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REPORT: ENGLISH,
YEAR 8 – KINGSWOOD
HIGH SCHOOL
Contemporary Teacher Leadership: Assessment 1

Liam Culhane
Student Number: 18361777
CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Table of Contents

Executive Summary: ................................................................................................................. 2


Objective and Context of the School and Curriculum Unit.......................................................... 2
Goals of the Report ........................................................................................................................... 4
List of Recommendations ................................................................................................................. 4
Background Information to Evaluated Unit ............................................................................ 6
Comparative Table: ................................................................................................................... 7
Recommendations: .................................................................................................................. 14
Reconstructed Unit: ................................................................................................................ 19
Scope and Sequence ........................................................................................................................ 19
Concept Map ................................................................................................................................... 21
Assessment Task and Marking Criteria – Part A........................................................................ 22
Assessment Task and Marking Criteria – Part B ........................................................................ 25
Redesigned Unit .............................................................................................................................. 28
References ............................................................................................................................... 65
Appendices of Original Documents: ...................................................................................... 68
Original Scope and Sequence ........................................................................................................ 68
Original Unit Plan .......................................................................................................................... 70
Original Assessment Task Part A ................................................................................................. 79
Original Assessment Task Part B.................................................................................................. 80
Original Assessment Task Part B – differentiated by mentor teacher Mr Church.................. 81

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Executive Summary:
Objective and Context of the School and Curriculum Unit

This report has been designed for use by Kingswood High School’s English faculty members,
in response to their ‘Short Story/Genre Study’ unit. The plan and scope of the unit has been
analysed and evaluated for the purpose of highlighting the strengths and weaknesses present
in the planning, and its goals and associated learning activities. Based on this analysis from
an ‘Understanding by Design (UbD)’ pedagogical position; targeted recommendations have
been suggested concerning ACARA’s (2016a/b/c/d) literacy, numeracy, critical and creative
thinking, and ethical understanding general capabilities; and have been implemented to
streamline the learning of students.

Kingswood High School is a comprehensive co-educational secondary school located in


Penrith area, and as such has a student-base from lower socioeconomic status areas as
evidenced by the distribution of 53% of students in the bottom socio-educational quartile in
2018 (ACARA, 2018). This manifests in lower student attendance levels, documented at 65%
for non-Indigenous students and 61% for Indigenous students. To its advantage, Kingswood
High School’s student-base is strong and diverse, with 22% of students with language
backgrounds other than English, and 9% of students identifying as Aboriginal or Torres Strait
Islander. Each of these factors and identities were present in the two streamed Year 8 English
classes the Harry Potter focussed ‘Short Story/Genre Study’ unit was taught in.

Figure 2: Student Demographic; Kingswood High School (ACARA, 2018)

Figure 1: Student Background; Kingswood High School (ACARA,


2018)

Although originally designed for the thirty-three-student strong higher functioning Year 8
class with behavioural challenges, the unit was also taught to a class of seventeen Year 8
students functioning at a learning support requirements level. While majority of Year 8’s

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reading and numeracy NAPLAN results sat in bands 6 or 7 the year prior, nearly 50% of the
students performed at a band 5 level or below in writing, as pictured below.

Figure 3: Year 7 NAPLAN Writing, 2017 (ACARA, 2018)

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Goals of the Report


The goals of this report include the following:
 To reorganise the design of planning, outcomes and learning activity objectives using
a ‘UbD pedagogical approach;
 To improve literacy outcomes by expanding on pre-existing creative and analytical
writing tasks focused on metalanguage, structure and language features; and
intertextual engagement;
 To develop numeracy general capabilities through learning activities in a cohesive
and relevant way;
 To promote existing critical and creative thinking with targeted learning activities and
scaffolds;
 And to support student understandings of a text rich in ethical dilemmas with
supported by learning activities that interrogate language and our judgements as
readers.

List of Recommendations
Understanding by Design (UbD):
1. Framing outline and learning activities using essential questions which guide and
demonstrate student learning and understanding;
2. Organizing learning activities in a logical and incremental knowledge progression,
that is guided by the learning goals of essential questions which overarch and link
objectives;
3. Closely linking essential questions and learning activities to standards which can be
used as evidence for learning.

Literacy:
1. Unit focus on guided close reading learning activities to model technique
identification and interpretation, at an individual and class level through modes that
appeal to a wide range of learning styles ie. Annotations on physical print-outs using
coloured textas, modelled via board projection.
2. Targeted language techniques representative of backwards planning, reflective of
essential questions that model the effects of language techniques

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3. Providing students with frameworks and opportunities to draft and revisit work, and
collaboratively peer edit in multiple ways – especially framed around their
assessments.

Numeracy:
1. Incorporate Venn diagrams and additional visual representation tools when linking
thematic analysis evidence within and across the text, to help students interpret, apply
and have perspective in a higher order task;
2. Link observation of numerous language forms/adjectives in close readings, to
recording and representing this data quantitatively, to complement author’s intent in
positioning written information and assess students’ ability to recognise these features
in preparation for assessment.

Critical and Creative Thinking:


1. Planning for creative tasks that are relevant to the overarching essential questions of
the unit, that challenge or support students in recreating and experimenting with
literature;
2. Planning for active efforts to scaffold critical thinking to encourage student self-
regulation, specifically guided:
- Close reading analysis and strategies
- PETAL framework for analytical paragraph writing
- Creative writing process
- Research, topic development and justification techniques

Ethical Understanding:
1. Incorporating learning activities that ensure students are exposed to real-world
historical narratives and can draw similarities between these and the text.
2. Structuring essential questions and learning activities that highlight underlying
discourses of difference, and challenge students to recognise when they are being
manipulated into empathy or apathy – through multiple learning activities centred
around student-led class discussions.

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Background Information to Evaluated Unit


The ‘Short Story/Genre Study’ is the fourth and final unit in the Year 8 scope and sequence
and aims to target the multiplicity of skills which outcomes and learning activities have been
developing throughout Stage 4. The critical nature of the unit’s assessment tasks, which are
the final assessments for the year, suggest a continued commitment to developing student
writing skills that has been sustained in units prior and are representative of the needs
reflected in Year 8’s NAPLAN results (ACARA, 2018). The selected text, ‘Harry Potter and
the Philosopher’s Stone’, is a rich and complex text with multiple moral discourses to be
explored, some of which are directly relevant to the personal worlds of Kingswood High
School and larger political discussions at present. Additionally, the choice to engage students
in reading, analysing and researching this particular novel as a contemporary popular text
embedded within their cultural background knowledge, acts as protective motivating factor
for student engagement in class work and reading.

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Comparative Table:
Area of Strengths of the area Concerns of the area of Suggested Changes to Research support for the
consideration of consideration consideration counteract concerns changes suggested.

Students actively While close readings are Close readings are tied to clear Using varying conversation
engaged in creative listed in the unit plan, the way goals about student structures including student
Literacy and analytical writing these enable students to understanding, and therefore and/or teacher-led individual
tasks using: interpret and use language learning activities should and group discussions, teachers
(adjustments - Metalanguage confidently are: reflect: can model processes of
in green) - Form/structure - Not pre-planned in - targeted language metalanguage and interpretation
- Language line with broader techniques skills to students. This
features concepts reflected in - essential questions that conference style also enables
the original scope and model the effects of students to share skills and
sequence language techniques perspectives (Atwell, 1987;
- Do not address - guided close reading Brophy, 2007).
students with learning activities to
additional needs or model technique
diverse learning identification and
styles interpretation, at an
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- Not guided in how to individual and class


use this language in level through modes
their own writing that appeal to a wide
Fails to acknowledge student range of learning
understanding. styles.
Students provided Unit plan fails to offer Provide students with Scaffolded training of students
with opportunity to students time and opportunity frameworks and opportunities in literary criticism improves a
engage with multiple to reflect on completed work to draft and revisit work, and student’s ability to interpret and
additional genre- and enhance this individually collaboratively peer edit in respond to texts, and improves
specific texts or collaboratively and multiple ways – especially their own writing – thus
therefore develop their framed around their improving self-regulation and
confidence. assessments. internalising good analytical
practice (ACARA, 2016c;
Brophy, 2007; Wandor, 2012).

Brainstorm activities Misses opportunities to link During close reading activities, Numeracy can support the
incorporate some observation of numerous for example in ‘Diagon recognition of textual forms and
Numeracy degree of numeracy in language forms/adjectives in Alley/Chapter 5’ – student relationships, by complimenting
the listing and close readings, to recording observations of language forms verbal and written information
(adjustments representation of and representing this data and features that establish as supporting evidence for
in red) quantitatively, to complement Draco as an unlikable character

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multiple themes and author’s intent in positioning can be recorded and patterns identification and
language forms. written information. represented, and then compared prediction (ACARA, 2016d).
across the class as a means of
assessing students’ ability to
recognise these features in
preparation for assessment.
Misses opportunity to explain Incorporate Venn diagrams as a Venn diagrams can be used in
and represent complex ideas visual representation tool when English to visually organise
and literary connections used linking evidence within and relationships between various
in the assessment visually ie. across the text for ‘Conspiracy components of a narrative or
The use of Venn diagrams. Theories’ topics, to help argument and to sort complex
students interpret, apply and information into categories and
have perspective in a higher illustrate these to an audience
order task. (ACARA, 2016d).

Students provided Very little evidence of Plan for active efforts to Scaffolding provides students
with opportunity to planned scaffolds to guide scaffold critical thinking to with a sequence of thinking
Critical and create using art and student thinking and develop encourage student self- skills which equip students with
Creative etymology. self-regulation. regulation, specifically guided: a developing set of tools to be
Thinking - Close reading analysis used when engaging problems
and strategies and unfamiliar information or

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(adjustments in - PETAL framework for new ideas – specifically an


blue) analytical paragraph increasingly sophisticated
writing ability to critically analyse
- Creative writing embedded meaning in texts as
process they share personal responses
- Research, topic and justify their points of view
development and and respond to the views of
justification techniques others (ACARA, 2016a).

Multiple occasions Creative task planning Plan for creative tasks that are ACARA (2016a) states that
where students must appears to be focused on type relevant to the overarching students should be challenged
identify relevant of activity, namely engaging essential questions of the unit, to develop their creative
information and and simplistic activities at the that challenge or support thinking capability by
present their work in expense of the purposeful students in recreating and evaluating authorial decisions,
diverse forms larger goals of the unit. experimenting with literature. and exploring and
including: experimenting with further
possibilities, and creating ideas
- Summary
for imaginative texts based on
- Paragraph
real or imagined events.
- Creatively
- Presentation

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Selected chapter close Students engage in close Structure overarching essential The encouragement and support
readings and some readings where: language questions and learning of students becoming active and
Ethical prompt questions have reflect social dilemmas activities that highlight informed citizens is a key focus
Understanding content which may including bias and loaded underlying discourses of of Australian education
guide students toward jargon; and the reader’s difference, and challenge profession. Therefore, building
(adjustments in conversations that decision-making is being students to recognise when they students understandings of their
purple) interrogate the influenced to encourage are being manipulated into own and other’s complex
inclusive and empathy or apathy – yet this empathy or apathy – through values and behavioural
exclusive effects of potential does not appear to multiple learning activities influence in the world, as
language and how this be addressed in the unit centred around student-led social, cultural and political
influences our outline as a desired learning class discussions. agents, is vital (ACARA,
judgements as readers. result for learners. 2016b).
Students engage in Opportunities to include Incorporate learning activities Connecting abstract and
study involving narratives that address that ensure students are concepts to real-life or
censorship and the personal and historically exposed to real-world historical hypothetical situations within
associated ethical similar issues and events and narratives and can draw the classroom is a helpful
positions and associated ethical principles similarities between these and technique for exploring
dilemmas. don’t feature as supports in a the text. complex issues and supporting

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stage 3/learning activities understandings (ACARA,


phase. 2016b).
The unit outline Planning lacks any mention In the revised unit outline and Units of work should be
reflects to an extent a of standards to be assessed, scope and sequence, essential designed to be engaging,
Understanding planning with ‘the end which suggests absence of questions which guide students however for learning to be
by Design in mind’ approach UbD backwards planning, in to demonstrate understanding, effective it cannot be engaging
similar to UbD, as addition to planning for both and the related learning at the expense of efficiency.
(adjustments both do record the unit and its requirements activities – must be closely Therefore, design must address
in orange) learning activities and appearing incomplete. linked to standards which can relevant unit goals and
resources. This is be used as evidence for their standards which can be
particularly notable in learning. evidenced (Wiggins &
the differentiated McTighe, 2005b).
assessment task, Part
B.
Certain activities are Planning doesn’t record any The learning in this unit should A UbD approach to planning
centred on big ideas big ideas or purpose to the be organised in a logical and affirms that teaching and
and transform and do unit, and therefore is not incremental knowledge learning should be focussed on
address desired coherent. Therefore, when progression, that is guided by big connective ideas, and that
student students engage in explaining, the learning goals of essential these ‘essential questions’
understandings. interpretation, applying, questions which overarch and should frame the goals of
perspective building, link objectives. learning. Additionally, these

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empathising or self- overarching questions


knowledge development – demonstrate to students how
this risks knowledge understanding changes and
progression feeling irrelevant develops over sustained inquiry
or mismatched. (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005a).

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Recommendations:
The below recommendations have been made based on evaluations from a UbD pedagogical
position; and have interrogated the implementation of literacy, numeracy, critical and creative
thinking, and ethical understanding general capabilities reflected in the outcomes and
learning activities in original unit.

The original and future content and learning activities of this unit should be evaluated using
the reflective questioning of a UbD approach, and consequently reorganized using the main
tenets of this pedagogical planning framework. The framing of a unit and learning activities
using essential questions to guide and demonstrate student learning and understanding, is a
definitive feature of this approach (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005a). These questions act as the
overarching goals which frame teacher design of learning and student interaction with
learning, which are frame meaning within all relevant content knowledge and skills (Sumrall
& Sumrall, 2018; Wiggins & McTighe, 2005a). These essential questions structure inquiry
around the desired evidenced learning outcomes for students within any unit, directly
engaging students in core content and its relevant key concepts. Therefore, these essential
questions encourage guided inquiry that involves student-directed construction of knowledge
as results of inquiry, rather than fixed answers (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005a). Such
significant essential questions and consequently relevant content and learning activities are
best formed using a ‘backwards design’ approach, the key planning feature of UbD. This
approach focalizes the identification of desired results as stage one of planning, establishing
goals before determining appropriate evidence and syllabus outcomes and then finally
specific learning activities to achieve this.

The original unit outline neither targets syllabus outcomes, nor possesses overarching
essential questions that aren’t limited to specific activities. Quite contrastingly, learning
activities do not appear in any order simulating learning progression. Therefore, the
reorganizing of learning activities in a logical and incremental knowledge progression
representative of backwards design is advised to support higher-order thinking – represented
by the differentiated Part B assessment (Dávilla, 2017; Mutton, Hagger & Burn, 2011;
Wiggins & McTighe, 2005b). These activities should be guided by the learning goals of
essential questions which overarch the unit and link content – targeted with the creation of a
concept map absent from the original unit; in addition to syllabus outcomes and activities.
CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

With essential questions linked to learning activities and syllabus outcomes, student inquiry
can be used as evidence for learning.

At a literacy level, the original unit and corresponding assessment tasks engage students in
creative and analytical writing tasks where they interact with metalanguage, genre structure,
language features, and adaptations and additional complementary texts. This interaction
develops literacy in the aspects of text, word and composition knowledge outlined by
ACARA’s (2016c) literacy general capabilities. However, if the answer to the UbD planning
question, “what do we want students to understand by the end of the unit”, is represented by
the successful competition of both analytical halves of the assessment, then the learning
activities when compared against these analytical requirements do not reflect planning with
the end in mind (Sumrall & Sumrall, 2018). Specifically, planning does not reflect the
sustained development of student ability to comprehend or compose texts through
listening/speaking, reading/writing or viewing/creating as outlined by ACARA (2016c).

To support students in achieving these analytical content understandings and skills processes,
it is recommended that the unit is organised around repeated student interaction with guided
close reading activities, to model language and thematic identification and interpretation, at
an individual and class level. These mini-lessons are reminiscent of Atwell’s (1987)
descriptions, and act as opportunities to model metalanguage, interpretation and annotation
skills to students. This high element interactivity modelling process is most effective using
varying pedagogical structures to accommodate diverse student needs and learning styles
(Brophy, 2007). Consequently, it is recommended that these annotation modelling activities
occur using physical print-outs, marked out using coloured textas, modelled via board
projection using a mix of student-led or teacher-led discussion, and student-directed
collaborative work using word banks, to allow content to transfer from working memory to
long term memory (Hanham, Leahy & Sweller, 2017). This learning can only be effective if
language techniques are targeted in the process of backwards design and reflected in the
essential questions of the unit. In developing student’s literacy ability and their ability to
make increasingly sophisticated language choices, providing students with literary criticism
frameworks and opportunities that extend to their own ability to draft and revisit work, and
collaboratively peer edit in multiple ways; is vital to affirming good analytical practice and
improving their self-regulation (ACARA, 2016c; Brophy, 2007; Wandor, 2012). Thus,
backwards design centred on developing student literacy capacity to respond and create

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empowers students with greater capacity to participate confidently in class and during
assessment.

As an English unit outline, planning in the original document does not reflect any targeted
numeracy development, and activities do not demonstrate cross-curricular opportunities to
interconnect mathematical concepts to unit content. While elements of numeracy general
capabilities such as measurement or fractions are not particularly relevant in the unit context,
the recognition and depiction of patterns and relationships have immediate relevancy to the
analytical processes students will engage with throughout learning activities and assessment
(ACARA, 2016d). In fact, the development of student ability to see patterns and relationships
both within texts, and between texts and the world using numeracy’s visual representations, is
a direct support of the literacy, critical and creative thinking, and ethical understanding goals
of this unit and the objective students will ultimately be assessed against.

Revisions to the unit plan utilize visual mathematic organisers such as Venn diagrams and
additional visual representation tools, which aim to demonstrate to students the linking of
thematic analysis evidence within and across the text. In addition to supporting student
interpretation, and application of perspective in higher order tasks directly reflective of their
assignment, students can utilize these tools themselves by engaging in the statistical
processes that underpin them during their own thematic analyses (ACARA, 2016d).
Additionally, challenging students to link observation of numerous language forms/adjectives
in close readings with processes of recording and representing this data measured against the
author’s intent, positions students as active meaning-makers and assesses their ability to
recognise these features while giving them a platform to share and rationalize their
observations as a learning community.

This process of rationalising new unfamiliar ideas and the following inquiry-based problem-
solving is at the centre of revisions concerning critical and creative thinking. These skills are
strengthened through the sequencing of thinking processes and concept learning, which in
turn can strengthen student confidence in self-regulating thinking and problem-solving
(ACARA, 2016a). The original unit design has a positive focus on creative activities and
engages students in the critical identification of information and its representation, yet these
activities are neither linked in any logical progression or to any larger goals in the unit, nor is
there evidence of supporting student’s critical and creative thinking with scaffolds.

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The revised unit outline draws inspiration from ideas in the original unit design. The original
creative thinking activities have been appropriated, transforming targeted creativity in this
unit from tokenistic activities for the sake of the fantasy genre, to concepts more relevant to
the overarching essential questions of the unit the develop student knowledge of the text and
the worldbuilding of the genre, in addition to challenging and supporting student’s recreation
and experimentation with literature. Perhaps the most important recommendation for the
trajectory of the entire unit, is the planning for active efforts to scaffold critical thinking that
encourage student self-regulation. This manifests in the prioritisation of the aforementioned
close reading analysis and annotation strategies; and other support activities, questions and
materials including the PETAL frameworks for analytical paragraph writing, creative writing
process prompts, and research, topic development and justification frameworks. Multiple
scaffolds in multiple forms supports the essential goals of the unit, reflected in the assessment
tasks, in addition to being essential for in the support of other recommendations (McLeskey
&Waldron, 1998; McLeskey & Waldron, 2011).

The final recommendations review the original unit planning through the lens of the ethical
understanding general capability. This unit is framed around ‘Harry Potter and the
Philosopher’s Stone’, a text well situated to discuss ethical issues including racism and
difference, bullying, societal responses to fear and loss, and censorship. Certain original
learning activities support the development of student ethical understands by noting their
presence and engaging students in discussion but fail to interrogate the inclusive and
exclusive effects of language and how this influences our judgements as readers, censorship
and the associated ethical positions and dilemmas. Additionally, these discussions never
specifically target real world narratives and student background knowledge.

The incorporation of learning activities that ensure students are exposed to real-world
historical narratives and can draw similarities between these and the text would not only
increase the personal relevance of the unit, but also challenge students consider how language
recreates scenarios of empowerment and disempowerment (ACARA, 2019b). Additionally,
structuring essential questions and learning activities that highlight underlying discourses of
difference, and challenge students to recognise when they are being manipulated into
empathy or apathy, such as in the case of Draco Malfoy, would build on pre-existing

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discussions regarding censorship and racism as catalysts for students to interrogate their own
character judgements.

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Reconstructed Unit:
Scope and Sequence
**Received term two and three scope and sequences, which has been adapted and additional terms created.

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Introductory Understanding heroes, Visual Analysis mini-lessons: Comic creation and adaptation:
Term 1: Comic and
Graphic Novels

comic villains and anti- Visual techniques, comic Scaffolded creation using well known films;
knowledge: heroes: terminology, and The Four Frames drafting and assessment presentation
Student Compelling
understandings characterisation, the
and key origin story, the
structures motive, the fatal flaw

EN4-1A, EN4-3B, EN4-4B, EN4-5C, EN4-6C, EN4-7D, EN4-8D

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Introduction to The Taming of the Shrew – Reading 10 Things I Hate PETAL writing focus – Assessment drafting
Appropriating
Shakespeare

Shakespeare and analysis of themes and close About You – viewing film review scaffolding and submission
Term 2:

Appropriations passages and comparative


analysis

EN4-2A, EN4-3B, EN4-6C, EN4-7D, EN4-8D, EN4-9E

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Poetry vs
Term 3:

Orientation Poetry/lyrical techniques and Music – pop culture and Podcast models, reflection and presentation
Music

and analysis decade analysis


pretesting
EN4-5C, EN4-7D, EN4-8D, EN4-9E
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Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Introduction Reading and Analysis PETAL writing Thematic analysis Project based planning and Part B
Term 4: Genre/Short Story

to Harry of The Philosopher’s process – Part A and start project- assessment presentation:
Potter and Stone close readings: assessment drafting based assessment Mr Church
the - fantasy genre and submission planning
Philosopher’s
- language techniques
Stone:
Mr Church - narrative voice …with Praccie Mr …with Praccie Mr
- characterisation Culhane Culhane

…with Praccie Mr
Culhane
EN4-1A, EN4-2A, EN4-3B, EN4-4B, EN4-5C, EN4-6C, EN4-9E

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Concept Map
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Assessment Task and Marking Criteria – Part A

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Marking Guidelines - Part A Mark


 demonstrates a sustained insightful and original response to chosen question, A
and a high level of engagement with key terminology and concepts;
 displays highly developed skills in identifying and analysing the effect of
language techniques with reference to multiple quotes;
 argument is clearly structured using PETAL paragraph format, demonstrating
high level of ability to critically incorporate sources into the argument, which
flows cohesively;
 response meets word limit minimum standards for essay.
 demonstrates detailed response to the question and a high level of engagement B
with key terminology and concepts;
 displays well-developed skills in identifying and analyzing the effect of
language techniques with reference to multiple quotes;
 argument is well structured using PETAL paragraph format, demonstrating a
consistent ability to critically incorporate sources into the argument, which
flows cohesively;
 response meets word limit minimum standards for book review and essay.
 demonstrates sound response to the question and engages with key terminology C
and concepts
 displays sound skills in identifying and analysing the effect of language
techniques with reference to multiple quotes (PETAL and book review)/some
quotes (essay);
 argument is well structured using PETAL paragraph format, demonstrating a
consistent ability to critically represent relationships in the text;
 response meets word limit minimum standards for PETAL paragraphs and
book review, but may not for essay.
 demonstrates an attempt to answer the question, and limited engagement with D
key terminology and concepts
 displays ability to identify language techniques and attempts to analyse the
effect of language techniques with reference to some quotes, but is often
descriptive;

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 argument attempts to use PETAL paragraph format, representing basic ability


to represent relationships in the text;
 response meets word limit minimum standards for PETAL paragraphs; but
may not for book review or essay.

 the question is not directly addressed; E


 briefly describes language techniques with minimum or no inclusion of quotes
or analysis;
 argument attempts to use PETAL paragraph format;
 response does not meet word limit minimum standards for PETAL paragraphs;
book review or essay.

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Assessment Task and Marking Criteria – Part B


**Part B was differentiated by my mentor teacher for the class – therefore differs from
original Part B document in appendices. I do not claim these changes as my intellectual
property, all rights to Mr Brandon Church, English Faculty, Kingswood High School.
_____________________________________________

TOP SECRET ASSESSMENT TASK – PART B:

Ok, then. We are going to make a little research presentation. You’re


going to put it together over the next few weeks and display your
research onto an A2 poster.
The details are:

 In groups of no more than 3 (you can ride solo if you want, too)
you will come up with a “Fan Theory” about the Harry Potter
Series, like “Harry Potter is a Bad Friend” - or anything you like,
really.

 Then you’ll start putting together evidence - This is the writing


part of the assessment - you can use quotes from the books too.
I personally recommend you write your evidence like it’s a
PETAL paragraph, but you can be more informal if you like, as
long as it makes sense!
399 words minimum
 You’ll also need pictures to help illustrate the point you are trying
to make. These can be hand drawn or printed off the net. They can
be direct from canon, or from other sources too.
4-6 pictures total
 On the day (and probably the days after) your group will be
required to present and display your findings. It is expected
your group will outline your investigation for a minimum of 2
minutes and a maximum of 6 minutes.

 The presentations and therefore, the due date for the task, will be
the Thursday and Friday of week 8 (6/12 & 7/12)

You will be marked on:


 The depth of your research
 The originality of your idea
 The structure and organisation of your evidence
 The control of your language in your written work
 How interesting, engaging and pretty your display is

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PLS NOTE: We will not mark the quality of the spoken presentation, but if you are not helping
out your friends then that might suggest that you just kicked back and let them do the work,
which is a no-no.

Marking Guidelines - Part B Mark


 demonstrates a sustained insightful response to chosen research question, A
which is highly original;
 argument is clearly structured using PETAL paragraph format, demonstrating
thorough engagement with key terminology and concepts;
 argument is well researched and critically incorporates multiple examples of
evidence, which flows cohesively;
 displays highly developed skills in identifying and analysing the effect of
language techniques with reference to multiple quotes and themes;
 presentation is insightful, original and engaging, with 4-6 pictures;
 response meets word limit minimum standards.
 demonstrates detailed response to the question response to chosen research B
question, which has elements of originality;
 argument is well structured using PETAL paragraph format, demonstrating a
strong engagement with key terminology and concepts;
 argument is well researched and critically incorporates multiple examples of
evidence;
 displays developed skills in identifying and analysing the effect of language
techniques with reference to multiple quotes and themes;
 presentation is engaging, with 4-6 pictures;
 response meets word limit minimum standards.
 demonstrates sound response to the chosen research question; C
 argument is well structured using PETAL paragraph format, demonstrating
consistent attempts to engage key terminology and concepts;
 argument is well researched and critically incorporates examples of evidence;
 displays sound skills in identifying and consistent attempts to analyse the effect
of language techniques with reference to quotes or themes;
 presentation is descriptive but interesting, with 4-6 pictures;
 response meets word limit minimum standards.
 demonstrates an attempt to answer research question; D

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

 argument attempts structure using PETAL paragraph format, with basic


engagement with key terminology and concepts;
 argument is sourced from less than three sources and attempts to incorporates
examples of evidence;
 displays ability to identify language techniques with often descriptive analysis,
with little reference to quotes;
 presentation is basic and not very engaging, with 4-6 pictures;
 response meets word limit minimum standards.
 research question is not directly addressed; E
 briefly describes language techniques with minimum or no inclusion of quotes
or analysis;
 argument does not show evidence of research;
 argument does not use PETAL paragraph format and lapses into small
collections of sentences;
 presentation is incomplete or very basic, with 3 or less pictures;
 response does not meet word limit minimum standards.

27
Redesigned Unit
Unit Outline Key:
Literacy Numeracy Critical and Creative Thinking Ethical Understanding
Understanding by Design Original Unit Content That Has Inspired Revisions

UNIT OUTLINE
Subject: English Stage: 4 Number of Weeks: 6:
Unit title: Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone

Key Concepts/ Big Ideas The importance of this learning


Essential Questions: The activities incorporated in this unit focus primarily on characters and engaging
What words or phrases stand out when I am activities for the students to bring the fantasy world to life. Activities include sorting hats,
reading? What does this make me think? How wand making, matching professors with descriptions and extended responses.
does this make me feel? What is the name of this
technique? This novel studies unit is designed to reinforce the development of student’s analytical
reading and writing skills, which has progressively occurred over the past three terms.
In what ways does J.K. Rowling use the reader’s This unit seeks to solidify developing student analytical processes by promoting self-
background knowledge to make meaning and regulation through modelling, scaffolds, and joint constructions of close reading, PETAL
authority in Harry Potter? paragraph structure, quote incorporation and thematic analysis. This unit encourages
students to move past summary understandings of texts toward engaging concepts such as
authors purpose, authority and genre. Additionally, ‘Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s
CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

How do the characters of Harry, Voldemort and Stone’ has been selected as a text well established in student’s background and cultural
Dumbledore and their interactions with other knowledge systems to encourage reading and engagement within the unit, and also assert
characters, setting and events shape reader’s that this student knowledge and experience is relevant to the classroom context.
expectations?

What are the steps I need to take to analyse, plan


and draft an analytical response?

Big Ideas:
Narrator Voice:
- point of view and characterisation
Fantasy Genre:
- worldbuilding, setting, jargon, suspense
Themes:
- mythology and symbolism, trauma, ‘The
Chosen One’, prophecy
Skills:
- close reading, paragraph writing
structure, language forms analysis

Unit context within Scope and Sequence Targeted Syllabus Outcomes (including life skills outcomes)

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The ‘Short Story/Genre Study’ is the fourth and EN4-1A: responds to and composes texts for understanding, interpretation, critical
final unit in the Year 8 scope and sequence and analysis, imaginative expression and pleasure
aims to target the multiplicity of analytical
EN4-2A: effectively uses a widening range of processes, skills, strategies and knowledge
thinking and writing skills which outcomes and
for responding to and composing texts in different media and technologies
learning activities have been developing
throughout Stage 4.
EN4-3B: uses and describes language forms, features and structures of texts appropriate to
a range of purposes, audiences and contexts

EN4-4B: makes effective language choices to creatively shape meaning with accuracy,
clarity and coherence

EN4-5C: thinks imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information,


ideas and arguments to respond to and compose texts

EN4-6C: identifies and explains connections between and among texts

EN4-9E: uses, reflects on and assesses their individual and collaborative skills for learning

Literacy Targets Numeracy Targets ICT Targets CCP/ GC Assessment


Scaffolded close reading Record number of Students continue to Critical and Creative Assessment for Learning:
to improve and support potential and named develop and refine Thinking: Informal – measurement
student analytical reading literary techniques research processes by of participation in class

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

and technique/theme identified in each close honing searches to Students engage in discussion and on task
identification. reading activity to generate and access relevant creative tasks that behaviour; consensus and
measure student’s ability relevant information from challenge or support recording during close
Scaffold and provide to recognise and name multiple sources. students in recreating and readings
opportunities to draft and features. experimenting with
revisit work, and As a learning community, literature, using scaffolds Formal – submission of
collaboratively peer edit in Visually represent engage with and and frameworks. PETAL writing booklets;
multiple ways to analytical evidence links contribute to online collection and compiling
encourage self-regulated within the text and across collaborative workspaces. Ethical Understanding: of creative tasks;
and reflective analytical the series. Students question recording of page
writing. underlying discourses of numbers during reading;
difference and authorial Kahoot feedback
responses of empathy or
apathy and compares Assessment of Learning:
these to real-world Part A – Assessment of
historical narratives. language forms analysis;
essay format (PETAL
Personal and Social paragraph structure, may
Capability: include book review).
Students use developing
critical language to

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

communicate their Part B – Assessment of


opinion collaboratively in thematic analysis and
class discussion and group research; PETAL
work, and through writing paragraphs and poster
processes. presentation

Students evaluate a range


of character interactions,
decisions and social
behaviours to develop
empathy and understand
motivations.

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Week 1 Period 1 Period 2 Period 3


Title Creating Lesson: Harry Potter and Reading Lesson: ‘Letters from no-one’ and Analysing Lesson: The Boy Who
Heraldry ‘Keepers of the Keys’ Lived and He-Who-Shall-Not-Be-
Named
Key EN4-1A EN4-3B EN4-5C
Outcome(s) EN4-2A EN4-4B EN4-6C:

Key How do the author’s creative Who are the positive and negative characters so far? What do Harry or Voldemort’s these
Concept(s) choices influence our judgements epithets say about their character?
about characters? Were the Dursley’s right to keep Harry’s identity What clues do we get about how they
How do our values influence our from him? earned those names?
judgement of characters? - Censorship How do other characters react to the
- Worldbuilding - Literary technique identification mention of these names?
- Author’s context - Genre
- Reader and narrative
expectations.
Learning Silent Reading Time: Silent Reading Time: Silent Reading Time:
Experiences Students read Philosopher’s Stone Students read Philosopher’s Stone - Settling Students read Philosopher’s Stone -
- Settling Activity – their page Activity – their page number is recorded on the Settling Activity – their page number
reading board is recorded on the reading board

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

number is recorded on the reading


board. Chapters 3 and 4 discussion: ‘The Boy Who Lived’ and ‘He Who
1. Identify three important events from the Shall Not Be Named’:
Hogwarts and Heraldry: novel so far? How does J.K. Rowling introduce
Read ‘The Sorting Hat’ extract to 2. Find three examples of skillful writing Harry Potter and Voldemort to
students and discuss the adjectives techniques that create suspense, in the readers? When is the first time we
that define each house, and the countdown scene before Harry’s birthday as hear about them?
adjectives that define them. Are Hagrid arrives. Name the technique and note Introduce students to meaning of
you loyal? Kind? Athletic? Are the quote. literary device ‘epithet’ on the board.
you vegan? Page 37-38 second last paragraph, from “As Think about: Alexander III of
Turn to the person next to you and night fell”… Macedonia, Muhammed Ali, Conor
ask them for 3 adjectives that they 3. Do you think it was right for the Dursley’s McGregor, Michael Jackson,
believe define you. to not tell Harry that he was a wizard? Why? Eminem, Beyoncé.
BONUS: Students discuss what
Students then create their own definition of
these adjectives say about their Joint Construction:
Censorship as a class. Is this censorship different
character? What are the Split the room in two, half assigned to
from Dumbledore, who leaves Harry with the
connotations?? the “The Boy Who Lived” and the
Dursleys and doesn’t tell him he is a wizard?
other to and “He Who Shall Not Be
Student Hogwarts House Coat of Reading and discussing the stories in the Tales of Named”. What are the connotations of
Arms Creation: Beedle the Bard(Rowling) and other common fairy your character’s epithet? (pp. 10, 13,
tales. 14 and 18).

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Students create their own house Students build the case for these two
Students discuss the meaning of the stories therein
coat of arms. Students research: opposing characters, suggested to
and outline the definition of censorship.
- The meaning of their first, students through Rowling’s use of:
second and surname(s) Students create simple summaries of the stories and Dialogue
- The symbolic meaning of discuss what the moral lessons of these stories are - Foreshadowing
their favourite animal students analyse the role of moral lessons. Dramatic Irony
- Their future job, and which All evidence for developing character
of their adjectives/ traits through events, descriptions and
relate to these. COMPREHENSION setting is attached to two ‘conspiracy
Students design their own coat of [cork] boards’ and linked with thread
The Warlock’s Hairy Heart (pp45-60)
arms using these three elements, to a central image of the character.
1) Summarise the story in 1 sentence
arranged on an A4 paper to be
2) Identify the key themes/ideas in the story.
handed in at the end of the lesson. Fantasy and ‘The Chosen One’:
3) Dumbledores afterword gives reasons why
The responses and interactions of
this story has not been censored (in the
other characters to Harry and
wizarding world) as much as the other
Voldemort’s epithets builds
stories in the novel.
expectations within readers.
- Do you agree with this statement? Why?
Relate this to students by asking them
Why not?
about the ‘Chosen One’s’ they know:
- Is it ok to censor stories? Provide 4 reasons
For example: Thanos, Anakin/Luke
to justify your response
Skywalker, Aang/The Avatar.

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Link this to the concept of the


Students summarise and compare the videos for The
‘hero’:
Three Billy Goats Gruff and The Three Brother (JK
Pre-reading activity: Chapter 8
Rowling)
1. Prior to starting High School,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO-5KgcfHmI - which subject were u looking
billy goats forward to the most? Why
2. What is your favourite subject
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgmEEDyeDv8
at school and why?
- three brothers
3. What is your least favourite
subject at school and why?
4. (Please do not be RUDE AND
MENTION teacher’s names).

1. List qualities that make a


hero. Definition: a person who is
admired for their courage,
outstanding achievements, or noble
qualities.

Hero:
● Saves lives

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

● Courageous
● Selfless
● Brave
● Journey/ adventure
2. List qualities that make an anti-
hero. Definition: central character in
a story, film, or drama who lacks
conventional heroic attributes.

Evidence of Reading progress recorded Reading progress recorded Reading progress recorded
Learning Personalised and annotated Coat of Responses to discussion in shared HAPRA Class discussion points written on
Arms collected document board and photographed, representing
Class discussion points written on board and student participation
photographed Two conspiracy cork boards with
contributions.

Resources Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone Novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s
Stone Novel Chromebooks Stone Novel
A4 sheets for students – 31xB Cork board x 2
17xE Loose paper and thread
Textas/Coloured Pens PowerPoint presentation w/ images

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Pre-prepared Coat of Arms


examples

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Week 2 Period 1 Period 2 Period 3


Title Reading Lesson: ‘Diagon Alley’ and Creating Lesson: Wands and Word Reflecting Lesson: ‘The Sorting Hat’ and
‘The Journey from Platform 9 ¾’ Origins ‘The Potions Master’
Key Outcomes EN4-3B EN4-1A EN4-5C
EN4-5C EN4-3B EN4-9E
Key Concepts How does the author and reader’s What fantasy elements in Harry Potter What are the fantasy genre worldbuilding
context influence a text’s authority? contribute to credibility of The techniques I have learned about so far?
Wizarding World?
What fantasy elements in Harry Potter - The fantasy genre and: What is the best way to write a
contribute to credibility of The - author/reader’s context, textual paragraph?
Wizarding World? authority, world building
- The fantasy genre and: (etymology)
- author/reader’s context, textual
authority, world building
Learning Settling silent reading: Students read Philosopher’s Stone - Students read Philosopher’s Stone -
Experiences Students read Philosopher’s Stone - Settling Activity – their page number Settling Activity – their page number is
Settling Activity – their page number is recorded on the reading board. recorded on the reading board.
is recorded on the reading board.
The Magic Behind Spells:
Do now: Go over the elements of fantasy
Kahoot Comprehension:

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/53d28980- The spells in Harry Potter are not


What is a moral? What is the moral of 3
5c87-4b54-b2cd-977f67e83abc random words, but are constructed of
Billy Goats Gruff? Target audience.
Latin words from the Muggle world,
Students read sections of the book and our world. We can understand their Show clip: Series of unfortunate events.
answer comprehension questions focus magic, by investigating their
Students makes notes of elements of
on “identify” and “inference” based etymology – the study of the origins of
fantasy. Discussion
concepts. words and the way their meanings
1. Rowling invents a Wizarding change. Grounding magic in words Group narrative:
World money system – with from our world suspends our disbelief.
This active will involve a story being
sickles, knuts and galleons. For example:
written by 3 different people: one person
What effect does this have on Abra-cadabra – Hebrew avra kadavra
writes the exposition, the next person
readers? - With this hand I create
writes the climax and the third person
2. Who is Mr Ollivander? Avada kedavra – Aramaic abaddha
writes the resolution. Once finished, pass
3. “Better Hufflepuff than kedhabhra - With this hand I destroy
your book to the left so the next person
Slytherin. There’s not a single
continues.
witch or wizard who went bad Using the worksheet provided,
who wasn’t in Slytherin.” – students match the spells and their Exposition: Must use 1 of the following
Who says this in ‘Diagon descriptors with their translations. elements of the fantasy genre:
Alley’?
Setting and character
4. What is unusual about Harry’s Create A Wand:
wand?

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

5. If you could pick a Hogwarts Students use their pens and arts/crafts
Climax- The climax of the story needs to
pet, what animal would you to create a wand, choosing appropriate
involve some sort of conflict and is the
choose? core/feather colours to fit your
highest point of tension.
6. Why do you think Dudley’s personality/trait.
attitude toward Harry has Creating a wand You must use one of the following
changed? Students use their pens and arts/crafts fantasy elements:
7. Platform 9 3/4, just like to create a pen. - A battle, likely between good and
Diagon Alley, is hidden in Choose an appropriate core to fit your evil
plain sight. How does this personality/trait - Magical powers at work
support Rowling’s world - Magical creatures- dragon
building and our understanding Defence Against the Dark Arts:
of the fantasy genre? Using their Chromebooks, students Interactive Journal Discussion:
8. In what way do the Famous make up five magical spells. For each Gather students into teams of three.
Witches and Wizards cards spell: Student 1 will respond to the question in
develop the Wizarding World - identify what your spell will do the first quarter and pass the paper within
for readers? - Choose an incantation of two their group. Student 2 reads the
9. Which do you think would be to three words that the contribution in quarter one and responds
your favourite Hogwarts class? witch/wizard would say to to it with additional thoughts or opinions.
10. What is your first impression make it happen. Person 3 must read the responses in
of Draco Malfoy? Identify - find each word’s root word; quarters one and two, and then respond.
three techniques J.K Rowling definition and write it down. All papers then return to Person 1, who

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

uses to make sure readers don’t Students to submit spells to be made reflects on all responses, guided by a
like Draco. into a spell book. reflection question: Eg. Did I learn
Support all of the answers to these Activity: Root words anything new? Do I still feel the same as I
questions with discussion about Make up five magical spells. For each did in quarter one? Do I have any
worldbuilding, author’s context, and spell, identify what your spell will do lingering questions?
textual authority – students make notes and the “incantation” of two to three 1. There are ghosts floating around
on worksheet with question list. words that the witch/wizard would say Hogwarts! How does this add to
Give students definition: Fantasy is a to make it happen. The words don’t our impression of Hogwarts?
fiction genre set in an imaginary have to be real, but they do have to List qualities that make an anti-hero.
universe, often but not always without have a root word that relates to the Definition: central character in a story,
any locations, events, or people from magic spell. film, or drama who lacks conventional
the real world. Most fantasy uses heroic attributes.
magic or other supernatural elements For example: Discussion: Is Snape a hero, villain or
as a main plot element, theme, or “Objecto revelus” would make an anti-hero? Justify your answer.
setting. Magic and magical creatures object appear out of nowhere. The root 2. There is a whole chapter devoted
are common in many of these of objecto is object and the root of to Professor Snape’s class. Find a
imaginary worlds. revelus is reveal. technique and a quote that
positions Snape as a nasty teacher.
Activity: What often happens in these Discuss with class.
stories? What are the common
Reflection Task:

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

elements, the conventions of these Students write a response to the


genres? following:
The first time you read Harry Potter, did
you notice the ways J.K. Rowling builds
a connection between readers and the
Wizarding World? How has your
understanding of Rowling’s world-
building techniques changed?
After brainstorming the worldbuilding
techniques the class has established,
students write a paragraph response,
referencing two examples of skilful
language.

Evidence of Reading progress recorded Reading progress recorded Reading progress recorded
Learning Kahoot performance data Etymology research worksheets Interactive Journals submitted
Kahoot note-taking worksheet Spell creations submitted on Paragraphs submitted to HAPARA or
HAPARA Liam
Brainstorm on board photographed
Resources Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Worksheets Chrome Books and access to HAPARA
Stone Novel Chrome books classroom

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Chromebooks Arts and crafts (already bought by Interactive Journal Questions.


Liam)

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Week 3 Period 1 Period 2 Period 3


Title Analysing Lesson: PETAL Writing Lesson: PETAL Writing Creating Lesson: PETAL Writing Skills
Paragraph Refresher
Key EN4-1A EN4-1A EN4-1A
Outcomes EN4-9E EN4-2A EN4-3B

Key What stands out to me as, do I think How do I start paragraph sentences? What stands out to me as, do I think is, or
Concepts is, or do I know is, a literary do I know is, a literary technique?
technique? How do I use quotes in paragraphs?
How do I identify the elements of a
How do I start paragraph sentences? How do I analyse and read paragraphs to PETAL paragraph by myself?
make them better?
*How does the author use language *How does the author use language to
to create an environment of position Malfoy as an unlikable character
suspense in Chapter 3, ‘The letters to readers?
from no-one’?
Learning Students read Philosopher’s Stone - Students read Philosopher’s Stone - Settling Students read Philosopher’s Stone -
Experiences Settling Activity – their page Activity – their page number is recorded on Settling Activity – their page number is
number is recorded on the reading the reading board. recorded on the reading board.
board.

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Students participate in a close study PETAL Draft Writing: Chapter 5 Close Reading – Malfoy
of the following chapters along with Students choose one of the discussed Teacher reads displayed extract and
comprehension questions to build techniques, to answer the question: students use textas to mark any words or
up their knowledge of the story for How does the author use language to create an phrases that the author uses to create
their assignment environment of suspense in Chapter 3, ‘The Malfoy as an unlikeable character –
- chapter 8 - the potions letters from no-one’? Scaffolds are displayed followed by class discussion and board
master and reinforced. mark-up.
- chapter 10 - hallowe'en - Dialogue
- chapter 12 - the mirror of For students who have finished early – - Juxtaposition
erised students edit their paragraph and make at least - Italics
- chapter 15 - the forbidden two changes, and under their paragraph
forest explain why they made this change. PETAL Wand Construction:
- chapter 16 - through the trap The following items are stuck to the board
door Peer Edit: with their explanations, as visual steps for
- chapter 17 - the man with Students peer edit with a partner using ‘two students to follow in addition to verbal
two faces stars and a wish’ framework. instruction:
- Are they repeating words? - Giant Paddle Pop stick (the
Chapter 3 Close Reading – - Do sentences make more sense if they magical wand core) – choose one
Suspense: are reordered? of your highlighted quotes from
Teacher reads through extract - Is there a better word for that? the reading you find most
(displayed on the board using interesting. Using your table

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

projector), students follow along Students then rewrite the line where the textas, write this on your paddle
listening to the way sentences are change has been made. pop stick.
read and use their textas to highlight - Colourful Origami paper (the
any words or phrases that the author Break: wand wood) – Name the
uses to create suspense. Students make comparisons between chapters technique in this quote and its
These may include what: of the book and there matching scenes in the effect on readers which we spoke
a) They know to be a literary film. Students note conventions of film and about earlier. Wrap this around
device or technique books and highlight them in their table. your paddle pop stick.
b) They think may be a literary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXvlqsSe - Post-It note (the spell) - How does
device/technique J7Q this technique position Malfoy as
c) Stand out - have an effect on What are some differences between the film an unlikable character to readers?
them as the reader version of this scene and the book’s What does this say about him?
Ask for student examples, using description? Write one to two sentences on
whiteboard markers to mimic their Hagrid is described in the book as a giant with your post-it note.
highlighting on the board. The a big bushy beard, and is portrayed as - Pipe cleaners to connect spells to
teacher draws attention to the powerful and mysterious, for example when, wands.
following in particular and using “He bent down over the fireplace, they Using the physical wands, have students
active questioning and examples couldn’t see what he was doing but when he explain some of the examples they chose.
prompts students to question how drew back…there was a roaring fire there” – Displaying the PETAL framework on the
these techniques make them feel. how does the film scene set Hagrid up as board (scrolled down from the extract
mysterious? projection), ask students to try match the

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Includes: Rhetorical question, part of the wand with a part of the PETAL
truncated sentences, onomatopoeia, framework.
alliteration, pathetic fallacy - Giant Paddle Pop stick (the
magical wand core) – Evidence
Peel Paragraph PowerPoint: - Colourful Origami paper (the
Remind students of their PETAL wand wood) –Technique
paragraph framework and access to - Post-It note (the spell) – Analyse
HAPARA and show them the ‘Joint (refer students to the question – explain
Construction Sentence Starters’. this is the Point)

Joint Construction Sentence Starters Using their PETAL wands, their PETAL
Scaffolds on HAPARA, and the PETAL
1. J.K. Rowling uses language Sentence Starters Scaffold displayed on
to create an environment of the board, students convert their wands
suspense in Harry Potter. into a PETAL paragraph to answer the
2. This can be seen in chapter question:
3, where Rowling describes How does the author use language to
the countdown to Harry’s position Malfoy as an unlikable character
birthday in the seaside to readers?
shack: “

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

3. The use …. emphasizes the


suspense in the scene,
4. as it suggests…. Rowling’s
use of … therefore develops
uncertainty within the reader
and Harry, (tell us the effect
of this?)

Evidence of Reading progress recorded Reading progress recorded Reading progress recorded
Learning Annotated close reading handouts PETAL scaffold filled out in active HAPARA Annotated close reading handouts cited
collected for use the next lesson document when leaving class
PETAL scaffold filled out in active PETAL draft paragraph written under PETAL Completed PETAL wand scaffold
HAPARA document scaffold creations
PETAL paragraph re-written under PETAL PETAL paragraph written out in active
draft paragraph HAPARA document

Resources Chromebooks Sentence starters scaffold + PETAL scaffold Sentence starters scaffold + PETAL
Projection Chromebooks scaffold
PowerPoint Slides + PETAL Chapter 3 close reading handouts Chromebooks
scaffold + sentence starter scaffold YouTube access to video Close Reading Printout
Chapter 3 close reading handouts Textas

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Textas Instructions on board (to be


photographed) with:
Giant paddle-pop sticks
Post-It notes
Origami paper
Textas

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Week 4 Period 1 Period 2 Period 3


Topic Writing Lesson: PETAL Writing Writing Lesson: PETAL Writing – Creating Lesson: Care of Magical
Assessment Drafting Creatures – Field Journals
Key EN4-1A EN4-1A EN4-6C
Outcomes EN4-3B EN4-2A

Key How am I progressing with my ability How do I incorporate my literary How does my personal background or
Concepts to identify and annotate literary techniques and close readings into my interests link with the mythology in Harry
devices? paragraphs? Potter?

How do I answer my assignment What aspects to my writing can I change to What does the use of mythology in Harry
question? express myself clearer? Potter contribute to credibility of The
Wizarding World?
How can I make my paragraph
sentences flow better?
Learning Chapter 12 Close Reading: - scaffolded PETAL Writing: Students open the Magical Journal
Experiences techniques at bottom of sheet Using any of their completed close reading Worksheet, and walk them through the
Anagram annotations, students can choose to either: serious task set to them by Newt
Imagery Transform their PETAL plans from Scamander himself.
Dialogue yesterday’s lesson into a proper paragraph

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CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Narration OR From the below list, students create a


Adjective – 3 examples Work on their assessment writing profile for a magical creature for our
Rhetorical Question submissions adventurers’ field journal.
Ningen – Antarctica
Writing: Drafting: Bunyip – Australia
How does the author use language to Students may choose to draft their own Yara-ma-yha-who – Australia
help us understand the emotional work, with their reflection underneath as Wendigo – America
experiences of characters in Chapter 12, performed earlier in the week Centaur – Greek
‘The Mirror of Erised’? (Assessment AND/OR Chimera – Greek
question). Peer edit their work, and document their Cerberus – Greek
changes as performed earlier in the week Rougarou – American
Students reference one technique in AND/OR Banshee – Irish
their answer, and then support their one Share this work and team-draft with Mr Chenoo – American
technique/quote with another Church or myself. Tokoloshe – South African
technique/quote from the close reading. Mermaid – European
Students complete these answers in Impundulu – Southern African
their PETAL scaffold, using their: Kitsune Fox – Japanese
- Sentence starters scaffold Nian – Chinese
- ‘Linking Words scaffold
Students work in pairs, as an illustrator
and a researcher to produce their one

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Peer Edit: page contribution to the ‘Fantastic Beasts


Two stars one wish with a partner– how and Where to Find Them – Muggle
well did their sentence starters flow? Mythology Edition’. Students have the
What linking words from the scaffold opportunity to vote for one of the
could they use instead? Highlight creatures above, or they will be assigned
changed words. one. Students are also welcome to
investigate a magical creature from their
own culture.

This will be composed into a Wizarding


Naturalist Journal.
Evidence of Reading progress recorded Paragraph structure completed in active Annotated journal pages submitted at the
Learning Annotated close readings collected for HAPARA document end of the lesson
use next lesson Draft conferences had with students
PETAL scaffold filled out in active Assessment handed in at the end of the day
HAPARA document with highlights

Resources Chromebooks PETAL scaffold Pencils, textas, felt tip pens


Close Reading Printout Sentence starters scaffold Aged looking A4 paper
PETAL scaffold ‘Linking Words scaffold Chromebooks
Sentence starters scaffold ‘Including Quotes’ scaffold Magical Journal worksheet

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‘Linking Words scaffold

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Week 5 Period 1 Period 2 Period 3

Topic Analysing Lesson: Mythology and Analysing Lesson: Harry Potter and Creating Lesson: Characterisation
Symbolism Trauma Study

Key EN4-1A EN4-1A EN4-1A


Outcomes EN4-6C EN4-3B EN4-5C

Key What are the deeper meanings JK Rowling What emotion does JK Rowling position What are the defining traits of the
Concepts has hidden in Harry Potter’s mythological readers to feel for Harry? Harry Potter characters I find most
symbols? interesting?
What are the symbols of trauma that recur
How doe differences between original texts throughout the text? What experiences would you share?
and adaptations change meaning for the
reader? What evidence do we have to suggest What motivates your character? What
Harry Potter suffers from trauma or Post makes them interesting or complex?
What is the effect of intertextual references Traumatic Stress Disorder?
within Harry Potter?
Learning Silent Reading Time: The Mirror of Erised Close Reading: Silent Reading Time:
Experiences Reflect on the use of close reading’s
literary devices:

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Students read Philosopher’s Stone - Settling Anagram Students read Philosopher’s Stone -
Activity – their page number is recorded on Imagery Settling Activity – their page number
the reading board. Dialogue is recorded on the reading board.
Narration
Chapter 15 close reading: Adjective – 3 examples Characterisation Study:
How does the author use symbolism to Rhetorical Question Students reference their worksheet.
foreshadow changes in Harry’s life? They pick two characters, with three
- Dialogue Harry Defeats Voldemort Scene: character traits for each character –
- Repetition What are the differences between this with supporting quote.
- Symbolism scene and the telling in the novel?
- Foreshadowing - The importance of the mirror Creative writing Hogwarts Year Book
Discuss the importance of the reference to - Trauma from the past manifesting entry:
Mars shining bright. itself in the present: Recurring Who’s who in Harry Potter matching
Show Harry Potter scene. Discuss racial motifs – ache, scar, mirror exercise.
undertones for the character of Firenze. Students to match professors with
Discuss Hagrid allowing students into the Kahoot Questioning: description. Once completed they are
forest and splitting them up into two groups- Brainstorm as class how do we know to match Kingswood High School
is he really a role model? Implications of him Harry Potter is being poorly treated. Class teachers with professors and justify
being a troll. discussion on different themes first 2 their choice.
Questions for students to answer in class and chapters has. Consider the elements of
for h/w:

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1. List words and phrases to describe Harry’s life (plot devices) that create Harry Define the concept of a ‘year book’ for
Harry’s feelings in the Forbidden as the “other” students.
Forest. Give students question: Compare and Imagine you are a Hogwarts student.
2. Imagine that you are Harry. Using Contrast the treatment of Harry with the Your task is to write a yearbook entry
the word bank above, write about treatment of Dudley by Mr and Mrs for two of these character’s yearbooks.
what happened in the clearing and Dursley in the early chapters of the novel. To successfully complete this task, you
explain how you felt. Remember to must:
use ‘I’. Students respond to quiz and record 1. Recount a memory you have
3. Why are Ronan and Bane upset correct answers on the ‘Trauma Evidence’ shared with one of these
that Firenze helps Harry? What worksheet (references to trauma characters. It can be a fun
does Firenze think? throughout the series) establishing adventure in Hogwarts (like in
4. Foreshadowing is a literary device connections between Harry’s trauma. From the dungeons or on the quidditch
by which an author hints what is to this, in groups students group these pieces field) or even a detention
come. Foreshadowing is a dramatic of evidence into overarching, and assign an memory!
device in which an important plot- overarching theme to each collection. For 2. Make sure you include your
point is mentioned early in the story example: chosen character’s key
and will return in a more Physical marks or pain characteristics (from the
significant way. Recurring motifs Character Study table) in your
5. Ronan and Bane both comment References by other characters recounted memory.
that Mars is shining brightly. Mars Responses to thoughts 3. Your memory should involve
is the Roman god of war. How another Hogwarts student and a

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might that foreshadow upcoming Students ctrl-f their online novel versions professor, and be more than 100
events in the wizarding world? and search for key words in each of these words.
6. Considering how dangerous the themes, for example: “scar” or “dream”
Forbidden Forest is, why would and record how many times these occur Students handwrite these creative
Hagrid split the students into two throughout the text. Students then graph stories in pairs on craft paper with a
groups and allow one to wander these, which are collated into on character’s name and photo (pre-done).
about unsupervised? document.
7. Who could have returned Harry's
Invisibility Cloak? Who can be
excluded? What does the attached
note mean?
8. Discuss how the author uses the
forest, centaurs, and the unicorns
as symbolism, and relate that to
events and characters in the story
so far
Student Reflection – Venn Diagram
Interactive Journals
Three circles to represent the three
mythological symbolic elements in this
scene:

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- Mars – the god of war, planet of


action/desire/anger/survival
- Unicorns – purity, innocence
- Centaurs and astronomy – divination,
man and nature, access to the spiritual
world.
Annotated using the prompts:
What is happening in this scene? Write down
three important facts.
Why is the unicorn significant in this scene?
Why are the centaurs significant in this
scene?
Passed around again after our conversation

Film Viewing:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X42oyQj
0USw

How is the series of events in film version


different to the book’s description?

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The film has omitted the focus on Mars but


has emphasized the focus on the unicorn.
Which element of the Venn diagram does this
emphasise?

Walk students through Fantastic Beasts and


Where to Find Them PDF, specifically
Newt’s division between beings and beasts.
How does this add authority to the Harry
Potter series?

Evidence of Reading progress recorded ‘Trauma Evidence’ worksheet submission Reading progress recorded
Learning Interactive Journals submitted after class Thematic analysis and graph work on open Character stories submitted for
Class discussion points written on board are access HAPARA document collation
photographed

Resources Chromebooks ‘Trauma Evidence’ worksheet Characterization Analysis Worksheet


Chapter 15 Close Reading Printout Chapter 12 Annotated Close Readings Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s
YouTube and projector access for: YouTube and projector access Stone novel
Kahoot

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- The Forbidden Forest movie Online text, Harry Potter and the
adaptation Philosopher’s Stone novel
- ‘Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find
Them’ extract

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Week 6 Period 1 Period 2

Topic Analysing Lesson: Dumbledore is Death Writing Lesson: Project Based Assessment – Planning

Key Outcomes EN4-2A EN4-2A


EN4-6C EN4-4B

Key Concepts How do I construct a research argument? Who is in my group?

How does intertextuality give a text/series authority? How What ‘conspiracy theory’ are we researching and
does it construct meaning across a text? presenting on?

What evidence is there to suggest Dumbledore represents What do we need to be able to present?
‘Death’?
Learning Tales of Beatle the Bard - Reading Activity: Read assessment task to class. Show example of
Experiences Students read along with The Tale of the Three Brothers on science fair. For this assessment, you will be working in
HAPARA. groups of two to create a visual display and oral
Discuss this text we are reading as an existing text within the presentation on our current unit: Harry Potter and the
world of Harry Potter – a feature that gives both the 7-part Philosopher’s Stone.
series and this supplementary text authority.
Discuss the three brothers and the moral of the story.

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Remind students about their assessment plans and their


The Tale of Three Brothers – HPatDH Part 2 groups/organize students into assessment groups 8E.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgmEEDyeDv8 Walk students through their Planning Scaffold on
Mention to students: HAPARA, discussing suggested theories/themes to
- Non-diegetic sound – narration research using the ‘Research Scaffold Presentation’. Read
- Dialogue – established story retold over many topics.
generations in different ways.
The symbolism of the three brothers – who is who? The first step is to choose a topic that is of interest to you.
- The one who died for power Although our unit is Fantasy: Harry Potter, you can
- The one who died for lost love choose any topic of your choice. List of possible topics
- The one who greeted death as an old friend includes:
“The one wo greeted death as an old friend” – Dumbledore
as “Death” Themes: Brainstorm themes in Harry Potter as class such
as family, school, magic, role models/ mentors, love,
Tales of Beatle the Bard – Dumbledore’s notes: friendship, growing up.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmVWuswEBSk&t=10s Students in their groups add to each theme. I.e family-
Page 95/115 – should one person become the rightful owner negative and positive experiences for different family
of all three, they would become “the master of death”. members, lack of love, blood is not thicker than water,
abuse.
As each layer of evidence is gathered:
1. Dumbledore holds all three deathly hallows

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2. Dumbledore greets Harry at Kings Cross/the afterlife Teams will have 15 minutes to discuss what they plan to
3. Dumbledore’s hand in Voldemort and Snape’s deaths research and work through scaffolds to generate their
These are represented in a Venn diagram, where students thinking and planning and agree on roles.
annotate and analyse the quotes associated with these pieces
of information (labels of individual Venn circles) are After discussing their concept plans, students will have 15
evidence of this theory. minutes to work through their Resources Survey.
Evidence of Individual student Venn diagrams – completed either on Student completion of Secret Resources for Secret
Learning HAPARA or on paper Assessment Survey

Resources Tales Beatle the Bard (on HAPARA) HAPARA Planning and topic scaffold
Access to projector for display of Tales of Beatle the Bard HAPARA Research Scaffold Presentation
and YouTube clips HAPARA Secret Resources for Secret Assessment
A4 paper and textas Survey
Chromebooks Chromebooks

64
References

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Agency [ACARA]. (2016a). Critical and

Creative Thinking – General Capabilities. Retrieved August 20 2019 from

https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/general-capabilities/critical-

and-creative-thinking/

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Agency [ACARA]. (2016b). Ethical

Understanding – General Capabilities. Retrieved August 20 2019 from

https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/general-capabilities/ethical-

understanding/

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Agency [ACARA]. (2016c). Literacy–

General Capabilities. Retrieved August 20 2019 from

https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/general-

capabilities/literacy/

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Agency [ACARA]. (2016d). Numeracy–

General Capabilities. Retrieved August 20 2019 from

https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/general-

capabilities/numeracy/

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Agency [ACARA]. (2018). My School

Website: Kingswood High School. Retrieved August 18 2019 from

https://www.myschool.edu.au/school/41826

Atwell, N. (1987). In the middle: writing, reading and learning with adolescents (pp. 76-

148). Boynton/Cook.
CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Brophy, K. (2007). Workshopping the workshop and teaching the unteachable. In G. Harper

& J. Kroll (Eds.), Creative Writing Studies: Practice, Research and Pedagogy (pp.

75-87). GBR: Channel View Publications.

Dávilla, A. (2017). Book review: Understanding by design. Colombian Applied Linguistics

Journal, 19(1), 140-142.

Hanham, J., Leahy, W., & Sweller, J. (2017). Cognitive load theory, element interactivity,

and the testing and reverse testing effects. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 31(3), 265-

280.

McLeskey, J., & Waldron, N.L. (1998). The effects of an inclusive school program on

students with mild and severe learning disabilities. Exceptional Children, 64(3), 395-

405.

McLeskey, J., & Waldron, N.L. (2011). Educational programs for elementary students with

learning disabilities: Can they be both effective and inclusive? Learning Disabilities

Research and Practice, 26(1), 48-57.

Mutton, T., Hagger, H., & Burn, K. (2011). Learning to plan, planning to learn: the

developing expertise of beginning teachers. Theory and Practice, 17(4), 399-416.

Sumrall, W., & Sumrall, K. (2018). Understanding by design. Science and Children, 58(1),

48-54.

Wandor, M. (2012). The creative writing workshop: a survival kit. In H. Beck (Eds.),

Teaching Creative Writing (pp. 51-59). Palgrave Macmillan.

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005a). Essential questions: Doorways to understanding. In

Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd Edition (pp. 105-125). Alexandria, NSW:

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

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Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005b). The design process. In Understanding by Design,

Expanded 2nd Edition (pp. 254-274). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision

and Curriculum Development.

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Appendices of Original Documents:
Original Scope and Sequence

Kingswood High School – Scope and Sequence


English
2019
Short Stories/Genre Study
Stage 4 Year 8

Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
Unit title Introductio Structure Creating Narrative Language Writing Writing Adapting Genre Fiction for Film:
n to Genre setting/ Voice Techniqu Endings Process: Film Study, Adapting & Marketing
character es
T Content
Short story subversion Peer- and Self
Evaluation

e Outcomes
r (including
Life Skills)
m Summative
assessment
Pre-test Begin
first draft
First
draft due

Formative Final draft


4 assessment due

Subject Specific
Requirements
CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Kingswood High School – Scope and Sequence


English
2019
Poetry vs Music
Stage 4 Year 8
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week Week Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 Week 10
T 5 6
e Unit title Orientation +
Pretesting
Poetic /lyrical
Techniques:
Poetic /lyrical Analysi Music
forms, ng and
Decad
e/
Podcast
s:
Podcast
Drafts -
Peer
feedbac
Prese
nting
r Rhythm, Met
re &
language and poetry/
imagery. Furt music: Cultur
Pop Theme
/
Models Scaffoldi
ng and
k and
reflectio
Podc
asts
m Syllabification her PETAL e Artist Form n
techniques study
Outcomes incl
2 uding Life Skills

Formative Pretesting Drafts Reflecti


Assessment “What’s on and
better: songs peer
or poetry? feedbac
Justify your k
answer with
evidence.”
Summative Assess
Assessment ment
due
Subject Specific
Requirements

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Original Unit Plan

Harry Potter Fantasy | Stage 6 | English

Summary Duration
Harry Potter is an orphan who discovers on his eleventh birthday that his parents were magical, and that he himself is Term 2
to enrol at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Harry makes friends and enemies at this 10 weeks
amazing school and soon becomes embroiled in an unfolding mystery. A skilfully written, entertaining and highly
imaginative tale.

Unit overview Assessment overview


The activities incorporated in this unit focus primarily on Students are to create a Book Fair for ‘Harry Potter and the
characters and engaging activities for the students to bring the Philosopher's Stone’.
fantasy world to life. Activities include sorting hats, wand
For this assessment, you will be working in groups of two to create a
making, matching professors with descriptions and extended
responses. visual display and oral presentation on our current unit: Harry Potter
and the Philosopher’s Stone.

Content Teaching, learning and assessment Resources Date


Harry Potter quiz to see what students know and don’t know about harry potter, if https://www.potterm 4/04
they have read it or not, overrated, underrated etc ore.com/features/wha
Survey 10 students in the classroom to see what they know about Harry Potter. t-is-a-patronus
Harry Potter- The Patronus.
Explain what it is- embodiment of an individual’s positive feelings, such as joy or love,
used to protect an individual from danger.
Questions:

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1. List 10 adjectives or features about yourself.


2. Get a peer to select 5 from that list and then 3 themselves.
3. what creature would your patronus be and why? Outline in detail how this
creature represents you.
Fantasy 26/04
As a passage is read you will need to sketch the visualisation.
In groups you will share your sketches and discuss reasons for your interpretation.
Discussion of fantasy definition.

Give students definition: Fantasy is a fiction genre set in an imaginary universe, often
but not always without any locations, events, or people from the real world. Most
fantasy uses magic or other supernatural elements as a main plot element, theme, or
setting. Magic and magical creatures are common in many of these imaginary worlds.

Activity: What often happens in these stories? What are the common elements, the
conventions of these genres?
•https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5J4Yu9oauxY
•https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V75dMMIW2B4
•https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSzx-zryEgM

Fairytales and
Censorship Reading and discussing the stories in the Tales of Beedle the Bard(Rowling) and other
common fairy tales.
Students discuss the meaning of the stories therein and outline the definition of
censorship.
Students then create their own definition of Censorship as a class.

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Students create simple summaries of the stories and discuss what the moral lessons of
these stories are - students analyse the role of moral lessons.

COMPREHENSION
The Warlock’s Hairy Heart (pp45-60)
1) Summarise the story in 1 sentence
2) Identify the key themes/ideas in the story.
3) Dumbledores afterword gives reasons why this story has not been censored (in
the wizarding world) as much as the other stories in the novel.
- Do you agree with this statement? Why? Why not?
- Is it ok to censor stories? Provide 4 reasons to justify your response
Students summarise and compare the videos for The Three Billy Goats Gruff and The
Three Brother (JK Rowling)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OO-5KgcfHmI - billy goats


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgmEEDyeDv8 - three brothers

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Fantasy writing 2/05


activity. Do now: Go over the elements of fantasy
What is a moral? What is the moral of 3 Billy Goats Gruff? Target audience.
Show clip: Series of unfortunate events.
Students makes notes of elements of fantasy. Discussion
Group narrative:
This active will involve a story being written by 3 different people: one person writes
the exposition, the next person writes the climax and the third person writes the
resolution. Once finished, pass your book to the left so the next person continues.
Exposition: Must use 1 of the following elements of the fantasy genre:
Setting and character
Climax- The climax of the story needs to involve some sort of conflict and is the highest
point of tension.
You must use one of the following fantasy elements:
- A battle, likely between good and evil
- Magical powers at work
- Magical creatures- dragon
Sorting Hat Buzz Feed Quiz to get students into Hogwarts houses. https://www.getaway 5/05
Brainstorm qualities of the different houses as a class. today.com/blogs/2015
Read chapter 11- The Sorting Hat as class. -12-30/harry-potter-
Have Mr Brandon sing the Sorting Hat song origami-sorting-hat-
free-printable
alternative task
Reading and Students read sections of the book and answer comprehension questions focus on Harry Potter and the 8/5
Comprehension “identify” and “inference” based concepts. Philosopher’s stone

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Students make comparisons between chapters of the book and there matching scenes
in the film. Students note conventions of film and books and highlight them in their
table.
Chapter 2- Students read chapter 2. 9/05
Treatment of Brainstorm as class how do we know Harry Potter is being poorly treated. Class
Harry versus discussion on different themes first 2 chapters has.
Dudley
Give students question: Compare and Contrast the treatment of Harry with the
treatment of Dudley by Mr and Mrs Dursley in the early chapters of the novel.
Comparison Question: 10/05
between Dudley Compare and Contrast the treatment of Harry with the treatment of Dudley by Mr and
and Harry Mrs Dursley in the early chapters of the novel.
Consider the elements of Harry’s life (plot devices) that create Harry as the “other”

How is Harry One supporting quote


treated to make
him appear as
the “other”

Students construct their opinion (thesis). Then they need to include evidence from the
table, so that opinion is actually justified.

Who’s who in Harry Potter matching exercise. 11/05

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Students to match professors with description. Once completed they are to match
Kingswood High School teachers with professors and justify their choice.
Wands Pens being made into wands https://www.youtube. 12/05
Create a spell just like JK Rowling com/watch?v=vEPhYh
- Choose an english word/ term/ verb/ noun KdJ7k
- ind its root word; definition and write it down
- Make the root word sound magical and write down a spell
- DUEL Pens
arts and crafts
Creating a wand
Students use their pens and arts/crafts to create a pen.
Choose an appropriate core to fit your personality/trait
Close Study Students participate in a close study of the following chapters along with WEEK
comprehension questions to build up their knowledge of the story for their assignment 5
- - chapter 8 - the potions master
Comprehen - chapter 10 - hallowe'en
- chapter 12 - the mirror of erised
sion - chapter 15 - the forbidden forest
- chapter 16 - through the trap door
- chapter 17 - the man with two faces
Chapter 3 Read Chapter 3 individually Harry Potter book 16/05
Activity: Read assessment task to class. Show example of science fair. For this
assessment, you will be working in groups of two to create a visual display and oral
presentation on our current unit: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.

The first step is to choose a topic that is of interest to you. Although our unit is Fantasy:
Harry Potter, you can choose any topic of your choice. List of possible topics includes:
Read topics.

Themes: Brainstorm themes in Harry Potter as class such as family, school, magic, role
models/ mentors, love, friendship, growing up.

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Students in their groups add to each theme. I.e family- negative and positive
experiences for different family members, lack of love, blood is not thicker than water,
abuse.
Chapter 8 Pre-reading activity: Chapter 8 Harry Potter book 22/05

1. Prior to starting High School, which subject were u looking forward to the
most? Why
2. What is your favourite subject at school and why? http://ed.ted.com/les
3. What is your least favourite subject at school and why? sons/what-makes-a-
4. (Please do not be RUDE AND MENTION teacher’s names). hero-matthew-
winkler#watch

1. List qualities that make a hero. Definition: a person who is admired for their http://ed.ted.com/les
courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities. sons/an-anti-hero-of-
Hero: one-s-own-tim-adams
● Saves lives
● Courageous
● Selfless
● Brave
● Journey/ adventure
2. List qualities that make an anti-hero. Definition: central character in a story, film, or
drama who lacks conventional heroic attributes.
Discussion: Is Snape a hero, villain or anti-hero? Justify your answer.
Read Chapter 15 as a class. Book 24/05
Discuss the importance of the reference to Mars shining bright.
https://www.youtube.
Show Harry Potter scene. Discuss racial undertones for the character of Firenze. com/watch?v=X42oyQ
j0USw

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Discuss Hagrid allowing students into the forest and splitting them up into two groups-
is he really a role model? Implications of him being a troll.
Questions
Questions for students to answer in class and for h/w:
1. List words and phrases to describe Harry’s feelings in the Forbidden Forest.
2. Imagine that you are Harry. Using the word bank above, write about what
happened in the clearing and explain how you felt. Remember to use ‘I’.
3. Why are Ronan and Bane upset that Firenze helps Harry? What does Firenze
think?
4. Foreshadowing is a literary device by which an author hints what is to come.
Foreshadowing is a dramatic device in which an important plot-point is
mentioned early in the story and will return in a more significant way.
5. Ronan and Bane both comment that Mars is shining brightly. Mars is the
Roman god of war. How might that foreshadow upcoming events in the
wizarding world?
6. Considering how dangerous the Forbidden Forest is, why would Hagrid split
the students into two groups and allow one to wander about unsupervised?
7. Who could have returned Harry's Invisibility Cloak? Who can be excluded?
What does the attached note mean?
8. Discuss how the author uses the forest, centaurs, and the unicorns as
symbolism, and relate that to events and characters in the story so far.

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Watch Harry Students watch Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s stone. 30/05
Potter
ACCEPTANCE https://photofunia.co
m/results/58e2f53c08
9f7a97bb8b45be

Harry Potter Activity: Root words http://blog.oxforddicti


spells’ Make up five magical spells. For each spell, identify what your spell will do and the onaries.com/2013/07/
root words “incantation” of two to three words that the witch/wizard would say to make it spells-harry-potter/
happen. The words don’t have to be real, but they do have to have a root word that
relates to the magic spell.

For example:
“Objecto revelus” would make an object appear out of nowhere. The root of objecto is
object and the root of revelus is reveal.

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Original Assessment Task Part A

No rubric received.
CTL Assessment One: Report Liam Culhane 18361777

Original Assessment Task Part B

No rubric received.

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Original Assessment Task Part B – differentiated by mentor teacher Mr Church

Ok, then. We are going to make a little research


presentation. You’re going to put it together over the
next few weeks and display your research onto an A2
coloured card board thing.
The details are:
 In groups of no more than 3 (you can ride solo if you want, too)
you will come up with a “Fan Theory” about the Harry Potter
Series, like “Harry Potter is a Bad Friend” - or anything you like,
really.

 Then you’ll start putting together evidence - This is the writing


part of the assessment - you can use quotes from the books too.
I personally recommend you write your evidence like it’s a
PETAL paragraph, but you can be more informal if you like, as
long as it makes sense!
399 words minimum
 You’ll also need pictures to help illustrate the point you are trying
to make. These can be hand drawn or printed off the net. They can
be direct from canon, or from other sources too.
4-6 pictures total
 On the day (and probably the days after) your group will be
required to present and display your findings. It is expected
your group will outline your investigation for a minimum of 2
minutes and a maximum of 6 minutes.

 The presentations and therefore, the due date for the task, will be
the Thursday and Friday of week 8 (6/12 & 7/12)

You will be marked on:


 The depth of your research
 The originality of your idea
 The structure and organisation of your evidence
 The control of your language in your written work
 How interesting, engaging and pretty your display is
PLS NOTE: We will not mark the quality of the spoken presentation, but if you are not helping
out your friends then that might suggest that you just kicked back and let them do the work,
which is a no-no.

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