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Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM

Background of the Study

Each teacher uses his/her own teaching style effectively and with mastery

of the topic. Teaching styles are the ways of teachers impart knowledge to their

students. These teaching styles also define the teachers’ methods and

behaviors in the classroom. A teaching style reflects on what the teachers’ value

in education, what methods that they believe are effective and how their

students learn their subject best.

No two teachers are alike, and any teacher with classroom teaching

experience will agree that their style of teaching is uniquely their own. An

effective teaching style engages students in the learning process and helps them

develop critical thinking skills. Traditional teaching styles have evolved with the

advent of differentiated instruction, prompting teachers to adjust their styles

toward students’ learning needs. (Gill, 2013)

Time, effort, willingness to experiment with different teaching strategies

and an examination of what is effective on teaching are the things a teacher

should consider to have an effective teaching style to his/her subject area.

Teachers often try to imitate their favorite teachers from the past but they should

also look on their strengths and capabilities. More effectively, they can develop

teaching styles in which they will maximize the time in engaging with their

students and learning. Teaching styles measure the ability of a teacher to have

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control of organization, to share large amount of information in a short period of

time, and to assess a large number of students especially on public schools.

This study focuses on the teaching styles of the teachers at Puelay

Elementary School and to determine the teaching styles and also to propose an

action plan in order to improve the teaching styles of the teachers. The

researchers will have all the licensed teachers working at the said school as their

respondents. The material needed for this study if a questionnaire which will be

answered by the respondents honestly and precisely. This study will be

conducted at Puelay Elementary School, Villasis, Pangasinan, from the month of

November 2017 up to March 2018.

However, the success of a teacher when he/she tries to influence a student

will develop from many factors. It can be assumed that using a variety of

teaching styles in different situations is likely to be more effective than the use

of a single style. A teacher should be integrated in using teaching styles after

all to be an effective one. No teacher can practice only one teaching style at all

subjects. In using teaching styles, teachers should be wise and flexible to

choose what appropriate teaching style to be used on a particular lesson or

subject. Quinonez, Natasha (February 2014) said that no two teachers will

teach in the same way, just as no two students learn something in the same

way. A teacher’s teaching style is based on their educational philosophy, their

classrooms demographic, what subject area (or areas) they teach, and the

school’s mission statement. Thornton, Paul B. (September 2013) also

aforementioned that the most effective teachers vary their styles depending on

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the nature of the subject matter, the phase of the course, and other factors. By

so doing, they encourage and inspire students to do their best at all times

throughout the semester. Teachers must recognize the diversity and

complexity in the classroom, be it the ethnicity, gender, culture, language

abilities and interests. Getting students to work and learn in class is largely

influenced in all these areas. Classroom diversity exists not only among students

and their peers but may be also exacerbated by language and cultural

differences between teachers and students.

According to Erickson (1978), the teachers, being the focal figure in

education, must be competent and knowledgeable in order to impart the

knowledge they could give to their students. Good teaching is a very personal

manner. Effective teaching is concerned with the student as a person and with

his general development. The teacher must recognize individual differences

among his/her students and adjust instructions that best suit to the learners. It is

always a fact that as educators, we play varied and vital roles in the classroom.

Teachers are considered the light in the classroom. We are entrusted with so

many responsibilities that range from the very simple to most complex and very

challenging jobs. Every day we encounter them as part of the work or mission

that we are in. It is very necessary that we need to understand the need to be

motivated in doing our work well, so as to have motivated learners in the

classroom. When students are motivated, then learning will easily take place.

However, motivating students to learn requires a very challenging role on the

part of the teacher. It requires a variety of teaching styles or techniques just to

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capture students' interests. Above all, the teacher must himself come into

possession of adequate knowledge of the objectives and standards of the

curriculum, skills in teaching, interests, appreciation and ideals. He needs to

exert effort to lead children or students into a life that is large, full, stimulating

and satisfying. Some students seem naturally enthusiastic about learning, but

many need or expect their instructors or teachers to inspire, challenge or

stimulate them. Effective learning in the classroom depends on the teacher's

ability to maintain the interest that brought students to the course in the first

place. Not all students are motivated by the same values, needs, desires and

wants. Some students are motivated by the approval of others or by overcoming

challenges.

Since 2003, many foreign professional teachers, particularly from the

Philippines, came to New York City to teach with little knowledge of American

school settings. Filipino teachers have distinct styles and expressions of

teaching. They expect that: education is interactive and spontaneous; teachers

and students work together in the teaching-learning process; students learn

through participation and interaction; homework is only part of the process;

teaching is an active process; students are not passive learners; factual

information is readily available; problem solving, creativity and critical thinking

are more important; teachers should facilitate and model problem solving;

students learn by being actively engaged in the process; and teachers need to

be questioned and challenged. However, many Filipino teachers encountered

many difficulties in teaching in NYC public schools. Some of these problems may

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be attributed to: students' behavior such as attention deficiency, hyperactivity

disorder, and disrespect among others; and language barriers such as accent

and poor understanding of languages other than English.

Schneider, Daniel K. once stated that teaching style refers to the teaching

strategies and methods employed plus use of certain kinds of rhetoric.

Marano, Marshal (1992) said that all people learn in different ways, it is

therefore essential that teachers try to incorporate as many different teaching

styles as possible into the delivery of what they are teaching. He suggests that

the concept of learning has to include positive attitudes, the ability to acquire

knowledge, allowing learners to extent their own knowledge and then applying

their knowledge to everyday life. He also believes that a teacher must develop

these concepts in order to help learners develop, and make learners learn

independently, so they may continue to develop and gather knowledge for the

rest of their lives.

There are many different approaches and theories on teaching styles.

Most agree that for all pupils to have an equal experience in education, teachers

must adapt their teaching styles so that everyone benefits within the classroom.

He suggests that lower ability pupils should be taught through closed tasks. A

closed task has a specific structure and set of instructions to give pupils a clear

idea of how a task should be approached and completed and then suggests that

higher ability pupils should experience more open-ended tasks, allowing pupils

to develop their thinking skills. This style of teaching is very much learner

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centered as the teacher must adapt their style of teaching to suit the needs of

pupils in their class.

Statement of the Problem

This study was sought to determine the teaching styles of teachers at

Puelay Elementary School.

Specifically, the researchers were sought to answer the following

questions:

1. What is the profile of the respondents in terms of :

a. age;

b. gender;

c. monthly income;

d. length of service; and

e. position?

2. What are the teaching styles of the teachers at Puelay Elementary

School?

3. Is there a significant relationship between the profile and the teaching

styles of the teachers at Puelay Elementary School?

4. What proposed action plan should be implemented in order to improve

the teaching styles of the teachers at Puelay Elementary School?

Null Hypothesis

There is no significant relationship between the profile and the teaching

styles of the teachers at Puelay Elementary School.

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Significance of the Study

Below are the individuals who will be benefited in our study.

● Teachers. The respondents, teachers of the said school, can assess

themselves on their teaching styles. Other teachers from different schools

can adopt some teaching styles which will make them more effective as

teachers.

● Students. The students will be aware of the teaching styles that their

teachers use. Also, they can suggest to their teachers to try some

teaching styles.

● Future Teachers. The future teachers can reflect on these teaching

styles and make use of them in the future. They will know which teaching

styles are appropriate to their personalities and behavior.

● Future Researchers. They can use this study as a reference and

develop their study for the improvement of it.

● Readers. This study will provide information to the readers about teaching

styles which may be helpful in assessing their former and present

teachers.

Definition of Terms

The following terms will be useful in understanding this study easier.

Advent. It is the adjusted and evolved teaching styles depending on the learning

needs of learners, from traditional to present.

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Auditory. It is where the students learn through discussion, using sense of

hearing.

Kinesthetic. It is where the teachers and students do what is being thought.

Teaching Style. It is how the teachers impart knowledge to their students in

their best ways possible depending on the subject matter and the personality of

the teachers and students.

Visual. It is where the teacher teach using words, numbers, pictures, and other

creative teaching materials.

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Chapter 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

This chapter presents the related literature and studies which will provide

more ideas about different teaching styles, as well as the theory related to the

study and the paradigm.

Related Literature

Based on the book of Grasha, Anthony F. which was published on January

2007 by Alliance Publishers, USA, entitled “Teaching with Style: A Practical

Guide to Enhancing Learning by Understanding Teaching and Learning Styles”,

there are ten categories of teaching styles. First, the Analytic or Synthetic

Approach whereas it is the ability to present and discuss theoretical issues and

new developments area from several points of view. For example, a teacher

contrasts implications of various theories. Second, Organization or Clarity that

has clear course objectives and organizes the information for students to learn.

In this style, a teacher explains material clearly and is well prepared. Third,

Teacher-Group Interaction, extent to which discussions and a mutual sharing of

ideas on issues occurs. A teacher encourages class discussions and invites

criticism of own ideas. Fourth, Teacher-Individual Student Interaction where the

instructor is approachable, interested in students, and respects them. He/She

relates to students as individuals and is accessible outside of class. Fifth,

Dynamism, also called Enthusiasm, a degree to which the instructor is energetic,

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stimulating, and enjoys teaching and is able to demonstrate that he/she enjoys

teaching the content. Sixth, the General Teaching Ability, which shows the

abilities that form a consistent pattern across different instructional styles. It

enables the teachers to stimulate intellectual curiosity of students and present

material in an interesting manner. Seventh, the difficulty of course requirements

and the amount of assigned course work called Overload, such as assigning

very difficult readings. Eighth, the Structure Style, the ability of teacher to plan

the details of class sessions and to organize a course. The teacher has

everything organized according to a schedule. Ninth, a teacher concerns the

quality of student’s work and performance and it is called Quality Style. For

instance, a teacher compliments the students when they have done well in task.

Lastly, the Student-Teacher Rapport, where the nature and quality of teacher-

student interaction is within the classroom. It is when the teacher listens

attentively to what class members have to say.

According to the book of Mishra, R.C. (2016) entitled “Teaching Styles”,

published by APH Publishing Corporation, New Delhi, there is no universal best

way to teach. There are specific methods of teaching styles included in this

book. Oral presentations, where evidence from a number of disciplines suggests

that oral presentations to large groups of passive students contribute very little to

real learning. A teacher should start off slowly, anticipate students’ anxiety, and

introduce change at the beginning of a course, to help students make the

transition from passive listeners to active participants in their own learning. Next,

demonstrations can be very effective for illustrating concepts in class, but can

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result in passive learning without careful attention to engaging students. They

can provoke students to think for themselves and are especially helpful if the

demonstration has a surprise, challenges an assumption, or illustrates an

otherwise abstract concept or mechanism. Demonstrations that use everyday

objects are especially effective and require little preparation on the part of the

faculty. Third, small group discussion sections often are used in large enrollment

courses to complement the lectures. In courses with small enrollments, they can

substitute for the lecture, or both lecture and discussion formats can be used in

the same class period. The main distinction between lecture and discussion is

the level of student participation that is expected, and a whole continuum exists.

In any case, discussion sessions are more productive when students are

expected to prepare in advance. Lastly, collaborative learning, an instructional

technique in which students work in groups to achieve a common goal, to which

they contribute in individually accountable ways.

Billington, Philomena (December 2005) wrote a book entitled “Source of Life:

Teaching Strategies Resource Book” which was published by Kagan Publishing,

USA, where lots of teaching strategy are included such as the following. The

KWL Chart that provides a structure for thought processes using inquiry and

evaluation -- know, want, and learn. A strategy that gives students the

opportunity to generate questions and responses to any given concept or

situation is called Huddle. A problem, situation or question is posed. Students

huddle together in 2, 3 or 4 to formulate responses. The Gallery Tour is

proposed to ensure that all students engage with material in a purposeful

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manner. Students feel valued by the group because they have particular

knowledge to share. An English strategy called Story Map encourages students

to transform their learning by extracting information and organizing it into a new

form. This strategy assists those students who need oral discussion to clarify

understanding. Another strategy called Reciprocal Question encourages

students to improve questioning skills to aid discovery of new meanings in texts.

Teacher models the difference between a question and a statement and

construct a series of questions. Lastly, the Problem Stories and Dilemma

Strategy which encourages deeper consideration of influences on different

people and their circumstances, in a variety of situations.

Jones and Bartlett Publisher (n.d.) located at United States, published a

journal and on the Chapter 9 entitled “Active Teaching and Learning Strategies”

includes the meaning of teaching strategies which refer to the structure, system,

methods, techniques, procedures, and processes that a teacher uses during

instruction. These are strategies that teacher employs to assist student learning.

There are many active teaching strategies and learning activities that can be

effectively used in a language diverse health education classroom. Some of the

strategies are the following. Assignments with choice strategies allow students to

decide how they will demonstrate that they have learned the required health

information and/or skill. Some students may choose to demonstrate their

learning by writing, others by speaking, drawing or illustrating, and building.

Building Teamwork is a strategy that asks small groups of students to prepare a

group resume consisting of items such as hobbies, talents, and any other

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information a student wishes to share. This strategy is designed to show the

diversity of experiences and abilities in the class. A strategy where the teacher

writes several questions about a topic on large sheets of paper posted around

the room is called Carousel Questions. Another strategy is Cooperative Learning

that involves small groups of students working together to complete a project or

task. Teachers using this instructional strategy often assign specific roles, duties,

and tasks to specific group members. Teachers should appropriately group

students based on the group task and students’ abilities. Also, Guided

Reciprocal Peer Questioning is a strategy where teachers provide students with

several sentence starters. Its purpose is to generate discussion.

A book entitled “Teaching Strategies for Intrapersonal Intelligence” was

written Armstrong, Thomas (2010). In this book says that teachers need to build

in frequent opportunities during the day for students to experience themselves

as autonomous beings with unique life histories and a sense of deep

individuality. Each of the following strategies helps accomplish this aim in a

slightly different way. One-minute reflection periods offer students time to digest

the information presented or to connect it to happenings in their own lives. They

also provide a refreshing change of pace that helps students stay alert and

ready for the next activity. A one-minute reflection period can occur anytime

during the school day, but it may be particularly useful after the presentation of

information that is especially challenging or central to the curriculum. Personal

Connection is also included as a strategy in this book. Most students have

probably asked this question in one way or another during their time in school.

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It’s up to teachers to help answer this question by continually making

connections between what is being taught and the personal lives of their

students. This strategy, then, asks teacher to weave students’ personal

associations, feelings, and experiences into instruction. Choice Time is giving

students choices, a fundamental principle of good teaching as it is a specific

intrapersonal teaching strategy. Essentially, choice time consists of building in

opportunities for students to make decisions about their learning experiences.

Making choices is like lifting weights. The more frequently students choose from

a group of options, the thicker their responsibility muscles become. A strategy

called Feeling-Toned Moments suggests that educators are responsible for

creating moments in teaching where students laugh, feel angry, express strong

opinions, get excited about a topic, or feel a wide range of other emotions.

Teachers can help create feeling-toned moments in a number of ways: first, by

modeling those emotions yourself as they teach; second, by making it safe for

students to have feelings in the classroom such as giving permission,

discouraging criticism, and acknowledging feelings when they occur, and finally,

by providing experiences such as movies, books, and controversial ideas that

evoke feeling-toned reactions. And, the Goal-Setting Sessions where one of the

characteristics of highly developed intrapersonal learners is their capacity to set

realistic goals for themselves. This ability certainly has to be among the most

important skills necessary for leading a successful life. Consequently, educators

help students immeasurably in their preparation for life when they provide

opportunities for setting goals.

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Related Studies

The research entitled “The Effects of Teachers’ Teaching Styles and

Experience on Elementary Students’ Mathematical Achievement” by Stanford,

Angela Gail (June 2014) of Liberty University, determined if a statistically

significant difference existed in the mathematical achievement of elementary

students in classrooms led by teachers with different dominant teaching styles

(Grasha, 1996) and varying years of teaching experience. The findings of this

study revealed the Arkansas Augmented Benchmark Examination (AABE)

mathematical scores of students in classrooms with teachers using facilitator and

delegator teaching styles significantly higher than students in classrooms of

teachers using expert, formal authority, and personal model teaching styles.

Students in classrooms with teachers with five or less years of teaching

experience scored significantly lower than teachers with more than five years of

teaching experience. The number of students who made (Academic Expected

Performance) AEP in mathematics who were taught in classrooms with facilitator

teaching styles exceeded the number of students who were expected to make

AEP in those classrooms.

The study of Trajanov, Marija (March 2016) conducted at University of

Zagreb, Craotia, is entitled “The Relationship Between Teaching Styles and

Strategies and FL Learners’ Motivation”. The results showed that the students

whose teacher had a democratic teaching style were more motivated to learn

English than the students whose teacher had an autocratic teaching style, which

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confirmed the first hypothesis. The results also confirmed that the teacher who

had a democratic teaching style used more motivational strategies than the

teacher who had an autocratic teaching style, which is in accordance with the

second hypothesis of the thesis.

Tulbure, Cristina (March 2012) proposed a study entitled “Learning styles,

teaching strategies and academic achievement in higher education: A cross-

sectional investigation” which was conducted at University of Bucharest, Faculty

of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Bucharest, Romania. This study aims

at comparing two groups of pre-service teachers (with Educational Sciences and

Economic Sciences major) in order to identify their learning style preferences,

the most effective teaching strategies for each learning style and some possible

differences between their academic achievements. A between subject design

was used to analyze the data collected through a survey method. Significant

differences between the two categories of students have emerged in relation

with the most effective teaching strategies corresponding to each learning style

category.

De Mesa, Marian C. and Villena, Marife G. (May 2015) of Lyceum of the

Philippines University, Batangas City, Philippines, conducted a study entitled

“Teaching Styles of the Classroom Managers in one Basic Primary School in the

Philippines”. This study aimed to determine the teaching styles of the classroom

managers in Pinamucan Elementary School. The study used descriptive

methods were a standardized questionnaire was utilized as the main instrument

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in gathering data. Based on the result, Most of the classroom managers

belonged to the middle aged bracket; had been working from 20 to 29 years in

this institution, and were assigned in different grades / levels, and had attended

7-9 seminars for the length of time they had served there; majority of the

respondents often use the question and answer method when doing whole class

activities. For individual activities, homework is often used by the classroom

managers to get their students’ attention while for small group activities, games

were often practiced as means of initiating cooperation among students. The

school may be practice the used of LCD. School administrator may conduct

seminars regarding modern classroom methodologies.

A study entitled “Methods and Teaching Strategies Used by Teacher

Education Faculty Members in one State University in the Philippines” by

Ramos, Amado C. (December 2015) at Pangasinan State University,

Bayambang Campus, Philippines determined the methods and teaching

strategies used by the PSU – CTE faculty members of Bayambang Campus,

Bayambang, Pangasinan during the first semester of the school year 2013-2014.

The descriptive correlational method of research was employed in this study

where it involved the collection of pertinent data in order to answer questions

concerning the current status of the subject of the study. Majority of the faculty

members are females, they are master’s degree holders, have a permanent

position with an academic rank of instructor, and most of the faculty members

are graduate of SUCs. They also have high attitude toward teaching; generally,

the faculty members perceived themselves to be often in using teaching

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approaches and teaching methods; and sometimes in using teaching

techniques/styles, instructional support activities, and non-formal activities; and

no significant relationships exist between the faculty members’ profile variables

and their level of pedagogical approaches in teaching approaches, teaching

methods, teaching techniques/styles, non-formal activities and instructional

support activities. Teachers should be encouraged to pursue/finish higher

education, likewise they should be motivated to conduct research studies like

action researches as part of their functions, particularly along their area of

specialization. Teachers should be encouraged to explore and view other

effective teaching strategies and find more ways to entice other students

challenge themselves to create their own strategies to use in the field and to

become more global in perspective. The use computer technology can be an

effective teaching strategy, especially when students are given information

specific to their own situation rather than general information

Theoretical Framework

This study is related to Jerome S. Bruner’s Theory of Instruction (1985).

Bruner encouraged teachers to allow students to take over their own learning

process. Bruner compared mental growth to the rises and rests of a staircase.

As the learner’s knowledge is nurtured, the concepts eventually mature and

advance to the next level of learning. Rather than focusing on a student’s

readiness to learn, He believed that the staircase of learning potential was

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present for every learner, but environmental influences, including instructional

tactics, had the ability to halt, slow, or advance the learning. Learning is, indeed,

sensitive by nature, but the learner is rather adaptive to a teacher’s range of

instructional approaches.

Bruner’s Theory of Instruction is prescriptive, rather than descriptive, in the

sense that instructional methods are prepared by educators based on how the

material can best be learned by the student. This theory expresses learning by

doing. It clearly explains that students face their own paces to discover, explore,

and learn independently. It is consist of four major principles that are practical for

not only analyzing instruction, but for determining the best method to lead a child

toward learning. First, Bruner declared that instruction should specify which

educational experiences most effectively lead a learner toward learning. With

various instructional methods producing a range of educational experiences for

learners, teachers should be mindful of the means in which material is delivered

to students in order to reap the most benefit from the experience. Second,

instruction must identify how a body of knowledge should be organized so that

learners can readily grasp the concept. When teaching a complex body of

knowledge, teachers should examine the structure of the knowledge in order to

provide students with smaller components of information at a given time. By

breaking the body of knowledge down into more manageable bits of information,

students build mental frameworks that enable them to obtain the whole body of

knowledge. Third, instruction must detail the manner and order in which the

material should be disseminated for learning. He suggested that the sequences

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teachers choose to deliver material have an impact on how well students attain

the overall body of knowledge. He provided educators the flexibility to determine

the pace and choice between extrinsic and intrinsic reward, once the material

was released to students. Fourth, Bruner believed that instruction must utilize

both types of reward, but that student learning progressed further with intrinsic

rewards. His theory reminds educators that the purpose of teaching is not only to

supply students with a prescribed body of knowledge, but also to supply them

with the know-how to process knowledge.

In addition to the prior theory, the National Competency-Based Teacher

Standard (NCBTS) proposed by the Department of Education, can also be used

to support this study. NCBTS is an integrated theoretical framework that includes

the different domains of effective teaching. It intelligibly stated the strategic and

vital role of teachers in the learning process of the students. According to the this

framework, this will allow teachers to self-assess their own performance against

the Competency Standards in order to identify areas of strength as well as areas

that need to be developed further in order for them to function more effectively

as facilitators of learning.

NCBTS has seven domains which helps the teachers to be effective and

proficient in teaching such as: Social Regard for Learning, Learning

Environment, Diversity of Learners, Curriculum, Planning, Assessing, and

Reporting, Community Linkages, and Personal Growth and Professionalism. It

provides a single framework that define effective teaching in all aspects of a

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teacher’s professional life & in all phases of teacher development. It can also

minimize confusion about what effective teaching is and how it should be done.

Most importantly, NCBTS provides a better guide for all teacher development

programs.

Input Process Output

Determining the:
1. profile of the
respondents in terms
1. Profile of the
of:
respondents in terms
of: a. age;
a. age; b. gender; Proposed action plan
b. gender; c. monthly income;
in order to improve
c. monthly income; d. length of service;
and the teaching styles of
d. length of
service; and e. position the teachers at Puelay
e. position Elementary School
2. Teaching styles of
2. Teaching styles of the teachers at Puelay
the teachers at Elementary School
Puelay Elementary
School 3.Significant
relationship between
the profile and the
teaching styles of the
teachers at Puelay
Elementary School

Figure 1: Paradigm of the Study

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Chapter 3

METHODOLOGY

This chapter specifies the type of research design, sample of the study, data

instrument, collection of data, and statistical treatment of data.

Research Design

This study falls under the types of quantitative research method

particularly descriptive correlational.

Descriptive research method was used in this study to uncover the

teaching styles of the respondents by assessing the questionnaire. Descriptive

studies are aimed at finding out "what is," so observational and survey methods

are frequently used to collect descriptive data (Borg & Gall, 1989).

The researchers also used correlational research method to find out if

there is a significant relationship between the profile and the teaching styles of

the respondents. Also, in this method, the researchers did not attempt to

manipulate the variables such as profile – age, gender, monthly income, length

of service, and position.

A descriptive correlational research method was practiced in this study to

determine and describe the teaching styles and to examine the relationship

between the profile and the teaching styles of the respondents. The information

gathered through conducting survey served as bases that were analyzed and

interpreted by the researchers.

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Population and Locale of the Study

This study was conducted at Puelay Elementary School, Villasis,

Pangasinan which focuses on the Teaching Styles of the Teachers. The

researchers have all the elementary teachers of the said school as their

respondents.

Data Gathering Tools

The most essential tool that was used in this study is the questionnaire

that was given to the respondents for them to assess their teaching styles

provided by the researchers. The researchers used the survey method because

it is the easiest way to gather information from large number of respondents.

The questionnaire was divided into two parts: profile and teaching styles.

The first part included the profile of the respondents in terms of a) age, b)

gender, c) monthly income; d) length of service; and e) position. On the second

part, the teaching styles and its categories are indicated such as visual, auditory,

and kinesthetic.

Data Gathering Procedure

Proceeding to the preparation of the study, the researchers formulated

the title through brainstorming from the possible subjects that were given by their

research adviser – Goldameir Sison-Pablo, L.P.T., M.Ed., which then, forwarded

to the same consultant for the approval.

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The researchers showed the questionnaire to the research adviser to

proofread and attach signature in all pages of the survey. Also, they were given

the permission to float their questionnaires to the respondents during research

time only. The researchers personally organized, analyzed and interpreted the

information gathered from conducting the survey.

Treatment of Data

In order to attain accurate results and precise conclusion, the following

statistical tools were used by the researchers:

1. The frequency and total number of respondents were used to determine

the percentage of each categories of profile in terms of a) age, b) gender,

c) monthly income, d) length of service, and e) position and to be able to

answer the statement number 1.

Formula:

f
P = (n) *100

Where:

P = Percentages

f = frequency

n = total no. of respondents

100 = constant value

2. To determine the teaching styles of the respondents, the average

weighted mean is used.

4(F4)+3(F3)+2(F2)+1(F1)
Formula: WM = n

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Where:

WM = weighted mean

F4 = number of respondents who answered “Always”

F3 = number of respondents who answered “Often”

F2 = number of respondents who answered “Sometimes”

F1 = number of respondents who answered “Never”

The following scale was used to interpret the attained weighted mean:

Scale Descriptive Equivalent

3.25 – 4.00 Always

2.50 – 3. 24 Often

1.75 – 2.49 Sometimes

1.00 – 1.74 Never

3. To determine the significant relationship between the profile and the

teaching styles of teachers at Puelay Elementary School, the chi-square

formula was used.

Formula:

2
2
(fo - fe)
x = ∑
fe

Where:

x² = chi- square value

fo = observed frequency

fe = expected frequency

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Chapter 4

RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS

This chapter includes the analysis and interpretation of the data gathered.

Moreover, the results obtained using statistical analyses are presented in both

tabular and textual forms to further explain the answers to the problems of the

study prior to the chapters of this study.

Demographic Characteristics of the Respondents

The first problem of the study dealt with the profile of respondents.

Table 1 below represents the demographic characteristics of the

respondents in terms of age, gender, monthly income, length of service, and

position.

Based on the table on the next page, most of the respondents are aged 41

and above with a frequency of 21 and a percentage of 70. Moreover, the age

bracket 31 to 40 has a percentage of 23.3, while 21 to 30 has 6.7%. None of the

respondents are aged 20 and below. This only means that most of the

respondents were already matured and have well-developed personalities.

When it comes to gender, females have a greater quantity than males, with

86.7% for female and 13.3% for male. This means that most of the respondents

tend to practice teaching styles.

26
Table 1

PROFILE OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


N = 30

Profile f %
Age
41 and above 21 70
31 to 40 7 23.3
21 to 30 2 6.7
20 and below 0 0
Gender
Male 4 13.3
Female 26 86.7
Monthly Income
Php. 30,000 and above 4 13.3
Php. 25,000 to Php. 29,999 5 16.7
Php. 20,000 to Php. 24,999 18 60
Php. 19,999 and below 3 10
Length of Service
7 years and above 23 76.7
4 to 6 years 4 13.3
1 to 3 years 2 6.7
11 months and below 1 3.3
Position
Teacher I to III 26 86.6
Master Teacher I to IV 4 13.3

It can also be seen on the table, 60% of the respondents receives a monthly

income of Php. 20,000 to Php. 24,999 with a frequency of 18. On the other hand,

10% of the respondents receive Php. 19,999 and below with a frequency of 3

which means the respondents monthly earn an income which is above average.

In terms of length of service, a percentage of 76.7 of the respondents are

currently serving the institution for 7 years and above with a frequency of 23.

Only one of them is a newly-employed teacher serving 11 months and below

with a percentage of 3.3. This only means that most of the respondents are

27
exposed to this institution and continuously sharing knowledge to the students

for a long time up to this day.

It is also indicated on the table that 26 respondents are currently ranked as

Teacher I to III with a percentage of 86.6, while the rest of the respondents are

currently ranked as Master Teacher I to IV with a percentage of 13.3. Therefore,

most of the respondents are on the starting position of teaching education.

TEACHING STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

The second problem of this study sought to determine the different teaching

styles of the respondents.

Table 2 below shows the computed weighted means of each category, the

overall average weighted mean and their corresponding descriptive equivalent

that determine the teaching styles of the respondents.

Visual

Based on the table on the next page, under the visual category, the highest

mean among the five indicators is 3.60 which is equivalent to “Always”, the

indicator number 5, “I am showing them the materials needed in their activities.”

In accordance to this result, Ministry of Education, Guyana (2016), stated that

learning materials are important because they can significantly increase student

achievement by supporting student learning. For example, a worksheet may

provide a student with important opportunities to practice a new skill gained in

class. This process aids in the learning process by allowing the student to

explore the knowledge independently as well as providing repetition. Learning

28
materials, regardless of what kind, all have some function in student learning.

(http://education.gov.gy/web/index.php/teachers/tips-for-teaching/item/2036-the-

importance-of-learning-materials-in-teaching)

Table 2.1
TEACHING STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
UNDER VISUAL CATEGORY

Indicators AWM DE
A. Visual
1. I use PowerPoint and other useful software in discussing 3.23 O
my everyday lesson.
2. I let them watch educational videos if needed. 3.33 A
3. I write lessons on the manila paper. 2.80 O
4. I use pictures, charts, diagrams, or maps during a 3.47 A
lecture.
5. I am showing them the materials needed in their 3.60 A
activities.
Mean 3.29 A
Legend: AVM = Average Weighted Mean; DE = Descriptive Equivalent; Always (A) =
3.25-4.00; Often (O) = 2.50-3.24; Sometimes (S) = 1.75 -2.49; and Never (N) 1.00- 1.74

The second highest average weighted mean still under visual category is

3.47 which has a descriptive equivalent of “Always”, indicator number 4, “I use

pictures, charts, diagrams, or maps during a lecture.” Digital images have proven

that they are incredible resource of materials. Not only can they be free

resources, but they can be taken from virtually anywhere. However, teachers

should take into account how to select their pictures, which pictures they should

select, and cite their sources properly. In a reading session where some texts

may be of little interest to the students, pictures can inspire the students and

give them a clear purpose of their reading. In addition, pictures can also be used

to improve other skills. Depending on the goals of the lesson, a teacher can

manipulate the use of pictures in many different ways. For these reasons,

29
pictures do play a vital role in teaching and should never be forgotten.

(http://usingpictures.blogspot.com/)

The third on the list is indicator number 2, “I let them watch educational

videos if needed”, which has an average weighted mean of 3.33 (Always).

Teachers using subtitled video as a teaching aid in the classroom gain many

benefits including greater student interest and improved reading and literacy

skills. Using sight and sound, video is the perfect medium for students who are

auditory or visual learners. With the added use of subtitles each child then has

the choice to watch, listen to, or read each presentation. Video stimulates and

engages students creating interest and maintaining that interest for longer

periods of time, and it provides an innovative and effective means for educators

to address and deliver the required curriculum content.

(http://www.zaneeducation.com/educational-video/education-and-video.php)

The second lowest under visual category is indicator number 1, “I use

PowerPoint and other useful software in discussing my everyday lesson”, having

an average weighted mean of 3.23 which has a descriptive equivalent of “Often”.

PowerPoint has become very popular because it's easy to learn and widely

available. It provides the ability to equip your presentations with different types of

media - including images, sounds, animations, and much more. This enhances

the students' abilities to retain what they're being taught, especially those who

are visual learners. Teachers can focus on the class and interacting with the

students instead of writing on a board, because the text and the entire

presentation is already there in the form of a PowerPoint file. PowerPoint is not

30
just for the teachers though, another way to use PowerPoint in an educational

setting is to have the students create their own presentations. This is a great

way to teach them how to use visual aids while working on their presentation

and public speaking abilities. (https://www.investintech.com/content/powerpoint/)

And, the lowest average weighted mean under visual category is 2.20

which is descriptively equivalent to “Often”. These are the indicators number 3

under visual “I write lessons on the manila paper”, and number 4 under

kinesthetic “I let the students dance a music related to the topic.” According to

Sexon, Draizelle (2013), classroom teaching during the early years would

revolve around the “sage on the stage.” In this period, teachers were the ones

who would manipulate the discussion while the students would just be listening

to the lecture. The teacher would really use much of his teaching time posting

manila paper and cartolina strips on the board.

Auditory

As for the ranking of indicators under auditory based on the table presented

on the next page, indicator number 5, “I let the students hear their classmates’

opinions during recitation”, has the highest average weighted mean of 3.57 with

a descriptive equivalent of “Always.” This means that the respondents let the

students pay attention when the other students recite. This result relates to the

book of Raleigh, Philp (2006), Engaging 'Tweens and Teens: Brain-Compatible

Approach to Reaching Middle and High School Students. It is stated in his book

that in the classroom, teachers should develop activities that encourage students

to talk about their emotions, listen to their classmates’ opinions, and think about

31
the motivations of the people who are outside the classroom. Using one carefully

chosen question or activity for discussion makes it possible for students to make

judgments or propose courses of action and report their reasons. As effective

discussion leaders, teachers need to establish and maintain a nonjudgmental

environment that encourages open, reasonable communication with other

students.

Table 2.2

TEACHING STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


UNDER AUDITORY CATEGORY
Indicators AWM DE
B. Auditory
1. I let the students conduct a musical performance or sing 2.93 O
a song related to the topic.
2. I recite out loud the information I want the students to 3.50 A
remember several times.
3. I prefer to play a music while the students are doing the 2.20 S
activities for them not to feel bored.
4. I opt to use a microphone and speakers while teaching. 1.40 N
5. I let the students hear their classmates’ opinions during 3.57 A
recitation.
Mean 2.72 O
Legend: AVM = Average Weighted Mean; DE = Descriptive Equivalent; Always (A) =
3.25-4.00; Often (O) = 2.50-3.24; Sometimes (S) = 1.75 -2.49; and Never (N) 1.00- 1.74

The second one is indicator number 3, “I recite out loud the information I

want the students to remember several times”, which has an average weighted

mean of 3.50. This means that the respondents always do the said indicator. In

line with this result, Stevens, Angie (2012) stated that having a teacher read

aloud to students helps increase their reading level, because it models fluent

reading for students. By following along and seeing how the teacher emphasizes

32
different words, pauses at commas and periods, and pronounces difficult words,

students can increase their own reading fluency.

Indicator number 1, “I let the students conduct a musical performance or

sing a song related to the topic”, ranked third under auditory, having an average

weighted mean of 2.90. The respondents often do this teaching style. Music is

an amazing tool for teaching languages, especially to children. Good songs will

remain with a learner long after a lesson is over, and tend to be picked up very

easily during lessons. By getting your learners to sing along to catchy tunes,

they will be able to pick up vocabulary, grammatical structures, and the rhythm of

the language more easily than trying to read it or study it from a course book.

(http://www.witslanguageschool.com/NewsRoom/ArticleView/tabid/180/ArticleId/

337/Using-music-in-the-classroom.aspx)

The fourth one is indicator number 3, “I prefer to play a music while the

students are doing the activities for them not to feel bored,” which has an

average weighted mean of 2.20 which is equivalent to “Sometimes”. This means

that the respondents play music sometimes only. A study from the University of

Helsinki (2015) noted that the simple act of listening to music while in class can

help improve students’ memory and learning capability. There is also an

evidence to show that music played at low volumes during class activities can

boost creativity and concentration.

When used creatively, music can serve as a core feature of a lesson or just

make for good background ambiance and signal transitions in class activity.

Whether playing it during tests or reading time, music can have a significant

33
impact on how students react to learning. Studying with music has been shown

to help students study longer and retain more information. There are no limits to

music’s application in the classroom as it can be used to help teach any subject

at just about any level. (https://www.uscranton.com/resources/teaching-tips/

music-in-the-classroom-proves-beneficial-for-learning/#.WpQds6iWbDc)

And, the lowest average weighted mean under auditory is 1.40, indicator

number 4, “I opt to use a microphone and speakers while teaching”, which has a

descriptive equivalent of “Never”. This means that microphones and speakers

were never used by the respondents. According to Zainol, Zaina (2014), using

these devices might be difficult for teachers to control device(s) use in class.

Also, students will not learn how to read effectively for they listen instead of

practicing to read stories, poems etc.

Kinesthetic

On the third category which is kinesthetic, the indicator number 1, “I

demonstrate the activity first before the students start doing it”, has the highest

average weighted mean of 3.83 with a descriptive equivalent of “Always”. This

means demonstrating the activity first before the students start doing it is the

most practiced teaching style to the respondents. According to Grant Wiggins,

Ed.D (2018), students learn best when teacher explains it, then shows it, then

asks the students to demonstrate to make sure they know how to do it and if

they don’t then further explains and also when a teacher shows the step by step

on how to do things and clarify any misunderstanding, has fun activities that

involve interaction between other students in order to gain new insights and has

34
field trips to experience real life situations.

(https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/students-learn-best/)

Table 2.3

TEACHING STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


UNDER AUDITORY CATEGORY
Indicators AWM DE
C. Kinesthetic
1. I demonstrate the activity first before the students start 3.83 A
doing it.
2. I let the students do a role play. 3.10 O
3. I allow the students work together, brainstorm, and make 3.37 A
a final output.
4. I let the students dance a music related to the topic. 2.80 O
5. I conduct games that are connected to the lessons. 3.37 A
Mean 3.29 A
Overall Mean 3.1 O
Legend: AVM = Average Weighted Mean; DE = Descriptive Equivalent; Always (A) =
3.25-4.00; Often (O) = 2.50-3.24; Sometimes (S) = 1.75 -2.49; and Never (N) 1.00- 1.74

Indicator number 3, “I conduct games that are connected to the lessons”,

and indicator number 5, “I allow the students work together, brainstorm, and

make a final output”, tied for having 3.37 average weighted mean which is

equivalent to “Always”. Pak, Rosshalde (n.d.) specified that classroom games

add flair and student engagement to more tedious, yet necessary tasks like

teaching math facts, grammar rules and vocabulary, reviewing for tests or even

completing lab experiments. Adding an element of competition motivates and

energizes students.

According to the site, Professional Learning Board, brainstorming in the

classroom motivates students to freely express their ideas and thoughts on a

subject. As there are no wrong and right answers, the sessions provide students

with a platform where they can voice their thoughts without fear of failure. The

35
sessions give the class a chance to tap into their previous knowledge and form

connections between the current topic and what they have already learned. It

also encourages them to listen and consider others’ ideas, thereby showing

respect for their fellow classmates.

(https://k12teacherstaffdevelopment.com/tlb/how-can-i-facilitate-brainstorming-

in-the-classroom/#respond)

The fourth one is indicator number 2, “I let the students do a role play.” It has

an average weighted mean of 3.10. This means that the respondents often use

this teaching style. McGuire, Della (n.d.) said that when teachers use role

playing as instruction, students have the capability of developing deeper

involvement and knowledge about the issues at hand. Another benefit is that

teachers can observe realistic behavior in role playing that can be used to

assess and diagnose where students are in their skill level and development of

knowledge. (https://study.com/academy/lesson/role-play-method-of-teaching-

definition-benefits.html)

Lastly, the lowest average weighted mean under kinesthetic category is 2.80

in indicator 4, “I let the students dance a music related to the topic”, which has a

descriptive equivalent of “Often”. To support this result, Hanna, Judith Lynne

(1999) stated that dance education aids the development of kinesthetic

intelligence. Dance education creates opportunities for self-expression and

communication within the constraints of the medium of the body. It provides an

opportunity for students to recognize that there are multiple solutions to

problems.

36
Generally, the teaching styles of the respondents have a totality of 3.1 with a

descriptive equivalent of “Often”. The researchers can say that almost all of the

teaching styles are often being used and practiced by the respondents.

Significant Relationship between the Profile and the Teaching Styles of the

Respondents

The third problem of this study tended to determine the significant

relationship between the profile and the teaching styles of the respondents.

Table 3 on the next page shows the tabular representation of the significant

relationship between the profile and the teaching styles of the respondents.

The table on the next page shows that on the visual category, it is presented

that there is no significant relationship between the age and the teaching styles

of the respondents because the computed chi-square value (3.78) is lower than

the tabular value (16.92). Therefore, the null hypothesis of gender is accepted.

This result is related to the study of Rahimi, Mehrak (2012) which revealed that

EFL teachers’ age and experience had a negative relationship with sensing style

of teaching. Therefore, as teachers become aged they lose their motives to use

sensing activities and style of teaching.

The null hypothesis of the significant relationship between the gender and

the teaching styles of the respondents is accepted. The computed chi-square

value of gender (0.27) is lower than the tabular value (7.82). Bennett,

Gottesman, Rock & Cerullo (1993) opined that gender and behavior of teachers

affect their judgments of academic skills. Martin and Harsh (2005) opined that

37
academic motivation and engagement are the same for male and female

teachers. They averred further that, academic motivation and engagement does

not significantly vary as a function of teachers’ gender and in terms of academic

motivation and determining teachers’ roles.

Table 3

SIGNIFICANT RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PROFILE AND THE


TEACHING STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

VISUAL AUDITORY KINESTHETIC

Profile x2 df TV DE x2 df TV DE x2 df TV DE
Age 0.71 9 16.92 NS 5.57 9 16.92 NS 4.32 9 16.92 NS
Gender 2.94 3 7.82 NS 0.61 3 7.82 NS 1.31 3 7.82 NS
Monthly 5.76 9 16.92 NS 5.9 9 16.92 NS 4.36 9 16.92 NS
Income
Length of 1.35 9 16.92 NS 4.01 9 16.92 NS 3.98 9 16.92 NS
Service
Position 2.66 3 7.82 NS 0.96 3 7.82 NS 2.37 3 7.82 NS
Legend: S= Significant; and NS= Not Significant
*Tested at 0.5 level of significance

As for the significant relationship between the monthly income and the

teaching styles of the respondents, the computed chi-square value of monthly

income is 4.26 which is lower than the tabular value (16.92). Thus, its null

hypothesis is accepted.

Also, the null hypothesis of significant relationship between the length of

service and the teaching styles of the respondents is accepted because the

computed chi-square value of length of service (5.8) is lower than the tabular

value (16.92).

Similarly, the null hypothesis of significant relationship between the

position and the teaching styles of the respondents is accepted since the

38
computed chi-square value of position (0.35) is lower than the tabular value

(7.82).

As for the auditory, there is no significant relationship between the age and

teaching styles of the respondents because the computed chi-square value of

age (5.57) is lower than the tabular value (16.92). Therefore, the null hypothesis

is accepted.

Likewise, the null hypothesis of significant relationship between the gender

and the teaching styles of the respondents is accepted since the computed chi-

square value of gender (0.61) is lower than the tabular value (7.82). Teacher

gender is a common background characteristic that, while not a proxy for quality,

is sometimes included in teacher effects research due to perceptions that female

and male teachers may teach or interact with students in different ways (An,

2008).

The computed chi-square value of monthly income (5.9) is lower than the

tabular value (16.92). Hence, the null hypothesis stating that there is no

significant relationship between the monthly income and teaching styles of the

respondents is accepted.

It is also showed in the table that there is no significant relationship between

the length of service and the teaching styles of the respondents because the

computed chi-square value (4.01) is lower than the tabular value (16.92). Thus,

the null hypothesis of length of service under auditory is accepted. According to

the study of Guskey, Thomas (1987), neither years of experience nor grade level

39
assignment was significantly related to any of the perceptual or attitudinal

variables of teaching strategies.

The null hypothesis of position is also accepted because the computed chi-

square value (0.96) is lower than the tabular vaue (7.82). This means that there

is no significant relationship between the position and teaching styles of the

respondents.

For the last category which is kinesthetic, there is also no significant

relationship between the age and teaching styles of the respondents because

the computed chi-square value (4.32) is lower than the tabular value (16.92).

Thus, the null hypothesis is accepted.

The null hypothesis of gender is also accepted because the computed chi-

square value (1.31) is lower than the tabular vaue (7.82). This means that there

is no significant relationship between the gender and teaching styles of the

respondents. This result is supported by the study of Bamba, et al., (2015)

‘Perception on the Level of Preparedness of in Teaching by PUNP College of

Teacher Education Graduating Students’, which implies that the tabular value of

the two respondents under gender is 7.815 which shows that there is no

significant relationship between the gender of the respondents and their level of

preparedness in teaching.

Based on the table, there is no significant relationship between the monthly

income and teaching styles of the respondents because the computed chi-

square value (4.36) is lower than the tabular value (16.92). Hence, the null

hypothesis of monthly income is accepted.

40
The null hypothesis of length of service is also accepted because the

computed chi-square value (3.98) is lower than the tabular vaue (16.92). This

means that there is no significant relationship between the length of service and

teaching styles of the respondents. Since teachers usually gain extensive

experience of successful and unsuccessful performances throughout their years

of teaching, this assumption has generated in-depth research into how teachers

who have been involved in teaching for different periods of time perceive their

teaching (Hoy & Woolfolk, 1993).

It is also presented in the table that there is no significant relationship

between the position and teaching styles of the respondents because the

computed chi-square value of position (2.37) is lower than the tabular value

(7.82). Thus, the null hypothesis of position is accepted.

Specifically, the teaching styles of the respondents have a totality of 3.1 with

a descriptive equivalent of “Often”. The researchers can say that almost all the

teaching styles often being used and practiced by the respondents.

Proposed Action Plan to Improve the Teaching Styles of Teachers at

Puelay Elementary School

ACTION PLAN

Statement of Objectives/Goals:

Goal : To improve the teachers of Puelay Elementary School on

their different teaching styles by conducting a 3-day

41
seminar-workshop that will improve their capabilities in

terms of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic categories to

become effective and quality teachers

Objectives : 1. Use different teaching styles for active student learning

2. Improve the quality of teaching to meet the learning

needs of students

3. Promote group activities for students

4. Guide the teachers in practicing the different teaching

styles and making educational materials

5. Provide varied activities for visual, auditory and

kinesthetic

42
IMPLEMENTATION EVALUATION

Activities People Time Key Remarks


Involved Frame Resources

1. Use different teaching styles for active student learning


Use different -Student - Day 1 -Donation Variety of Active
teaching styles Teacher -School teaching styles participation
for active student Fund were used by of students
learning the teacher. was achieved.

2. Improve the quality of teaching to meet the learning needs of students


Conduct activities -Student - Day 1 -Donation Teacher Students’
to address the Teacher -School conducted participation
students’ learning Fund different and abilities
needs activities were visible.
efficiently.
3. Promote group activity of students
Present different -Student Day 2 -Donation Teacher Individual
group activities -Teacher -School presented differences of
for students Fund different group the students
activities were
effectively. observed.
4. Guide the teachers in practicing the different teaching styles and making educational
materials
Introduce new -Resource Day 2 -Donation New teaching Teachers’
teaching Speaker -School strategies were willingness to
strategies -Teacher Fund presented adopt new
-Students strategies
were
observed.
5. Provide varied activities for visual, auditory and kinesthetic categories
Present varied -Teacher Day 3 -School Variety of Active
teaching -Students Fund unique and low- participation
materials in -Donation cost teaching of the
different activities materials were teachers and
for outputs presented. students were
observed.

43
Chapter 5

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter presents the conclusions obtained from the findings prior in

the study. Also, the recommendations of the study were indicated in this chapter.

Conclusions

Based on the findings of the study, the following conclusions were

obtained:

1. Most of the respondents are aged 41 and above. None of the

respondents are aged 20 and below. Females have a greater quantity

than males. Most of the respondents receive a monthly income of Php.

20,000 to Php. 24,999 with a frequency of 18. Also, 23 of the 30

respondents have 7 years and above length of service while only one of

them has 11 months and below. Lastly, 26 of the 30 respondents are

currently Teachers I to III, and the rest are Master Teachers I to IV.

2. The respondents often do the teaching styles.

3. There is no significant relationship between the profile and the teaching

styles of teachers at Puelay Elementary School.

4. The action plan is proposed in order to improve the teaching styles of the

teachers at Puelay Elementary School.

44
Recommendations

Based on the conclusions presented, the following recommendations

were formulated:

a. Teachers

1. Make and improve their own useful and informative teaching style.

2. Observe their co-teachers for them to get some teaching styles and

observe their students to know which teaching style is compatible to

their learning skills.

b. Students

1. Observe and have more knowledge about the teaching styles of their

respective teachers.

2. Get informed and entertained by the teaching styles.

c. Future Teachers

1. They can learn different teaching styles that they can use in their

future teaching years.

2. They will know which teaching styles are appropriate to use in a

specific subject.

d. Future Researchers

1. Include more categories of teaching styles on the indicators.

2. Add other profile of the respondents related to the topic.

e. Readers

1. They can learn from the different teaching styles which they can

observe on their past or present teachers.

45
2. Share what they have read about teaching styles to the teachers.

46
BIBLIOGRAPHY

A. Theses

Trajanov, Marija. The Relationship Between Teaching Styles and Strategies

and FL Learners’ Motivation. Master’s Thesis. University of Zagreb,

Craotia. March 2016.

Tulbure, Cristina. Learning styles, teaching strategies and academic

achievement in higher education: A cross-sectional investigation.

Student’s Thesis. University of Bucharest, Faculty of Psychology and

Educational Sciences, Bucharest, Romania. March 2012.

De Mesa, Marian C. and Villena, Marife G. Teaching Styles of the Classroom

Managers in one Basic Primary School in the Philippines. Students’

Thesis. Lyceum of the Philippines University, Batangas City, Philippines.

May 2015.

Ramos, Amado C. Methods and Teaching Strategies Used by Teacher

Education Faculty Members in one State University in the Philippines.

Doctor’s Thesis. Pangasinan State University, Bayambang Campus,

Philippines. December 2015.

47
B. Websites

Gill, Eric (January 2013). What is Your Teaching Style? 5 Effective Teaching

Methods for Your Classroom. Retrieved from https://education.cu-

portland.edu/blog/classroom-resources/5-types-of-classroom-

teaching-styles/

Quinonez, Natasha (February 2014). Different Teaching Styles and How

They Affect Your Students. Retrieved from

https://blog.udemy.com/teaching-styles/

Billington, Philomena (December 2005). Source of Life: Teaching Strategies

Resource Book. USA: Kagan Publishing. Retrieved from

https://stmaryswholeschoolreview.wikispaces.com/file/view/Teaching+and

+Learning+Strategies+Book.pdf

48
APPENDICES

Appendix A

LETTER TO RESPONDENTS

PHINMA UPANG COLLEGE URDANETA


Urdaneta City, Pangasinan

February 12, 2018


To the respondents:
Greetings!
We, the students of 12 GHT 3P, are conducting a research entitled “TEACHING
STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL”, as a partial
fulfillment of the requirements for the subject APP 007 Inquiries, Investigation,
and Immersion.
In line with this, may we request the teachers of the said school to participate in
this study by answering the questionnaire. Surely, the respondents’ personal
information will be confidential.
Thank you very much for your cooperation.

Respectfully yours,
CAMPOS, TRISHA MAE
CAOAYAN, EVETTE LYZA A.
CUARESMA, JENIFER D.
DUNGCA, ROCEL ANN B.
MANGSAT, JUVVY LENE

Noted by:
GOLDAMEIR SISON-PABLO, M.Ed.
Research Adviser

49
Appendix B
SAMPLE SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE

PHINMA UPANG COLLEGE URDANETA

Urdaneta City, Pangasinan

TEACHING STYLES OF TEACHERS AT PUELAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

(SURVEY QUESTIONNAIRE)

Name (Optional): ________________________________________________

I. Profile

Directions: Put a check (√) mark on the space provided to determine your

profile below.

A. Age

___ 41 and above

___ 31 to 40

___ 21 to 30

___ 20 and below

B. Gender

___ Male

___ Female

C. Monthly Income

___ Php. 30,000 and above

50
___ Php. 25,000 to Php. 29,999

___ Php. 20,000 to Php. 24,999

___ Php. 19,999 and below

D. Length of Service

___ 7 years and above

___ 4 to 6 years

___ 1 to 3 years

___ 11 months and below

E. Position

___ Teacher I to III

___ Master Teacher I to IV

II. Teaching Styles of Teachers

Directions: Put a check (√) mark on the column of your classification on the

teaching styles using the scale below.

4 Always The respondents always do the indicated teaching styles.

3 Often The respondents often do the indicated teaching styles.


2 Sometimes The respondents sometimes do the indicated teaching
styles.
1 Never The respondents never do the indicated teaching styles.

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Indicators 4 3 2 1
A. Visual
1. I use PowerPoint and other useful software in discussing my
everyday lesson.
2. I let them watch educational videos if needed.
3. I write the lessons on the manila paper.
4. I use pictures, charts, diagrams, or maps during a lecture.
5. I am showing them the materials needed in their activities.
B. Auditory 4 3 2 1
1. I let the students conduct a musical performance or sing a
song related to the topic.
2. I recite out loud the information I want the students to
remember several times.
3. I prefer to play a music while the students are doing their
activities for them not to feel bored.
4. I opt to use a microphone and speakers while teaching.
5. I let the students hear their classmates’ opinions during
recitation.
C. Kinesthetic 4 3 2 1
1. I demonstrate the activity first before the students start doing
it.
2. I let the students do a role play.
3. I allow the students work together, brainstorm, and make a
final output.
4. I let the students dance a music related to the topic.
5. I conduct games that are connected to the lessons.

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CURRICULUM VITAE

Personal Data

Name: TRISHA MAE RODRIGUEZ CAMPOS

Address: #10 Calaoagan St. Sumabnit, Binalonan

Date of birth: February 17, 2000

Contact Number: 09195526218

Email address: campostrishamae@yahoo.com

Motto: "God will make a way, when there seems to

……………………….. be no way."

Educational background

Secondary (Junior High): Sumabnit National High School

Sumabnit, Binalonan, Pangasinan

S.Y. 2015 - 2016

Elementary: Sumabnit Elementary School

Sumabnit, Binalonan, Pangasinan

S.Y. 2011 - 2012

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Personal Data

Name : EVETTE LYZA ABELLA CAOAYAN

Address: #312 Station District, Rosales, Pangasinan

Date of Birth : February 1, 2000

Contact Number : 09175555099

E-mail Address : evettelyzacaoayan@gmail.com

Motto : “Nothing worth having

………………………………………………………..….comes easy.”

Educational Background

Secondary (Junior High): Rosales National High School

Rosales, Pangasinan

S.Y. 2015 - 2016

Elementary: Rosales South Central School

Rosales, Pangasinan

S.Y. 2011 - 2012

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Personal Data

Name: JENIFER DELOS SANTOS CUARESMA

Address : Balisa San Filipe Sur,

……………………..Binalonan, Pangasinan

Date of birth : October 09, 1999

Contact Number: 09072843868

Email address: jdcinspiration@gmail.com

Motto: “Education is the most powerful weapon

…………...which we can use to change the world.”

Educational background

Secondary (Junior High): Juan G. Macareg National High School

Canarvacanan, Binalonan, Pangasinan

S.Y. 2015-2016

Elementary: Balisa Elementary School

Sitio Balisa San Filipe Sur, Binalonan,Pangasinan

S.Y. 2011-2012

55
Personal Data

Name: ROCEL ANN BAUTISTA DUNGCA

Address: Mangcasuy, Binalonan, Pangasinan

Date of birth: January 9, 2000

Contact Number: 09777475224

Email address: rocelandungca@yahoo.com

Motto: “Do my best, so that I can’t blame myself for

…………………………………….. anything.”

Educational background

Secondary (Junior High): Juan G. Macaraeg National High School

Canarvacanan, Binalonan ,Pangasinan

S.Y. 2015-2016

Elementary: South Central School

Poblacion, Binalonan Pangasinan

S.Y. 2011-2012

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Personal Data

Name: MA. JUVVY LENE ONIA MANGSAT

Address: Palapad Capas Binalonan, Pangasinan

Date of birth: September 17, 1999

Contact Number: 09951023448

Email address: juvvylene_21@yahoo.com

Motto: With God, nothing is impossible.

Educational background

Secondary (Junior High): Juan G. Macaraeg National High School

Binalonan, Pangasinan

S.Y. 2015-2016

Elementary : North Central School

Binalonan, Pangasinan

S. Y. 2011-2012

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