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Title: 3D Printing YouTube

Duration: 4:18 minutes

Description:
A look at the possibilities of 3D printing and what it could mean for Shell, and illustrating how it has
been used to create a 3D prototype to aid in the construction of FPSO buoys.

3D Printing YouTube Transcript

[Background music plays]


Rhythmic, anthemic instrumental music.

[Video footage]
Panning aerial view of an FPSO on the ocean.

High angle view of a harbour scene, the focus on a large yellow buoy, cutting to a wide view through
windows of the buoy being hoisted by a crane.

[Text displays]
3D Printing

Enabling efficient execution

[Video footage]
Closer front view of the buoy held aloft by the crane.

Bird’s eye view of the buoy on board the FPSO that appears to be making its way out of the harbour,
cutting to another wide view through a window of the FPSO at sea, the buoy still on board.

[Text displays]
Projects are the lifeline for Shell’s growth and vital in helping to meet the world’s energy demand

[Video footage]
Side view of the buoy being lowered into the ocean, cutting to a fast motion wider views of this
process.

[Text displays]
We are finding ways to be more cost-efficient, and scrutinising how we design and execute projects

Interviews with people involved in the project

[Title]
Executive Vice President, Engineering, Shell

[Video footage]
High angle view of buoy now slightly submerged in the ocean.

Slightly panning bird’s eye view of the buoy submerged in the ocean with a platform support vessel
visible top of frame-left.

[Robert Patterson]
A fundamental part of the engineering design process is to visualise what an end product will be.

[Text displays]
Robert Patterson

Executive Vice President, Engineering, Shell

[Video footage]
Close-up of Robert Patterson.

Close-up of the white circular structure of the buoy model.

Close-up of a hand holding a rectangular white model component aloft, descending to place is in the
aforementioned model structure. Design drawings can be seen on the walls as his hand descends.

Wide shot of a group of workmen standing in a circle as they talk, all dressed in safety gear.

Wide view of an industrial area with machinery and cranes scattered around and a large rectangular
block being hoisted in the air.

Low angle view of a workman in safety gear, and panning up to a close-up of heavy equipment seen
just above where he is standing.

[Robert Patterson]
3D printing allows for very rapid prototyping. It allows you to really engage with the design, installation
sequence, and the safety risks associated with putting it together. You do all of those things early, it
leads to far better outcomes.

[Video footage]
Close-up of Robert Patterson.

[Robert Patterson]
In particular, in the offshore environment, where the teams in the Americas have been doing some
experimentation with 3D printing for some of their work, they face a particular challenge with the high
cost of installation.

[Text displays]
Stones Buoy design verification and install

[Video footage]
Wide shot of rectangular blocks on pallets and a forklift frame-right, moving one of these loaded
pallets.

Panning close-up of the stacked rectangular blocks.

Low angle view of adjoined rectangular blocks extending vertically.


Slightly zooming wide view of what appears to be an almost completed buoy filling frame-right, and
another partially completed towards frame-left.

[Graphic]
High angle pull back view of an FPSO at sea, with the buoy alongside it, towards frame-right.

[Robert Patterson]
At Stones, they looked at a pretty complex activity of putting together large blocks of syntactic foam in
a special, disconnectable buoy to an FPSO that will be the world’s deepest water installation.

[Video footage]
Wide view of an industrial area with machinery and cranes scattered around and a large rectangular
block being hoisted in the air.

Worm’s eye view of a rectangular block held aloft against the background of a cloudy sky, cutting to the
block being pulled into place on the buoy structure, using ropes, again cutting to closer views of the
block being lowered into place.

[Robert Patterson]
They realised that the construction sequence of putting together hundreds of syntactic foam blocks was
complex. What’s the right sequence to put those blocks into a very complex geometry?

[Video footage]
Wide shot of a group of workmen in safety gear, as Amir stands in the foreground, holding a white
component of the model, explaining to them.

Close-up of Blake Moore with factory structures visible in the background.

Panning close-up of white foam components of the model lying on a work surface, cutting to close-ups
of various permutations of the white components, finally panning to a close-up of the partially
assembled circular buoy model.

[Title]
FPSO Lead, Stones Project, Shell

[Text displays]
Blake Moore

FPSO Lead, Stones Project, Shell

[Blake Moore]
Usually you have nothing more than paper drawings to try to describe how best to do the installation
work. What we’ve done is we’ve actually used a 3D printer and we created a… the model in 3D of the
structure, and then a model of all 222 components of the foam blocks so that we could then plan it and
make sure the sequence was right to ensure that we did it safely.

[Video footage]
Mid-shot of Amir seen standing alongside the white model structures on his work surface. On the wall
behind him, designs of the model are visible.

[Title]
Construction Engineer, Stones Project, SBM Offshore
[Text displays]
Amir Salem

Construction Engineer, Stones Project, SBM Offshore

[Amir Salem]
Having a model like this in the design process really bridges the gap between design and fabrication.

[Video footage]
Close-up in profile of Amir holding model components as he speaks and gestures toward the full-size
components comprising the blocks behind him.

Close-up of one of the pallets as its load is hoisted.

[Blake Moore]
It’s already added value in understanding whether the dimensions are correct and whether we have
clashes or not.

[Video footage]
Worm’s eye view of a component being lowered on ropes within the buoy structure. A workman stands
beneath, cutting to a close-up of the component being lowered and back to the previous view.

Wide shot of a group of workmen in safety gear, as Amir stands in the foreground, holding the white
component of the model, explaining to them.

[Amir Salem]
It’s a great tool to be able to plan the work, execute it and anticipate the problems and come up with a
work-around before the process even starts.

[Video footage]
Mid-shot of several men seated around a table, equipment on the table in front of them, and design
drawings visible on the screen behind them.

Close-up of L J Delcambre as he speaks.

Close-up of some assembled components of the model on the table in front of the men.

High angle view of a red crane lifting a yellow component.

[Text displays]
Coulomb Mudmat Hinge Assembly

[Robert Patterson]
We’ve already seen benefits at Coulomb in really improving the design of the bolt connections to
hinges – complex activities that affect offshore installation.

[Video footage]
Mid-shot of three of the men around the table, model components in front of them on the table.

Close-up of one of the components, cutting to a close-up of the man handling the component.

Close-up of N Lee Walden, design drawings visible on the screen behind him.

[Title]
Subsea Structural Engineer, Coulomb Project, Shell

[Text displays]
N Lee Walden

Subsea Structural Engineer, Coulomb Project, Shell

[N Lee Walden]
We commissioned the Coulomb 3D print to convey to the engineers that were designing the hinge
assemblies, and to the contractor, the complexity of the structure that we’re trying to build.

[Video footage]
Close-up again of the model components on the table, cutting to a mid-shot of L J Delcambre as he
speaks and gestures towards the component.

Wide shot of the group of men, the design drawings visible on the screen behind them.

Close-up of L J Delcambre, a factory/industrial scene forming the background.

[Title]
Project Manager, Coulomb Project, Omega, LLC

[Text displays]
L J Delcambre

Project Manager, Coulomb Project, Omega, LLC

[L J Delcambre]
Having a 3D model aids you in finding and detecting the problems. It gives us the chance to sit together
as a team, sitting down with the model and detecting any problems that we foresee.

[Video footage]
Close-up of the components as the men shift them around the table.

Close-up of another man in profile as he speaks, cutting to a close-up of his hand pointing to one of the
components.

Mid-shot of N Lee Walden standing in front of the screen, pointing to the design drawings as he speaks.

Mid-shot of L J Delcambre as he speaks and gestures to the components on the table.

Profile view of a workman welding.

[N. Lee Walden]


Seeing them in a solid format allows us to see the physical integration between parts and pieces. On
the Coulomb Project, it’s allowed us to predict the potential problems before we even got into the
fabrication stage.

[Video footage]
Close-up of Robert Patterson, as before.

Wide view of factory structures with the buoy components on pallets in front of them as several
workmen move about.

Close-up of a forklift moving a pallet bearing the stacked rectangular components.


Close-up of Robert Patterson.

[Robert Patterson]
When we move to a 3D printed prototype, we can ensure that we’ve set ourselves up for a successful
design, a successful installation and a successful operation.

[Video footage]
Close-up aerial view of 3D printer, cutting to fast motion shots of a 3D model as it is formed, and a hand
brushing away the excess material to reveal the component in the printer.

Close-up of several components placed on a table.

[Robert Patterson]
But 3D printing has an even bigger future than that – the ability to make spare parts, the ability to
create new and different shapes and products.

[Video footage]
Close up of René Honig, windows visible behind him.

[Title]
VP Innovation, Shell

[Text displays]
René Honig

VP Innovation, Shell

[René Honig]
A central 3D printing team will help us to scale up the capability as fast as we can, and therefore drive
value in the fastest possible way. The role of the central team is really understanding how to create
value and to leverage the best practice across the group.

[Video footage]
Close-up of Robert Patterson, as before.

Point of view shot as a hand is seen moving down a corridor, into a work area and towards and finally
into a 3D printer.

Panning close-up of a 3D model.

Close-up as before of several components on a table, several pairs of hands either handling the
components or resting on the table beside them.

[Robert Patterson]
We’re just at the beginning of new possibilities and 3D printing and what it can mean for Shell.

[Graphic]
White flash dissolve to Shell logo.

[Audio]
Shell jingle.

[Text displays]
© Shell International Limited 2016