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Lesson Plan Using Cognitive, Affective, Psychomotor Domains

Conducted by: Sydney Maxfield and Sabrina Raygada

Lesson Plan on Intuitive Eating

Duration: 10-12 minutes


Target group: Middle- High School kids
Overall goal: The overall goal is to provide education on intuitive eating to adolescents
about healthy eating habits for them to use as they grow into young adults.
Major concepts:
● Define intuitive eating
● Distinguish taste hunger and emotional hunger
● Physical hunger and practical hunger
● Mindful Eating Meditation- Activity
Icebreaker or Attention Grabber (3 minutes)
● Quick: Ask to define intuitive eating before the lesson begins. Students will be
handed two sticky notes. The second sticky note will be used at the end of the
lesson plan, where students will be asked to write down what they have learned
and a goal they decide to set for themselves.

Objectives and learning domains; generalizations and learning Experiences

Activity: To begin, students will list a time they’ve experienced or foods that correlate
with taste, emotional, physical, and practical hunger. By participating in the activity
students will be organizing and understanding their value systems of food and hunger.
Students will then be introduced to the power of the pause during eating activity. The
power of the pause during eating is mindful meditation. Students will be given three
steps to follow: Step 1-take a few deep, calming breaths. On each breathes,
concentrate on inhaling deeply from the pit of your stomach and letting the air fill up all
of your body to the tip of your head. On your exhale, let the fresh, pure air trickle down
your body through each individual cell. Allow any tension to be released from your

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hands, shoulders, feet, and so forth. Step 2-the breath is a bridge between the mind and
the body and will allow you to connect with yourself more fully. Notice any emotions you
are feeling at this moment. Are you physically hungry? Or are you noticing other
sensations or feelings arise? Step 3- Reflect on how acting in a more thoughtful way will
make you feel later today. When you learn to recognize and meet your true needs, the
urges to eat for reasons other than physical hunger begin to fade.
Domain:
This lesson covers all three domains: cognitive, affective and psychomotor
Cognitive: Students will list a time they’ve experienced or foods that correlate with taste,
emotional, physical, and practical hunger.
Affective: By participating in the activity students will be organizing, questioning, and
understanding their value systems of food and hunger.
Psychomotor: by meditating, students will imperfectly practice creating healthy eating
habits.
Generalization:

Tribole, E., & Resch, E. (2020). Intuitive Eating: a revolutionary program that works. S.l.: ST
MARTINS ESSENTIALS.

Provide a PowerPoint presentation covering the following concepts:


Intuitive eating, mindful eating, the differences between taste, emotional, physical
and practical hunger and will finish with a mindful meditation activity

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https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1Q13ZyGJaOPgycWvH-
QYZzRQL0ezEoab-u_wJsqSriMM/edit?usp=sharing

Teaching aids and materials:


● PowerPoint projector and screen
● Intuitive Eating/Mindful Eating - Meditation Handout
● Pencils
● Meditation music
Summary:
The lesson will start out explaining what Intuitive eating is, and it’s benefits. We
will also define mindful eating and how the two relate. Then we will introduce 4 common
hunger types and how to identify them. For an activity, we will ask students to write
down foods that relate to and or moments in time a student felt some of the different
types of hunger. To help release any stress or tension we will have the class practice
mindful meditation and acknowledge that every type of hunger has its place and that
being able to identify their feelings is a powerful tool in navigating stress-free eating.
Evaluation:
We will pass out a survey asking how likely students think they will practice intuitive
eating in the future, and if they liked the lesson overall.
Assignment:
An evaluation survey will be given to students at the end of the presentation and
activity. The survey will consist of answering three questions. The three questions will
determine to understand whether or not students understand intuitive eating and the
concepts that were provided during the lesson activity.
Survey:

-How stressful do you think eating is?

-Do you think this tool is helpful?

-On a scale of 1-10, how likely are you to use this tool in the future?

-What can you do today to commit to your journey toward intuitive eating?

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Nutrition Education Paper
Lesson Plan + Handout
Nutrition Education and Communication 551
By: Sabrina Raygada & Sydney Maxfield

Introduction/Literature Review
Intuitive eating is a useful approach for eating, being satisfied and healthy. Its
backbone is ten simple principles: reject the diet mentality, honor your hunger, make
peace with food, challenge the food police, respect your fullness, discover the
satisfaction factor, honor your feelings without using food, respect your body, exercise-
feel the difference, and honor your health. (Tribole, E., & Resch, E.2020). Two
registered dietitians Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch coined the program: intuitive eating
in the 1990s and published their book “Intuitive Eating: A Revolutionary Program That
Works” that we read prior to teaching, reading the book is crucial to this lesson because
it's a well thought out and covers so much. This lesson teaches that not only is what you
eat important towards the physical and mental state but how and when you eat is just as
important. “Intuitive eating teaches you how to get in touch with your body cues like
hunger, fullness, and satisfaction while learning to trust your body around food again”
(Rumsey, MS, RD). Research states intuitive eating as highly effective. A study towards
intuitive eating is associated with glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes
mellitus conducted that of the four types of intuitive eating: taste hunger, emotional
hunger, physical hunger, and practical hunger, the effect of emotion on eating was
linked to worsening glycaemic control. The journal Intuitive Eating Scale: An
Examination Among Early Adolescents states, “using food to satisfy physiological
hunger drives rather than as a coping mechanism for emotional distress. Reliance on
physiological cues of hunger and satiety such as awareness of physiological hunger
and satiety cues and reliance on these cues to manage eating” (Dockendorff,
Greenleaf, Martin, n.d). Mindful hunger comes into effect; intuitive eating is listening to
yourself in a mindful manner by focuses on a balanced mindset and body relationship
through food choices along with the satisfaction. We wanted students to learn the
differences between the four types of hunger so that the next time they are in a stressful

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situation they can acknowledge their actions, and make healthier decisions. This goal of
getting students to acknowledge and change undesirable behavior is using social
cognitive theory. We believe that through education and nurturing on this sensitive topic
we’ll be able to motivate our students to how common eating problems are and how
they’re rooted in emotion, stress, practicality, or a physical need.
Taste hunger, emotional hunger, physical hunger, and practical hunger. Taste
hunger occurs when you have a taste for a specific food that may present outside of
physical hunger. Taste hunger is when food just sounds good. Emotional hunger is
when you have an unmet emotional need that presents itself with a desire to eat food. It
comes on quickly in conjunction with an intense emotion. You might have also recently
eaten, or feel the need for comfort, security or distraction more so than a need for
energy. Physical hunger stems from a need for energy from food. When we feel the
physical signs of hunger, it means we need food. Physical hunger can present as
fatigue, anxiety, headaches, shakiness, or just thinking more about food. The only way
to take care of physical hunger is to eat. Practical hunger a need to eat in response to
anticipated physical hunger that you won’t be able to satisfy. An example might be
eating a large meal before a long plane ride or having lunch during a set lunch break,
even though you are not hungry at the moment.
There are many benefits that evolve through intuitive eating. When an individual
begins to eat intuitively they are lowering their body mass index, internalizing the
culturally thin ideal, lowering their triglycerides, lower their chances of developing
disordered eating, and over time they are able to have lower self-silencing such as
suppressing their thoughts, feelings, and needs. In addition to the benefits, intuitive
eaters have higher self-esteem, higher well-being, and optimism, have the ability and
acceptance towards a variety of foods, have a high body appreciation and acceptance,
their cholesterol levels are improved, develop high interoceptive awareness, high
pleasure from eating, high proactive coping, high psychological hardiness, and
unconditional self-regard. Intuitive eating is listening to yourself in a mindful manner by
focuses on a balanced mindset and body relationship through food choices along with
satisfaction. Both intuitive eating and mindful eating can go hand in hand such as both

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intuitive eaters and mindful eaters are aware of the nutrients provided in food. Along
with acknowledging likes, dislikes, and neutral reactions to food without judgment.
Methods and Materials
The one main goal for this lesson is to get students more in tune with their body
and realize the reason behind their actions, and to use this to make healthier choices in
the future. To achieve this goal we came up with an activity that covers all three
domains: cognitive, affective and psychomotor. Cognitive: Students will list a time
they’ve experienced or foods that correlate with taste, emotional, physical, and practical
hunger. Affective: by participating in the activity students will be organizing, questioning,
and understanding their value systems of food and hunger. Psychomotor: by meditating,
students will imperfectly practice creating healthy eating habits.
Methods towards the development of our intuitive eating lesson begins with an
explanation of what Intuitive eating is and it can benefit life by being more aware,
followed by intruding mindful eating and how the two relate. The following task consists
of introducing the four most common hunger types and how to identify them. For this
activity, students will be asked to write down foods that relate to and or moments in time
a student felt some of the different types of hunger. To help release any stress or
tension the class will practice mindful meditation known as the power of the pause
during eating and acknowledge that every type of hunger has its place and that being
able to identify their feelings is a powerful tool in navigating stress-free eating.
The power of the pause during eating is mindful meditation, and we will have all
the lights turned off, ask students to close their eyes and play relaxing music while we
read three steps explaining how to breathe deep. These steps are also on the hand out
that students can take home and practice by themselves. An evaluation survey will also
be handed to students at the end of the presentation and activity. The survey’s purpose
is towards determining whether or not students understood intuitive eating and if they
will incorporate intuitive eating into their everyday life. Materials needed are stated down
below and may vary.
Teaching aids and materials:
● PowerPoint projector and screen
● Intuitive Eating/Mindful Eating - Meditation Handout

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● Pencils
● Meditation music

Results
Figures of survey data:
Survey:
-How stressful do you think eating is?

7 said it was very stressful,


11 said stressful when figuring out what to eat - planning and getting food,
13 said not stressful at all

-Do you think this tool is helpful?

All 31 surveys said intuitive eating and mindfulness is helpful

-What can you do today to commit to your journey toward intuitive eating?

Most answers said: determining what type of hunger they’re feeling, be mindful and breathe!
(meditate)

Data:

58% of students believe eating is somewhat to very stressful

100% of students found this tool helpful

Discussion

This lesson showed that a lot of students understand how stressful food can be
whether it is shopping, preparing, or eating. It was nice to be able to help relax students
through this stressful topic and time of finals. Our peer review articles showed that
people who followed through with the plan had better eating over time but since we’re
not able to follow the students eating patterns through time we won't really be able to
compare the two but we had some great feedback saying that students were definitely

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more aware of their eating patterns- specifically stress / emotional eating. These results
show that students are capable to take control of their eating and are interested in
knowing more about psychology and food. One plus for Sydney is a very calming
attitude on organizing and a delta is provided insufficient information on why people
should adapt to intuitive eating. One plus for Sabrina is a very beautiful design for the
visual aids and a delta is the content was too wordy. In the future, this group could do
better by revising and practicing more.

Conclusion
The overall goal for using this lesson plan to provide education on intuitive eating
to adolescents about healthy eating habits for them to use as they grow into young
adults. There is evidence that eating intuitively can improve self-esteem, promote body
acceptance, and can provide health benefits by using its 10 principle concepts: reject
the diet mentality, honor your hunger, make peace with food, challenge the food police,
respect your fullness, discover the satisfaction factor, honor your feelings without using
food, respect your body, exercise-feel the difference, and honor your health. Using
these principles, along with your own life experiences, to drive what you eat. Research
has proven that eating intuitively can help one cope with disordered eating. It is a
personal process that is both physically and mentally. Not only do intuitive eaters honor
their health by listening and responding to the direct messages their body is signaling,
but intuitive eaters are also meeting their physical and psychological needs.
Education Handout

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~The power of the pause during eating: To help us check in at that exact moment on how we are
feeling and what we are thinking, how this is directly affecting what we are eating.

Smog: Grade level 8


Fall 2019, Sydney Maxfield & Sabrina Raygada

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Self Reflection

SYDNEY SELF REFLECTION:


1. What was the topic or title of your presentation?
Intuitive Eating
2. Describe one thing that you did well in this presentation.
I stayed positive and didn’t trigger anyone with disordered eating.
3. Describe one thing that you would change about your preparation for this
presentation.
Hand out sticky notes to get students definitions on intuitive eating before and after the
presentation.

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4. Comment on the content of your presentation: do you feel that you provided
your audience with information that they did not know prior to your presentation?
Explain.
I liked the content of the presentation, we were able to cover a wide range of
information while staying on topic and this is an important topic in the world of nutrition
and while I believe a lot of nutrition students know of intuitive eating I don't think they
understood its applicability and possible impact on eating.
5. Comment on your eye contact: was it sufficient? Why or why not? If not, how
do you plan to improve your eye contact for your next presentation?
I think eye contact was sufficient, I took pauses from looking at the screen however I
would like to have practiced a few more times to be completely free of the screen.
6. Comment on your gestures and movement: were they effective? Why or why
not? If not, how do you plan to improve your gestures and movement for your
next presentation?
I stayed pretty still and away from the powerpoint, this body language was calming and
allowed the students to relax and not be looking around too much.
7. Comment on your practice for this presentation: did you practice thoroughly?
If you believe that you did not practice thoroughly, how will you modify your
practice for your next presentation? Be specific.
Yes, my partner and I practiced multiple times - even though we were nervous and had
a few technical issues I believe we did well.
8. Please provide an overall assessment of your presentation. Were you satisfied
with your presentation? Why or why not?
Overall our presentation was relaxed and had a different pace compared to other
presentations. I like how it went I just wish that we had a little more time to do more
activities, like hand out sticky notes or incorporate food.
9. How did your group divide the work? Was it fair? Did you work well together?
We divided the work through communicating, we face timed while working from home
and also met at the library two times. It was fair and we were able to work well together.

SABRINA SELF REFLECTION:

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1. What was the topic or title of your presentation?
- Our topics for our presentation: Intuitive Eating
2. Describe one thing that you did well in this presentation.
- One thing I believe I did well in this presentation was being confident and
ensuring I project my voice loud enough for everyone to hear.
3. Describe one thing that you would change about your preparation for this
presentation.
- One thing I would have changed would have been to practice presenting our
powerpoint by remembering what to say and limiting the number of words
presented on the screen to the class.
4. Comment on the content of your presentation: do you feel that you provided
your audience with information that they did not know prior to your presentation?
Explain.
- I definitely feel that Sydney and I provided our audience with information that
they did not know prior to our presentation. Many have heard about Intuitive
Eating but have not gone in-depth with the major concepts that we were able to
summarize within 10 minutes.
5. Comment on your eye contact: was it sufficient? Why or why not? If not, how
do you plan to improve your eye contact for your next presentation?
- My eye contact was absolutely not sufficient but I did try to make eye contact.
Eye contact during presentations is something I am trying to improve. I will get
better! I want to be screen-free.
6. Comment on your gestures and movement: were they effective? Why or why
not? If not, how do you plan to improve your gestures and movement for your
next presentation?
- My gestures and movement were effective. Our goal was to be calm and deliver
a calming presentation.
7. Comment on your practice for this presentation: did you practice thoroughly?
If you believe that you did not practice thoroughly, how will you modify your
practice for your next presentation? Be specific.

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- Sydney and I worked hard throughout this project. We combined our ideas and
delivered an educational presentation. We met in the library and FaceTimed
accordingly.
8. Please provide an overall assessment of your presentation. Were you satisfied
with your presentation? Why or why not?
- Overall, I am very satisfied with our presentation, I think we did great. We were
both happy with the outcomes.
9. How did your group divide the work? Was it fair? Did you work well together?
- Sydney and I worked great together! This assignment was definitely a bonding
experience. We divided the work fairly and accomplished each task on time.

References

Anderson, D. A., Schaumberg, K., Anderson, L. M., & Reilly, E. E. (2015). Is the level of
intuitive eating associated with plate size effects? Eating Behaviors.

Dockendorff, S. A., Petrie, T. A., Greenleaf, C. A., & Martin, S. (n.d). Intuitive Eating
Scale: An examination among early adolescents. Journal of Counseling Psychology.

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Humphrey, L., Clifford, D., & Morris, M. N. (2016, March 10). Health at Every Size
College Course Reduces Dieting Behaviors and Improves Intuitive Eating, Body
Esteem, and Anti-Fat Attitudes. Retrieved from
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1499404615000111.

Tribole, E., & Resch, E. (2020). Intuitive Eating: a revolutionary program that works. S.l.:
ST MARTINS ESSENTIALS.

Wheeler, B., Lawrence, J., Chae, M., Paterson, H., Gray, A., Healey, D., Taylor, B.
(2016). Intuitive eating is associated with glycaemic control in adolescents with type I
diabetes mellitus.

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