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94 Energy Harvesting: Solar, Wind, and Ocean Energy Conversion Systems

Solar arrays

PMAD

Payload
Switch Inv./ Flight control &
box con communications
Avionics
Energy
storage: fuel
cell

Electric
Electrolyzer H2 Dual motor
pres.
O2 reg.
H2O

Pump Fuel cell

FIGURE 1.113 Power system of the solar-powered UAV.

power to the drive train. The power flow from solar arrays to the vehicle propulsion and to
the electrolyzer is determined by a power management strategy. In addition, the fuel cell
power is available to balance the power.
The power and propulsion system of the UAV is shown in Figure 1.113.

1.10 Summary
This chapter focuses on solar energy harvesting, which is one of the most important renew-
able energy sources that has gained increased attention in recent years. Solar energy is
plentiful; it has the greatest availability among other energy sources. This chapter deals with
I–V characteristics of PV systems, PV models and equivalent circuits, sun tracking systems,
MPPT systems, shading effects, power electronic interfaces for grid-connected and stand-
alone PV systems, sizing criteria for applications, and modern solar energy applications
such as residential, vehicular, naval, and space applications.

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Solar Energy Harvesting 95

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© 2010 by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC