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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

CHESS
Unit 3 – Indoor Recreational Activities

MR. CARLO JUSTINO J. LUNA


Malabanias Integrated School
Angeles City
HISTORY
ORIGIN
• Chess is a game that has been played for
Brief History centuries and was thought to have
of Chess originated in India over the 15th
century.
• Long ago, it was considered a game
reserved only for Kings and members
of the upper classes.
• Nowadays, chess is played by common
people even at early age.
ORIGIN
• The modern design of chess pieces
Brief History bears the name Staunton, who was an
of Chess English master in the mid-18OO's.
• These are the type of pieces that are now
used in all tournaments worldwide.
ANDERSSEN
• London Tourney – the first
Brief History international chess tournament played in
of Chess 1851
• Adolf Anderssen – a German who
won the game, London Tourney.
• He became the unofficial best chess player
of the world because he did not receive
any award or title.
MORPHY
• Paul Morphy – the first great
Brief History American-born chess player
of Chess
• Paul traveled to Europe in the 185O's,
where he beat all challengers, including
Adolf Anderssen.
• However, the English champion of the time
(Staunton) refused to play with him, so
Morphy never became a world chess
champ.
STEINITZ
• The first official championship chess
Brief History tournament was played in 1866 in
of Chess London, with sand clocks to restrict the
length of a game.
• Steinitz – a Bohemian (Czechoslovakian)
Jew who won the game
• He became the world's first official chess
champion, holding this title until 1894.
TODAY
• Recently, Russia dominates the game of
Brief History chess. This results from the establishment
of Chess of government schools for talented chess
players after the communist revolution of
1917.
• Since 1927, many of the top chess players
have been citizens of the former USSR, and
include: Tal, Alekhine, Petrosian, Spassky,
Smyslov, Anatoli Karpov, and Gary
Kasparov.
GOAL
• Chess is a game played between two
GOAL opponents on opposite sides of a board
containing 64 squares of alternating
colors. Each player has 16 pieces: 1
king, 1 queen, 2 rooks, 2 bishops, 2 knights,
and 8 pawns.
• The goal of the game is to checkmate
the other king. Checkmate happens when
the king is in a position to be captured (in
check) and cannot escape from capture.
CHESS
PIECES
CHESS
PIECES Pieces
on the
Board

White
Diagram
Pieces

Black
Diagram
Pieces

King Queen Bishop Knight Rook Pawn


⊙The King’s crown has a
King rounded shape. King’s has a
& Queen cross on top of their crown.

⊙The Queen’s crown has


a pointed shape.

King Queen
The cleft
between the front
and back of the
Mitre became the

Bishop diagonal cut in the


Bishop chess piece.
These are
lappers, not
“feet”

A Bishops’ Mitre Chess Bishop


Clipart courtesy FCIT, http://etc.usf.edu/clipart for print diagrams
⊙ The shape of the Bishop used in printed chess
diagrams is based on the Bishop’s Mitre, a
liturgical headpiece worn by the bishop when
exercising his office.
⊙ Two bands called “lappers” hang from the
back of the Mitre down onto the shoulders.
Knight

Statue, Doncaster Knights Chess Knight


Rugby Club for print diagrams
© Copyright Dave Pickersgill and licensed for
reuse
⊙The shape of the Knight used in
printed chess diagrams is the head
of a Knight’s horse.
Rook

Winsor Castle Chess Rook


© Derek A R., 2005 licensed for reuse for print diagrams
⊙ The shape of the Rook used in printed
chess diagrams is a circular tower
from a castle.
Pawn

Pikeman’s Armor, 1600-1630 A.D. Chess Pawn


© mharrsch, licensed for reuse for print diagrams
⊙Swiss infantry formed pike squares of 100 infantry men
in a 10 x 10 array, each holding a long pointed staff. A
well-drilled pike square was impenetrable by cavalry
and very mobile.
⊙Notice how the pikeman’s helmet and armor
looks like a pawn.
Pike
Square
CHESS BASICS
⊙How to Set Up the Chess Board
CHESS
BASICS
⊙Basic Rules
 How the Pieces Move
 Rules for Castling
 En Passant Pawn Captures
 Checkmate – How a game is won
 The Ways to Draw a Game
SETTING UP A CHESS BOARD
“White to the right”
CHESS Put the white corner to
BASICS
the right side

Switching this can make a


game invalid.

If the board has letters,


they should read A-H for
the white player.
SETTING UP THE PIECES
“Queen on her color”
CHESS ⊙ White Queen is on a
BASICS white square.
⊙ Black Queen is on a
shaded square.

“A lady wants her shoes


to match her dress.”

Check this before you


start the game.
PIECES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
“Add the pieces in
CHESS alphabetical order, going
BASICS out from the King &
Queen.”
Bishops next to K & Q
Knights next to Bishops
Rooks in the Corners

Switching a Bishop and


a Knight is a common mistake in
setting up the board.
ADD THE PAWNS IN FRONT

CHESS
Now the board
BASICS is ready to play
chess!
RULES FOR SETTING UP BOARD

CHESS  White (corner) to the right


BASICS  Queen on her color
 Add pieces alphabetically from the
center
 Pawns in Front
HOW THE PIECES
MOVE
MOVING ROOKS
Rooks move to vacant
squares in a
horizontal or vertical
straight line.

Rooks must stop


before their own
pieces, or they can
capture an
opponent’s piece and
occupy that square.
MOVING BISHOPS
Bishops move to
vacant squares in a
diagonal straight line.

Bishops must stop


before their own
pieces, or they can
capture an
opponent’s piece and
occupy that square.
MOVING KNIGHTS
Knights move in an
“L”, two squares in
one direction and one
square at a right
angle.

Knights jump over


pieces of any color.

Knights can capture opponent’s pieces, but


not their own pieces.
MOVING THE QUEEN
The Queen combines
the moves of the
Rook and the
Bishop. The Queen
moves to vacant
squares in a straight
line.
The Queen must stop
before her own pieces,
or she can capture an
opponent’s piece and
occupy that square.
MOVING THE KING
The King moves
one square in any
direction, but
cannot stay in or
move to a square
under attack by an
opposing piece, or
occupy a square
that has one of his
own pieces.
MOVING THE KING
The King may
capture an
unprotected piece,
even if it is
attacking him.

Castling is done
with both the King
and Rook in the
same move.
MOVING PAWNS
Pawns move
forward, either one
or two empty
squares on their
first move, and only
one empty square
after that.
MOVING PAWNS
Pawns may capture
opponent’s pieces
that are one
diagonal square in
front of it.

A Pawn cannot
capture a piece
directly in front of
it.
“EN PASSANT” CAPTURE
Pawns allowed able to take
an opponent’s pawn “en
passant”
(French for “in passing”).

When the opponent’s pawn


moves two squares, the pawn
can captures as if the pawn
only moves one square.
“EN PASSANT” CAPTURE
This en passant capture
MUST be done immediately
(on the very next move), or
the option to capture this
way is lost.
RULES FOR CASTLING

1. The King & Rook have not yet


CASTLING
moved in the game.
2. All squares between the King
and Rook are empty.
3. The King is not in check.
4. The King does not move to or
move over a square that is in
check.
CHECKMATE AND WHEN TO
RESIGN
CHECKMATE  Checkmate is when one player’s King is
threatened and there is no legal move
to meet the threat.
 The player giving checkmate wins the
game.
 A player can resign when their position
is hopeless. It is a loss, but it saves time
& shows they knew they lost.
4 WAYS TO DRAW A GAME

1. By agreement with your opponent


DRAW
2. Repeating the same position three
(3) times, with the same person to
move and the same possible moves
3. Stalemate: The player to move has
no legal moves and is not in check
4. The 50-Move Rule: 50 moves
without a check or a piece being
captured
ABOUT DRAWS
 To request a draw:
DRAW 1. You must be the player to move
2. Make your move
3. Offer a draw before touching the
clock. The offer is considered on
your time, not your opponent’s time.
 If your opponent offers a draw, he
often thinks he is losing. Check what
winning chances you have.
50-MOVE DRAW EXAMPLE
 The opposite-color
50-MOVE Bishops can avoid
DRAW each other, and
avoid capture by the
King forever.

 This will be a draw


eventually, if one is
not offered and
accepted.
PERFORMANCE
PERFORMANCE
1. Name each chess piece.
APPLICATION 2. Set up the chess board.
3. Demonstrate how each chess piece
moves.
4. Demonstrate castling and en passant
capture.
5. Explain the four rules in castling.
6. Demonstrate on a chess board four
ways a chess game can end in a draw.
THANKS! PHYSICAL EDUCATION

CHESS
Unit 3 – Indoor Recreational Activities

MR. CARLO JUSTINO J. LUNA


Malabanias Integrated School
Angeles City