives:
To study the concept of wave theories, forces and design of jacket towers, pipes and cables.

Unit-1
Wave Theories: Wave generation process, small, finite amplitude and nonlinear wave theories.
09 Hours

Unit-2
Forces of Offshore Structures: Wind forces, wave forces on small bodies and large bodies - current
forces - Morison equation. 09 Hours

Unit-3
Offshore Soil and structure Modeling: Different types of offshore structures, foundation modeling, fixed
jacket platform structural modeling. 09 Hours

Unit-5
Design of offshore structures: Design of platforms, helipads, Jacket tower, analysis and design of
mooring cables and pipelines. 09 Hours

Course Outcome:
On completion of this course students will be able to determine the forces due to ocean waves and analyze and
design offshore structures like platform, helipads, jackets, towers etc.,
Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. API RP 2A-WSD, Planning, Designing and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms -Working
Stress Design - API Publishing Services, 2005
2. Chakrabarti, S.K., Handbook of Offshore Engineering by, Elsevier, 2005.
3. Chakrabarti, S.K., Hydrodynamics of Offshore Structures, WIT press, 2001.
4. Dawson.T.H., Offshore Structural Engineering, Prentice Hall Inc Englewood Cliffs, N.J.1983.
5. James F. Wilson, Dynamics of Offshore Structures, John Wiley & Sons, Inc, 2003.
6. Reddy, D.V. and Arockiasamy, M., Offshore Structures, Vol.1 and Vol.2, Krieger Publishing
Company, 1991.
7. Reddy.D.V and Swamidas A.S.J.,Essential of offshore structures.CRC Press.2013
8. Turgut Sarpkaya, Wave Forces on Offshore Structures, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
ELECTIVE-IV
DESIGN OF PLATES AND SHELLS
SEMESTER – II
Subject Code : 18MTSE241 IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
Course objectives:
This subject is taught to impart knowledge about the behaviour of plates and shells.

UNIT-1
Thin plates: Laterally loaded thin plates – Differential equation–Boundary conditions. Bending of plates–Simply
supported rectangular plates–Navier’s solution and Levy’s method–Rectangular plates with various edge conditions.
09 Hours
UNIT-2
Plate bending: Symmetrical bending of circular plates – Finite difference method for analysis of square and rectangular
plates.
09 Hours
UNIT-3
Types of shells– Structural action – Membrane theory–Limitations –Beam method of analysis. 09 Hours

UNIT-4
Design of shells: Analysis and design of doubly curved shells–Elliptic paraboloid- Conoid and hyperbolic paraboloid
roofs. 09 Hours

UNIT-5
Folded plate structures: Folded plate structures – Structural behaviour–Various types –Design of folded plates
-Reinforced detailing. 09 Hours

Course outcomes:
Expected Outcome: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to
1. Analyse the plates using Navier’s and Levy’s method.
2. Analyse the circular, rectangular and square plates by finite difference method.
3. Design the curved shells and roofs.
4. Design the various folded plate structures.

Text Book:
1. G.S.Ramaswamy, (1996), Design and construction of concrete shell roofs, CBS Publishers and distributors.
Reference Books:
1. Timoshenko and Krieger, (20002), Theory of Plates and Shells, McGraw Hill Inc, New Delhi.
2. Chatterjee, (1996), Theory and Design of Concrete Shells, Oxford and IBH, New Delhi.
3. K.Chandrasekara, (1998), Analysis of Thin concrete Shells, Tata McGraw Hill Book Company.
4. H.Karde Stuncer, “Elementary Matrix Analysis of Structures”, McGraw Hill 1974

WIND RESITANT DESIGN OF STRUCTURES


SEMESTER – II
Subject Code : 18MTSEM242 IA Marks : 50
No. of Lecture Hrs./ Week : 03 Exam Hrs : 03
Total No. of Lecture Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Course objectives:
To introduce concept of wind flow, static and dynamic wind load analysis including exposure to Indian Standard
code for wind.

UNIT-1
Wind Characteristics: Variation of wind velocity, atmospheric circulations – pressure gradient force, coriolis force,
frictionless wind balance, geostrophic flow, boundary layer. Extra ordinary winds–Foehn, Bora, Cyclones,
Tornadoes etc. 09 Hours

UNIT-2
Static wind effects and building codes with particular reference to IS 875 (Part-III), wind speed map of India,
introduction to the proposed revisions of IS 875 (Part III).
09 Hours
UNIT-3
Dynamic wind effects: Wind induced vibrations, flow around bluff bodies, along wind and across wind response,
flutter, galloping, vortex shedding, locking, ovalling; analysis of dynamic wind loads, code provisions – gust factor,
dynamic response factor; vibration control and structural monitoring; exposure to perturbation method, averaging
techniques, 09 Hours

UNIT-4
Wind tunnel testing: Open circuit and closed circuit wind tunnels, rigid and aero elastic models, wind tunnel
measurements and instruments along with site visit. 09 Hours
UNIT-5
Case studies: low rise buildings, parking sheds, workshop building, multistory building, water tanks, towers,
chimneys, bridges. 09 Hours

Course outcomes:
At the completion of this course, the student shall acquire knowledge and ability,
i. To perform static and dynamic analysis for wind loading
ii. To design a structure for wind induced loadings.

REFERENCE BOOKS:
1. Simiu, E., & Scanlan, R. H. (1986). Wind effects on structures: an introduction to wind
Engineering. John Wiley.
2. Scruton, C. (1981). An introduction to wind effects on structures (Vol. 3). Oxford: Oxford
University Press
3. Sachs, P. (2013). Wind forces in engineering. Elsevier.
4. Lawson, T. V. (1980). Wind Effects on Buildings: Design Applications (Vol. 1). Spon Press.
5. Cook, N. J. (1986). Designers guide to wind loading of building structures. Part 1.
6. Simiu, E., &Scanlan, R. H. (1996). Wind effects on structures. Wiley.
7. Dyrbye, C., & Hansen, S. O. (1996). Wind loads on structures. John Wiley & Sons.
8. Holmes, J. D. (2015). Wind loading of structures. CRC Press.
9. Nayfeh, A. H. (2011). Introduction to perturbation techniques. John Wiley & Sons
10. Blevins, R. D. (1990). Flow-induced vibration.
11. Holmes, M. H. (2012). Introduction to perturbation methods (Vol. 20). Springer Science &
Business Media
12. Simiu, E., & Miyata, T. (2006). Design of buildings and bridges for wind: a practical guide
for ASCE-7 standard users and designers of special structures
Design of Industrial Steel Structures
SEMESTER – II
Subject Code : 18MTSE243 IA Marks : 50
No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Objectives:
To study different types of loads and their effect on industrial and multi-story structures. Analysis and design of
advanced steel structural elements and their connections as per national code of practices

Outcomes:
On completion of this course, students are able to
 Analyse and design of advanced steel structural elements
 Evaluate the steel structures using the moments resulted due to the load applies
 Creating economical and stable steel structure using IS codal provisions

UNIT-1
Introduction: Properties of steel ,Structural steel sections ,Loads on Structures, Metal joining methods using rivets,
welding, bolting, Advantages and Disadvantages of Steel structures, Limit State Method (LSM) of design, Failure
criteria for steel, Specifications and section classification, Failure criteria for steel. Behaviour of Bolted joints.

09 Hours
UNIT-2

Bolting: Design strength of ordinary Black Bolts, Design strength of High Strength Friction Grip bolts (HSFG),
Simple Connections, eccentric Connections, Moment resistant connections.

Welding: Advantages of Welding, Types and Properties of Welds, Types of joints, Weld symbols, Weld
specifications, Effective areas of welds, Design of welds, Simple joints, eccentric connections. 09 Hours

UNIT-3
Design of Column Bases: Design of simple slab base and gusseted base. 09 Hours

UNIT-4.
Design of Gantry Girders. 09 Hours

UNIT-5
Plastic behavior of Structural Steel: Introduction, Plastic theory, Plastic collapse, methods of plastic analyis.
09 Hours
TEXT BOOKS:
1. Subramanian, N. (2016), Design of Steel Structures-Limit State Design, Oxford University press, India.
2. Bhavikatti, S.S. (2010), Design of Steel Structures By Limit State Method as Per IS: 800—2007, Second Edition,
I K International Publishing House, New Delhi.

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING LAB-II


SEMESTER – II

Subject Code : 18MTSE202L IA Marks : 50


No. of Hrs. / Week : 03 Exams Hrs : 03
Total No. of Hrs. : 45 Exam Marks : 100

Course objectives:
The objective of this course is to make students
 To learn principles of design of experiments,
 To investigate the performance of structural elements.
 To evaluate the different testing methods and equipments.

Course outcomes:

On completion of this course, students are able to:

 Achieve Knowledge of design and development of programming skills. - 12 Hours

 Understand the principles of structural analysis and design - 12 Hours

 Design and develop analytical skills. - 12 Hours

 Summarize the performance of structures for static and dynamic forces. - 09 Hours

1. Static and Dynamic analysis and design of Multistory Building structures using software (ETABS
/ STAADPRO)
2. Design of RCC and Steel Tall structures using software (ETABS / STAADPRO)
3. Analysis of folded plates and shells using software.
4. Preparation of EXCEL sheets for structural design.
Department of
CE –Structural
Engineering
III Semesters
Syllabus

Master of Technology
SOIL DYNAMICS

SEMESTER – III
Subject Code : 18MTSE311 IA Marks: 50
Number of Lecture Hours/Week: 03 Total Number of Lecture Hours;45
Exam Hours: 03 Maximum Marks: 100
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Course objectives: This course will enable students to


• To study vibration concepts in soils like damping, wave propagation, resonance and effect of modes of vibrations
• To study dynamic soil properties. Determination of dynamic properties by field and laboratory tests
• Effect of liquefaction and anti-liquifaction measures
• To study vibration isolation, machine foundation design

UNIT 1:
Fundamentals of Vibration: Definitions, Simple harmonic motion, Response of SDOF systems of Free and Forced
vibrations with and without viscous damping, Frequency dependent excitation, Systems under transient loads,
Rayleigh’s method of fundamental frequency, Logarithmic decrement, Determination of viscous damping,
Transmissibility, Systems with Two and Multiple degrees of freedom, Vibration measuring instruments. 09 Hours

UNIT 2:
Wave Propagation and Dynamic Soil Properties: Propagation of seismic waves in soil deposits - Attenuation of stress
waves, Stress strain behavior of cyclically loaded soils, Strength of cyclically loaded soils, Dynamic soil properties -
Laboratory and field testing techniques, Elastic constants of soils, Correlations for shear modulus and damping ratio
in sand, gravels, clays and lightly cemented sand. Liquefaction of soils: An introduction and evaluation using simple
methods. 09 Hours

UNIT 3:
Vibration Analyses: Types, General Requirements, Permissible amplitude, Allowable soil pressure, Modes of
vibration of a rigid foundation block, Methods of analysis, Lumped Mass models, elastic half space method, elasto-
dynamics, effect of footing shape on vibratory response, dynamic response of embedded block foundation, Vibration
isolation. 09 Hours

UNIT 4:
Design of Machine Foundations: Analysis and design of block foundations for reciprocating engines, Dynamic
analysis and design procedure for a hammer foundation, IS code of practice design procedure for foundations of
reciprocating and impact type machines. Vibration isolation and absorption techniques. 09 Hours

UNIT 5:
Machine Foundations on Piles: Introduction, Analysis of piles under vertical vibrations, Analysis of piles under
translation and rocking, Analysis of piles under torsion, Design procedure for a pile supported machine foundation.
09 Hours

Course outcomes: During this course, students will be trained:


• To develop a mechanism to design the foundations for resisting vibrations and achieve static equilibrium conditions
of structures
• To understand the classical geotechnical failures due to liquefaction and mitigate the same.
• Design of foundations in large structures like power plants, other industrial buildings etc., for analyzing the
vibrating waves which can be isolated and measures for achieving safety of the adjacent foundations

Text Books:
1. Soil Dynamics and Machine Foundation (2010), Swami Saran, Galgotia Publications Pvt. Ltd.
2. Soil Dynamics(1981)- Prakash, S. McGraw Hill Book Company
Reference Books:
1. Foundation for Machines (1998) Prakash, S. and Puri, V. K.: Analysis and Design, John Wiley & Sons,
2. Vibration Analysis and Foundation Dynamics(1998)-Kameswara Rao, N. S. V., Wheeler Publication Ltd.,
3. Vibrations of Soils and Foundations(1970) Richart, F. E. Hall J. R and Woods R. D., Prentice Hall Inc.,
4. Principles of Soil Dynamics (2002) Das, B. M., PWS KENT publishing Company, Boston.
PRE-STRESSED AND COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

SEMESTER – III

Number of Lecture Hours/Week: 03 Total Number of Lecture Hours;45


Exam Hours: 03 Maximum Marks: 100
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Course objectives: This course will enable students to


1. Design pre-stressed elements
2. Understand the behavior of pre-stressed elements.
3. Design composite beam elements

UNIT 1:
Losses of Prestress : Loss of prestress in pre-tensioned and posttensioned members due to various causes like elastic
shortening of concrete, shrinkage of concrete, creep of concrete, relaxation of steel, slip in anchorage, bending of
member and frictional loss – Analysis of sections for flexure. 09 Hours
UNIT 2:
Design of Section for Flexure: Allowable stresses, Elastic design of simple beams having rectangular and I-section
for flexure, kern lines, cable profile and cable layout. 09 Hours

UNIT 3:
Design of Sections for Shear: Shear and Principal stresses, Improving shear resistance by different prestressing
techniqueshorizontal, sloping and vertical prestressing, Analysis of rectangular and I–beam, Design of shear
reinforcement, Indian code provisions.
09 Hours
UNIT 4:
Stress distribution in end block, Design of anchorage zone reinforcement, Problems based on Stress distribution in
end block and anchorage zone reinforcement. 09 Hours

UNIT 5:
Steel Concrete Composite Beams and construction: Introduction advantages and did advantages, Anatomy, types of
floor systems, composite deck slabs, shear connectors, beams and columns. 09 Hours

Course outcomes: After studying this course, students will be able to:
Analyse , Design and detail PSC elements
Analyse and design End block anchorages
Analyse the shear and Flexure of PSC elements
Understand the behavior of the composite structures

Text books: Srinath. L.S., Advanced Mechanics of Solids, Tata M Delhi cGraw-Hill Publishing Co ltd., New Delhi.

Reference Books:
1. Krishna Raju, “Prestressed concrete”, Tata Mc Graw Hill Book – Co ., New Delhi.
2. T.Y. Lin and Burn, “Design of prestress concrete structures”, John Wiley, New York.
3. S. Ramamrutham, “Prestressed concrete”, Dhanpat Rai & Sons, Delhi.
4. R.P.Johnson: Composite Structure of Steel and Concrete (Volume 1), Blackwell Scientific Publication (Second
Edition), U.K., 1994.
5. IS: 11384-1985, Code of Practice for Composite Construction in Structural Steel and Concrete

DESIGN OF MASONRY STRUCTURES

SEMESTER – III

Number of Lecture Hours/Week: 03 Total Number of Lecture Hours;45


Exam Hours: 03 Maximum Marks: 100
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Course objectives:
The objective of this course is to make students,
 To learn performance of masonry structures,
 To design the masonry structures for earthquake resistance.
 To evaluate the strength and stability of the masonry structures.

MODULE -1
Introduction, Masonry units, materials and types: History of masonry Characteristics of Brick, stone, clay block, concrete
block, stabilized mud block masonry units – strength, modulus of elasticity and water absorption. Masonry materials –
Classification properties of mortars, selection of mortars. 9 Hours

MODULE -2
Strength of Masonry in Compression: Behavior of Masonry under compression, strength and elastic properties, influence of
masonry unit and mortar characteristics, effect of masonry unit height on compressive strength, influence of masonry bonding
patterns on strength, prediction of strength of masonry in Indian context, Failure theories of masonry under compression.
Effects of slenderness eccentricity, effect of rate of absorption, effect of curing, effect of ageing, workmanship on compressive
strength. 9 Hours

Flexural and shear bond, flexural strength and shear strength: Bond between masonry unit and mortar, tests for
determining flexural and shear bond strengths, factors affecting bond strength, effect of bond strength on compressive strength,
orthotropic strength properties of masonry in flexure, shear strength of masonry, test procedures for evaluating flexural and
shear strength. 9 Hours

MODULE -4
Design of load bearing masonry buildings: Permissible compressive stress, stress reduction and shape reduction factors,
increase in permissible stresses for eccentric vertical and lateral loads, permissible tensile and shear stresses, Effective height of
walls and columns, opening in walls, effective length, effective thickness, slenderness ratio, eccentricity, load dispersion,
arching action, lintels; Wall carrying axial load, eccentric load with different eccentricity ratios, wall with openings,
freestanding wall; Design of load bearing masonry for buildings up to 3 to 8 storey’s using BIS codal provisions.
9 Hours
MODULE -5
Earthquake resistant masonry buildings: Behaviour of masonry during earthquakes, concepts and design procedure for
earthquake resistant masonry, BIS codal provisions. Masonry arches, domes and vaults: Components and classification of
masonry arches,domes and vaults, historical buildings, construction procedure. 9 Hours

Course outcomes:

On completion of this course, students are able to:

 Achieve Knowledge of design and development of problem solving skills.


 Understand the principles of design and construction of masonry structures
 Design and develop analytical skills.
 Summarize the masonry Characteristics.
 Evaluate the strength and stability of the masonry structures.

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. Hendry A.W., “Structural masonry”- Macmillan Education Ltd., 2nd edition


2. Sinha B.P & Davis S.R., “Design of Masonry structures”- E & FN Spon
3. Dayaratnam P, “Brick and Reinforced Brick Structures”- Oxford & IBH
4. Curtin, “Design of Reinforced and Prestressed Masonry”- Thomas Telford
5. Sven Sahlin, “Structural Masonry”-Prentice Hall
6. Jagadish K S, Venkatarama Reddy B V and Nanjunda Rao K S, “Alternative Building
Materials and Technologies”-New Age International, New Delhi &Bangalore
7. IS 1905, BIS, New Delhi.
8. SP20(S&T),New Delhi
Master of Technology
Department of
CE –Structural
Engineering
IV Semesters
Syllabus
Project Phase-II and Dissertation