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Program of Instruction

for
Driver Education and Traffic Safety
October 2000

This document provides the approved Program of Instruction for teenage driver education
and traffic safety programs in Texas as prescribed by the Texas Administrative Code (TAC).
Schools may photocopy this document, download copies at www.tea.state.tx.us, or
purchase additional copies from TEA publications distribution office to ensure distribution
to all driver education and curriculum staff.

Course content, minimum instruction requirements, and administrative guidelines for each
phase of teenage driver education and traffic safety classroom instruction, in-car training
(behind-the-wheel and observation), and, if utilized, simulation, and multicar range, shall
follow one of the prescribed instructional course options and shall include the instructional
objectives established by the commissioner of education. Further, programs and teachers
must meet the requirements of the Texas Administrative Code and the statutes authorizing
those codes.

Schools may elect to develop their own course curriculums based on the approved program
of instruction, or utilize the model course curriculum developed by the Texas Education
Agency entitled the Texas Driver and Traffic Safety Education Master Curriculum Guide.
The TEA curriculum includes sample lessons, instructor activities, fact sheets, student
worksheets, transparency masters, in-car lessons, resources, evaluations, and parent
involvement support. A copy of the TEA sample curriculum will be mailed to schools in
November, within a few weeks of receipt of this document. Additional copies of the
curriculum can be purchased from the TEA publications distribution office. When the
model curriculum is available online, schools will be notified.

Contacts: If you have any questions or need further assistance regarding teenage driver
education, please contact the following Texas Education Agency and Texas Department of Public
Safety staff:

• Public/charter schools, college and universities, and education service centers contact the
driver education program administrator, Lauralea Bauer, at 512/463-9574,
lbauer@tea.state.tx.us,

• Licensed (commercial) schools contact any of the driver education program specialists at
512/997-6500, gnophske@tea.state.tx.us.

• Parent taught programs contact the parent taught program staff at 512/424-2027,
Mimzie.Herklotz@txdps.state.tx.us.
TEENAGE DRIVER EDUCATION AND TRAFFIC SAFETY
In Texas, driver education students acquire the essential knowledge, skills, and experiences to
perform reduced-risk driving practices in the total traffic environment by completing a driver
education and traffic safety course. To achieve this goal, students are required to master the
following elements: applicable Texas traffic laws, rules, and procedures for operating and owning
an automobile; benefits of occupant protection, use of a space management system; factors and
behaviors that affect driver performance including alcohol and other drugs; and protecting Texas
natural resources, including litter prevention.

Teachers help students master these elements through a combination of classroom and actual or
simulated in-car instruction that includes modeling, knowledge assessment, skill assessment,
guided observation, and parental involvement. Driver education and traffic safety training provide
the foundation for the student and parent/mentor to continue the life-long learning process of
reduced-risk driving.
COURSE OPTIONS
The following course options are authorized by the Texas Education Agency:

(1) Core program. This program shall consist of at least 32 hours of classroom instruction,
seven hours of behind-the-wheel instruction, and seven hours of in-car observation. Under
this plan, a student may receive only local credit for the course.
(2) In-car only program. This program shall consist of at least seven hours of behind-the-
wheel instruction and seven hours of in-car observation. Under this plan, a student may
receive only local credit for the course.
(3) Classroom only program. This program shall consist of at least 32 hours of classroom
instruction. Under this plan, a student may receive only local credit for the course.
(4) School day credit program. This program shall consist of at least one class period per
scheduled day of school, for a semester (traditional, condensed, accelerated, Module, etc.),
covering the driver education classroom and in-car program of organized instruction or only
the classroom program of organized instruction. This class traditionally consists of at least
56 hours of driver education classroom instruction and, if in-car instruction is provided, must
include seven hours of behind-the-wheel instruction and seven hours of in-car observation.
Under this plan, a student may receive one-half unit of state credit toward graduation.
(5) Non-school day credit program. This program shall consist of at least 56 hours of driver
education classroom instruction and, if in-car instruction is provided, must include seven
hours of behind-the-wheel instruction and seven hours of in-car observation. Under this
plan, a student may receive one-half unit of state credit toward graduation.
(6) Multi-phase school day or non-school day credit program. This program shall consist
of at least 40 hours of driver education classroom instruction, four hours of behind-the-
wheel instruction, eight hours of in-car observation, and 12 hours of simulator instruction.
Under this plan, a student may receive one-half unit of state credit toward graduation.

Substitutions: For Options 1, 2, 4, and 5, a minimum of four periods of at least 55 minutes per
hour of instruction in a simulator may be substituted for one hour of behind-the-wheel and one hour
observation instruction. A minimum of two periods of at least 55 minutes per hour of multicar
driving range instruction may be substituted for one hour of behind-the-wheel and one hour
observation instruction relating to elementary or city driving lessons. However, a minimum of four
hours must be devoted to behind-the-wheel instruction, and a minimum of four hours must be
devoted to observation instruction. Option 3 does not include behind-the-wheel training, and
Option 6 must be taught exactly as described with no substitutions.

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INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES
Teenage driver education and traffic safety programs must be modeled on the following
instructional objectives. Simulated training and multi-car range are optional offerings and, when
offered, must comply to instructional objectives.

Module One: Texas Driver Responsibilities - Knowing Texas Traffic Laws. The student
develops an understanding of Texas traffic laws and formulates a knowledge of rules, regulations,
and penalties required to relate the laws to driver responsibility. NOTE: A student may apply to the
Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) for an instruction permit after successfully completing
and mastering a minimum of six hours of classroom instruction as specified by this module.

1.1.0 Instructional Topics:

1.1.1 Your License to Drive. The student completes registration; explores and
engages in discussions pertaining to the driver education program goals; lists the
characteristics of a novice driver; understands and applies the rules and guidelines
of the program; investigates the process of obtaining and maintaining a Texas
driver license; examines the vehicle inspection and registration process; and
learns the values of financially responsible drivers.
1.1.2 Right of Way Concepts. The student knows and understands the rules and
regulations that determine right of way on Texas roadways and assesses the
consequences of not obeying the right of way rules and regulations.
1.1.3 Traffic Control Devices. The student recognizes, understands, and describes the
laws and procedures related to roadway signs, signals, and markings.
1.1.4 Controlling Traffic Flow. The student knows laws and procedures required to
control traffic flow and establish appropriate car positions in the driving
environment.
1.1.5 Alcohol and Other Drugs. The student explores basic elements of Texas laws
pertaining to alcohol and other drugs and improper use of a driver license
specifically as they apply to minors and adults. NOTE: This lesson provides an
introduction and brief overview to alcohol and other drugs. Module 7 is a
comprehensive lesson on the topic.
1.1.6 Cooperating with Other Users. The student describes responsibilities of sharing
the roadway with other users.

1.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation: Upon successful completion and mastery of
Module One, Instructional Topics, 1.1.1 – 1.1.6, the student driver applies for and obtains a
valid driver’s license or instruction permit from the Texas Department of Public Safety.
Students without a valid driver’s license or instruction permit in his/her possession shall not
receive behind-the-wheel training no matter where the instruction is provided as specified
by the Texas Administrative Code. (The licensing process cannot be credited as
classroom, behind-the-wheel, or in-car observation training, although identified as an
instructional objective.)

1.3.0 Simulation: The student driver differentiates between simulated and actual in-car training;
recognizes the value of simulated training; explores and engages in discussions pertaining
to the simulated program goals; understands the policies and procedures for participating
in simulated training; and operates the simulator equipment. Detailed instructional
objectives for simulation are under development and will be provided to schools upon
availability.

1.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

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Module Two: Preparing to Operate the Vehicle. The student recognizes the necessity of
making routine vehicle checks and adjustments prior to and after entering the vehicle; identifies
and responds appropriately to alert symbols, warning symbols, vehicle control devices, and safety
devices; understands and controls vehicle balance and vehicle operating spaces; and appropriately
applies the techniques of vehicle reference points to establish roadway position and vehicle
placement.

2.1.0 Instructional Topics:

2.1.1 Driver Preparation Procedures. The student utilizes basic procedures and
readiness techniques to enter, start, and secure the vehicle and perform the basic
vehicle maintenance checks.
2.1.2 Identifying Vehicle Control Devices. The student recognizes and understands
the function and operation of each vehicular alert or warning symbol, control
device, information device, and comfort system.
2.1.3 Operating Vehicle Control Devices. The student demonstrates proper steering,
braking, and acceleration techniques and is capable of operating the vehicular
systems and devices while seated in the driver seat.
2.1.4 Vehicle Balance Considerations. The student recognizes the effects of steering,
braking, and acceleration inputs on the balance of a vehicle and demonstrates
vehicular control utilizing vehicle balance techniques.
2.1.5 Standard Vehicle Reference Points. The student utilizes standard vehicle
reference points to determine and execute lane placement, stopping position, and
turning maneuvers.

2.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation: The student driver:

2.2.1 possesses a valid Texas driver license or instruction permit;


2.2.2 performs routine vehicle checks and adjustments prior to and after entering the
vehicle;
2.2.3 locates, identifies and responds appropriately to alert symbols, warning symbols,
and vehicle control and safety devices;
2.2.4 performs starting and securing procedures;
2.2.5 steers the vehicle within given spaces utilizing proper steering techniques and
hand positioning;
2.2.6 pulls to and from the curb line;
2.2.7 backs the car straight, left, and right utilizing correct hand position and steering
techniques;
2.2.8 demonstrates the ability to position the front, sides, and rear of the vehicle within
given distances of a fixed location;
2.2.9 recognizes and manages hidden spaces and limitations to the front, rear, and
sides of the vehicle by establishing sightline, path of travel, and target line
references;
2.2.10 establishes placement while moving or stopped and executes turning or parking
maneuvers by utilizing vehicular visual reference points;
2.2.11 determines appropriate lane position, gap selection, and speed;
2.2.12 explores mirror use and space management areas; and
2.2.13 describes and utilizes vehicle balance techniques when braking, accelerating, and
steering.

2.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Two in a simulated
environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under development and
will be provided to schools upon availability.

2.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

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Module Three: Basic Maneuvering Tasks - Low Risk Environment. The student utilizes critical
thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills to operate the vehicle and perform the basic
maneuvers in low risk environments.

3.1.0 Instructional Topic

3.1.1 Basic Maneuvers. The student utilizes critical thinking skills to enter and start the
vehicle, enter roadways, and perform maneuvers in reverse with competency.
3.1.2 Vision and Perception. The student understands basic components of vision,
visually synthesizes information from the driving environment, and applies critical
thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills to the driving task.
3.1.3 Controlling High Risk Situations. The student applies a space management
system such as “SEE it Texas”, Mottola Zone Control, or Quensel IPDE process,
etc., to search and evaluate the traffic environment and respond appropriately.
3.1.4 Steering and Speed Adjustments. The student demonstrates skilled steering
and speed control to manage space and reduce evasive actions.

3.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation: The student driver:

3.2.1 utilizes critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills to operate the
vehicle and perform basic maneuvers;
3.2.2 pulls to and from the curb without affecting the flow of traffic;
3.2.3 establishes and utilizes a space management system;
3.2.4 enters the roadway both forward and reverse from a private and public driveway;
3.2.5 demonstrates vehicle balance, placement, and lane position to manage space and
reduce evasive actions while turning or steering, traveling forward at low to
average rates of speed, and driving in reverse;
3.2.6 estimates, establishes, and maintains following distances appropriate to
conditions, limitations of the driver, other roadway users including tailgaters or
aggressive drivers, vehicle, roadway and environmental factors;
3.2.7 makes adjustments to positioning in response to conditions inside and outside the
space management areas;
3.2.8 performs proper blind spot, mirror checks, and lane changes;
3.2.9 completes right and left turns utilizing proper procedures, lane position, and rate of
speed;
3.2.10 identifies open, closed, or changing path of travel and responds appropriately; and
3.2.11 accepts or yields right of way based on law, consequences, and conditions.

3.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Three in a
simulated environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under
development and will be provided to schools upon availability.

3.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

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Module Four: Basic Maneuvering Tasks - Moderate Risk Environment. The student defines
risk assessment; applies risk reduction principles; recognizes moderate risk driving environments;
utilizes space management concepts to establish roadway position, vehicle speed, and to
communicate with other roadway users; synthesizes information from the driving environment; and
applies critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills to select the appropriate
parking or turnabout maneuver for the given situation.

4.1.0 Instructional Topics:

4.1.1 Risk Assessment. The student defines risk assessment and applies risk
reduction principles to establish roadway position, vehicle speed, and to
communicate with other roadway users.
4.1.2 Space Management. The student assesses moderate risk driving environments
and applies space management concepts to establish roadway position and
vehicle speed and to communicate with other roadway users.
4.1.3 Lane Changes. The student utilizes basic space management concepts when
changing the path of travel and turning the vehicle.
4.1.4 Turnabouts. The student synthesizes information and applies critical thinking,
decision-making, and problem-solving skills to select and safely execute a
turnabout.
4.1.5 Parking. The student utilizes decision-making and problem-solving skills to safely
execute parking procedures.

4.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation – Module Four: The student driver:

4.2.1 repeats, in moderate risk environments, the elements of behind-the-wheel and in-
car observation covered in Modules Two and Three,
4.2.2 utilizes space management techniques to synthesize information; establish
position and following distances; set speed; communicate; identify conflicts;
manage open, closed, or changing sightline, path of travel; and target line
references in low to moderate risk environments;
4.2.3 applies risk reduction principles;
4.2.4 accomplishes speed adjustment maneuvers and lane changes to the left and right
based on legal postings and limitations of the driver, vehicle, roadway, other
roadway users including tailgaters or aggressive drivers, and environmental
factors;
4.2.5 estimates arrival to a specific position in seconds and determines path of travel for
self and other vehicles;
4.2.6 visualizes and evaluates immediate and future target zones, 0 – 20 seconds
surrounding current position to select intended path of travel and analyze or
resolve traffic conflicts;
4.2.7 identifies when the travel path is open, closed, or changing and makes appropriate
speed or lane position adjustments;
4.2.8 utilizes proper procedures within legal boundaries to complete gradual and sharp-
turn parking maneuvers including angle and perpendicular parking, left, right, and
U-turns at major intersections and mid-block, and turnabouts including 2-point and
3-point or Y-turnarounds; and
4.2.9 participates in commentary driving while being evaluated and is provided a verbal
and written evaluation on behind the wheel and observation elements of Module
Two – Four.

4.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Four in a simulated
environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under development and
will be provided to schools upon availability.

4.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.
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Module Five: Information Processing - Moderate Risk Environment. The student defines
driver information processing; applies information processing principles; recognizes moderate risk
driving environments; utilizes space management concepts to establish roadway position, vehicle
speed, and communicate with other roadway users; synthesizes information from the driving
environment; and applies critical thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills to select the
appropriate intersection entry, curve management, hill management, and passing maneuvers for
the given situation.

5.1.0 Instructional Topics

5.1.1 Processing Information. The student defines driver information processing and
applies processing principles to establish roadway position, vehicle speed, and
communicate with other roadway users. The student assesses moderate risk
driving environments and applies space management concepts to establish
roadway position, vehicle speed, and to communicate with other roadway users.
5.1.2 Intersections, Curves, and Hills. The student utilizes basic space management
concepts to adjust speed or the path of travel when approaching controlled and
uncontrolled intersections, curves, and hills with line of sight or path of travel
limitations.
5.1.3 Passing. The student synthesizes information and applies critical thinking,
decision-making, and problem-solving skills to select and safely execute speed
and position adjustments for passing another vehicle.

5.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation: The student driver:

5.2.1 repeats, in complex risk environments, the elements of behind-the-wheel and in-
car observation covered in Module Three and Four;
5.2.2 applies information processing principles and space management techniques to
enter and exit curves, hills, and merge areas, to perform passing maneuvers and
advanced intersection entry and exit at controlled and uncontrolled intersections
including railroad grade crossings, and to negotiate multiple lane roadways and
heavy traffic; and
5.2.3 participates in commentary driving while being evaluated and is provided a verbal
and written evaluation on behind the wheel and observation elements of Module
Five.

5.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Five in a simulated
environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under development and
will be provided to schools upon availability.

5.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

Module Six: Information Processing - Multiple Lane Expressways. Complex Risk


Environments. The student applies risk-reducing strategies to utilize multiple lane roadways at
speeds up to 70 miles per hour in complex risk environments including expressways.

6.1.0 Instructional Topics:

6.1.1 Characteristics of Expressways. The student understands the characteristics of


complex risk environments including expressways and multiple lane roadways at
speeds up to 70 miles per hour.
6.1.2 Entering, Changing Lanes, and Exiting. The student collects information,
applies critical thinking, and utilizes decision-making/problem-solving skills and risk
reducing strategies to enter and exit traffic, steer, and establish speed and lane
position, pass other vehicles, and travel on multiple lane roadways at speeds up to
70 miles per hour in complex risk environments including expressways.
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6.1.3 High Speed Considerations. The student collects information, applies critical
thinking, and utilizes decision-making and problem-solving skills to travel on
multiple lane roadways at speeds up to 70 miles per hour in complex risk
environments including expressways.

6.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation – Module Six: The student driver:

6.2.1 utilizes space management techniques to synthesize information, establish


position and following distances, set speed, communicate, identify conflicts, and
manage open, closed, or changing sightline, path of travel, and target line
references in complex risk environments including freeways and multiple lane
roadways;
6.2.2 demonstrates proper procedures and space management techniques for entering,
exiting and traveling on rural highways, multiple lane roadways both city and rural,
and freeways;
6.2.3 performs no-risk, simulated or real passing maneuvers using proper procedures;
6.2.4 traverses frontage roads, weave lanes, metered ramps, and freeway interchanges
such as cloverleafs, diamonds or trumpets;
6.2.5 demonstrates vehicle and speed control and maintains lane positioning while
performing multiple tasks in the vehicle at speeds exceeding 40 mph and up to 70
mph; and
6.2.6 participates in commentary driving while being evaluated and is provided a verbal
and written evaluation on behind the wheel and observation elements of Module
Six.

6.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Six in a simulated
environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under development and
will be provided to schools upon availability.

6.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

Module Seven: Driver Performance - Personal Factors. The student develops an


understanding of the effects of alcohol and other drugs, fatigue, and emotions on the driving task,
assesses the dangers of these factors, and develops strategies to making health-promoting
decisions throughout the life span.

7.1.0 Instructional Topics:

7.1.1 Introduction of the Alcohol Problem. Saying No. The student synthesizes
information and applies problem-solving skills for making health-promoting
decisions regarding impaired driving.
7.1.2 Nature of Alcohol-Related Crash Problems. The student analyzes data and
statistical information and utilizes critical thinking to evaluate the nature of the
impaired driving crash problems.
7.1.3 Physiological and Psychological Effects of Alcohol on the Driving Task. The
student analyzes and evaluates the physiological and psychological effects of
alcohol and understands how they affect the driving task.
7.1.4 Affects on the Driving Task. The student understands the effects of alcohol
and other drugs on the driving task, analyzes and evaluates the physiological and
psychological effects of drugs other than alcohol on the driving task, and
understands how they affect the driving task.
7.1.5 Dealing with Driver Fatigue. The student recognizes the symptoms for fatigue
and develops strategies to avoid driving while fatigued.
7.1.6 Preventing Road Rage. The student understands the dangers of aggressive
driving, avoids aggressive driving, and utilizes strategies to respond appropriately
to aggressive drivers.
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7.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation – Module Seven: The student driver:

7.2.1 repeats behind-the-wheel and in-car observation elements of Module Two – Six if
additional attention to master skill is required;
7.2.2 practices communication and space management skills;
7.2.3 demonstrates, in no-risk, simulated situations, appropriate responses and
avoidance techniques to fatigued, impaired, and aggressive driving and drivers;
7.2.4 performs speed and position changes in traffic at high speeds; and
7.2.5 participates in commentary driving while being evaluated and is provided a verbal
and written evaluation on behind the wheel and observation elements of Module
Seven.

7.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Seven in a
simulated environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under
development and will be provided to schools upon availability.

7.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

Module Eight: Driver Responsibilities - Adverse Conditions. The student appraises inclement
and extreme weather conditions and formulates predictions on vehicular and driver limitations
before developing and executing responses; investigates roadway and vehicle technology including
occupant protection to develop an understanding of the related uses as crash and injury
protections; demonstrates proper use of occupant protection devices; and utilizes map reading and
route planning techniques to avoid adverse driving conditions.

8.1.0 Instructional Topics:

8.1.1 Visibility in Adverse Conditions. The student recognizes driver and vehicular
responsibilities and limitations for reduced-visibility driving conditions such as
glare, darkness, fog, precipitation, winter weather, or smoke, and formulates
predictions on vehicular and driver limitations before developing and executing
appropriate responses.
8.1.2 Extreme Weather Conditions. The student describes extreme weather
conditions relative to driving such as flooding, heat, cold, or strong winds and
formulates predictions on related vehicular and driver limitations before developing
and executing appropriate responses.
8.1.3 Protecting Occupants. The student lists proper use for vehicle occupant
protection devices; associates occupant protection to seatbelts, airbags, child
restraints, and vehicular and roadway technology; demonstrates proper use of a
seatbelt; and distinguishes occupant protection devices as crash survival
mechanisms.
8.1.4 Roadway and Vehicle Technology. The student understands and properly uses
survival mechanisms and protections provided by enhanced occupant protection
features incorporated into highway and vehicular design technology and
distinguishes highway and vehicular occupant protection devices as crash survival
mechanisms.
8.1.5 Traction Loss Concerns. The student recognizes vehicular imbalance and
chooses appropriate countermeasures to prevent loss of vehicle control.

8.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation – Module Eight: The student driver:

8.2.1 repeats behind-the-wheel and in-car observation elements of Module Two – Seven
if additional attention to master skill is required;
8.2.2 utilizes proper procedures to parallel park;

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8.2.3 demonstrates no-risk, simulated compensation techniques for limited visibility
conditions such as darkness, glare, dirty windshields, fog, and inclement weather;
8.2.4 simulates recognition and no-risk avoidance techniques of low water crossings and
roadway areas blocked by water;
8.2.5 recognizes and explains purpose of specific highway safety design features such
as shoulders, rumble strips, median barriers, traffic calming devices, breakaway
support poles, guard rails, crash attenuators, turn bays, collector and distributor
lanes, and message signs;
8.2.6 recognizes and explains purpose of specific automotive technology such as anti-
lock brakes, traction control devices, suspension control devices, electronic
stability program, crumple zones, door latches, and safety glass;
8.2.7 uses low and high beam headlights appropriately;
8.2.8 describes risk reduction techniques for controlling consequences of vehicular
breakdowns, collisions, traction loss, and skids;
8.2.9 demonstrates in a no-risk, non-damaging, simulated practice situation, the
recovery procedures for an off-road position lost; and
8.2.10 participates in commentary driving while being evaluated and is provided a verbal
and written evaluation on behind the wheel and observation elements of Module
Eight.

8.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Eight in a
simulated environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under
development and will be provided to schools upon availability.

8.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

Module Nine: Texas Driver Responsibilities - Vehicle Functions. The driver gains information
about vehicle system functions and malfunctions, recognizes when ABS engages, responds to
vehicle malfunctions, respects other users, and understands the role of agencies which manage
the highway system.

9.1.0 Instructional Topics:

9.1.1 Vehicle Functions/Malfunctions. The student assesses vehicle operation and


malfunctions to eliminate or prevent related problems by securing scheduled and
unscheduled maintenance or repairs.
9.1.2 Anti-lock Braking Systems. The student understands vehicle braking systems
and utilizes proper braking techniques in favorable and unfavorable vehicular,
weather, and roadway conditions.
9.1.3 Vehicle Performance. The student understands vehicle performance and
potential conflicts other motorized and non-motorized roadway users present and
applies critical-thinking, decision-making, and problem-solving skills to respond
appropriately.
9.1.4 Highway Transportation System Agencies. The student understands the
impact and consequences of personal driving behaviors on other users of the
Highway Transportation System (HTS) and that a consortium of federal, state,
local, and individual systems function together to provide a safe and lawful driving
community.

9.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation – Module Nine: The student driver:

9.2.1 repeats behind-the-wheel and in-car observation elements of Module Two – Eight,
if additional attention to master skill is required;
9.2.2 demonstrates appropriate procedures, in a simulated, no-risk, non-damaging
simulated practice situation engine failure, brake failure, loss of forward vision,
blowout, steering failure, vehicle fire, running out of gas, and accelerator failure;
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9.2.3 practices threshold braking to stop without a skid; and
9.2.4 participates in commentary driving while being evaluated and is provided a verbal
and written evaluation on Modules Eight - Nine skills.

9.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Nine in a simulated
environment. Detailed instructional objectives for simulation are under development and
will be provided to schools upon availability.

9.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

Module Ten: Texas Driver Responsibilities - The Wise Consumer & Driver Assessment.
Making Informed Choices. The student synthesizes information and applies strategies to select
motor vehicles and purchase insurance, plan extended trips, avoid littering concerns, and protect
the environment.

10.1.0 Instructional Objectives:

10.1.1 Insuring Vehicle. The student complies with the Safety Responsibility Law,
understands the conditions of insurance coverage, and demonstrates responsibility
for immediate and long-term obligations of owning and driving an automobile.
10.1.2 Purchasing Vehicle. The student analyzes data and utilizes critical-thinking and
problem-solving techniques prior to and upon purchase of a new or used
automobile.
10.1.3 Trip Planning. The student plans, determines routes, predicts personal and
vehicular needs, and calculates costs for an extended trip.
10.1.4 Texas Littering Concerns. The student develops personal strategies to reduce
litter on Texas roadways, understands the health and economical impacts of litter
on individuals and the community, and applies strategies to conserve fuel, recycle
automobile fluids and parts, maintain motor vehicles, and make wise automobile
selections to protect the environment by reducing pollution and conserving energy.
10.1.5 Driver Licensing. The student recognizes driver and traffic safety education as a
foundation assisting the student and parent/mentor to continue the life-long
learning process of reduced risk driving.

10.2.0 Behind-the-Wheel and In-car Observation – Module Ten: The student driver:

10.2.1 repeats behind-the-wheel and in-car observation elements of Module Two – Nine,
if additional attention to master skill is required;
10.2.2 performs at a 70 percent or above on a comprehensive final evaluation of behind
the wheel and in car observation while driving for a minimum of 20 minutes on a
predetermined route with minimal guidance or instructions and while observing
another driver for a minimum of 30 minutes and is provided a verbal and written
evaluation of the final evaluation and overall driving skills.

10.3.0 Simulation: The student driver demonstrates the objectives of Module Ten in a simulated
environment and performs at 70 percent or above on a comprehensive final evaluation
while driving the simulator for a minimum of 30 minutes with minimal guidance or
instructions and is provided the final evaluation both verbal and in writing. Detailed
instructional objectives for simulation are under development and will be provided to
schools upon availability.

10.4.0 Multi-car Range: This space reserved for multi-car range instructional objectives.

October 2000
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