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The Antelope Valley

POLITICAL OBSERVER
Volume I Number 5 A First Amendment Free Press January 2006

Murrell’s Community Service Agency NOMINATION


Seeks Relief From Palmdale Water District PAPERS
PULLED
Thomas Fitzgerald
Editor-in-Chief
The question regarding im-
mediate relief to avoid the
closure of Murrell’s Commu- Ten Hopefuls Take First Step
nity Service Agency was put
before the Board of Directors
In Quest For Seat In
of the Palmdale Water Dis- Lancaster City Government
trict at their regularly sched-
uled meeting on December 5, The Lancaster municipal The staff at The Antelope
2005. election is scheduled for Tues- Valley Political Observer en-
The community service day, April 11, 2006. courages every eligible
agency occupies a water dis- The office of mayor, along Lancaster voter to participate
trict owned building adjacent with two council seats, is up in the April 11 election.
to the district building on the Photo by: Thomas Fitzgerald for election. As is our current policy, The
northeast corner of Avenue Q The mayor is elected every Antelope Valley Political Ob-
Murrell’s Community Service Agency may be forced to shut its doors and close shop at the
and 20th Street East in two-years and each council server will not endorse nor
corner of Ave Q and 20th Street East. The Agency leases a Palmdale Water District building
Palmdale. seat is for a four-year term. oppose any candidate.
At issue was the ability of forced to shut its doors effec- citizen comment. young men aged 12 to 17 that According to the Lancaster
the agency to afford the cur- tive December 31, 2005. Murrell spoke first and ex- have no father in the home. city clerk, the persons listed Mayor
rent monthly lease payment. “I do not draw a salary, I do plained the positive impact The young men learn about at right have pulled nomina- Irv Mitchell
The lease, which will ex- this because of my commit- his center has had on the com- God, man and redemption. tion papers. Gene Gaynor
pire in July 2006, carries a ment to the community,” said munity. “Man School is focused on This list is valid only up to Henry Hearns
monthly financial obligation Murrell. “The center is a neutral preparing young men and press time, 29 December, and David Paul
to the water district of $2,750 When item B 2 on the zone, there is no violence. It making them ready to be pro- others may have pulled papers
per month. agenda, Consideration and is a clean, well maintained ductive members of the com- as well since then. City Council
The agency’s founder, possible action on request re- and graffiti free facility,” said munity,” said Murrell. Citizens should contact the (Incumbent) Ed Sileo
Emmett Murrell, asked the ceived from Murrell’s Com- Murrell. “We are surrounded by An- Lancaster city clerk at (Qualified) Ron Smith
water district for immediate munity Service Agency re- Among the many programs telope Valley gangs right here 723.6000 for an updated list.
James Abadejos
relief in the form of a re- garding closure of their available at the agency, at this location. We’re in their Readers should see page 11
duced rent of $1 per month. agency, was called at 7:10p, Murrell spoke first on a pro- turf. At the service agency Nellie Tillman
for a TAVPO public service
Without relief, Murrell it set into motion a one hour gram called “Man School.” next door, we have never had announcement about the Janette Crawford
said the agency would be and five minute procession of Man School is designed for Lancaster municipal election. James Young
Continued On Page 10

Runner vs. Runner


Politics may make strange bedfellows, but bedfellows do not necessarily make similar politics.
Although a team in life and both seated on the Republican side of the aisle in Sacramento, he in the senate and she in the
assembly, husband and wife locally elected legislators George and Sharon Runner have a mind of their own when it comes to
voting on legislation.
Antelope Valley Political Observer staff conducted a review of both Runner’s voting record on all Bills that reached Governor
Schwarzenegger’s desk in 2005.
In conclusion, we discovered 65 instances where 36th District Assemblywoman Sharon Runner and Senator George Runner of the
17th Senate District, cast votes opposite one another.
Below, readers will find the Bill number, the sponsor of the legislation along with their party affiliation and city, followed by the title
of the Bill. Bill text may be reviewed at: http://www.legislature.ca.gov/
The governor’s veto message may be accessed by visiting: http://www.governor.ca.gov/state/govsite/gov_homepage.
Type into search: “legislative updates 2005.” Veto messages will be found below signed legislation listings.
TAVPO File Photo Both signed and vetoed Bill text along with the Legislative Counsel’s Digest (summary) may also be read in its entirety at this site. TAVPO File Photo

TAVPO Staff George Sharon Arnold


SB 8 by Senator Nell Soto (D-Pomona) - Political Reform Act of 1974: local officials: conflicts of interest NO YES SIGNED
SB 45 by Senator Richard Alarcon (D-Sun Valley) - Intermodal marine terminals NO YES SIGNED
SB 102 by Senator Denise Moreno Ducheny (D-San Diego) - Nurse training funding NO YES SIGNED
SB 112 by Senator Deborah V. Ortiz (D-Sacramento) - Refugee social services NO YES SIGNED
SB 141 by Senator Nell Soto (D-Pomona) - Residential care facilities: preadmission fee refunds NO YES SIGNED
SB 239 by Senator Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) - Corrections: media access NO YES SIGNED
SB 266 by Senator Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) - Trauma care NO YES VETO

SB 275 by Senator Tom Torlakson (D-Antioch) - Transportation needs assessment YES NO VETO
SB 439 by Senator Joseph Simitian (D-Palo Alto) - Public records: disclosure: public investment funds NO YES SIGNED
SB 488 by Senator Nell Soto (D-Pomona) – Contractors NO YES SIGNED
SB 527 by Senator Elaine Alquist (D-Santa Clara) - Redevelopment: senior housing NO YES SIGNED
SB 640 by Senator Matha M. Escutia (D-Whittier) - Child care resource and referral programs: funding NO YES SIGNED
SB 701 by Senator Carole Migden (D-San Francisco) - Child care subsidies: City and County of San Francisco: pilot project YES NO SIGNED
SB 707 by Senator Christine Kehoe (D-San Diego) - Before and after school programs NO YES SIGNED
SB 800 by Senator Joseph Simitian (D-Palo Alto) - Vehicles: tow trucks: authorized emergency vehicles: NO YES VETO
avoidance on highway: flashing amber warning lights
SB 730 by Senator Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) - Organic products: aquaculture products YES NO SIGNED
SB 851 by Senator Kevin Murray (D-Los Angeles) - Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority NO YES VETO
SB 959 by Senator Christine Kehoe (D-San Diego) - San Diego Metropolitan Transit Development Board YES NO SIGNED
SB 1081 by Senator Denise Moreno Ducheny (D-San Diego) - Maywood Riverfront Park grant NO YES SIGNED
AB 153 by Committee on Budget - Courts NO YES VETO
AB 97 by Assemblymember Rebecca Cohn (D-Saratoga) - School budget reserves NO YES VETO
AB 139 by Committee on Budget - State government NO YES SIGNED
AB 228 by Assemblymember Paul Koretz (D-West Hollywood) - Transplantation services: human immunodeficiency virus YES NO SIGNED
AB 256 by Assemblymember Hector De La Torre (D-South Gate) - Public employees’ benefits YES NO SIGNED
Continued On Page 9

HAPPY NEW YEAR, IT’S NOW THE LAW... The Antelope Valley
Pocket Bikes the buyer which clearly indicates Good Driver Discount drivers’ license examinations that
Adds definition of “pocket
bike” to Vehicle Code.
Adds §21720 to the Vehicle
where a pocket bike cannot be
operated.
Authorizes law enforcement
DUI/ Manslaughter Convictions
Prohibits a person from receiv-
ing a Good Driver Insurance Dis-
deals with the risks and punish-
ments associated with evading a
law enforcement vehicle.
Political Observer
Home Delivery
Code, which makes it illegal to to seize a pocket bike and hold count if convicted of a DUI or Significantly increases fines
operate a pocket bike on a side- it for 48 hours when the opera- manslaughter within 10 years of and jail/prison time for persons
walk, roadway, or any other part tor is cited for violation of Ve- the date the application is made. who flee from law enforcement
of a highway, or on a bikeway, hicle Code §21720. Convictions prior to January 1, in a vehicle.
bicycle path or trail, equestrian 1999, will not count for the pur- Requires law enforcement
trail, hiking or recreational trail,
or on public lands open to off-
Registration Renewal
Authorizes the DMV to accept
poses of this section. agencies to implement a police
pursuit policy and to provide re-
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highway motor vehicle use. vehicle registration renewal fees Police Pursuits lated training.
Requires the manufacturer to up to 75 days prior to the current Requires DMV to include a Source: http://www.dmv.ca.gov/ 12 Issues Only $12!
provide a disclosure statement to expiration date of a vehicle. question in all non-commercial about/leg/leginfo.htm

“Democracy becomes a government of bullies tempered by editors.” -- Ralph Waldo Emerson


2 The Antelope Valley Political Observer

The Antelope Valley

Political Observer Thomas’ Top Two


PMB # 383
3020 East Palmdale Blvd Suite D
Palmdale Zoning Ordinance
Palmdale California 93550 CHAPTER 7 ARTICLE 74 OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION (ZONE OR)
Publisher
Thomas Fitzgerald Section 74.03 Uses Permitted Without Planning Approval
Associate Publisher The following uses are allowed in the OR zone without zoning clearance or other planning approval,
Ryan J. Robb except as required by State law.
Editor-in-Chief
Thomas Fitzgerald A. Field, tree, bush, berry and row crops, including nursery stock, as an interim use, provided that no
Managing Editor permanent structures are constructed, and provided that no sludge and/or biosolid material shall be
Cale Snyder applied to any land as a solid amendment.
Copy Editor
Joe Zahra B. Riding, hiking and bicycle trails and appurtenant facilities.
Staff Writers
Dina Abdel Hady C. Storage, temporary, of materials and equipment used in construction of public or private improve-
Teri Richardson
ments, provided that all such items are stored on the construction site and pose no traffic hazard or
Advertising Manager other adverse impact on surrounding properties.
Marie Davis

Advertising Agent D. Temporary and permanent facilities for detention, retention and conveyance of stormwater runoff.
Melissa Montoya

Distribution Manager E. Natural areas, open space areas, biological preserves.


Lawrence “Mitterand” Hux

The Antelope Valley Political Observer is a First Amendment Free Press. CHAPTER 7 ARTICLE 75 DOWNTOWN COMMERCIAL ZONE
The Antelope Valley Political Observer, in compliance with Federal civil
rights legislation, does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, Section 75.03 Special Development Requirements
national origin, ancestry, religion or absence of, sex, age, disability, The following special development requirements shall apply to property within the Downtown Com-
marital staus, sexual orientation or veteran status in its employment. mercial (C-D) Zone.
The Antelope Valley Political Observer has not investigated any ser-
A. Standards of Development
vices, products or politicians advertised in this issue. Publication of any
advertising, political or otherwise, does not imply endorsement by this
newspaper. 7. Pedestrian Amenities. Provision of pedestrian amenities shall be required with new construc-
tion and for major modification to existing construction, except where it is determined by
The Antelope Valley Political Observer is published monthly with a the reviewing authority that location of any such improvements on the site is infeasible.
circulation of 6000 and is distributed to homes and participating retail Pedestrian amenities shall consist of one or more of the following in keeping with the quality
establishments throughout the cities of Palmdale and Lancaster. and character of designs as described in the Downtown Revitalization Plan:
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advertisement shall constitute final acceptance. Visual Focal Points
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DELIVERED TO YOUR BUSINESS
To arrange delivery of multiple copies of this publication 9. Outdoor Display. Outdoor display of merchandise shall be permitted subject to the follow-
and have your business serve as a community distribution point, ing restrictions:
contact Lawrence “Mitterand” Hux at 661.435.9220. a. Displayed merchandise shall consist of new merchandise only.
b. Displayed merchandise shall not be located within the public right-of-way.
c. Displayed merchandise shall not obstruct handicap or fire department access to any
SEND A LETTER TO THE EDITOR doorway or walkway.
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Write, “Letter to the Editor” in the subject line. Do not send your such merchandise.
correspondence as an attachment. e. Displayed merchandise shall not be placed in such a way as to significantly block visibil-
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U.S. Mail: The Antelope Valley Political Observer
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Palmdale, Ca 93550

You must include your full name, address, city and daytime home
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town will be published.

CALIFORNIA CODE
PENAL CODE SECTIONS 538a & 538c

538a. Every person who signs any letter addressed to a newspaper with the name of a
person other than himself and sends such letter to the newspaper, or causes it to be sent to
such newspaper, with intent to lead the newspaper to believe that such letter was written
by the person whose name is signed thereto, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

538c. (a) Except as provided in subdivision (c), any person who attaches or
inserts an unauthorized advertisement in a newspaper, whether alone or in con-
cert with another, and who redistributes it to the public or who has the intent to
redistribute it to the public, is guilty of the crime of theft of advertising ser-
vices which shall be punishable as a misdemeanor.
(b) As used in this section:
(1) “Unauthorized advertisement” means any form of representation or communi
cation, including any handbill, newsletter, pamphlet, or notice that contains any letters,
words, or pictorial representation that is attached to or inserted in a newspaper without a
contractual agreement between the publisher and an advertiser.
(2) “Newspaper” includes any newspaper, magazine, periodical, or other tangible
publication, whether offered for retail sale or distributed without charge.
(c) This section does not apply if the publisher or authorized distributor of the
newspaper consents to the attachment or insertion of the advertisement.
(d) This section does not apply to a newspaper distributor who is directed to insert
an unauthorized advertisement by a person or company supplying the newspapers, and
who is not aware that the advertisement is unauthorized.
(e) A conviction under this section shall not constitute a conviction for petty theft.

Silence Dogood Caliber Letters Excepted

The Antelope Valley


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January 2006 3

This Month in American History Revolution: Approach


15 January 1777: Independence is declared by the residents of the New Hampshire Grants-the part of the New 10 January 1847: General Kearney takes Los Angeles after two skirmishes near the San Gabriel River. These end
Hampshire territory west of the Connecticut River, which is also claimed by New York. The settlers establish the the hostilities in California, and on January 13 the remaining Mexican forces in the area sign the Treaty of Cahuenga
“republic” of New Connecticut. with Captain Fremont.
17 January 1766: A committee of English merchants working for repeal of the Stamp Act presents a petition to January 1849: Life/Customs: Amelia Bloomer begins publishing The Lily, a journal supporting temperance and
Parliament citing the increase in merchant bankruptcies resulting from the colonial nonimportation movement. women’s rights.
January – February 1769: The English Parliament urges the bringing to trial of the inciters of rebellion in the 1850: Slavery: The phrase “sold down the river” enters American language from a reference to slavery: Those
American colonies. slaves on older plantations were supposed to regard their lives as better than those in their families who might have
23 January 1775: The Georgia Colony adopts a revised version of the Continental Association which mandates a been sold into work further down the Mississippi River, in the Deep South, cut off from home.
nonimportation policy and a trade embargo against Britain to force repeal of the Coercive Acts of 1774. 1859: Life/Customs: Students from Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts, and from Williams College in
Revolutionary War Williamstown, Massachusetts, meet in Pittsfield to play the first intercollegiate baseball game.
09 January 1776: Politics: In Philadelphia, Thomas Paine publishes Common Sense a highly effective propagandis- 1862: Life/Customs: The first enclosed baseball field opens in Brooklyn, New York.
tic pamphlet that attacks the English crown and presents a clear and persuasive argument for colonial independence. 1865: Life/Customs: Beards become fashionable just after the war. Interest in baseball mushrooms with the for-
24 January 1776: American Colonel Henry Knox arrives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with the 43 British can- mation of 91 clubs within the National Association.
nons and 16 mortars captured by Ethan Allen at Fort Ticonderoga. The artillery have been transported cross country Civil War: Approach
through the wilderness. 16 January 1833: In the uproar that follows President Jackson’s proclamation against secession (December 5, 1832),
03 January 1777: George Washington achieves a second important victory in defeating the British at Princeton, the South Carolina legislature defies “King Jackson” and even raises a volunteer unit to repel any “invasion.”
New Jersey, and drives them, with heavy losses, toward New Brunswick. January 1836: In Philadelphia James Birney edits the first issue of the Philanthropist, an anti-slavery newspaper.
10 January 1779: The French present John Paul Jones with a dilapidated vessel, the Duc de Duras. This Jones 11 January 1836: Abolitionists present petitions to Congress in an attempt to abolish slavery in the District of
refits, mounts with 42 guns, and renames Bonhomme Richard in honor of Benjamin Franklin. Columbia. Calhoun refuses to accept the petitions and calls them “foul slander” of the South.
29 January 1779: Augusta, Georgia, is captured by a British force led by Lieutenant Colonel Archibald Campbell. 26 January 1837: Michigan, the 26th state, joins the Union as a free state.
01 January 1780: American patriots conduct a continuing guerilla campaign against the British in the territory 24 January 1842: Citizens in the northeastern Massachusetts town of Haverhill have John Quincy Adams submit
surrounding Augusta, Georgia. a petition to Congress that requests the peaceful dissolution of the Union.
15 January 1780: Politics: The Continental congress establishes the court of appeals. 15 January 1856: The free-soil Kansans elect their own governor, Charles Robinson, and their own legislature.
01 January 1782: The supporters of the British cause, the Loyalists, begin to leave America, mainly for Nova On January 24 President Pierce condemns this as an act of “rebellion” since the federal governor approved the pro-
Scotia and New Brunswick. Among the first to leave are those from the New England states and New York. If they slavery legislation.
stay, the Loyalists fear legal charges of treason or collaboration, and property confiscation. 15 January 1857: Abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison is more and more supportive of disunion; he wants in no
20 January 1783: Politics: Preliminary articles of peace are signed between England and France and between way to be associated with slavery. Garrison is one of the main speakers at a Massachusetts Disunion Convention
England and Spain. The preliminary peace treaty between England and the United states will not go into effect until held in Worcester. Their slogan becomes, “no union with slaveholders.”
Great Britain and France negotiate a settlement. 03 January 1861: The state of Georgia takes over the Federal Fort Pulaski.
14 January 1784: Politics: Congress ratifies the Treaty of Paris, officially ending the Revolutionary War and 09 January 1861: A state convention in Mississippi votes to secede from the Union.
initiating peace with Great Britain. 10 January 1861: Florida secedes from the Union.
Testing A Union 1788 – 1865 11 January 1861: Alabama secedes from the Union.
02 January 1788: National: In ratifying the new Federal constitution, Georgia becomes the fourth state to do so 19 January 1861: Georgia secedes from the Union.
and the third state to ratify unanimously. 26 January 1861: Louisiana secedes from the Union.
09 January 1788: National: The fifth state to ratify the Constitution is Connecticut. The state’s constitutional 29 January 1861: Kansas admitted as a slave-free state to the Union, becoming the 34th state.
convention votes 128 – 40 for ratification. Civil War
05 January 1791: Black Experience: In Charleston, North Carolina, free blacks boldly present to the state legis- 01 January 1863: The emancipation Proclamation takes effect. The Confederacy views the proclamation as con-
lature a formal protest against the banning of black-initiated lawsuits and the ban on black testimony in the courts. firming its view of Lincoln as a hypocritical anti-Southern abolitionist.
The legislature rejects the document. 19 January 1864: Arkansas, a Union slaveholding state, adopts a new anti-slavery constitution.
10 January 1791: National: Though not yet a state, Vermont ratifies the United States Constitution. Civil War: Reconstruction
January 1792: Ideas/Beliefs: The second part of Tom Paine’s political pamphlet, The Rights of Man, is issued. 08 January 1867: Suffrage is granted to blacks in Washington DC. In a continuing battle over blacks’ v. states’ rights,
1793: Ideas/Beliefs: Itinerant Quaker minister John Woolman publishes his humanitarian essay, A Word of Re- President Johnson, siding with the states, vetoes the bill. Congress, as it now regularly does, overrides the veto.
membrance and Caution to the Rich, which calls for sweeping social reforms, including the abolition of slavery. 26 January 1870: Virginia is granted readmission to the Union, and thus to representation in Congress, after
29 January 1795: Immigration: Congress passes the Naturalization Act, which mandates a five-year residency in accepting the Fifteenth Amendment.
the United States before citizenship will be granted.
January 1796: National: Robert Randall is charged with trying to coerce members of the House of Representa- Amendment XV Section 1:
tives on behalf of Great Lakes fur traders. The House concludes that any such attempts to influence House members “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States
for private gain rather than the public good are to be considered instances of contempt. or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.
17 January 1798: International: In Paris, speaking for the American diplomatic commission to France, John
Marshall formally rejects the bribes requested in exchange for the French presence at the negotiating table. Forging A Nation 1866-1900
02 January 1800: Slavery: The free blacks of Philadelphia present a petition opposing slavery, the slave trade, and 31 January 1867: By an act of Congress, suffrage is granted to all males over 21 in all United States territories.
the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793, to Congress, which lets the petition expire in committee. 04 January 1870: Labor: A telegraph operators’ strike spreads throughout the country. Although the union move-
12 January 1803: International: President Jefferson names James Monroe as minister plenipotentiary to ment has grown slowly, considering the conditions under which workers are forced to labor, membership has
France, to negotiate together with American minister to France Robert R. Livingston for concessions in the reached 300,000 now and people are becoming aware that a single person is not on equal footing with the million-
Louisiana Territory. dollar industries they might like to bargain with.
January 1803: Westward Movement: In a message to Congress, President Jefferson requests an appropriation to 20 January 1874: National: Under great pressure from a shocked nation, Congress repeals the “Salary Grab” Act
finance a western expedition with the goal of establishing friendly relations with the Indians and extending Ameri- of 1873. It leaves intact raises for the President and Supreme Court Justices but forgoes raises for itself.
can internal commercial boundaries. Congress grants the president’s request. 10 January 1878: The Women’s Suffrage Amendment is introduced into Congress.
January 1806: Arts/Culture: Connecticut-born grammarian, lexicographer and Federalist journalist Noah Webster 24 January 1881: In Springer v. United States, the Supreme Court finds that income tax laws are constitutional.
issues his modest Compendius Dictionary of the English Language. With this volume, Webster has retreated from 01 January 1892: Immigration: Ellis Island becomes the golden door for foreigners coming to live in America.
his earlier efforts to Americanize the English language. Webster does not include such Americanisms as “belittle,” More than half a million immigrants are arriving yearly.
or “caucus,” but the basic intent of this work is to formulate a standardized English language in the United States. 04 January 1896: Utah enters the Union as the 45th State. Its constitution includes women’s suffrage.
01 January 1808: Slavery: According to Article I, Section 9 of the United States Constitution, Congress has been 1896: Arts/Culture: The first comic strip, “The Yellow Kid,” first appears in the New York World. “The Yellow
banned from passing any legislation affecting the foreign slave trade before 1808. On this date, a congressional law, Kid” will give his name to an entire genre of journalism, the sensationalistic, jingoistic, “yellow journalism.”
passed on March 2, 1807, forbidding the importation of slaves into the United States becomes effective. As recom- Expanding Resources 1901-1945
mended by President Jefferson, the African slave trade law calls for the forfeiture of the importing ship and its slave 26 January 1907: Finally responsive to public anger at the blatant way some of the captains of industry have been
cargo. The state that makes the seizure is to dispose of the slaves. corrupting public official, Congress passes an act forbidding corporations from contributing to election campaigns
for national office.
Article I Section 9: 24 January 1916: National: The Supreme Court finds that a federal income tax is constitutional.
“The Migration or Importation of such Persons as any of the States now existing shall think proper to 16 January 1920: Prohibition: The 18th Amendment brings about a new era as it goes into effect at midnight.
admit, shall not be prohibited by the Congress prior to the Year one thousand eight hundred and eight,…” From this intentionally moral legislation will come some of the shadiest people and practices in American history.
05 January 1925: Continuing its tradition of fairness in its treatment of women, Wyoming inaugurates the country’s
January 1819: National: Congress fails to endorse a report sponsored by Henry Clay, condemning Andrew Jackson’s first woman governor, Nellie Taylor Ross.
conduct in the First Seminole War in Florida. 1930: Life/Customs: A copy of James Joyce’s new novel, Ulysses, sent from its Paris publisher to a New York
01 January 1831: National: In Boston, William Lloyd Garrison, among the more radical of the abolitionists, publisher, is seized by the Bureau of Customs on the grounds that it is “obscene.”
begins publishing The Liberator, a newspaper dedicated to the abolition of slavery. He vows to continue publishing 1933: Arts/Culture: In a major decision for free speech and the creative arts, Federal Judge John Woolsey in New
the paper until slaves are freed. York lifts the ban on the importation and sale of James Joyce’s Ulysses (banned from the U.S. since its appearance
15 January 1831: Transportation: The “Best Friend” is the first American-make locomotive to actually carry in Paris in the 1920s).
passengers. It runs from Charleston to Hamburg on the South Carolina Railroad. Later this year, Isaac Dripps
Civil Rights
invents a device that will become standard on locomotives - the cowcatcher.
16 January 1786: Ideas/Beliefs: The Virginia legislature adopts an Ordinance of Religious Freedom. Although
21 January 1832: Slavery: The Virginia assembly debates abolition, and Thomas Jefferson Randolph, the grand-
this very same statute, written by Thomas Jefferson, had been voted down by the assembly in 1779, it now passes
son of Thomas Jefferson, presents an old Jeffersonian plan endorsing gradual emancipation.
when reintroduced by James Madison. The main thrust of this act, which is later to become the model for the first
03 January 1834: International: Stephen F. Austin goes to Mexico City to present a resolution from American
amendment to the United States Constitution, is to guarantee that no man can be forced to attend or support any
settlers in Texas stating their desire to separate from Mexico. The Mexican government arrests Austin and holds
church, nor may he be discriminated against because of his religious preference.
him in prison for eight months.
19 January 1869: The American Equal Rights Association meets in Washington DC. It is the beginning of an
30 January 1835: National: Richard Lawrence abruptly fires two pistols at President Jackson as he is leaving the
organized women’s movement. Susan Brownell Anthony is elected president.
House of Representatives chamber. The president is unharmed because both of Lawrence’s pistols misfire. Judged
12 January 1948: National: A United States Supreme Court decision dictates, in Sipeul v. Board of Regents of the
insane, Lawrence is committed to a lunatic asylum.
University of Oklahoma, that no state can discriminate against a law school applicant on the basis of race.
January 1843: Life/Customs: Dorothea Lynde Dix addresses the Massachusetts Legislature on the harsh treat-
23 January 1964: The 24th Amendment, eliminating the poll tax for eligibility in Federal elections, is ratified.
ment of the insane. She publishes her address and continues investigations that will lead to significant reforms.
23 January 1845: National: Congress acts to establish a uniform election day for all presidential elections. They
will take place on the first Tuesday following the first Monday in November in all states.
12 January 1846: International: John Slidell’s report on his unsuccessful attempt to negotiate with the President “22. But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness,
of Mexico reaches President Polk. The following day Polk orders General Zachary Taylor to move from the Nueces goodness, faithfulness, 23. gentleness and self-control. Against such
River to a position on or near the left bank of the Rio Grande River. Taylor’s “Army of Observation” now has nearly
3500 troops, about one-half of the United States Army. things there is no law.” -- Galatians 5:22-23

This Month in American History facts taken from The Almanac of American History by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. ISBN 0-399-51082-6 - Bold and Italic Emphasis Added

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4 The Antelope Valley Political Observer

What Exactly Is Section 8 Housing?


Code of Federal Regulations Title 24 Housing and Urban Development

Chapter IX Part 982 - Section 8 Tenant Based Assistance: Housing Choice Voucher Program
Subpart J – Housing Assistance Payments Contract Owner Responsibility
982.452 Owner responsibilities.
(a) The owner is responsible for performing all of the owner’s obligations under the HAP (Housing Assistance Payment), contract and the lease.
(b) the owner is responsible for:
(1) Performing all management and rental functions for the assisted unit, including selecting a voucher-holder to lease the unit, and deciding if the family is suitable for tenancy of the unit.
(6) Enforcing tenant obligations under the lease.

Subpart L – Family Obligations; Denial and Termination of Assistance


982.551 Obligations of participant.
(a) Purpose. This section states the obligations of a participant family under the program.
(b) Supplying required information—(1) The family must supply any information that the PHA or HUD determines is necessary in the administration of the program, including submission of required evidence
of citizenship or eligible immigration status (as provided by 24 CFR part 5). “Information” includes any requested certification, release or other documentation.
(d) Allowing PHA inspection. The family must allow the PHA to inspect the unit at reasonable times and after reasonable notice.
(e) Violation of lease. The family may not commit any serious or repeated violation of the lease.
(2) The composition of the assisted family residing in the unit must be approved by the PHA. The family must promptly inform the PHA of the birth, adoption or court-awarded custody of a child. The family must
request PHA approval to add any other family member as an occupant of the unit. No other person [i.e., nobody but members of the assisted family] may reside in the unit (except for a foster child or live-in aide
as provided in paragraph (h)(4) of this section).
(5) Members of the household may engage in legal profitmaking activities in the unit, but only if such activities are incidental to primary use of the unit for residence by members of the family.
(l) Crime by household members. The members of the household may not engage in drug-related criminal activity or violent criminal activity or other criminal activity that threatens the health, safety or right to
peaceful enjoyment of other residents and persons residing in the immediate vicinity of the premises (see §982.553).
(m) Alcohol abuse by household members. The members of the household must not abuse alcohol in a way that threatens the health, safety or right to peaceful enjoyment of other residents and persons residing
in the immediate vicinity of the premises.

982.553 Denial of admission and termination of assistance for criminals and alcohol abusers.
(a) Denial of admission. (1) Prohibiting admission of drug criminals.
(i) The PHA must prohibit admission to the program of an applicant for three years from the date of eviction if a household member has been evicted from federally assisted housing for drug-related criminal
activity. However, the PHA may admit the household if the PHA determines:
(A) That the evicted household member who engaged in drug-related criminal activity has successfully completed a supervised drug rehabilitation program approved by the PHA; or
(B) That the circumstances leading to eviction no longer exist (for example, the criminal household member has died or is imprisoned).
(ii) The PHA must establish standards that prohibit admission if:
(A) The PHA determines that any household member is currently engaging in illegal use of a drug;
(B) The PHA determines that it has reasonable cause to believe that a household member’s illegal drug use or a pattern of illegal drug use may threaten the health, safety, or right to peaceful enjoyment
of the premises by other residents; or
(2) Prohibiting admission of other criminals—(i) Mandatory prohibition. The PHA must establish standards that prohibit admission to the program if any member of the household is subject to a lifetime
registration requirement under a State sex offender registration program. In this screening of applicants, the PHA must perform criminal history background checks necessary to determine whether any household
member is subject to a lifetime sex offender registration requirement in the State where the housing is located and in other States where the household members are known to have resided.
(ii) Permissive prohibitions. (A) The PHA may prohibit admission of a household to the program if the PHA determines that any household member is currently engaged in, or has engaged in during a reasonable
time before the admission:
(1) Drug-related criminal activity;
(2) Violent criminal activity;
(3) Other criminal activity which may threaten the health, safety, or right to peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other residents or persons residing in the immediate vicinity; or
(4) Other criminal activity which may threaten the health or safety of the owner, property management staff, or persons performing a contract administration function or responsibility on behalf of the PHA
(including a PHA employee or a PHA contractor, subcontractor or agent).
(B) The PHA may establish a period before the admission decision during which an applicant must not to have engaged in the activities specified in paragraph (a)(2)(i) of this section (“reasonable time”).
(C) If the PHA previously denied admission to an applicant because a member of the household engaged in criminal activity, the PHA may reconsider the applicant if the PHA has sufficient evidence that the
members of the household are not currently engaged in, and have not engaged in, such criminal activity during a reasonable period, as determined by the PHA, before the admission decision.
(1) The PHA would have “sufficient evidence” if the household member submitted a certification that she or he is not currently engaged in and has not engaged in such criminal activity during the specified period
and provided supporting information from such sources as a probation officer, a landlord, neighbors, social service agency workers and criminal records, which the PHA verified.
(2) For purposes of this section, a household member is “currently engaged in” criminal activity if the person has engaged in the behavior recently enough to justify a reasonable belief that the behavior is current.
(3) Prohibiting admission of alcohol abusers. The PHA must establish standards that prohibit admission to the program if the PHA determines that it has reasonable cause to believe that a household member’s
abuse or pattern of abuse of alcohol may threaten the health, safety, or right to peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other residents.
(b) Terminating assistance—(1) Terminating assistance for drug criminals. (i) The PHA must establish standards that allow the PHA to terminate assistance for a family under the program if the PHA determines that:
(A) Any household member is currently engaged in any illegal use of a drug; or
(B) A pattern of illegal use of a drug by any household member interferes with the health, safety, or right to peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other residents.
(iii) The PHA must establish standards that allow the PHA to terminate assistance under the program for a family if the PHA determines that any family member has violated the family’s obligation under §982.551
not to engage in any drug-related criminal activity.
(2) Terminating assistance for other criminals. The PHA must establish standards that allow the PHA to terminate assistance under the program for a family if the PHA determines that any household member has
violated the family’s obligation under §982.551 not to engage in violent criminal activity.
(3) Terminating assistance for alcohol abusers. The PHA must establish standards that allow termination of assistance for a family if the PHA determines that a household member’s abuse or pattern of abuse of
alcohol may threaten the health, safety, or right to peaceful enjoyment of the premises by other residents.
(c) Evidence of criminal activity. The PHA may terminate assistance for criminal activity by a household member as authorized in this section if the PHA determines, based on a preponderance of the evidence,
that the household member has engaged in the activity, regardless of whether the household member has been arrested or convicted for such activity.
(d) Use of criminal record.—(1) Denial. If a PHA proposes to deny admission for criminal activity as shown by a criminal record, the PHA must provide the subject of the record and the applicant with a copy
of the criminal record. The PHA must give the family an opportunity to dispute the accuracy and relevance of that record, in the informal review process in accordance with §982.554. (See part 5, subpart J for
provision concerning access to criminal records.)
(2) Termination of assistance. If a PHA proposes to terminate assistance for criminal activity as shown by a criminal record, the PHA must notify the household of the proposed action to be based on the
information and must provide the subject of the record and the tenant with a copy of the criminal record. The PHA must give the family an opportunity to dispute the accuracy and relevance of that record in
accordance with §982.555.
(3) Cost of obtaining criminal record. The PHA may not pass along to the tenant the costs of a criminal records check.

Introducing A New TAVPO Feature - WORD OF THE MONTH -


TMESIS
Tmesis (TMEE-sis), plural Tmeses, noun: in grammar and rhetoric, the separation of the parts of a compound word, now generally done for humorous effect .

Example Sentences:

“In two words, im possible.” - Samuel Goldwyn


“Immediately after last summer’s Supreme Court eminent domain decision, my city gub mnt’ put into motion the process to seize my land to build a new strip mall.” - Thomas Fitzgerald

Advertise in The Antelope Valley Political Observer 661.435.9220


January 2006 5

EXTRA
As a service to the reader, The Antelope Valley Political Observer has included a special four page pull-out of select legislation that crossed the Governor’s desk in 2005.

Signed
AB 1045 by Assemblymember Dario Frommer (D-Los Feliz) - Payers’ Bill of Rights: procedure charges.
Pass Assembly 47-32 Sharon Runner: No
Pass Senate 22-15 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law provides for the licensure and regulation of health facilities by the State Department of Health Services. A violation of those provisions is a misdemeanor.
The existing Payers’ Bill of Rights requires each hospital to compile a list of the charges for 25 services or procedures commonly charged to patients. Beginning July 1, 2004, existing law requires each hospital
to make that list available to any person upon request and to file the list annually with the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development.
This bill would recast those provisions to require each hospital to compile a list of the average charges for 25 common outpatient procedures and the 25 most common inpatient procedures, as grouped by
Medicare diagnostic-related group (DRG), and to submit these lists to the office. The bill would require each hospital to provide a list of average charges for outpatient procedures to the office and would require
the office to publish this information on its Internet Web site. The bill would require certain information to be updated by the office at least annually.
Existing law authorizes the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development to compile a list of the 10 most common Medicare DRGs and the average charge for each of these DRGs per hospital and to
publish that information on its Internet Web site.
This bill would repeal those provisions.
Except for the provision of emergency services, this bill would require a hospital, upon the request of a person with no health coverage, to provide the person with a written estimate of the amount the hospital will require
the person to pay for the health care services, procedures, and supplies that are reasonably expected to be provided to the person by the hospital and an application for financial assistance or charity care.
This bill would provide that any hospital that does not file the information required by the Payers’ Bill of Rights may be liable for civil penalties.

AB 1194 by Assemblymember Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach) - Entertainment: emergency exits.


Pass Assembly 57-20 Sharon Runner: Aye
Pass Senate 23-9 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
1) Existing law requires the State Fire Marshal to prepare and adopt regulations establishing minimum requirements for the prevention of fire and for the protection of life and property against fire and panic in,
among other things, any assembly occupancy where 50 or more persons may gather together in a building, room, or structure for the purpose of amusement, entertainment, instruction, deliberation, worship,
drinking or dining, awaiting transportation, or education.
This bill would require that any person, as specified, that owns, rents, leases, or manages a facility, as defined, that hosts a ticketed event for live entertainment make an announcement of the availability of
emergency exits prior to the beginning of the live entertainment. Because a violation of this provision would be a misdemeanor, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program by creating a new crime.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. Section 13113.6 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:
13113.6. (a) Any person, or public or private firm, organization, or corporation, that owns, rents, leases, or manages a facility that hosts a ticketed event for live entertainment shall make an announcement of the
availability of emergency exits prior to the beginning of the live entertainment.
(b) As used in this section, “facility” means a building or portion of a building having an assembly room with an occupancy load of less than 1,000 persons and a legitimate stage for the gathering
together of 50 or more persons as defined pursuant to Division 2 of Section 303.1.1 of Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations (California Building Code of 2001).

AB 1400 by Assemblymember John Laird (D-Santa Cruz) - Civil Rights Act.


Pass Assembly 48-29 Sharon Runner: No
Pass Senate 22-16 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
The Unruh Civil Rights Act generally prohibits business establishments from discriminating on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability, or medical condition. The Unruh Civil
Rights Act provides civil remedies for violations of its provisions.
This bill would further prohibit that discrimination on the basis of marital status or sexual orientation, and would define related terms. The bill would also integrate those definitions into other related provisions,
and would make specified findings and declarations in that regard.

SB 670 by Senator Joe Dunn (D-Santa Ana) - Mexican repatriation program of the 1930s.
Pass Assembly 52-20 Sharon Runner: No
Pass Senate 23-9 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
This bill would enact the “Apology Act for the 1930s Mexican Repatriation Program” and make findings and declarations regarding the unconstitutional removal and coerced emigration of United States citizens
and legal residents of Mexican descent, between the years 1929 and 1944, to Mexico from the United States during the 1930s “Mexican Repatriation” Program.
The bill would express the apology of the State of California to those individuals who were illegally deported and coerced into emigrating to Mexico and would require that a plaque to commemorate those
individuals be installed and maintained by the Department of Parks and Recreation in an appropriate public place in Los Angeles.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. Chapter 8.5 (commencing with Section 8720) is added to Division 1 of Title 2 of the Government Code, to read:
CHAPTER 8.5. MEXICAN REPATRIATION
8720. This chapter may be cited as the “Apology Act for the 1930s Mexican Repatriation Program.”
8721. The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Beginning in 1929, government authorities and certain private sector entities in California and throughout the United States undertook an aggressive program to forcibly remove persons of Mexican ancestry
from the United States.
(b) In California alone, approximately 400,000 American citizens and legal residents of Mexican ancestry were forced to go to Mexico.
(c) In total, it is estimated that two million people of Mexican ancestry were forcibly relocated to Mexico, approximately 1.2 million of whom had been born in the United States, including the State of California.
(d) Throughout California, massive raids were conducted on Mexican-American communities, resulting in the clandestine removal of thousands of people, many of whom were never able to return to the United
States, their country of birth.
(e) These raids also had the effect of coercing thousands of people to leave the country in the face of threats and acts of violence.
(f) These raids targeted persons of Mexican ancestry, with authorities and others indiscriminately characterizing these persons as “illegal aliens” even when they were United States citizens or permanent legal
residents.
(g) Authorities in California and other states instituted programs to wrongfully remove persons of Mexican ancestry and secure transportation arrangements with railroads, automobiles, ships, and airlines to
effectuate the wholesale removal of persons out of the United States to Mexico.
(h) As a result of these illegal activities, families were forced to abandon, or were defrauded of, personal and real property, which often was sold by local authorities as “payment” for the transportation expenses
incurred in their removal from the United States to Mexico.
(i) As a further result of these illegal activities, United States citizens and legal residents were separated from their families and country and were deprived of their livelihood and United States constitutional rights.
(j) As a further result of these illegal activities, United States citizens were deprived of the right to participate in the political process guaranteed to all citizens, thereby resulting in the tragic denial of due process
and equal protection of the laws.
8722. The State of California apologizes to those individuals described in Section 8721 for the fundamental violations of their basic civil liberties and constitutional rights committed during the
period of illegal deportation and coerced emigration. The State of California regrets the suffering and hardship those individuals and their families endured as a direct result of the government sponsored
Repatriation Program of the 1930s.
8723. A plaque commemorating the individuals described in Section 8721 shall be installed and maintained by the Department of Parks and Recreation at an appropriate public place in Los Angeles. If the plaque
is not located on state property, the department shall consult with the appropriate local jurisdiction to determine a site owned by the City or County of Los Angeles for location of the plaque.

SB 689 by Senator Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) - Vehicles: organ and tissue donors: registry.
Passed Assembly 72-1 Sharon Runner: Aye
Passed Senate 35-0 George Runner: Aye
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law authorizes the creation of a nonprofit entity designated as the California Organ and Tissue Donor Registrar, which is required to establish and maintain the California Organ and Tissue Donor Registry.
Existing law requires the Department of Motor Vehicles, upon issuance of a new driver’s license or a renewal of a driver’s license or the issuance of an identification card, to provide information on
organ and tissue donation, including a standardized form to be filled out by an individual who desires to enroll in the California Organ and Tissue Donor Registry with instructions for mailing the completed form
to the California Organ and Tissue Donor Registrar, and including a donor dot that may be affixed to the new driver’s license or identification card.
This bill, instead, would require the department to collect donor designation information on all applications for an original or renewal driver’s license or identification card.
The bill would require the department to electronically transmit donor designation information on a weekly basis to Donate Life California, a nonprofit organization, that is designated as the California Organ and
Tissue Donor Registrar.
The bill would require the department to print the word “DONOR” or another appropriate designation on the face of a driver’s license or identification card issued to certain persons registered as donors.
The bill would authorize a person who applies for an original or renewal driver’s license, or identification card to designate a voluntary contribution of $2 for the purpose of promoting and
supporting organ and tissue donation. The bill would require this contribution to be collected by the department, and treated as a voluntary contribution to Donate Life California and not as a fee for issuance of
a driver’s license or identification card.
The bill would create the Donate Life California Trust Subaccount in the Motor Vehicle Account in the State Transportation Fund. The bill would require the department to deposit the remaining moneys
contributed, after deduction of specified administrative costs, in the Donate Life California Trust Subaccount, which would be continuously appropriated to the Controller for allocation to Donate Life California
for the purpose of increasing participation in organ donation programs.
The bill would authorize a person between the age of 16 and 18 to designate himself or herself as an organ and tissue donor, subject to that person’s legal guardian making the final decision regarding the donation.
The bill would become operative on July 1, 2006.

SB 730 by Senator Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) - Organic products: aquaculture products.


Pass Assembly 50-28 Sharon Runner: No
Pass Senate 23-11 George Runner: Aye
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
The California Organic Products Act of 2003 regulates the production of products sold, labeled, or represented as organic. The act requires producers, handlers, and processors of organic products to pay a
registration fee to the State Department of Health Services based on gross sales of products sold as organic in the calendar year that precedes the date of registration. The act makes it a crime for any person to sell,
offer for sale, advertise, or label any product in violation of the act.
This bill would prohibit any aquaculture, fish, or seafood product from being labeled or represented as “organic” until formal organic certification standards have been developed and implemented by the United
States Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program or by the California Department of Food and Agriculture. Because a violation of this prohibition would be a crime under existing provisions of law,
this bill would impose a state-mandated local program by changing the definition of a crime.
6 The Antelope Valley Political Observer

SB 776 by George C. Runner (R-Antelope Valley) - Health care districts: mortgage insurance, loans, credit.
Passed Assembly 78-0
Passed Senate 38-0
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law provides for the formation and establishes the powers of a health care district. Existing law places limits on the extent to which a health care district may borrow money and incur indebtedness.
Existing law authorizes the board of directors of any district to borrow money or issue bonds and to execute first mortgages, first deeds of trust, or other necessary security interests exclusively for
the purpose of securing federal mortgage insurance or federal loans for financing or refinancing the construction of new health facilities, the expansion, modernization, renovation, remodeling, or
alteration of existing health facilities, and the initial equipping of those health facilities under the federal mortgage insurance programs available to a local hospital district.
This bill would add to the purposes for which the board of directors of a district may borrow money, issue bonds, or execute first mortgages, first deeds of trust, or other security interests, the purpose of securing
federally insured loans issued under the National Housing Act.
Existing law requires that any first mortgage, first deed of trust, or other necessary security interest be executed in favor of the United States or appropriate federal agency.
The bill would additionally authorize the board of directors to execute first mortgages, first deeds of trust, or other security interests in favor of a federally designated mortgagor.
Existing law states the Legislature’s determination that the United States or appropriate federal agency named as beneficiary of any first mortgage or other security interest delivered as authorized by this section
is not a private person or body for purposes of the California Constitution’s prohibition on the Legislature delegating to a private person or body the power to make, control, appropriate, supervise, or interfere with
county or municipal corporation improvements, money, or property, or to levy taxes or assessments, or perform municipal functions.
For purposes of the constitutional provision above, the bill would add that the Legislature determines that a federally designated mortgagor named as beneficiary of any first mortgage or other security interest is
not a private person or body.
The bill would authorize a district, by resolution adopted by a majority of the district board, to (1) enter into a line of credit with a commercial lender that is secured by the accounts receivable or other intangible
assets of the district, and thereafter borrow funds against the line of credit to be used for any district purpose, (2) enter into capital leases for the purchase by the district of equipment to be used for any district
purpose, and (3) enter into lease-purchase agreements for the purchase by the district of real property, buildings, and facilities to be used for any district purpose.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. The Legislature intends to provide California’s public hospitals owned and operated by health care districts with access to loans insured by the United States Department of Housing and Urban
Development to ensure that they are able to finance essential modernization and seismic safety retrofit and reconstruction projects. It is the intent of the Legislature that federally insured hospital loans be utilized
on a priority basis to finance essential retrofit and construction projects.
SEC. 2. Section 32127.3 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:
32127.3. (a) Exclusively for the purpose of securing federal mortgage insurance, federal loans, or federally insured loans issued pursuant to the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. Secs. 1715w and
1715z-7) for financing or refinancing the construction of new health facilities, the expansion, modernization, renovation, remodeling, or alteration of existing health facilities, and the initial equipping of those
health facilities under the federal mortgage insurance
programs as are now or may hereafter become available to a local hospital district, and notwithstanding any provision of this division, or any other provision or holding of law, the board of directors of any district
may do either or both of the following:
(1) Borrow money or issue bonds, in addition to other financing methods authorized under this division.
(2) Execute, in favor of the United States, appropriate federal agency, or federally designated mortgagor, first mortgages, first deeds of trust, or other necessary security interests as the federal
government may reasonably require with respect to a health facility project property as security for that insurance.
(b) No payments of principal, interest, insurance premiums and inspection fees, and all other costs of financing obtained as authorized by this section shall be made from funds derived from the district’s power to
tax.
(c) The Legislature hereby determines and declares that the authorizations for executing the mortgages, deeds of trust, or other necessary security agreements by the board and for the enforcement of the federal
government’s rights thereunder are in the public interest in order to preserve and promote the health, welfare, and safety of the people of the state by providing, without cost to the state, a federal mortgage insurance
program for health facility construction loans in order to stimulate the flow of private capital into health facilities construction to enable the critical need for new, expanded, and modernized public health facilities
to be met.
(d) The Legislature further determines and declares that the United States, appropriate federal agency, or federally designated mortgagor named as beneficiary of any first mortgage or other
security interest delivered as authorized by this section is not a private person or body within the meaning of Section 11 of Article XI of the California Constitution.
SEC. 3. Section 32130.6 is added to the Health and Safety Code, to read:
32130.6. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a district may do any of the following by resolution adopted by a majority of the district board:
(a) Enter into a line of credit with a commercial lender that is secured, in whole or in part, by the accounts receivable or other intangible assets of the district, including anticipated tax revenues, and thereafter borrow
funds against the line of credit to be used for any district purpose.
(1) Any money borrowed under this line of credit shall be repaid within five years from each separate borrowing or draw upon the line of credit.
(2) The district may enter into a new and separate line of credit to repay a previous line of credit, provided that the district complies with this section in entering into a new line of credit.
(b) Enter into capital leases for the purchase by the district of equipment to be used for any district purpose.
(1) The term of any capital lease shall not be longer than 10 years.
(2) The district may secure the purchase of equipment by a capital lease by giving the lender a security interest in the equipment leased under the capital lease.
(c) Enter into lease-purchase agreements for the purchase by the district of real property, buildings, and facilities to be used for any district purpose. The term of any lease-purchase agreement shall not exceed 10
years.
(d) Nothing in this section shall provide the district with the authority to increase taxes in order to repay a line of credit established pursuant to subdivision (a) unless the tax is passed pursuant to Article 4.6
(commencing with Section 53750) of Chapter 4 of Part 1 of Division 2 of Title 5 of the Government Code.

Veto
AB 13 by Assemblymember Jackie Goldberg (D-Los Angeles) - California Racial Mascots Act: athletic team names and mascots.
Passed Assembly 43-34 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 22-15 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
(1) Existing provisions of the Education Code relate to the prohibition of discrimination in the provision of educational services by elementary and secondary schools.
This bill would establish the California Racial Mascots Act, which would prohibit public schools from using the term Redskins as a school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname commencing January 1, 2007.
The bill would provide that the act does not apply to a school or campus if certain conditions regarding prior expenditures on uniforms and other materials are met, as specified. The bill would, in addition, provide
that the act does not apply to certain schools located within, or with enrollment boundaries that include a portion of, “Indian country,” as defined, if certain conditions are met. The bill would also provide that this
prohibition may not be waived by the State Board of Education. To the extent that this prohibition would impose additional duties on schools, the bill would create a state-mandated local program.
(2) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that
reimbursement.
This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. Article 3 (commencing with Section 221.2) is added to Chapter 2 of Part 1 of the Education Code, to read:
Article 3. The California Racial Mascots Act
221.2. The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) The use of racially derogatory or discriminatory school or athletic team names, mascots, or nicknames in California public schools is antithetical to the California school mission of providing an equal education to all.
(b) Certain athletic team names, mascots, and nicknames that have been and remain in use by other teams, including school teams, in other parts of the nation are discriminatory in singling out the
Native American/American Indian community for the derision to which mascots or nicknames are often subjected.
(c) Many individuals and organizations interested and experienced in human relations, including the United States Commission on Civil Rights, have concluded that the use of Native American images and names
in school sports is a barrier to equality and understanding, and that all residents of the United States would benefit from the discontinuance of their use.
(d) No individual or school has a cognizable interest in retaining a racially derogatory or discriminatory school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname.
221.3. (a) Commencing on January 1, 2007, all public schools are prohibited from using the term Redskins for school or athletic team names, mascots, or nicknames.
(b) This section does not apply to a school located within, or with enrollment boundaries that include a portion of, “Indian country,” as defined in Section 1151 of Title 18 of the United States
Code, provided that the tribe having regulatory jurisdiction over the territory within that boundary has authorized the use of the school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname through an appropriate enactment
or resolution.
(c) Notwithstanding this section, a school may continue to use uniforms or other materials bearing the term Redskins as a school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname that were purchased before January 1,
2007, if all of the following requirements are met:
(1) The school selects a new school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname.
(2) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the school refrains from purchasing or acquiring, for the purpose of distribution or sale to pupils or school employees, any uniform that includes or bears the term Redskins.
(B) Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), prior to January 1, 2009, a school using uniforms that bear the term Redskins may purchase or acquire a number of uniforms equal to up to 20 percent of the total number
of uniforms used by a team or band at that school during the 2006-07 school year for the purposes of replacing damaged or lost uniforms.
(3) Refrains from purchasing or acquiring, for the purpose of distribution or sale to pupils or school employees, any yearbook, newspaper, program, or other similar material that includes or bears the prohibited
school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname in its logo or cover title.
(4) Refrains from purchasing or constructing a marquee, sign, or other new or replacement fixture that includes or bears the prohibited school or athletic team name, mascot, or nickname.
(d) This section is not subject to waiver by the State Board of Education pursuant to Section 33050, except as specified in this section.

To the Members of the California State Assembly:


I am returning Assembly Bill 13 without my signature. I vetoed a nearly identical bill last year because it added another non-academic state administrative requirement, thereby diverting focus from increasing
student academic achievement. Administrative decisions regarding athletic team names, nicknames or mascots should be retained at the local level. Therefore, I am unable to sign this bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

AB 605 by Assemblymember Alan Nakanishi (R-Lodi) - Pupils: suspension and expulsion.


Passed Assembly 78-0 Sharon Runner: Aye
Passed Senate 34-1 George Runner: Aye
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law authorizes a superintendent or principal of a school to suspend or expel a pupil who commits one or more of enumerated acts. This bill would authorize a superintendent or principal of a school to
suspend a pupil who knowingly makes a false accusation to a school employee that another school employee has committed or attempted to commit a sexual assault against that pupil, as defined.

To the Members of the California State Assembly:


I am returning Assembly Bill 605 without my signature. While I abhor the conduct of any student who would threaten the reputation of a school teacher or other school employee by making false claims of sexual assault,
I have a greater responsibility to protect the well being of California’s school children. We must do everything possible to ensure that students who have been the victims of actual or attempted sexual assaults may come
forward and report these incidents without fear of retribution. This bill could potentially result in a chilling effect on students’ willingness to report. For these reasons, I am unable to sign this bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

AB 738 by Assemblymember Joe Nation (D-San Rafael) - Elections


Passed Assembly 44-33 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 24-13 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law requires that any state or local initiative petition, as specified, contain a statement, as described, notifying the public that the petition may be circulated by either a paid or a volunteer signature gatherer,
and that the public has the right to ask.
This bill would require an individual who receives compensation to circulate an initiative, referendum, or recall petition to wear a badge stating, in no smaller than 30-point font, that he or she is a “paid” signature
gatherer. The bill would require the individual circulating the initiative, referendum, or recall petition to wear the badge on his or her chest in clear view of all individuals
signing or asked to sign the petition.
January 2006 7

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. Section 101.5 is added to the Elections Code, to read:
101.5. (a) An individual who receives compensation to circulate an initiative, referendum, or recall petition shall identify himself or herself as a paid signature gatherer by wearing a badge stating “PAID
SIGNATURE GATHERER.”
(b) The individual circulating an initiative, referendum, or recall petition shall wear the badge required by subdivision (a) on his or her chest in clear view of all individuals signing or asked to
sign the petition.
(c) The print on the badge shall be no smaller than 30-point font.

To the Members of the California State Assembly:


I am returning AB 738 without my signature. This bill requires an individual who is paid to collect signatures on any state or local initiative, referendum or petition to wear a badge stating “Paid Signature Gatherer.” I agree
with Governor Davis and Governor Wilson, who returned similar measures without their signature, that this bill is unnecessary. Under existing law, petitions must contain the following notice in 12 point type: NOTICE
TO THE PUBLIC – THIS PETITION IS BEING CIRCULATED BY A PAID SIGNATURE GATHERER OR A VOLUNTEER. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO ASK. I see no compelling reason to change existing law.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

AB 1070 by Assemblymember Dave Cogdill (R-Modesto) - Community colleges: fees for loss or damage of district instructional equipment.
Passed Assembly 75-2 Sharon Runner: Aye (Goldberg/Mountjoy-Noes)
Passed Senate 34-1 George Runner: Aye (McClintock-No)
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges. Existing law authorizes the establishment of
community college districts under the administration of community college governing boards, and authorizes these districts to provide instruction at community college campuses throughout the state. Existing law
also authorizes community college governing boards to charge students various fees, including fees for enrollment in and auditing of courses, health services, parking, transportation, and the construction and
operation of student body centers.
This bill would authorize a community college district governing board to charge any enrolled student a fee to recover the costs of replacing or repairing instructional equipment that is owned or leased by the
district and that has been lost or damaged by that student. The bill would require that the amount of the fee charged to any student under this section not exceed the district’s good-faith estimate of the cost it will
incur in replacing or repairing the equipment that the student has lost or damaged. The bill would require that the amount of the fee be reduced to the extent that certain funds are available to cover all or part of the
cost. The bill would require that, if a fee is charged as a condition of enrollment in a course or courses, the fee be refunded to the student at the end of the term if he or she is not responsible for loss or damage to
equipment covered by the fee.

To Members of the California State Assembly:


I am returning Assembly Bill 1070 without my signature.
I respect the author’s intent to address the reasonable issue of allowing local community colleges to charge students for the costs of replacing or repairing instructional equipment that has been lost or damaged. The
ability to recoup such costs encourages personal responsibility and the exercise of care in using valuable equipment. However, this bill would allow community colleges to assess fees as a condition of enrollment
in a course or courses, with no limit on the amount that could be charged. I am concerned that, depending on the level of fees and the number of courses in which they are charged, this bill could deter some
promising students of limited means from choosing to pursue a course of study that requires the use of costly instructional equipment. As a result, this bill could have a negative impact on the number of students
who choose to enter the important career fields such as science, medicine, or nursing. I encourage the Legislature to work with my Administration in crafting legislation that avoids these unintended consequences.
Therefore, in its current form, I am unable to sign this bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

SB 60 by Senator Gilbert Cedillo (D-Los Angeles) - Vehicles: driver’s license.


Passed Assembly 41-34 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 21-16 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
(1) Existing law requires the Department of Motor Vehicles (hereafter the department), upon proper application, to issue driver’s licenses and identification cards.
This bill would require the department, in the issuance of driver’s licenses and identification cards, to issue licenses and cards that are in compliance with specified requirements of the federal Real ID Act of 2005
(Public Law 109-13).
The bill, after notice of the adoption of final regulations implementing the federal Real ID Act of 2005 is published in the Federal Register, but no later than May 12, 2008, would require the
department to issue driver’s licenses that permit driving and are acceptable by a federal agency for any official purpose, as certified by the federal Secretary of Homeland Security, to those applicants who are in compliance
with specified requirements of specified provisions of the federal act.
The bill would also require the department, in compliance with the federal act, and no later than 240 days after the above-described notice is published in the Federal Register, to issue driver’s licenses that permit driving,
and are not acceptable by a federal agency for federal identification or for any other official purpose, to those applicants who do not provide valid documentary evidence of lawful status under the federal act.
(2) Existing law requires the department to require every applicant for an original driver’s license or identification card to submit satisfactory proof that the applicant’s presence in the United States is autho-
rized under federal law and prohibits the department from issuing a license or card to a person who does not do so. Existing law requires the department to adopt regulations, including
procedures for verifying citizenship or legal residency of applicants for driver’s licenses and identification cards, and to make a specified report, annually.
This bill would repeal those requirements on the date that the Secretary of State receives a notice from the Director of Motor Vehicles indicating that the department is in compliance with the implementation of the
federal Real ID Act of 2005.
This bill would, however, until the date of receipt by the Secretary of State of the notice, described above, require the department to accept an original notice of action document that contains a valid application
verification number and is issued by a regional service center of the federal Citizenship and Immigration Service (CIS) of the United States Department of Homeland Security, as proof that the driver’s license
applicant’s presence in the United States is authorized under federal law.
The bill would require the department to use the Case Status Service Online Internet Web site of the CIS, or any other verification mechanism deemed acceptable by the CIS and the department, to verify an
applicant’s pending status.
The bill would require a driver’s license issued to a person eligible under these provisions to be for a limited term of 30 months. The bill would require the department to renew the license for consecutive one-year
periods until the date the department determines that the CIS has taken a final action on the applicant’s legal residency application, or until the department has implemented the provisions of the federal Real ID Act
of 2005, whichever date occurs first.
The bill would require the department to commence implementation of the provisions relating to acceptance of CIS documents as proof of an applicant’s lawful presence on or before March 1, 2006.
(3) Existing law makes it a misdemeanor for any person to knowingly assist in obtaining a driver’s license or identification card for any person whose presence in the United States is not authorized under federal law.
This bill would delete that provision.
(4) The bill would provide that its provisions are severable.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 60 without my signature.
This bill is premature and could undermine national security efforts to identify individuals who pose enormous risk to the safety of Californians. I have repeatedly stated that the ability to verify documents used
to establish an identity must include a way to determine whether an individual is who he or she purports to be and must include a criminal background check. In addition, enacting this bill will result in millions of
dollars being spent on a process that ultimately could conflict with federal regulations. Once the federal rule making is finalized, it would be appropriate to engage in discussions relating to implementation of the
Act, including whether or not a driving only certificate is appropriate in California. For these reasons I am unable to sign this bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

SB 72 by Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review - Instructional materials: English language learners
Passed Assembly 50-28 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 22-13 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law requires the State Board of Education to adopt at least five separate basic instructional materials, as defined, for use in kindergarten and each of grades 1 to 8, inclusive, in language arts, mathematics,
science, social science, bilingual or bicultural subjects, and any other subject, discipline or interdisciplinary areas for which the state board determines the adoption of instructional materials to be necessary or
desirable. This bill would provide specified funding to school districts to provide supplementary instructional materials specifically for English language learners in kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, for
the purpose of accelerating those pupils as rapidly as possible toward grade level proficiency, with certain requirements. The bill would appropriate $20,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of
Education to provide supplemental instructional materials for English language learners in accordance with these provisions.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 72 without my signature.
While I support all efforts to ensure that English Learners attain English proficiency as rapidly as possible, this bill would appropriate $20 million for supplemental instructional materials that is in addition to the
$30 million appropriation that was authorized a year ago. Despite being appropriated more than a year ago in the 2004-05 Budget Act, the funds are only now being apportioned to school districts this month, with
the final apportionment to arrive in the spring of next year. Clearly, the additional $20 million appropriated in this bill is premature. It would be more prudent to determine whether the materials school districts
eventually purchase are, in fact, effective in helping students gain English language proficiency before authorizing an additional $20 million. For this reason, I cannot support the bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

SB 338 by Senator Abel Maldonado (R-Santa Maria) - School curricula: Internet safety.
Passed Assembly 72-0 Sharon Runner: Absent/Abstain
Passed Senate 39-0 George Runner: Aye
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law prescribes various matters to be included in the adopted course of study at the appropriate elementary and secondary grade levels.
This bill would authorize the State Department of Education, in cooperation with industry, and nonprofit organizations involved with Internet safety, to identify existing Internet safety programs and make that
information available on its Web site for use in public schools.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Pupils are spending increasingly greater amounts of time interacting on the Internet in the course of both research and social interaction.
(b) With the increase in worldwide Internet use, many safety concerns have arisen with regard to Internet use, including concerns as to personal safety, privacy, and the protection of intellectual property.
(c) Increased use of the Internet as an educational tool has raised concerns in the areas of cheating, plagiarism, and illegal downloading, and pupils are more tempted than ever to engage in unethical, and sometimes
unlawful, practices in these areas. Without providing warnings or raising pupil awareness as to these dangers, the ease of Internet use and the availability of resources is likely to cause some younger pupils to engage
in these practices ignorantly.
(d) The risks and dangers that are increasingly associated with Internet use are as real and as dangerous to pupils and to society as the more familiar physical dangers addressed in school safety plans and codes of
conduct, and it is in the best interests of the state to educate pupils concerning these risks and dangers.
SEC. 2. Chapter 5.8 (commencing with Section 51950) is added to Part 28 of the Education Code, to read:
CHAPTER 5.8. INTERNET SAFETY EDUCATION
51950. The department, in cooperation with industry, and nonprofit organizations involved with Internet safety, is authorized to identify existing Internet safety programs and make that information available on
its Web site for use in public schools. The department is authorized to act as liaison between the schools and school districts and the industry and nonprofit organizations involved with Internet safety.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 338 without my signature. While I believe that Internet safety is important, this bill does virtually nothing to ensure districts do more to protect students from accessing inappropriate
websites. The Superintendent of Public Instruction has the authority and should already be taking all of the necessary steps to protect children in schools even without this bill. Therefore, I am unable to sign this
bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger
8 The Antelope Valley Political Observer

SB 469 by Senator Debra Bowen (D-Marina del Rey) - Petitions: initiative, referendum, recall.
Passed Assembly 46-32 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 23-15 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Under existing law, an initiative petition must contain specified language advising the public of its right to determine whether the person circulating the petition is a paid signature gatherer or a volunteer.
This bill instead would require an initiative, referendum, or recall petition to reflect, in specified language, whether it is being circulated by a paid circulator or by a volunteer.
This bill would define “volunteer” and “paid circulator.”
This bill would additionally require any state or local initiative, referendum, or recall petition circulated by a paid circulator who is paid by a committee, as defined, to include a disclosure statement identifying the names
of the persons from whom the committee received the 5 largest cumulative contributions in support of the measure, as specified. The bill would require that if more than 5 donors meet this disclosure threshold at identical
contribution levels, the 5 highest donations be disclosed according to chronological sequence and if the major donors share a common employer, the identity of the employer be disclosed. The bill would require this
disclosure statement to be updated within 7 days of any change in the 5 largest cumulative contributors. The bill would require a committee that employs one or more paid circulators for the purpose of circulating an
initiative, referendum, or recall petition to submit a disclosure statement, and any updates to that statement, to the Secretary of State to post that statement on his or her Internet Web site.
By imposing additional requirements on local elections officials with respect to petitions, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these statutory provisions.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 469 without my signature.
When special interests dominate Sacramento, the only recourse the people of California have is the initiative, the referendum and the recall. As I have previously said, at the very heart of the initiative process is
the 1st Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the core value of political speech. Any burden placed on either of these fundamental rights of Californians must be examined through a lens that favors the right
of the people to address grievances with the government through initiatives, referendums, and recalls. This bill requires different notices on petitions to reflect whether it is being circulated by a paid or volunteer
circulator. The paid or volunteer status of a circulator has no bearing on the merits of the petition being presented to voters. Furthermore, under existing law, petitions must contain the following notice in 12 point
type: NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC - THIS PETITION IS BEING CIRCULATED BY A PAID SIGNATURE GATHERER OR A VOLUNTEER. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO ASK. This bill attacks the
initiative process and makes it more difficult for the people of California to gather signatures and qualify measures for the ballot. While difficulty of the process may be a good thing for big-money special interests
and for political consultants who stand to gain financially, it is not for everyday Californians with an idea for reform.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

SB 645 by Senator Joe Dunn (D-Santa Ana) - Mexican repatriation: commission


Passed Assembly 46-29 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 27-10 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
(1) Existing law establishes various advisory boards and commissions in state government with specified duties and responsibilities. This bill would, until January 1, 2008, create The Commission on the
Unconstitutional Deportation of American Citizens During the 1930’s within state government. The bill would require the commission to, among other things, gather facts regarding, and conduct a study of, the
unconstitutional removal and coerced emigration of United States citizens and legal residents of Mexican descent, between 1929 and 1944, to Mexico during the 1930’s “Repatriation” Program.
The bill would require the commission to hold public hearings and make a written report to the Governor and the Legislature concerning its actions and its findings and recommendations not later than July 1, 2009.
The bill would provide that the commission may apply for and accept private funding once the commission has been convened. The bill would preclude expenditure of state funds for these purposes.
The bill would provide that the commission terminates 6 months after it transmits its final report to the Governor and the Legislature on July 1, 2009.
(2) The bill would also establish the 1930’s Reparations Fund in the General Fund and a 9-member board of directors appointed by the Governor with the consent of the Senate, with specified duties for
administering the fund and making compensation to eligible individuals. The bill would specify the duties of the board and require the board to make a report on its activities to the Governor and the Legislature
beginning every 6 months after the first meeting of the board. The board would terminate 90 days after the termination of the fund.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 645 without my signature.
This bill is substantially similar to Senate Bill 427 that I vetoed last year. The establishment of a new commission is not necessary. The Legislature and the Administration can create commissions to advise them
without the need for legislation. As I stated last year, the Legislature and the Administration have many resources to advise them on the issues that this commission is being created for. For these reasons I am
returning Senate Bill 645 without my signature.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

SB 672 by Senator Dave Cox (R-Fair Oaks) - Community colleges: inmate education programs: computation of apportionments.
Passed Assembly 76-2 Sharon Runner: Aye
Passed Senate 35-2 George Runner: Aye
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law establishes the California Community Colleges under the administration of the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.
Existing law provides that, notwithstanding open course provisions in statute or regulations of the board of governors, the governing board of a community college district that provides classes for inmates of certain
facilities, including a federal correctional facility, may include the units of full-time equivalent students generated in those classes for purposes of state apportionments.
This bill would instead require the open course provisions in statute or regulations of the board of governors to be waived for any governing board of a community college district that provides those classes for inmates,
including inmates of state correctional facilities, and would authorize the board of governors to include the units of full-time equivalent students generated in those classes for purposes of state apportionments.
Existing law provides for the method of computing apportionments for purposes of these inmate education programs.
This bill would make revisions to that method of computation.
The bill would prohibit a community college district from claiming, under the bill, for purposes of apportionments, any class for which a district receives full compensation for its direct education costs for the
conduct of the class from any public or private agency, individual, or group of individuals, and any class offered pursuant to a contract or instructional agreement entered into between the district and a public or
private agency, individual, or group of individuals that has received from another source full compensation for the costs the district incurs under that contract or instructional agreement, as prescribed.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. Section 84810.5 of the Education Code is amended to read:
84810.5. (a) Open course provisions in statute or regulations of the board of governors shall be waived for any governing board of a community college district that provides classes for inmates of any city, county,
or city and county jail, road camp, farm for adults, or state or federal correctional facility. This section shall not be construed to authorize the waiver of open course provisions in any context or situation other than
those that are specifically authorized in this section. Subject to limitations set forth in subdivision (b), the board of governors may include the units of full-time equivalent students (FTES) generated in those classes
for purposes of state apportionment. The attendance hours generated by credit or noncredit shall be added and counted for apportionment purposes.
(b) (1) No community college district may claim for purposes of state apportionment under this section any class to which either of the following applies:
(A) The district receives full compensation for its direct education costs for the conduct of the class from any public or private agency, individual, or group of individuals.
(B) The district has a contract or instructional agreement, or both, for the conduct of the class with a public or private agency, individual, or group of individuals, that has received from another source full
compensation for the costs the district incurs under that contract or instructional agreement.
(2) In reporting a claim for apportionment to the chancellor under this section, the district shall report any partial compensation it receives from the sources described in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of paragraph
(1) during the period for which the claim is made. The chancellor shall subtract the amount of any partial compensation received from the total apportionment to be paid.
(c) This section shall not be construed as providing a source of funds to shift, supplant, or reduce the costs incurred by the Department of Corrections in providing inmate education programs.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 672 without my signature.
This bill would inappropriately authorize community college districts to receive reimbursement at the “full-credit” reimbursement rate rather than the lower “non-credit” rate, for hours generated teaching credit
classes at state prisons. The higher rate results in an excessive reimbursement given that when providing instruction in a correctional setting, community colleges do not incur facility or other student services costs.
For this reason, I am unable to sign this bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

SB 675 by Senator Gilbert Cedillo (D-Los Angeles) - Vehicle forfeiture: safe transportation.
Passed Assembly 42-34 Sharon Runner: No
Passed Senate 21-14 George Runner: No
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST
Existing law authorizes a peace officer to either immediately arrest a person and cause the removal and seizure of the vehicle he or she was operating or, if the vehicle is involved in a traffic collision, cause the
removal and seizure of the vehicle, without the necessity of arresting the person, if the peace officer determines that the person was driving the vehicle while his or her driving privilege was suspended or revoked
or without having been issued a license. Existing law subjects a vehicle to forfeiture as a nuisance if it is driven on a highway by a driver with a suspended or revoked license, or by an unlicensed driver, as specified.
Existing law requires a vehicle to be impounded if its driver is unable to produce a valid driver’s license, except as specified.
This bill would declare the intent of the Legislature that any peace officer who causes the vehicle to be seized and impounded pursuant to those provisions shall provide safe transportation for the persons in the
vehicle who are not arrested, to an operating point of public transportation, as defined, the place of residence of the driver, or a safe place that has access to the use of a telephone, whichever is closer to the point
of seizure, unless the person waives that transportation.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:


SECTION 1. Section 14607.9 is added to the Vehicle Code, to read:
14607.9. It is the intent of the Legislature that any peace officer who seizes a vehicle pursuant to Section 14602.6 or 14607.6 shall provide or cause to be provided safe transportation for all persons traveling in
the vehicle who are not arrested, to an operating point of public transportation, the place of residence of the driver, or a safe place that has access to the use of a telephone, whichever is closer to the point of seizure,
unless the person waives that transportation. An “operating point of public transportation” means a bus station, subway station, or train station on a route operating within one hour of the time a peace officer leaves
a person at the station.

To the Members of the California State Senate:


I am returning Senate Bill 675 without my signature.
This bill would declare the legislative intent that any peace officer who seizes a vehicle for driving while unlicensed or driving with a suspended license, shall provide transportation for all persons traveling in the
vehicle. This bill is unnecessary because current law provides an appropriate incentive for peace officers to make necessary arrangements to ensure the safety of all occupants.
The provisions of this bill intend to restrict law enforcement by mandating that transportation be provided in a specified manner. Officers are trained to use their best judgment in each situation to decide where
the safest location to transport individuals left stranded after the seizure of a vehicle. The intent of this bill would severely affect law enforcement’s ability to maintain the current level of service provided to the
public, especially in rural areas where only one or two units may be on duty during night shifts.
In every area of the state, public safety could be compromised by requiring officers to take time to transport people for potentially long distances to the specified locations in statute when they should be responding
to emergencies, aiding disabled motorists, or proactively seeking DUI drivers.
For these reason I am unable to sign this bill.
Sincerely,
Arnold Schwarzenegger

Thomas Jefferson On: Too Rapid Growth by Immigration

“[Is] rapid population [growth] by as great importations of foreigners as possible...founded in good policy? They will bring with them the principles of the governments
they leave, imbibed in their early youth; or, if able to throw them off, it will be in exchange for an unbounded licentiousness, passing, as is usual, from one extreme to another.
It would be a miracle were they to stop precisely at the point of temperate liberty. These principles, with their language, they will transmit to their children. In proportion to
their number, they will share with us the legislation. They will infuse into it their spirit, warp and bias its direction, and render it a heterogeneous, incoherent, distracted
mass...If they come of themselves, they are entitled to all the rights of citizenship: but I doubt the expediency of inviting them by extraordinary encouragements.”
January 2006 9

Continued From Page 1


Runner vs. Runner George Sharon Arnold
AB 304 by Assemblymember Loni Hancock (D-Berkeley) - Building standards: reconstruction NO YES SIGNED
AB 322 by Assemblymember Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach) - Athletes’ Bill of Rights NO YES SIGNED
AB 363 by Assemblymember Judy Chu (D-Monterey Park) - Child and Family Service Review System NO YES SIGNED
AB 378 by Assemblymember Judy Chu (D-Monterey) - Statute of limitation: protected classes NO YES SIGNED
AB 428 by Assemblymember Mike Gordon (D-El Segundo) - Alcohol Beverage Control Fund: grant assistance program NO YES SIGNED
AB 443 by Assemblymember Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) - School food sales NO YES VETO
AB 459 by Assemblymember Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach) - Transfer of real property: YES NO SIGNED
disclosure of supplemental property taxes
AB 518 by Assemblymember Joe Canciamilla (D-Pittsburg) - State Budget: Department of Finance Reports NO YES VETO
AB 550 by Assemblymember Jackie Goldberg (D-Los Angeles) - Correctional institutions: sexual abuse NO YES SIGNED
AB 585 by Assemblymember Gloria Negrete McLeod (D-Chino) - Equipment dealers NO YES SIGNED
AB 649 by Assemblymember Nicole Parra (D-Hanford) - Tomatoes NO YES VETO
AB 689 by Assemblymember Pedro Nava (D-Santa Barbara) - Nutrition and physical activity curriculum NO YES SIGNED
AB 698 by Assemblymember Ray Haynes (R-Riverside) - Corrections: media access NO YES VETO
AB 726 by Assemblymember Jackie Goldberg (D-Los Angeles) - Adult instruction NO YES VETO
AB 729 by Assemblymember Paul Koretz (D-West Hollywood) - Production agencies: regulation NO YES SIGNED
AB 795 by Assemblymember Mark Ridley-Thomas (D-Leimert Park) - Public employment: state museum employees YES NO VETO
AB 800 by Assemblymember Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) - Medical records: patient’s spoken language NO YES SIGNED
AB 819 by Assemblymember Mark Ridley-Thomas (D-Leimert Park) - Taxpayer contributions: NO YES SIGNED
California Colorectal Cancer Prevention Fund
AB 826 by Assemblymember Pedro Nava (D-Santa Barbara) - California Farm to School
Child Nutrition Improvement Program NO YES VETO
AB 846 by Assemblymember Carol Liu (D-La Canada Flintridge) - Driver education: Internet: private secondary schools NO YES SIGNED
AB 927 by Assemblymember Gene Mullin (D-South San Francisco) - State preschool programs NO YES VETO
AB 1051 by Assemblymember John J. Benoit (R-Palm Desert) - Pocket bikes: restrictions NO YES SIGNED
AB 1065 by Assemblymember Barbara Matthews (D-Tracy) - Kitchen grease: transporters NO YES SIGNED
AB 1166 by Assemblymember Joe Canciamilla (D-Pittsburg) - Public employees’ benefits NO YES SIGNED
AB 1194 by Assemblymember Jenny Oropeza (D-Long Beach) - Entertainment: emergency exits NO YES SIGNED
AB 1230 by Assemblymember Mark Ridley-Thomas (D-Leimert Park) - Public hospitals: inspector general: NO YES VETO
Los Angeles County
AB 1351 by Assemblymember Juan Vargas (D-San Diego) - San Diego County Regional Airport Authority YES NO VETO
AB 1358 by Assemblymember Gene Mullin (D-South San Francisco) - Acquisition of proposed schoolsites: notice NO YES SIGNED
AB 1380 by Assemblymember Mike Gordon (D-El Segundo) - Telecommunications: new area codes NO YES VETO
AB 1424 by Assemblymember Lori Saldana (D-San Diego) - Taxation: delinquent tax liabilities: surplus line brokers YES NO SIGNED
AB 1431 by Assemblymember Lori Saldana (D-San Diego) - Fishing: trawl gear: halibut NO YES SIGNED
AB 1435 by Assemblymember Noreen Evans (D-Santa Rosa) - Court facilities YES NO SIGNED
AB 1438 by Assemblymember Simon Salinas (D-Salinas) - Local agencies: open meetings NO YES SIGNED

AB 1448 by Assemblymember Lori Saldana (D-San Diego) - Conflicts of interest NO YES VETO
AB 1565 by Assemblymember Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills) - Child day care facilities: star quality rating system: study NO YES VETO
AB 1593 by Assemblymember Joe Coto (D-San Jose) - Child nutrition NO YES VETO
AB 1610 by Assemblymember Lois Wolk (D-Davis) - Charter schools NO YES SIGNED
AB 1690 by Assemblymember John Laird (D-Santa Cruz) - Municipal services: University of California: Legislative Analyst NO YES VETO
AB 1736 by Assemblymember Lloyd Levine (D-San Fernando Valley) - Medi-Cal: disease management YES NO VETO
AB 1760 by Committee on Insurance – Insurance NO YES SIGNED
AB 1767 by Committee on Revenue and Taxation - Franchise Tax Board: administration: collections and seizures: YES NO SIGNED
erroneous levies: required disclosures: claim of right

American Humor

One Day In The Life Of George Horatio Watermaker


At times, I find my existence on earth very confusing. dealing with an obtuse insurance salesman, I slowly and very
There I am the other morning, about 9am, just minding my loudly began reading the words verbatim.
own business, preparing coffee, when I noticed that I “THE OLIVE GARDEN...WHEN YOU’RE HERE, YOU’RE FAMILY! Why
hadn’t any sugar. would I pay you? My mother feeds me when I visit and she’s
Still dressed in my sleepwear, I took to the street, cof- family. She has a bill for the groceries too, just like you,
fee cup in hand…on a mission! Fortunately for me, around the but does she charge me? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!”
corner and a few hundred feet down the road was a State Farm The manager began dialing the police on his cell phone so
Insurance office. I didn’t stick around to see what would transpire with the
“Good morning!” I cheerfully announced as I walked situation. All I knew was that would be the last time I ever
into the office, hair disheveled, dressed merely in my stopped off to grab a bite and wet the whistle at an Olive
slippers and robe. Garden restaurant.
“G-G-Good morning?” said the actuary cautiously. “May I That is no way to treat members of your family!
help you?”
Bad choice of words, friend, I thought to myself. Feeling confused after the encounter and needing to regain
“Sugar!” I said, thrusting my mug towards the finely my senses and get on with my day, I stopped at Radio Shack.
dressed gentleman. Immediately upon entering, a sales associate approached me
“What?” replied the actuary. with a warm and welcoming smile.
“Sugar! I need some sugar. I haven’t anymore sugar and the “May I help you with anything?” asked the sales associate.
coffee is ready,” I said. “My lucky day,” I thought to myself. I began by asking
“This is a place of business,” shouted the actuary. “Be questions that would enable me to regain my bearing after
gone or I shall be forced to call the police!” such a traumatic morning and mid-day.
“HEY!!!” I shouted, “What does that say on your door?” “Has anybody left a message for me at home?” I inquired.
I demanded! “What?!” replied the sales associate.
Pointing in the direction of the shop front, where name, “How will the Yankees finish in 2006? Will they go all the
office hours and sundry information was displayed, I read way?” I queried.
verbatim to my confused friend in a slow and sarcastic tone, “What the hell are you talking about?!” asked the unsus-
“LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR, STATE FARM IS THERE!...now then...I pecting sales associate.
didn’t write that, you did! So where’s my sugar?” He didn’t appear to have any answers so I let loose in
The actuary began dialing the police...so I left. And rapid fire fashion with the questions.
without any sugar. That is no way to treat a neighbor! “What’s my dog’s name? Who is going to win in Lancaster’s
April election? Is there really a God?” I demanded!
At this moment, other associates were listening in with
Later that day, finding myself hankering for some grub, I disbelief. After one threatened to get physical with me if I
decided to patronize a local restaurant. After eating my didn’t leave immediately...I left immediately.
meal, I casually rose and exited the establishment when inex- But not before informing them that their company tagline
plicably, while en-route to my automobile, I was suddenly is inaccurate. The friendly folks at Radio Shack on Palmdale
accosted by several employees. Blvd did not live up to their, “You’ve got questions, we’ve
I was puzzled. got answers” claim.
“HEY!” hollered the manager. “Don’t you take another step I did however inform them that I would be back and I was
Mister! You owe us money!” bringing Larry H. Parker with me. I was injured and I knew
“For WHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAT?” I hollered back. Larry H. Parker would fight for me.
“You know perfectly clear for what. For the $35 worth of
food and drink you just finished devouring!” clamored the Later that evening, there I was, at home with the little
manager. woman, playing Scrabble and watching the idiot box, when a
“What does that say on your door?” I quizzed the manager hunger overcame me once again.
and his hospitality industry clad posse. Then amazingly and serendipitously on the television, a
The men turned and looked toward the restaurant and seeing commercial for Albertson’s grocery store appeared.
nothing unusual returned their aggressive attention to my With a joyous and inviting melody the commercial pro-
direction. claimed, “Albertson’s, it’s your store!”
With the same sarcastic tone used previously that day when Bail was set at $5000. Life is certainly confusing at times.

The Antelope Valley Political Observer


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10 The Antelope Valley Political Observer

Palmdale’s Teen Council


Tomorrow’s Leaders, Leading Today
Dina Abdel Hady There is also one more little requirement. “You have to be in a high school in the Ante-
Staff Writer lope Valley,” said McDonald.
With an abundance of bad news about young people in our community who have After being chosen, the members have one-term, which lasts until the end of the school
made poor decisions, the reader may be comforted to know that a group of 16 year the following May.
Palmdale teens have stepped up and stepped into the world of leadership and politics. However, members can re-apply the next fall.
The Antelope Valley Political Observer would like to introduce you to the Palmdale Although not governed by the Brown Act Open Meeting Law, the teen council
Teen Council, a program where teens can impact the lives of their peers and the does adopt an agenda, call the roll, and include an opportunity for public comment
community in a positive way. at each meeting.
The club is far from being new. It was founded in 1992 as a program for teens to Much of their work, like most government bodies, is done in committee.
make decisions around the community. The teen council is also given the opportunity to address the mayor and city council
Their official purpose is to act as an advisory group to the city council and the parks once a year, usually at the end of the council’s term in late spring.
and recreation department on issues that directly affect teens in Palmdale. The Palmdale Teen Council will have new quarters in 2006 to conduct their regu-
“[Its main purpose is] to give the teens in the community a voice,” said Aaron McDonald, larly scheduled meetings with the opening of Oasis Park Recreation Center at 40th
one of the two club advisors. East and Avenue S.
The club not only discusses political issues, but they also set up events for other teens In the past, the teen council met at the Palmdale Recreational Center on 10th Street
in the community. East near City Hall.
“They do a couple of fundraisers. They also put on teen events. In the past, we had an With a new term just underway, the members are still discussing their spring plans
event at Fun Land. There were two bands. In another past event, we had a fashion show,” and events.
said McDonald. There seems to be a whisper of allowing other teens into the club’s meetings, ac-
The members had to go through a certain procedure to be on the council. cording to McDonald.
They first had to fill out an application, which could be found at local high schools or However, this remains a debatable topic on the club’s discussion table.
at the Palmdale Department of Parks and Recreation. The good news is there are young people engaged in the community whose actions
After submitting their application, the applicants were asked to come in for an produce a positive effect.
interview. For more information on the Palmdale Teen Council, contact the Palmdale Parks and
Based on their answers both on the application and the interview, the members are selected. Recreation Office at 267.5611

Murrell’s Community Service Agency


Continued From Page 1 In attendance to support the community ser- at all costs.
a shooting or stabbing incident,” added vice agency was 2005 Palmdale mayoral can- “On May 25, 2003, my son was killed
Murrell, “and we have served thousands didate, Desmond Kester. in gang related violence. I moved here
of individuals over the previous three Citing his occupation with the Los Angeles from South Central to get away from it
years.” County Assessor’s Office, Kester addressed all. Murrell’s makes a difference,” said
Murrell’s Community Service Agency has the board and offered suggestions for possible McKnight.
strong support from the water district di- solutions. A woman who identified herself as Bar-
rectors. “The water district may consider writing off bara Smith and said she is a business
“Nobody wants to see this place close, the building and charge the agency rent based owner in Palmdale, told the board,
it’s what we can do legally,” commented on the land,” suggested Kester. “Palmdale is a better place because of
Division II Director, Dick Wells. A speaker who identified herself as Debbie Murrell’s Community Service Agency.”
Wells’ sentiments were echoed by Divi- Simmons said she was a single parent of at- Former Major League Baseball player
sion V representative Dave Gomez. risk foster youth. and community leader, Ellis Valentine,
“I want to compliment you on the youth “Murrell’s is a drug, gang and alcohol free also spoke at the meeting.
center,” said Gomez, “It helps a lot of kids place for teenagers. We must find a way to Valentine, who operates AV Light Foun-
in the community.” fund a program with a proven success rate. dation, a youth sports program, reminded
Division III representative, Sheryl Sarna They build the type of men the community the board that parents and children can-
added, “It is not a matter of if you’re worth need,” said Simmons. not always communicate.
it because it is hands down, yes. The ques- A speaker who identified herself as
tion is: is it [$1 per month rent] legal?” McKnight said the center should stay open Continued On Page 11

Diana wears many hats but mostly she’s about:

“Strengthening our community one family at a time.” And “Walking the walk - not just talking the talk!”

Will Present a minimum of $7,000 in cash scholarship - award funds to graduating A.V. high school
seniors who plan to continue their education. It’s about character, academics and helping those
students who are often overlooked because they don’t have extremely high GPAs. Other awards
such as computers also will be presented.

Information and application packets will be available starting January 15, 2006. Deadline for sub-
mission is May 1, 2006.

Contact Diana Beard-Williams at 661-224-1116 for information, OR pick up your packet from
your local high school office. Other pick-up locations include:

Dan Williams Della Acosta Miriam Nieves Diana Beard-Williams


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January 2006 11

Negligent Section 8 Property Public Service Announcement


Owners Deserve Equal Scrutiny Participate in Government: Vote in the Election!
Be Sure to Vote!

general has suffered such simi- So, then whose responsibil- Anyone who is 18 or over, a U.S. citizen and a Lancaster resident can cast a vote. By making
Joe Zahra an informed decision about which candidate best represents you, you can have your say in
lar pain along with the popula- ity is it?
Contributing Writer community decisions that affect us all.
Opinion tion explosion over the last ten This is where our local gov-
to twenty years as well. ernment must step in but the Voter registration forms are available at the City Clerk’s Office. If you have moved, changed
I believe the voting public question is: How? your name or want to change your party affiliation, you must re-register to vote.
Disclaimer: The opinion of this must be reminded that when I ask: is it a wise use of lim- You may register to vote by mail or in person. Forms are also available at most libraries, post
writer does not represent the it comes to Section 8 housing, ited and valuable resources to offices, the DMV and on the Internet at www.ss.ca.gov.
opinion of The Antelope Valley
we should not throw the baby conduct sweeps targeting Sec-
Political Observer and should Do you want a say in what happens in your community? Then let your voice be heard by
out with the bath water. tion 8 housing tenants or
not be construed as such by the
The mentality to do so may would it better serve the com- participating in the City of Lancaster’s 2006 General Municipal Election slated for Tuesday,
reader.
The opinions of this writer re- be very dangerous because munity to focus and direct April 11, 2006.
flect only the writer’s opinion. Section 8 does not absolutely enforcement toward the own- This year, two four-year Council Member seats and the Mayor’s two-year seat will be
The Antelope Valley Political equal crime. ers of Section 8 homes who on the ballot.
Observer welcomes opinion sub- Programs such as Section 8, neglect to properly screen and
missions from community mem- when appropriately imple- manage their tenants? Do you want to become involved in the City’s General Municipal Election?
bers for possible publication. mented along with quality Section 8, like many other Become a paid Poll Worker! You must be 18 years of age or older and a registered voter in
control, are good programs government programs, need L.A. County.
Since we have come under that are designed to help the an overhaul so it can benefit If you are interested, please call the City at 723-6020. We are looking for Poll Workers,
the 100 day mark till very poor. the people it was intended to. especially, bilingual Poll Workers! Get involved – give us a call!
Lancaster’s municipal elec- Section 8 housing is an im- Since the program is man-
tion, scheduled for Tuesday, portant element in the social aged at the county level, the Important Election Dates:
April 11 2006, there seems to safety net for single parents county government needs to
be some argument among can- with small children, the dis- take steps to ensure that prop- March 13, 2006
didates and government offi- abled, (social security and erty owners adhere to strictly First day to request absentee ballots
cials in general as how best to state disability do not cover enforced rules before funding March 27, 2006
combat crime in Lancaster. 100% of the cost of living for is granted or continued. Last day to register to vote for the April 11, 2006 election
And the mention of crime the indigent) and younger new It appears that many city April 4, 2006
has brought Section 8 under parents just starting out and in council and mayoral candi- Last day to request absentee ballots
the microscope, because it need of a helping hand. dates plan on cleaning up
seems in some quarters, crime Title 24: Housing and Ur- Lancaster ’s Section 8 pro-
is synonymous with Section
8 housing.
ban Development, Chapter
IX, Part 982, Subpart E -
gram if elected in April.
Let’s hope they do it Murrell’s Community Service Agency
I do concede, however, that The Admission to Tenet through reform that shifts the agenda item. themselves with music and
the Housing Choice Voucher Based Programs: 982.201 onus off the tenant onto the Continued From Page 10
Following are examples of dance instead of being on the
program, or Section 8 as it is Eligibility and targeting property owner that collects a
“Murrell’s bridges the gap programs available through streets where they might get
generally referred to, is a hot states: “The PHA (public tax dollar subsidized rent each
between parent and child in Murrell’s Community Service involved with trouble.
topic regardless if it is elec- housing authority) has no month. circumstances where that is Agency. Workshops and Job Place-
tion season or not and to be liability or authority to the The advice of this writer:
needed,” said Valentine. Bike Club: Youths meet on ment for youths on probation
sure, crime has risen in the owner or other persons for start from the top and work
After all citizens wishing to Thursdays and Saturdays for that are high risk.
city of Lancaster. the fa mily’s beha vior or yourself down.
address the board had done endurance training. Youths Referrals from probation
But the Antelope Valley in suitability for tenancy…” so, Division IV representa- participate in freestyle, BMX for counseling, anger man-
tive, Raul Figueroa, reminded racing and marathon events that agement or community ser-
“The successful politician owes his power to the fact that he moves within the those present that ultimately, range from local to national. vice.
accepted framework of thought, that he thinks and talks conventionally. It the responsibility of the BAAD: Born Again Al- The Palmdale Water Dis-
would be almost a contradiction in terms for a politician to be a leader in the Palmdale Water District is to cohol & Drug is a fa ith trict may be reached by tele-
field of ideas. His task in a democracy is to find out what the opinions held by the rate payers. b a s e d a l coho l a nd drug phone @: 947.4111
When public comment abuse program. Murrell’s Community Ser-
the largest number are, not to give currency to new opinions which may be-
ended, the water district did Friday Night Live: Where vice Agency may be reached
come the majority view in some distant future.” - F.A. Hayek not take any action on the youths can come and enjoy by telephone @: 273.9412

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12 The Antelope Valley Political Observer

Government
Antelope Valley College County Supervisor 5th District Palmdale City Council
Jack Seefus Michael Antonovich Mayor James Ledford jledford@cityofpalmdale.org
Steve Fox Steve Buffalo Antelope Valley Office 661.726.3600 Mike Dispenza mdispenza@cityofpalmdale.org
Betty Weinke Earl Wilson E-mail: fifthdistrict@bos.co.la.ca.us Steve Hofbauer shofbauer@cityofpalmdale.org
Student Trustee Harmony Perkins Board Hearing Room 500 West Temple St. LA Room 381B Steve Knight sknight@cityofpalmdale.org
AVC Boardroom 3041 West Ave K, Lancaster Tuesday, January 10, 17, 24 & 31 @ 9am Tom Lackey tlackey@cityofpalmdale.org
Tuesday, January 10 @ 6:30 pm Information 661.722.6300 City Council Chambers 38300 Sierra Hwy. Suite B
Eastside Union School District K-8 Monday, January 9 & 23 @ 7pm City Clerk 267.5100
Antelope Valley Healthcare District Board of Trustees
Martha Johnson
Chairperson Don Parazo Palmdale School District K-8
Abdallah Farrukh June Snow Janette Crawford Peggy Foster
Charles Cooke John Altin Ginn Sandy Corrales
John Manning Berna Lee Mayer
AV Hospital Room 406 44105 15th Street West Lancaster Boardroom 45006 30th Street East, Lancaster Sheldon Epstein Jeffrey Ferrin
No January Meeting Information 949.5533 Monday, January 9 @ 6pm Information 661.952.1200 ext. 7 Vacated by Tom Lackey Robert Bynum
Boardroom 39139 10th Street East, Palmdale
Lancaster City Council Tuesday, January 17 @ 7:30pm Information 661.947.7191
Antelope Valley Joint Union High School District Mayor Frank Roberts
Albert Beattie Sr. Vice Mayor Bishop Henry Hearns Jim Jeffra Palmdale Water District
Ira Simonds James Lott Ed Sileo Andrew Visokey Division 1 Gordon Dexter
Tom Pigott Donita Winn E-mail Councilmembers @ www.cityoflancasterca.org Division 2 Dick Wells
District Boardroom 44811 North Sierra Hwy, Lancaster City Council Chambers 44933 North Fern Avenue Division 3 Sheryl Sarna
Wednesday, January 18 Time TBD Information 948.7655 ext. 225 Tuesday, January 10 & 24 @ 6pm City Hall 661.723.6000 Division 4 Raul Figueroa
*Lancaster Election Is Tuesday, April 11 Division 5 Dave Gomez
District Office 2029 East Ave Q, Palmdale
~AVTA ~ Wednesday, January 11 & 25 @ 7pm Main Office 661.947.4111
Antelope Valley Transit Authority Lancaster School District K-8
Keith Giles
Palmdale Reps Mayor Ledford & Councilmember Dispenza Westside Union School District K-8
Lancaster Representatives Mayor Roberts & Vice Mayor Hearns Greg Tepe Mel Kleven
LA County Representatives Larry Levin & Bob Keys John Miller Diana Grooms Gwendolyn Farrell
AVTA Boardroom 42210 6th St West, Lancaster Rotating locations. Phone for location of Board Meeting Deborah Rutkowski-Hines Linda Jones
Monday, January 23 @ 9am Information 729.2208 Tuesday, January 3 & 17 @ 7pm Information 661.948.4661 John Curiel Joan Sodergren
Hillview El Multipurpose Room 40525 Peonza Lane, Palmdale
Tuesday, January 17 @ 7pm Information 661.948.2669

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