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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

The Disaster Preparedness Implemented by Quezon City High School as

Perceived by Selected Teachers and Students S.Y. 2017-2018

A Research Proposal Presented to

Mrs. Grace B. Sioson

of Quezon City High School

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements in the Subject

Research

Samru Estephen N. Jetajobe

Fernand Niño Pabiona

Erica Zeta

Elvin Marco Loja

Christian Joshua Coronel

Jenefer Mae Nuñez

Cathrina Mae Bonayon

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Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTING

Abstract

This research looked upon the insight of the Disaster Preparedness

Implemented in Quezon City High School as Perceived by the Selected Teachers

and Students S.Y. 2017-2018.It pursue responses that refer to the extent of the

disaster preparedness. A survey questionnaire serves as the guide to settle data

from the respondents. Using the weighted mean and percentage system the

aftermath of the questionnaire was tabulated.

Furthermore, the findings divulge that when the respondents were

divided by their age, gender and grade level, they perceived that being prepared

to a disaster is consequential.

The most frequent problem encountered in this study were the lack of

train and experienced personnels, financial burdens and the insufficiency of the

facilities to be used.

Financial sector of the school were the first recommendation to give

importance to the study. Next one was the insufficient time the students have to

study the actions need to be done in case a scenario happened. Another

recommendation is to train teachers and facilitators to enhance their skills and

knowledge about disaster preparedness.

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Introduction

The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review of articles

that cover aspects of disaster mental health preparedness. Disasters are

circumscribed in time and place with a subsequent cascade of secondary

stressors and adversities occurring in the aftermath in which students, teachers

and other school personnel should be prepared in the scenario we presume will

occur. A disaster is a severe disruption, ecological and psychosocial, which

greatly exceeds the coping capacity of the affected facilities, resources and

community. Disasters are stressful events not onl y for individuals who suffer from

personal loss but also for the community at large (Khankeh et al., 2011; Norris et

al., 1999). Formation and responses to disaster are not abundantly explored in

most public secondary schools.

In line with the campaign of the Department of Education (DepEd) in equipping the

students with the knowledge, proper attitude and skills they must perform when

the real catastrophe happen, the government has constructed drills and seminars

that may help the students in dealing with different forms of disasters. Disaster

mental health preparedness is a significant reduction method to protect individuals

from detrimental psychological effects arising from unexpected natural disasters.

Those exercises are widely important to ESEP students because they do not have

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enough time to practice those drills all by themselves due to lack of time for school

activities.

The main purpose of this research is to know how inclusive does an ESEP student

know about a disaster and on how they can protect themselves when the tragedy

happens. Psychological attitudes play a constitutional and an essential part in

disaster research, particularly with regard to disaster response in trauma

management to the people who are affected by natural disasters and also

providing counseling and therapy services. This research may also inspire

teachers, school personnel, and other school assistance to be safe and on how

can they protect their selves when the disaster happened likewise they must know

on how can they guide their students in doing everything they learned from the

drill and seminars that the government provides. Psychological preparedness can

help people to think logically and wisely, which in turn may decrease the risk of

severe injury and loss of life. Therefore, individuals and communities need to

prepare psychologically for confronting a disaster. People are not fully aware of

disasters and the mental effects on human’s health, so natural disaster mental

health preparedness is frequently unnoticed due to the more immediate and basic

physical needs in disaster situations. The main concern involved in the community

mental health preparedness investigations is the lack of context-bound tools to

evaluate this important issue based on a clear conceptual definition.

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Background of the Study

The cornerstone of disaster management policy in the Philippines dates

back to 1978 when Presidential Decree No. 1566 was enacted, which called for

the strengthening of Philippine disaster control and capability and establishing the

national program on community disaster preparedness. By encouraging self-help

and mutual assistance, thus, primary responsibility was placed upon LGUs,

especially officials such as the Governor, City or Municipal Mayor, and the

Barangay Captain. In planning and actual operations, inter-agency and multi-

sectoral coordination was required to optimize utilization of resources, LGUs were

directed to utilize local resources fully before support from the national

government can be sought. As a signatory to the Hyogo Framework for Action

(HFA), the Philippine Government, through the then National Disaster

Coordinating Council (NDCC) has adopted the HFA five priorities for action by

developing and enhancing current plans, programs, and activities on disaster risk

reduction.

In June 2007, NDCC initiated through 7 the Partnership for Disaster

Reduction in the Southeast Asia Phase 4 Project (PDRSEA 4), the formulation of

the Philippine National Strategic Plan on Community-Based Disaster Reduction

Management (CBDRM) that outlined activities in establishing an effective system

to promote CBDRM.

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The same is true with the country being a signatory to the ASEAN

Agreement on Disaster Management and Emergency Response (AADMER). The

major shift of the disaster management strategy of the country bored down to the

smaller political subdivisions of the land. At the local level, a Local Disaster Risk

Reduction and Management Fund (LDRRMF) is appropriated amounting to not

less than 5 percent of the estimated revenue from regular sources as mandated

under the Local Government Code of 1991 to support disaster risk management

activities such as, but not limited to, pre-disaster preparedness programs including

training, purchasing lifesaving rescue equipment, supplies and medicines, for

post-disaster activities and for the payment of premiums on calamity insurance. In

the same way as at the national level, 30 percent of the amount appropriated for

the LDRRMF is allocated as Quick Response Fund (QRF). Before 2010, most of

the remaining fund was used for post-disaster activities. With the enactment of the

disaster risk reduction and management law, it is 8 now specified that 70 percent

of the LDRRMF can be allocated for pre-disaster preparedness activities.

An online news article about a disaster preparedness seminar in Manila for

barangay officials published last March 8, 2013 by www.journal.com.ph and

written by Itchie Cabayan began with this statement: “By next month, all

barangays in Manila will be prepared to face any disaster within their jurisdiction.”

Then a typhoon-induced habagat coupled with monsoon rains came down on the

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greater part of Luzon on the third week of August this year which practically halted

all economic activities and public services in Manila, and may have resulted to a

considerable damage to property, buildings and structures, as well as

infrastructures. These two events and other circumstances exposed the level of

implementation of R.A. No. 10121, both from the side of the implementers and

from the side of the affected communities. The urgent need to properly assess the

preparedness of the barangay is as real as the disaster risks it has to face day-in

and day-out, from season to season.

Especially so if one is living near or within the port area where the

community is susceptible to flooding, sanitation and waste problems as well as the

prevalence of diseases. 9 Henceforth, as expressly provided for under Section 12

(a) of Republic Act No. 10121, also known as the Philippine Disaster Risk

Reduction and Management (PDRRM) Act of 2010, approved May 27, 2010:

“There shall be established a Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management

Office (LDRRMO) in every province, city and municipality, and a Barangay

Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Committee (BDRRMC) in every

barangay which shall be responsible in setting the direction, development,

implementation and coordination of disaster risk management programs within

their territorial jurisdiction.” The composition of the Local Disaster Risk Reduction

and Management Council (LDRRMC) reflects the comprehensiveness as well as

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the complexities of disaster risk reduction and management. While Section 5 of

the Implementing Rules and Regulations of R.A. No. 10121 defines the BDRRMC,

to wit: “It shall be a regular committee of the existing BDC (Barangay

Development Council) and subject thereto.

The punong barangay shall facilitate and ensure the participation of at least

two (2) CSO (Civil Society Organization) representatives from existing and active

community-based people’s organizations representing the most vulnerable and

marginalized groups in the barangay.” This 10 provision further strengthens the

selection of the barangay to be included in the study. Also, the aforementioned

IRR aims to strengthen “…the local government units (LGUs) together with partner

stakeholders, to build the disaster resilience of communities, and to institutionalize

arrangements and measures reducing disaster risks, including projected climate

risks, and enhancing disaster preparedness and response capabilities at all

level…” Disaster preparedness, as operationally defined in the thesis, consists of

“the knowledge and capacities developed by government, professional response

and recovery organizations, communities and individuals to effectively anticipate,

respond to, and recover from – the impacts of likely, imminent or current hazard

events or conditions.” It also adds that preparedness is “based on a sound

analysis of disaster risk, and good linkages with early warning systems, and

includes such activities as contingency planning, stockpiling of equipment and

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supplies, the development of arrangements for coordination, evacuation and

public information and associated training and filed exercises.”

Disaster risk reduction, on the other hand, is considered a challenge to

development at the global, national, local, community and even individual level.

This study, therefore, is particularly focused on the level of preparedness of 11

Barangay No. 649, Zone 68, Manila as stipulated in their respective Barangay

Risk Reduction and Management Plan and as implemented by its BDRRMC. The

role of the barangay in disaster risk reduction and management cannot be

understated.

In Section 384 of the Republic Act No. 7160, also known as the Local

Government Code of 1991, it is provided, thus, that “as the basic political unit, the

barangay serves as the primary planning and implementing unit of government

policies, plans, programs, projects, and activities in the community xxx.” While (6),

Section 389 of the same Code provides that the Punong Barangay as the chief

executive officer of the community “organized and lead an emergency group

whenever the same may be necessary for the maintenance of peace and order or

on occasions of emergency or calamity within the barangay xxx.” Historical

background of the selected community – BASECO, or the Bataan Shipyard and

Engineering Company, was formerly known as NASSCO (National Shipyard and

Steel Corporation).

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The area covers five shipyard centers in Manila: Bataan, Iligan, Punta, Sta.

Ana, Pandacan, and North Harbor. 12 Its first inhabitants were fisherfolk from the

Visayas (mostly from Samar) and Bataan who built “staging posts” or temporary

huts while fishing in the area. Later, the relatives of the caretakers and the stay-in

guards of the shipping companies in the BASECO Compound began to reside

there. In 1982, BASECO was officially declared Barangay 649, Zone 68. In 1986,

the government, under the administration of then President Corazon C. Aquino,

sequestered the shipping facilities formerly acquired by the Romualdez family

(during the Marcos era), which were believed to be part of the ill-gotten wealth of

the Marcos family. The series of informal settlement demolitions in Quezon City

and other parts of Metro Manila between 1990 and 1993 accelerated the growth of

the barangay as it became the government’s relocation site for the evicted slum

dwellers.

Further contributing to the sudden increase in population are the

“professional” squatters in the area, who sell houses for PhP1,000 to PhP5,000 to

those looking for a permanent residence there. With a total land area of

approximately 52 hectares, BASECO is located at South Harbor, Port Area,

Manila. Its largest portion lies within the eastern part of Manila Bay, beside the

mouth of Pasig River, bordering the northeast coast of the river and straddling the

northern and southern boundaries of Manila. 13 There are three (3) major roads

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leading to BASECO Compound: 2nd Street, Muelle del Rio, and Tacoma. From

Manila City Hall, one can reach the barangay by taking a jeep to Pier South and a

tricycle (three-wheeled motorized vehicle) at the BASECO tricycle terminal

besides the Red Cross building along Bonifacio Drive.

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Conceptual Framework

Input Process Output

 Experiences  Effective
of teachers implementation
and students of disaster
 The behavior Manual for disaster preparedness in
of students QCHS
preparedness as
and teachers
perceived by the  The behavior of
 Strategy and following teachers and the teachers and
operation
students students after
management
the disaster

 Standard in
personal needs

Feedback
Figure 1: The Research Paradigm

Figure 1 is the Research Paradigm of this study. The INPUT box includes

the experiences and behaviors of teachers and students and the strategy and

operation management implemented by the school.

The PROCESS box contains the manual for disaster preparedness as

perceived by the following teachers and students.

The OUTPUT box presents the effective implementation of disaster

preparedness of Quezon City High School students and teachers.

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Rationale

This research focus on the disaster preparedness of the students

implemented in Quezon City High School as perceived by selected teachers and

students. Disaster is a type of situation that can affect our lives. Strengthening

disaster prevention, mitigation and preparedness is one of the key strategies to

address the weaknesses of children in and out of school. With the increasing

impact of climate change, it is important to raise children's awareness and ability

to prepare for and manage possible disasters and / or emergencies. It also

prepares for influencing family preparation while students can share and apply

their home lessons.

Quezon City High School is one of the secondary schools in Quezon City

that conducts preparatory and preventive activities when there is a disaster and

one that can be handled when there is a disaster. The Department of Health

(DOH), the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), the

Department of Science and Technology (DOST), the Philippine Coast Guard, the

National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) Armed

Forces of Philippine and many more. Another problem is the lack of cooperation

and disregard for programs and activities that are enforced. They are important to

know, to prepare and survive the disaster that is coming.

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Based on the situation mentioned the following questions were raised:

 Why is disaster preparedness important?

 Will the students and teachers be prepared for the upcoming disaster if they

are cooperating with activities and programs?

 There are other ways to survive the disaster other than participating in
activities?

Statement of the Problem


This study aims to find out the disaster preparedness of Engineering and

Science Education Program (ESEP) students in Quezon City High School as

perceived by selected students, school year 2017-2018.

Specifically, it attempted to find the answer to the following question.

1. What is the demographic profile of the respondents in terms of:

a.) Age

b.) Sex

c.) Grade level

2. Did the school ready for disasters?

3. Does the people always have a communication even disasters occur?


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Significance of the Study

Natural disasters can be especially traumatic for children and youth.

Experiencing a dangerous or violent flood, storm, or earthquake is frightening

even for adults, and the devastation to the familiar environment (i.e., home and

community) can be long lasting and distressing. Often an entire community is

impacted, further undermining a child's sense of security and normalcy. These

factors present a variety of unique issues and coping challenges, including issues

associated with specific types of natural disasters, the need to relocate when

home and/or community have been destroyed, the role of the family in lessening

or exacerbating the trauma, emotional reactions, and coping techniques.

Students. When a hurricane strikes, victims experience intense thunder,

rain, lightning, and wind. So the students importantly know what preparedness will

they do because consequently, startle reactions to sounds may be acute in the

months that follow. Among a few children subsequent storms may trigger panic

reactions. Immediate reactions to hurricanes can include emotional and physical

exhaustion. In some instances children may experience survivor guilt (e.g., that

they were not harmed, while others were injured or killed).

Teachers. Some natural disasters can be predicted, giving schools

enough warning to evacuate or take other safety precautions, but others can

happen unexpectedly or go through rapid changes that suddenly put a school in


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danger. The first step schools should take in preparing for these types of

emergencies is to assess the natural disaster risks in their areas. So the teacher

need to know about the disaster preparedness and they will passed what is they

understanding to the parents, and students.

Administrators. Schools can help play an important role is in this process

by providing a stable and familiar environment and by giving knowledge to the

administrators passed to the students. Through the support of caring adults school

personnel can help children return to normal activities and routines (to the extent

possible), and provide an opportunity to transform a frightening event into a

learning experience.

Future researchers. Children will look to the research study to have their

ideas and significant adults in their lives for guidance on how to manage their

reactions after the immediate threat is over. Parents, teachers, and other

caregivers can help children and youth cope in the aftermath of a natural disaster

by remaining calm and reassuring children that they will be all right. Immediate

response efforts should emphasize teaching effective coping strategies, fostering

supportive relationships, and helping children understand their reactions.

Issues Associated With Specific Disasters Hurricanes. Usually hurricanes

are predicted days to weeks in advance, giving communities time to prepare.

These predictions give families time to gather supplies and prepare. At the same
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time, however, these activities may generate fear and anxiety. Although

communities can be made aware of potential danger, there is always uncertainty

about the exact location of where the hurricane will impact.

Scope and Delimitation

This study focused on the disaster preparedness of fifty (50) selected

students of Quezon City High School, school year 2017 – 2018 particularly those

who are part of Engineering Science Educational Program (ESEP) since they

have more school-related activities and have limited time to take part in the drills

or to be part of symposiums or seminars about disaster preparedness.

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Definition of Terms

The following terms are defined operationally based on how they are used in

this study.

Catastrophe. It is an event causing great and often sudden damage or

suffering; a disaster.

Circumscribed. It means restrict (something) within limits.

DepEd(Department Of Education). The Department of Education is the

executive department of the Philippine government responsible for ensuring

access to, promoting equity in, and improving the quality of basic education.

Disaster. A sudden event, such as an accident or a natural catastrophe,

that causes great damage or loss of life.

Earthquake. An earthquake is the shaking of the surface of the Earth, resulting

from the sudden release of energy in the Earth's lithosphere that creates seismic

waves.

Ecological. Relating to or concerned with the relation of living organisms to one

another and to their physical surroundings.

Nature. Nature, in the broadest sense, is the natural, physical, or material world or

universe. "Nature" can refer to the phenomena of the physical worlds, and also to

life in general. The study of nature is a large part of science.

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Natural Hazard. Natural hazards are naturally occurring physical phenomena

caused either by rapid or slow onset events which can be geophysical

(earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, and volcanic activity), hydrological

(avalanches and floods), climatological (extreme temperature, drought and

wildfires), meteorological ( cyclones and storms/wave surges) or biological

(disease epidemics and insect/animal plagues).

Occurrences. The fact or frequency of something happening.

Prediction. A thing predicted; a forecast.

Relocate. Move to a new place and establish one's home or business there.

Resilient. Able to withstand or recover quickly from difficult conditions.

Technology. Technology is the collection of techniques, skills, methods,

and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the

accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigations.

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CHAPTER 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

Foreign Literature

According to researchers comprehensive disaster plan is the “first major

step toward minimizing risk and optimizing recovery time following an emergency”

(Levitt, 1997). However, it appears that the majority of citizens do not prepare a

comprehensive disaster plan for their families based on past catastrophe. Apathy

contributes to indifference to disaster preparedness.

According to Auf der Heide he explains that factors of personal or public

apathy include lack of awareness, underestimation of risk, reliance on technology,

fatalism and denial, and social pressures. Governmental apathy factors also

include opposing special interest groups, lack of organized constituency to

advocate disaster preparedness, defeatism, priorities competing with “low-

probability” events, difficulty in sustaining benefits of preparedness, overestimation

of capability, the inter-governmental paradox, and ambiguity of responsibility. “Be

selective in deciding which aspects of disaster preparedness to emphasize” to

appeal to the widest range of participants to attempt to overcome the apathy factor

(Auf der Heide, 1989).

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The problem with the school and the students needs to be solved that

UNISDR (2009)has proven a serious problem that needs to be addressed as a

problem with many tasks, time problems, family problems and social problems.

Typical calamities are characterized as a result of the combination of people’s and

government ‘s weakening expectations such as students who are doing many

tasks as well as many problems. Many peoples and organizations also make a

solution like wisner that helps to solve problems and disasters. These problems

not only afflict them but also make depression and despair.

A data showed that earthquake concern was more likely among people

who were female, younger, and non-Anglo it is based in a telephone survey of

800 samples . They also found that there was a greater likelihood of preparation

for those that had more concern, were married, and had lived longer at their

present address (Dooley, 1992). Unexpected findings were the result of a study of

household preparedness and stress related to a natural disaster. The study found

that those who has participated in disaster education and engaged in household

preparedness had results of higher levels of stress (Faupel and Styles, 1993).

Specialized studies emphasize the need to consider special-needs

populations when attempting to launch an earthquake preparedness educational

campaign. The populations also includes non-English speaking residents,

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seniors, and the disabled (State of California, 1993). Other researchers have

noted a concern regarding children and pets as well.

Local Literature

It is uncertain how well disaster risk is communicated to the public, how

many projects focus on improving community knowledge on hazards and disaster

risk, and challenges remain in measuring and assessing the complex nature of all

the factors which can influence disaster risk locally. There are limited studies to

measure the combined socio-ecological resilience of the Philippines, at local and

national scales, to help decision-makers locate areas of high vulnerability.

It is uncertain how well disaster risk is communicated to the public, how

many projects focus on improving community knowledge on hazards and disaster

risk, and challenges remain in measuring and assessing the complex nature of all

the factors which can influence disaster risk locally. There are limited studies to

measure the combined socio-ecological resilience of the Philippines, at local and

national scales, to help decision-makers locate areas of high vulnerability.

Post-Haiyan surveys found that the public had not understood what “storm

surge” signified, did not necessarily know that their houses were located in a

potential storm surge area, and even expressed opinions that the risk maps may

be exaggerated. A number of NGOs, including the Philippines Red Cross, conduct

community-based vulnerability assessments to improve community awareness.


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More work on hazard sensitization and continuing to augment awareness and

knowledge of hazards and the threats they pose appear to be needed.

Disaster Preparedness provides for the key strategic actions that give

importance to activities revolving around community awareness and

understanding; contingency planning; conduct of local drills and the development

of a national disaster response plan. Risk-related information coming from the

prevention and mitigation aspect is necessary in order for the preparedness

activities to be responsive to the needs of the people and situation on the ground.

Also, the policies, budget and institutional mechanisms established under the

prevention and mitigation priority area will be further enhanced through capacity

building activities, development of coordination mechanisms. Through these,

coordination, complementation and interoperability of work in DRRM operations

and essential services will be ensured. Behavioral change created by the

preparedness aspect is eventually measured by how well people responded to the

disasters. At the frontlines of preparedness are the local government units, local

chief executives and communities. Disaster Response gives importance to

activities during the actual disaster response operations from needs assessment

to search and rescue to relief operations to early recovery activities are

emphasized.

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Foreign Studies

Disaster preparedness and planning for the physically challenged (elderly

and disabled) present additional scenarios. Special precautions for people with

impaired mobility involve letting neighbors know that what problems may be

incurred in getting out of the home. It is easier to evacuate by clearing paths,

finding alternate routes, or securing objects such as bookcases that may block

egress. Persons in a wheelchair are instructed to stay in the chair, lock the

wheels, and use their arms to cover their head.

A problem with conceiving of disaster in this way is that it becomes too

easy to imagine disaster events as isolated moments or periods lying outside the

influence of development planning. It is argued here that disasters are, on the

contrary, an outcome of processes of risk accumulation deeply embedded in

contemporary and historical development decisions. Disaster risk results from a

combination of hazards (potentially damaging event or processes) and people’s

vulnerability to those hazards. Both hazard and vulnerability are to varying extents

products of development processes. A further common perception is that disasters

are usually large-scale events involving a single hazard, such as a flood or an

earthquake. As far as scale is concerned, there is disruptions can reach disasters

status. Political spin can either exaggerate or play down the scale of a disaster,

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with an eye respectively on donor air or on private sectors investment flows. The

sole publicly accessible global database on disasters and their impacts, EM-DAT.

For people that are blind or have impaired vision, their surroundings may

be greatly disrupted by an earthquake. Objects may fall that obstruct exits during

earthquake. The vision-impaired should have an extra cane at home and at work.

Wherever they may be, things will be changed because of the earthquake and

they’ll need a cane, even if they have a seeing-eye dog. They must know

alternate escape routes at their home and at work, the ones they are used to may

be blocked (OES, 1998). Elderly citizens require many of the same precautions

as the physically challenged. A security light in each room will light up

automatically if there is a loss of electricity, and continue to operate for four to six

hours, and can be turned off by hand in an emergency (FEMA, 1985).

For people who are deaf or are hearing-impaired, the greatest threat comes

not from the effects of the quake itself, but it’s aftermath. If electrical power is out,

communicating in the dark requires a flashlight. Also, people may not realize that

deaf or hearing-impaired persons cannot hear evacuation warnings and

instructions, and may be left behind. The deaf and hearing-impaired can make

sure they have a flashlight, pencil and pad, and hearing aid batteries, next to their

bed.

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Disaster preparedness and planning for the physically challenged (elderly

and disabled) present additional scenarios. Special precautions for people with

impaired mobility involve letting neighbors know that what problems may be

incurred in getting out of the home. It is easier to evacuate by clearing paths,

finding alternate routes, or securing objects such as bookcases that may block

egress. Persons in a wheelchair are instructed to stay in the chair, lock the

wheels, and use their arms to cover their head.

Local Studies

The evidence gathered during the course of this research clearly points to

positive outcomes for children as a result of the integration of DRR into education.

While it was not always possible to document the specific outcomes, for example,

in the two country case studies where disasters had not struck since the time of

implementation, it was very clear that significant change has occurred at both the

national and the local levels, which is leading to increased education and greater

preparedness and resiliency among communities. Clearly, outcomes are

important, but there is also a growing trend to redesign evaluations to focus not

only on inputs-outputs-outcomes, but also on the changes in decision-making

processes that have facilitated the outcomes; in other words, how results are

being achieved.

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Early warning systems and evacuation plans necessarily rely on a public

who understands their risks and understand the consequence of the information

being disseminated, so that they can prepare appropriately in sufficient time. Both

an independent study and a PAGASA (the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical

and Astronomical Services Administration) program introduced community-based

monitoring and early warning of hazards into several provinces and showed these

were effective complements to traditional centralized early warning systems

because they were real-time, localized, empowered those in the best position to

undertake preparation and were more likely to be sustained.

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CHAPTER 3

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research Method and Design

Descriptive survey method of research were applied in this study.

Descriptive research is a review to portray the respondents in an authentic and

correct way. Most likely, descriptive research is all about illustrating participants

who take part in a study. Observational is one of the three ways in doing a

descriptive research, it is a detailed method of examining the participants. The

next one is the case study, it is characterized as a particular individual or in

company. And the last one is the survey, described as a concise interview or

consultation with a solitary about a specific topic. (Devin Kowalczyk, 2003).

Population and Sampling Sizes

The researchers selected twenty-seven students from Grade 7 to Grade 10

and sixteen subject teachers in Quezon City High School to become respondents

of this study.

Only those selected respondents are surveyed. Out of all the sections in

Grade 7, the researchers selected randomly 6 students. In the Grade 8, 8

students are selected. In Grade 9, the researchers surveyed 6 students. And 7

students are surveyed in Grade 10.


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The researchers requested for the list of the name, section, age, gender,

and teacher’s name of the students. And for the teachers, the researchers

requested their name, age, subject that he/she teach, gender and how many

years he/she in service to find out exactly who are respondents of this study.

Definition of Instrument

Researchers used survey questionnaires to gather data that will be used for

the study. It has several questions to be answer by the selective students and

teachers as the researchers respondent.

In the first statement, researchers asked the respondents about what will

they do if an expected scenario come,if they will be stationary and remain on their

places.

In the second statement, focused on communication availability if an

emergency and who will they communicate.

In the third statement, researchers asked if the school allowed the student

and teachers to go home and if the transportation availability.

In the fourth statement, respondents were asked if there are prepared

facilities, resources, assistance available in the school.

In the fifth statement, if they are dependent upon to someone to get through

your needs during the scenario.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
In the sixth statement, respondents were asked by the researchers if time is

one of the biggest problem.

Lastly, in the seventh statement, researchers asked the respondents if this

research will help to solve their problems in disaster preparing.

Statistical Treatment of Data

The researchers collected, tabulated, and analyzed the data carefully.

Responses to the questionnaire were statistically analyzed using the formula of:

P=F/N x 100 to get the percentage

P=percentage

F=frequency of the number of respondents every item.

N=total number of the percentage

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
CHAPTER 4

PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA

The following tables represent the results that the researchers gathered from
the data collected.

Student

Gender
Male Female Total
Grade 7 3 3 6
Grade 8 1 6 7
Grade 9 0 6 6
Grade 10 3 4 7
Table 1. In this table shows the gender, year level, and the number of
students that took the survey.

AGE
12 13 14 15 16 17 Total
Grade 7 1 5 0 0 0 0 6
Grade 8 0 0 5 1 0 1 7
Grade 9 0 0 0 0 6 0 6
Grade 10 0 0 0 2 5 0 7
Table 2. In this table shows the age of the students that took the survey.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Grade 7
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 0 ( 6 0
you are? 0%) (100%) (0%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do you 3 3 0
need to communicate? (50%) (50%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 2 3 1
transportation necessary to be use? (33.33%) (50%) (16.66%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 6 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 1 5 0
will happen? (16.66%) (83.33%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 3 3 0
6 problem you have? (50%) (50%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 1 4 1
7 when problem arisen? (16.66%) (66.66%) (16.66%)

Table 3.

In this table shows the percentage of grade 7 students who answered the
survey. Most of the grade 7 students are not prepared when the disaster comes,
base on our survey. 3 out of 6 of grade 7 students that answered are lack of time is
one of their most problems. 1 of them believed that this research will help to solve
their problem.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Grade 8
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 0 ( 7 0
you are? 0%) (100%) (0%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do you 5 2 0
need to communicate? (71.44%) (28.55%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 3 3 1
transportation necessary to be use? (42.88%) (42.88) (14.22%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 5 2 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (28.55%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 3 4 0
will happen? (42.88%) (57.11%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 5 2 0
6 problem you have? (71.44%) (28.55%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 4 3 0
7 when problem arisen? (57.11%) (42.88%) (0%)
Table 4.

In this table shows the percentage of grade 8 students who answered the
survey. Most of them know about what they will do if certain disasters came. All of
them answered sometimes in the 1st statement, they are not sure if they will
stationary and remain where they are if disasters came.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Grade 9
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 2 4 0
you are? (33.33%) (66.66%) (0%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do you 1 5 0
need to communicate? (16.66%) (83.33%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 4 2 0
transportation necessary to be use? (66.66%) (33.33%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 2 4 0
assistance available in your school? (33.33%) (66.66%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 1 4 2
will happen? (16.66%) (66.66%) (33.33%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 2 4 0
6 problem you have? (33.33%) (66.66%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 1 4 1
7 when problem arisen? (16.66%) (66.66%) (16.66%)

Table 5.

In this table shows the percentage of grade 9 students who answered the
survey. Most of them did not know what they will do during disaster because most of
them answered sometimes in all questions. Only 1 of them believed that this
research will help to solve his/her problem.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Grade 10
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 1 ( 6 0
you are? 14.22%) (85.77%) (0%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do you 3 4 0
need to communicate? (42.88%) (57.11%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 2 3 2
transportation necessary to be use? (28.55%) (42.88) (28.55%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 4 3
assistance available in your school? (57.11%) (42.88%) 0 (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 1 3 3
will happen? (14.22%) (42.88%) (42.88%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 5 2 0
6 problem you have? (71.44%) (28.55%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 2 4 1
7 when problem arisen? (28.55%) (57.11%) (14.22%)

Table 6.

In this table shows the percentage of grade10 students who answered the
survey. Most of them did not know if they will stay in their places if disasters come,
and then only one of them did not believed that this research will not help to solve
his/her problem. 5 out of 7 grade 10 students said that lack of time is one of their
biggest problems.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Teachers

Age
30-35 36-40 40-45 46-50 51-55 Total
Biology 1 0 0 0 0 1
Araling Panlipunan 0 0 1 0 1 1
Mathematics 0 1 1 1 0 3
Mapeh 0 0 0 0 1 1
English 0 0 1 0 0 1
Filipino 2 0 1 2 0 5
ICT/Tle 1 1 1 0 0 3
Table 7.

In this table shows the age of the teachers that took the survey.

Gender

Male Female Total

Biology 1 0 1

Araling Panlipunan 0 2 2

Mathematics 1 2 3

Mapeh 0 1 1

English 0 1 1

Filipino 0 5 0

ICT/Tle 0 3 3
Table 8.

In this table shows the gender of the teachers that took the survey.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Araling Panlipunan
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 1 0 1
you are? (50%) (0%) (50%)
Is communication available to you during
2 an emergency and whom do you need to 1 1 0
communicate? (50%) (50%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 2 0 0
transportation necessary to be use? (100%) (0%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 1 1
assistance available in your school? (0%) (50%) (50%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 1 1 0
will happen? (50%) (50%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 1 1 0
6 problem you have? (50%) (50%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 1 0 1
7 when problem arisen? (50%) (0%) (50%)

Table 9.

This table shows the Araling Panlipunan teachers who answered the survey. The
researchers have observed that transportations are necessary and most
recommended to use in going home when a disaster have finished.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Biology
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 0 0 1
you are? (0%) (0%) (100%)
Is communication available to you during
2 an emergency and whom do you need to 0 1 0
communicate? (0%) (100%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 1 0 0
transportation necessary to be use? (100%) (0%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 1 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 0 1 0
will happen? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 1 0 0
6 problem you have? (100%) (0%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 0 1 0
7 when problem arisen? (0%) (100%) (0%)

Table 10

This table shows the Biology teacher who answered the survey. The
researchers have observed that the answer given in number 1 which is if he/she will
be stationary and will remain where he/she is when a disaster happened is that
he/she will never do the above statement.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

English
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 0 1 0
you are? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Is communication available to you during
2 an emergency and whom do you need to 0 1 0
communicate? (0%) (100%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 0 1 0
transportation necessary to be use? (0%) (100%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 1 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 1 0 0
will happen? (100%) (0%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 1 0 0
6 problem you have? (100%) (0%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 0 1 0
7 when problem arisen? (0%) (100%) (0%)

Table 11

This table shows the English teacher who answered the survey. The
researchers have observed that she/he will be dependent in doing things to survive
when a disaster happens.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

MAPEH
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain where 0 0 1
you are? (0%) (0%) (100%)
Is communication available to you during
2 an emergency and whom do you need to 0 1 0
communicate? (0%) (100%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 1 0 0
transportation necessary to be use? (100%) (0%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 1 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you presume 0 1 0
will happen? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 1 0 0
6 problem you have? (100%) (0%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 0 1 0
7 when problem arisen? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Table 12.

This table shows the MAPEH teacher who answered the survey. The researchers
have observed that the lack of time is one of their biggest problem.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

ICT/ TLE
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain 0 1 2
where you are? (0%) (33.33%) (66.66%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do 2 1 0
you need to communicate? (66.66%) (33.33%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 2 1 0
transportation necessary to be use? (66.66%) (33.33%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 3 0 0
assistance available in your school? (100%) (0%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you 1 2 0
presume will happen? (33.33%) (66.66%) (0%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 1 2 0
6 problem you have? (33.33%) (66.66%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 1 2 0
7 when problem arisen? (33.33%) (66.66%) (0%)
Table 13.

This table shows the ICT/TLE teachers who answered the survey. The
researchers have observed that the respondents are prepared if a disaster occurred.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Mathematics
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain 0 3 0
where you are? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do 2 1 0
you need to communicate? (66.66%) (33.33%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 2 1 0
transportation necessary to be use? (66.66%) (33.33%) (0%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 3 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (0%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you 2 0 1
presume will happen? (66.66%) (0%) (33.33%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 2 0 1
6 problem you have? (66.66%) (0%) (33.33%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 0 3 0
7 when problem arisen? (0%) (100%) (0%)

Table 14.

This table shows the Mathematics teachers who answered the survey. The
researchers have observed that this research paper will help them to resolve their
problem.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Filipino
Questions Always Sometimes Never
In your expected emergency scenario
1 will you be stationary and remain 0 3 2
where you are? (0%) (60%) (66.66%)
Is communication available to you
2 during an emergency and whom do 4 1 0
you need to communicate? (80%) (20%) (0%)
If ever your school allowed you to go
3 home after disaster happened is 3 1 1
transportation necessary to be use? (60%) (20%) (20%)
During an emergency are there any
4 prepared facilities, resources, and 0 5 0
assistance available in your school? (0%) (100%) (0%)
Are you dependent upon someone or
something else to get through your
5 needs during the scenario you 0 4 1
presume will happen? (0%) (80%) (20%)
Is lack of time is one of the biggest 1 4 0
6 problem you have? (20%) (80%) (0%)
Is this research helps you to resolve 4 1 0
7 when problem arisen? (80%) (20%) (0%)

Table 15.

This table shows the Filipino teachers who answered the survey. The
researchers have observed that the needs for the disaster are limited inside the
school.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Findings

1. The most common problem of student and teachers, when it comes to disaster

preparedness are the things that they need and the knowledge a

2. About the disaster. So the government need to orient the administrators in the

school, then the teachers will guide and orient the students.

3. The secondary students can’t afford all materials that they need, when it

comes to disaster preparedness, therefore the government would supply the

schools and distribute things that they need.

4. After analyzing completed questionnaire and interviews in chapter 4 most of

the students are lack of knowledge on planning about disaster preparedness.

5. The students thought that they had enough knowledge as they rated it good

and average in the survey questionnaire.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

RECOMMENDATION

Based on the findings and conclusions, the following are recommended:

1. Engage in a whole community dialogue and build upon public-private

partnerships.

2. Enhance data-driven decisions.

3. Align incentives promoting disaster cost reduction and resilience.

4. Enable resilient recovery.

5. Support disaster risk reduction nationally.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Conclusions

The subsequent conclusions were peaked based in the significant finding:

1. There are still lots of complication as regards in the practice of the disaster

preparedness. This incorporate the insufficiency of experienced and skilled

personnel and the lack of allowance and facilities to be use.

2. It’s a huge help for this study the feedback of the respondents on how they

approach in regards the disaster preparedness.

3. Complete facilities, decent time in studying some scenarios, sufficient budget

were the dominant explication to the problems detect in implementing disaster

preparedness.

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Bibliography

Ligon, K. (2015). Disaster Preparedness Plan for the Study Abroad Student: How
to Engage Students in Hazard Preparedness. Retrieved from http://commons.cu-
portland.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1023&context=gradproj

Gregorio E. Jr. & Kobayashi J. (n. d.). Case study of the Emergency and Disaster
Preparedness, Response and Rehabilitation Capacities of Government Schools in
Philippine, and Development of Asian Statement. Retrieve from
https://www.jst.go.jp/sicp/ws2015_j-rapid_result/pdf/10_kobayashi_Grego tion
rio_web.pdf

Alcayna, T., Bollettino, V., Dy, P, & Vinck, P. (2016).Resilience and Disaster
Trends in the Philippines: Opportunities for National and Local Capacity Building.
Retrieve from http://currents.plos.org/disasters/article/resilience-and-disaster-
trends-in-the-philippines-opportunities-for-national-and-local-capacity-building/

Disaster Risk Reduction (Earthquake- A Terrifying Disaster, Flashflood- A


devastating Phenomenon). (n. d.). Retrieved from
https://ecogroup3.weebly.com/chapter-2-review-of-related-literature.html

Chapter 2 Rrl. (n. d.). Retrieved from


https://www.scribd.com/document/100289598/Chapter-2-Rrl

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Dekens, J. (2007). Local Knowledge for Disaster Preparedness: A Literature
Review. Retrieved from
https://www.preventionweb.net/files/2693_icimod8fc84ee621cad6e77e083486ba6
f9cdb.pdf

Mamogale, H. M. (2011). Assessing disaster preparedness of learners and


educators in Soshanguve North Schools. Retrieved from
https://www.ufs.ac.za/docs/librariesprovider22/disaster-management-training-and-
education-centre-for-africa-(dimtec)-documents/dissertations/2291.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Ozmen, F. (2006). The Level of Preparedness of the Schools for Disasters from
the Aspect of the school Principals. Retrieved from
https://www.preventionweb.net/files/5135_TR01EQ832-Ft.pdf

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Dear Respondent,

We, the Redfox Group 3 is conducting our research study entitled

“Disaster preparedness implemented in Quezon City High School as

perceived by selected teachers and student S.Y. 2017-2018” . In this regard,

we would like to seek your participation in the conduct of this study by answering

the questions below.

Your answers in this survey are very important. We ask that you take

your time to complete the survey. Thank you for your participation.

Respectfully yours,

Samru Estephen N. Jetajobe

Leader - Group3

Noted by:

Page | 49
QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
MRS. MARY GRACE B. SIOSON

Research Teacher

Dear Teachers,

We, the Redfox Group 3 is conducting our research study entitled

“Disaster preparedness implemented in Quezon City High School as

perceived by selected teachers and student S.Y. 2017-2018” . In this regard,

we would like to seek your participation in the conduct of this study by answering

the questions below.

Your answers in this survey are very important. We ask that you take

your time to complete the survey. Thank you for your participation.

Respectfully yours,

Samru Estephen N. Jetajobe

Leader - Group3

Noted by:

Page | 50
QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
MRS. MARY GRACE B. SIOSON

Research Teacher

Survey Questionnaire

Name:___________________________________ Sex:____________________

Age:________ Grade Level:______________

Questions Always Sometimes Never

1. In your expected emergency

scenario will you be stationary and

remain where you are?

2. Is communication available to

you during an emergency and

whom do you need to

communicate?

3. If ever your school allowed you to

go home after disaster happened is

Page | 51
QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
transportation necessary to be use?

4. During an emergency are there

any prepared facilities, resources,

and assistance available in your

school?

5. Are you dependent upon

someone or something else to get

through your needs during the

scenario you presume will happen?

6. Is lack of time is one of the

biggest problem you have?

7. Is this research helps you to

resolve when problem arisen?

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Samru Estephen N. Jetajobe

#34 Laura St. Old Balara

Diliman, Quezon City

Jetajobesamru8132@yahoo.com

A. Personal Data

Age: 14 years old

Birthdate: January 1, 2004

Civil Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Gender: Male

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: playing rubik’s cube, researching about science, watching anime, and

listening to music

B. Special Skills

-motivating other people

-solving rubik’s cube

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

C. Educational Background

Schools School Year Achievements


Elementary: 2010-2013 Grade 1- Top 1

Philippine Missionary Grade 2- Top 2

Fellowship Academy

(Grade 1-3)

Old Balara Elementary 2013-2016 Grade 3- Top 5

School (Grade 4-6) Grade 6- Top 9

High School:

Quezon City High School 2016-present Grade 7 (Top 5- With

Honor)

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Fernand Niño C. Pabiona

122 Scout De Guia Brgy.

Sacred Heart, Quezon City

fernandniniopabiona@yahoo.com

A. Personal Data

Age: 14 years old

Birthdate:May 14, 2003

Civil Status: Single

Religion: Born Again Christian

Gender: Male

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: playing chess, guitar, piano

B. Special Skills

-writing poems

-writing stories

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

C. Educational Background

Schools School Year Achievements


Elementary: 2010-2016 Grade 1- Top 8

Kamuning Elementary Grade 2- Top 6

School Grade 3- Top 5

Grade 4- Top 7

Grade 5- Top 3

High School: 2016-present Grade 7- With Honor

Quezon City High

School

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Erica Zeta

90 Magnolia St. Roxas District

Quezon City

zeta.erica.@yahoo.com.ph

A. Personal Data

Age: 13 years old

Birthdate: February 11, 2004

Civil Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Gender: Female

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: reading books and ballet dancing

B. Special Skills

-making poems

-ballet dancing
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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

C. Educational Background

Schools School Year Achievements

Elementary: 2010-2016 Grade 1-3- Top 3

General Roxas Grade 4- Top 2

Elementary School Grade 5- Top 4

Grade 6- Top 1

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
High School: 2016-present Grade 7- With Honor

Quezon City High

School

Christian Joshua C. Coronel

A-115 Nia Road, Brgy.

Pinyahan, Quezon City

christianjoshua994@gmail.com

A. Personal Data

Age: 14 years old

Birthdate: June 21, 2003

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Civil Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Gender: Male

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: playing volleyball, baseball, football, watching anime, reading manga

B. Special Skills

-drawing anime characters

C. Educational Background

Schools School Year Achievements

Elementary: 2010-2016 Grade 1- Top 3

Angustia Elementary Grade 2- Top 1

School Grade 3- Top 2

Grade 4- Top 3

Grade 5- Top 5

Grade 6- Top 2

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
High School: 2016-present

Quezon City High

School

Elvin Marco T. Loja

30Z-9 Maningning Extension

Barangay Malaya, Quezon City

@elvinmarco.loja

A. Personal Data

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Age: 13 years old

Birthdate: August 30, 2004

Civil Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Gender: Male

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: singing, acting

B. Special Skills

-sing high notes

C.Educational Background

Schools School Year Achievements

Elementary: 2010-2016 Grade 2- Top 7

Quirino Elementary Grade 3- Top 2

School Grade 4- Top 10

Grade 5- Top 10

Grade 6- Top 6

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
High School: 2016-present Best in Attendance

Quezon City High

School

Jenefer May P. Nuñez

#411th Jamboree St. Brgy.

Sacred Heart, Quezon City

Jenefermaen@yahoo.com

A. Personal Data

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Age: 14 years old

Birthdate: September 12, 2003

Civil Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Gender: Female

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: singing, dancing, listening to music

B. Special Skills

-memorizing

C.Educational Background

Schools School Year Achievements

Elementary: 2010-2016 Grade 1- Top 3

Kamuning Elementary Grade 2- Top 4

School Grade 3- Top 7

Grade 4- Top 6

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Grade 5- Top 4

Grade 6- Top 1

High School: 2016-present

Quezon City High

School

Cathrina Mae D. Bonayon

12 C Mecca Street

Cubao, Quezon City

@cathrinamaebonayon

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL

Schools School Year Achievements

A. Personal Data

Age: 13 years old

Birthdate: May 08, 2004

Civil Status: Single

Religion: Roman Catholic

Gender: Female

Citizenship: Filipino

Hobbies: singing, reading books, listening to music

B. Special Skills

-writing poems

C.Educational Background

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QUEZON CITY HIGH SCHOOL
Elementary: 2010-2016 Grade 6- Most Active

Ponciano Bernardo

Elementary School

High School: 2016-present Most Friendly

Quezon City High

School

Page | 67