Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 7

LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

Login to Edit

Ubuntu Documentation > Community Documentation > LDAPClientAuthentication
LDAPClientAuthentication
Introduction Conteúdos

1. Introduction
This page is intended for anyone who wants to enable an Ubuntu client to 2. Installation
authenticate on an existing OpenLDAP server. For more details on the 1. Quick Description
server installation part see OpenLDAPServer. 3. README
4. Configuration
If you want Kerberos as well for single-sign-on (likely), see SingleSignOn. 1. Name Service
2. PAM
For authenticating on a Sun Java Enterprise System Directory Server, please 3. PAM: Stronger Passwords (Optional)
consult the SunLDAPClientAuthentication page. 4. Notes for 7.10 and later
5. Host-based Authentication
For authenticating using a Mac OS X Leopard Server, consult the 1. libpam-ldap authentication
OSXLDAPClientAuthentication page. 2. pam_filter authentication
6. Credits
For version 7.10 and later, see bottom of page for another way of
authentication. (auth-client-config).

If you have lookup failures on some accounts using libpam-ldap, try installing libpam-ldapd instead. Configuration will be via
/etc/nslcd.conf

Installation
Install the following packages: libpam-ldap libnss-ldap nss-updatedb libnss-db. Note that you have to enable
the universe repositories for this.

Quick Description
libpam-ldap to allows for authentication via LDAP. libnss-ldap provides account information (username, uid, groups, etc) via
LDAP. That's why /etc/libnss-ldap.conf and /etc/pam_ldap.conf have such similar structures.

During installation, you will be asked the following questions:

The address of the LDAP server used. You can also use a fully qualified domain name here. For example:
ldap.example.com
The distinguished name of the search base. For example dc=example,dc=com
The LDAP version to use. You usually would choose 3 here.
If your database requires logging in. You would usually choose no here.
If you want to make configuration readable/writeable by owner only. A no should be the answer to this.
A Dialog is displayed stating "it cannot manage nsswitch.conf automatically" just select OK.
If you want the local root to be the database admin. You would usually choose yes here.
Again If your database requires logging in. You would usually choose no here.
Your root login account. For example: cn=manager,dc=example,dc=com
Your root password.
After, a dialog explaining the different encryption methods to specify the encryption method to use before sending your
password. exop is usually a good choice.

The above steps might vary a bit depending on the Ubuntu distribution used. When you want to restart the configuration you can

1 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29
LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

use dpkg-reconfigure for both libpam-ldap and libnss-ldap packages.

When finished configuring you will need to double check the data in /etc/libnss-ldap.conf. Especially the host entry which doesn't
accept URI. Better is to use the URI entries and comment out the host.

README
This is taken from /usr/share/doc/libpam-ldap/README.Debian:

Be very careful when you use "sufficient pam_ldap.so" in Debian's /etc/pam.d/common-* files: Some services can
place other "required" PAM-modules after the includes, which will be ignored if pam_ldap.so succeeds. As a workaround,
use something like the following construct:

# Check local authentication first, so root can still login
# while LDAP is down.
auth [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so
auth required pam_ldap.so use_first_pass
auth required pam_permit.so

The third line is needed, so "success=1" can skip over one module and still has a module to jump to. Without that, PAM
segfaults!
If you want to use the "pam_check_host_attr" feature, make sure "pam_unix.so" doesn't provide a valid "account" via the
Name Service Switch (NSS), which overrides your LDAP configuration. Don't use "ldap" for "shadow" in
/etc/nsswitch.conf, just use "shadow: files". For PAM, use something like the following:

# Try local /etc/shadow first and skip LDAP on success
account [success=1 default=ignore] pam_unix.so
account required pam_ldap.so
account required pam_permit.so

If you discover that cron is suddenly not running root's crontab after getting LDAP running on your client machine, and are
getting messages in /var/log/syslog like

Apr  7 10:17:01 localhost CRON[28168]: Authentication token is no longer valid;
new one required.

then you may need to make these changes to /etc/nsswitch.conf and /etc/pam.d/common-account. First
though, check that root's password hasn't really expired. This can happen even though the root account is locked if for some
reason in the past you unlocked and relocked the root account. Run the command chage -l root, and check if
everything is OK. If the root password has expired, you can make it so that it never expires by running
sudo chage -E-1 root. If that wasn't the problem, then make the above changes to your PAM configuration.
Ubuntu uses /etc/ldap.conf as libpam-ldap's configuration file and /etc/ldap.secret as the file to store the
password of the rootbinddn. This file is shared with libnss-ldap, which should work for most configurations. If separate
configuration files for libnss-ldap and libpam-ldap are required, you can specify an alternate configuration file in
/etc/pam.d/common-* by adding a config=</path> argument to the pam_ldap.so entry, such as:

auth sufficient pam_ldap.so config=/etc/pam_ldap.conf

This would let you have two separate configurations: /etc/ldap.conf for NSS, and /etc/pam_ldap.conf for PAM.
Thanks to Etienne Goyer for pointing this out.
See LDAP-Permissions.txt for details about the required LDAP permissions.

Configuration
After the installation of the necessary packages you will need to configure the Name Service and PAM.

Name Service
In /etc/nsswitch.conf replace compat with files ldap for both the passwd and group entries so you get something like this:

2 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29
LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

passwd:         files ldap
group:          files ldap

There is a full example provided in the documentation of libnss-ldap: /usr/share/doc/libnss-ldap/examples/nsswitch.ldap

Because the nscd daemon caches the lookup results, you need to restart it:

$ /etc/init.d/nscd restart

Now you can test the configuration:

$ getent passwd

or

$ getent group

You should see lines that look like they've come straight out of /etc/passwd. These are the lines published by your LDAP server. If
you do, the Name Service (NSS) side of the job is done. If not, check /etc/libnss-ldap.conf for typos.

If your setup requires a password to connect to the LDAP server, don't forget to put that password into /etc/libnss-ldap.secret.

BUG ALERT: Make sure /etc/libnss-ldap.conf has "bind_policy soft". If it's not there, a nasty bug with udev can arise at boot-time.
You should probably also make this change in /etc/pam_ldap.conf.

[*} It's also a good idea to shorten the timeouts there.

Don't use sudo when editing this file or leave it open while testing. If you save with a typo, it could mean that you can't
access your server anymore.

PAM
There are four central files that control PAM's use of LDAP: common-account, common-auth, common-password and common-
session. They are located in /etc/pam.d.

For details, see the pam(7) manpage.

Edit /etc/pam.d/common-account to look like this:

account sufficient      pam_ldap.so
account required        pam_unix.so

Edit /etc/pam.d/common-auth to look like this:

auth    required        pam_group.so use_first_pass 
auth    sufficient      pam_ldap.so
auth    required        pam_unix.so nullok_secure use_first_pass

Edit /etc/pam.d/common-password to look like this:

password        sufficient      pam_ldap.so
password        required        pam_unix.so nullok obscure min=4 max=8 md5

You can test if it's working using ssh (assuming nickf is a ldap user):

ssh nickf@localhost

PAM: Stronger Passwords (Optional)
You might be interested in libpam-cracklib (see InstallingSoftware).

To activate it you'll need to edit /etc/pam.d/common-password:

3 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29
LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

password        required        pam_cracklib.so retry=3 minlen=6 difok=3
password        sufficient      pam_ldap.so use_authtok
password        required        pam_unix.so use_authtok use_first_pass

Edit /etc/pam.d/common-session and add pam_ldap.so, like this:

session optional        pam_foreground.so
session sufficient      pam_ldap.so
session required        pam_unix.so

PAM: Home directory creation (optional)

Edit the common-session file again:

session required        pam_unix.so
session required        pam_mkhomedir.so skel=/etc/skel/
session optional        pam_ldap.so
session optional        pam_foreground.so

Again, you can test local groups using ssh (assuming nickf is a ldap user):

ssh nickf@localhost

Option: Caching Name Service directories

In order to prevent network slowdown or outage from preventing user name lookup and thus login, you can use the nss-updatedb
package to create a local database of the user names, and in conjunction, use libpam-ccreds to cache credentials locally. This can be
particularly useful on laptops.

Please refer to PamCcredsHowto for complete instructions.

Below is a script for running nss_updatedb hourly. PamCcredsHowto shows a much simpler way to run this daily, but if you want
to run it every hour, then please use the code below.

Create a script called nssupdate.sh in /etc/cron.hourly/ and make it executable. It should contain the following:

 #!/bin/bash

LOCK=/var/run/auth-update.cron

[ "$1" != "0" ] && [ -f $LOCK ] && [ -d /proc/"$(cat $LOCK)" ] && exit 0
echo $$ > $LOCK

RANGE=3600
[ "$1" != "" ] && RANGE=$1
SLEEP=$RANDOM
[ "$RANGE" != "0" ] && let "SLEEP %= $RANGE" || SLEEP=0

sleep $SLEEP

go=true
while $go; do
        /usr/sbin/nss_updatedb ldap
        [ $? -eq 0 ] && go=false
        [ "$go" == "true" ] && sleep 10
done

rm $LOCK

exit 0

Notes for 7.10 and later
There is a new tool since 7.10 to modify the pam and nsswitch files at once: AuthClientConfig.
There is now a meta-package ldap-auth-client which will install all the following required packages for an ldap client:
auth-client-config ldap-auth-config libnss-ldap libpam-ldap

4 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29
LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

You can use that tool by running: sudo auth-client-config -a -p lac_ldap to reflect the changes handled on this


page. * Read more about it in this thread: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=597056

*If the lac_ldap option fails (as it did on my 8.10 system) the following settings were successful. These settings will also cause
domain (ldap) users to become members of local groups so that local devices needing fuse, plugdev, scanner etc... membership will
work properly. For example: If you are having problems with automounting of usb drives the pam_group.so option is likely your
problem.

Using your favorite text editor, edit the following config:

/etc/auth-client-config/profile.d/open_ldap

and paste the following into it:

[open_ldap]
nss_passwd=passwd: files ldap
nss_group=group: files ldap
nss_shadow=shadow: files ldap
nss_netgroup=netgroup: files ldap
pam_auth=auth       required     pam_env.so
        auth       sufficient   pam_unix.so likeauth nullok
#the following line (containing pam_group.so) must be placed before pam_ldap.so 
#for ldap users to be placed in local groups such as fuse, plugdev, scanner, etc ...
        auth       required     pam_group.so use_first_pass
        auth       sufficient   pam_ldap.so use_first_pass
        auth       required     pam_deny.so
pam_account=account    sufficient   pam_unix.so
        account    sufficient   pam_ldap.so
        account    required     pam_deny.so
pam_password=password   sufficient   pam_unix.so nullok md5 shadow
        password   sufficient   pam_ldap.so use_first_pass
        password   required     pam_deny.so
pam_session=session    required     pam_limits.so
        session    required     pam_mkhomedir.so skel=/etc/skel/
        session    required     pam_unix.so
        session    optional     pam_ldap.so

Now to activate that pam profile run the following command:

auth-client-config -a -p open_ldap

To assign local groups to domain (ldap) users do the following:

Using your favorite text editor, edit the following config:

/etc/security/group.conf

and add the following to the end of the file (note you can determine which groups to add to this line by logging in as a local user
and using the 'groups' command):

*; *; *; Al0000-2400;audio,cdrom,floppy,plugdev,video,fuse,scanner,dip

You should now have local groups showing up for users logging in via gdm and ssh ('su username' did not give these groups on
my system). Note that I did not have to edit the gdm, sshd, or login files in /etc/pam.d/ as they include a call to @include
common-auth giving them the pam_group.so line in the proper order (before pam_ldap.so).

You can test local groups using ssh (assuming nickf is a ldap user):

ssh nickf@localhost

once you are logged in as a ldap user you can see your groups with the 'id' or 'groups' command

nickf@ubuntu-ltsp:~$ id
uid=10178(nickf) gid=512(Domain Admins) 
groups=24(cdrom),25(floppy),29(audio),30(dip),44(video),46(plugdev),104(scanner),107(fuse),512(Domain
 Admins),544(Administrators),10000(Teachers) 

5 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29
LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

Host-based Authentication
Host based authentication allows you to restrict who can log into a machine that uses LDAP for authentication. Basically you add
an attribute to each LDAP user's record that includes hostnames that they are allowed to log in to. Each client system then checks
this field against its own hostname and either allows or denies login based upon the attribute field. There are two methods to
enforce host-based authentication, the first is to use libpam-ldap, the second method is to use an LDAP pam_filter.

libpam-ldap authentication
Using the pam_check_host_attr directive to enforce host authentication has the effect that users are explicitly informed they are not
permitted to access the host with an error message: Access denied for this host.

Libpam-ldap requires that you use the host attribute. The package documentation includes a schema which provides this attribute,
located at /usr/share/doc/libpam-ldap/ldapns.schema, which can be added to slapd.conf if needed. To populate
that attribute, you can use a web tool such as phpldapadmin, or you can create a modification LDIF such as:

dn: uid=user_to_change,ou=Users,dc=example,dc=com
changetype: modify
add: host
host: thehostname

The hostname should match the output from the hostname command. When in doubt, check the slapd logs on the server. Make
the change using:

ldapmodify -H ldaps://ldapserver -D "cn=admin,dc=example,dc=com" -x -W -f your_file.ldif

On the client side, simply modify /etc/ldap.conf (or other appropriate configuration file as defined in pam.d) to include the
line:

pam_check_host_attr yes

Warning: /etc/nsswitch.conf should *not* contain "ldap" in the "shadow" entry, or host-based authentication will always
succeed. See /usr/share/doc/libpam-ldap/ for additional information.

pam_filter authentication
Using the pam_filter directive in /etc/ldap.conf it is possible to enforce PAM to only access accounts with attributes of our
choosing. Users who are not permitted access to the host will receive no error, instead PAM responds as if they have entered an
incorrect password.

An example using the libpam-ldap host attribute, we can create a filter which matches thehostname or * in /etc/ldap.conf:

pam_filter |(host=thehostname)(host=\*)

Another example using Gosa's accessTo and trustModel attributes would look like the following:

pam_filter |(&(accessTo=thehostname)(trustModel=byhost))(trustModel=fullaccess)

Warning Another example (?) using Gosa's accessTo and trustModel attributes with hostGroups grants? This is totally
undocumented and probably it is the key feature to introduce an open solution like this one in a corporation... Any idea? (I
apologize for the misuse of the wiki):

???

Credits
Some of the information used in this document was found on this page.
pam(7) manpage

6 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29
LDAPClientAuthentication - Community Ubuntu D... https://help.ubuntu.com/community/LDAPClientAut...

An alternate directory server authentication HOWTO KRB5+LDAP Authentication

LDAPClientAuthentication (editada pela última vez em 2010-07-15 11:59:45 por https://login.launchpad.net/+id/hL4fGr7 @
62.213.130.74[62.213.130.74]:Guido Serra)

Page History

7 de 7 23-11-2010 09:29