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MANUAL HISTORY

Date of issue for original version and subsequent versions:

Version 1.0 ....... February 1993 ....... Software Version N/A___

(This manual supersedes previous Form 1680R-6/84, 5th Edition)

Page Version Page Version Page Version


No. No. No. No. No. No.
Cover ....................... 1.0
History Page ............ 1.0
i — v ......................... 1.0

1-1 — 1-8 ................. 1.0

2-1 — 2-12 ............... 1.0

3-1 — 3-6 ................. 1.0

4-1 — 4-34 ............... 1.0

5-1 — 5-3 ................. 1.0

6-1 — 6-3 ................. 1.0

NOTE: The above pages represent a complete new printing. All


previous versions of this manual are superseded.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
CONTENTS
Typical Installation #7 - Typical
1 Introduction .....1-1 — 1-8 manifold system for 585 &585A series
Scope ........................................ 1-1 submersible pump (A) ....................... 2-11
General ..................................... 1-1 Typical Installation #8 - Typical
manifold system for 585 & 5855A series
Dispensers ................................ 1-2 submersible pump (B) ....................... 2-12
Mechanical Dispensers ........................ 1-2
Electronic Dispensers .......................... 1-3
System Component Block 3 Protecting Your
Diagrams .................................. 1-4 Investment .......3-1 — 3-6
Mechanical System Component Block
Diagrams ............................................. 1-4
Scope ........................................ 3-1
Electronic System Component Block General ..................................... 3-1
Diagrams ............................................. 1-6 Hints for Better Pump
System Component Block Diagram for Performance ............................. 3-2
Booster System .................................... 1-8
Demand Competent service ................. 3-2
Use Authorized Parts........................... 3-2
2 Typical Installations Make Regular Inspections ................... 3-2
Operate with Reasonable Care ............ 3-2
....................... 2-1 — 2-12 Regular Inspection Notes ......... 3-3
Scope ........................................ 2-1 Keep water out .................................... 3-3
General ..................................... 2-1 Rotary Pump Lubrication .................... 3-3
Motor Lubrication ............................... 3-3
Installation Problems ................ 2-2 Retrev-A-Hose Mechanism ................. 3-3
Friction Loss ....................................... 2-3 Mechanical Computer Lubrication ...... 3-3
Head Loss ............................................ 2-3 Clean the Suction Screen ..................... 3-3
Friction Loss in Pump Keep the drive belts adjusted ............... 3-3
Installations - Diagram ........................ 2-4
Preserving the Finish of Your
Typical Installation Diagrams ... 2-5
Pumps ....................................... 3-4
Typical Installation #1 - Suction
Cleaning Schedule ............................... 3-4
Dispenser with an above ground tank . 2-5
Waxing of Painted surfaces ................. 3-4
Typical Installation #2 - Suction
Cleaning of severely weathered painted
Dispenser with above ground tank ...... 2-6
surfaces ............................................... 3-4
Typical Installation #3 - Connecting
Cleaning of plastic and rubber surfaces3-4
two suction pumps on one suction line 2-7
Cleaning of stainless steel.................... 3-5
Typical Installation #4 - Booster
system with 52 pressure regulator ....... 2-8 Preparing Used Pumps for
Typical Installation #5 - For the Storage ..................................... 3-6
submerged 585A series pump ............. 2-9 Drain the entire pump .......................... 3-6
Typical Installation #6 - Typical Oiling the interior ................................ 3-6
syphon system for 585 & 585A series Sealing the unit .................................... 3-6
submersible pump ............................. 2-10

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 i


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
4 Technical Information
and Maintenance of Rotary Pump ........................................ 4-17
System Components Priming ............................................. 4-17
End Play ............................................ 4-17
....................... 4-1 — 4-33 Causes of Sticking ............................ 4-17
Replacing Pump Head ...................... 4-18
Scope ........................................ 4-1 Adjusting Pump Head ....................... 4-18
The Mechanical Computer ....... 4-2 Replacing the Valves ........................ 4-19
Maintaining the computer.................... 4-2 Replacing the Valve seats ................. 4-19
Cleaning and oiling .............................. 4-2 Repacking Rotary Pump Shaft ......... 4-19
Air Separator ....................................... 4-20
Setting the Price per Gallon ................. 4-2
Float Chamber .................................. 4-20
The Reset Mechanisms............. 4-3 Supply Chamber ............................... 4-20
Manual Reset ...................................... 4-3 Surge Check Valve ........................... 4-21
Power Reset Service ............................ 4-4 Possible Troubles and Remedies ...... 4-22
Pulsers ...................................... 4-6 Vacuum &Pressure Test- diagram .... 4-23
Types ................................................... 4-6 Vacuum & Pressure Tests ................. 4-24
Vacuum Test ....................................... 4-24
Operation ............................................. 4-6
Pressure Test ....................................... 4-25
Possible Problems ............................... 4-6
Magnetic Wheel Pulser ......................... 4-6 Remote System ....................... 4-26
Optical Pulser ........................................ 4-6 Submerged Pump .............................. 4-26
Both Pulsers .......................................... 4-6 Motors ................................................. 4-26
Meter Assembly ....................... 4-7 Operation ............................................. 4-27
Emergency Shutoff Valve ................... 4-27
898 positive displacement type meter-
Use of a Multimeter ............................ 4-27
diagram ............................................... 4-8 How to Measure Ohm Values between
To Remove Meter Assembly ............... 4-9 Wires and Ground ............................... 4-27
To Adjust Meter Assembly ................. 4-9 How to measure Ohm Values between
To Repack Drive Shaft........................ 4-9 Wires ................................................... 4-28
Meter Troubles .................................... 4-9 Motor Bolt Torque Specification. ....... 4-28
Binding ................................................ 4-9 Pressure Tests ................................... 4-28
Overhauling ....................................... 4-10 Submerged Pump Syphon Test ......... 4-29
Replacing Cover ................................ 4-11 Submerged Pump Syphon test -
Overmeasuring .................................. 4-11 Diagram ............................................... 4-30
Testing the Sliding Valve and The Pressure Monitor -
Plunger Cups ....................................... 4-11 Model 585A-PM ............................... 4-31
Testing the Valve Seat ........................ 4-12 General Description ............................ 4-31
Pumping Devices .................... 4-13 The Relay Control Box
Suction System .................................. 4-13 (Models 168 & 268) ............... 4-32
Adjusting the belt ................................ 4-13 General Description ........................... 4-32
Motor ................................................... 4-14
Correct Wiring .................................. 4-14 The Model 52 Pressure
Motor Switch .................................... 4-14 Regulator Valve ...................... 4-33
Rotary Pump and Air Separator ......... 4-15 General Description ........................... 4-33
Flow Diagram ................................... 4-15 Use of the 52 Valve ........................... 4-33
Procedure for removing water or
Flow Chart ........................................ 4-33
moisture from the system ................. 4-15
Diagram ............................................... 4-34
Rotary pump and Air separator -
diagram ............................................. 4-16

ii The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
5 Possible Troubles &
Remedies ..........5-1 — 5-3
Scope ........................................ 5-1
General ..................................... 5-1
Discharge with the switch
turned off .................................. 5-2
Discharge from the vent line
(during hot weather) ................. 5-2
Mechanical computer creeping . 5-2
Slow delivery ............................ 5-3
Slow delivery after first
gallon of normal delivery .......... 5-3

Index.......................6-1 — 6-3

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 iii


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
EMERGENCY POWER CUTOFF

Tokheim Corporation has determined that because more than one disconnect may
be required, Consoles and/or Dispensers equipped with Emergency Stop Switches
do not guarantee shutting off all power to the dispensers. In order to provide the
highest level of safety to you, your employees and customers, we recommend that
all employees be trained as to the location and procedure of turning off power to
the entire system. This is in keeping with N.F.P.A. 30A, 1990 Edition, Code #4-1.2:
"A clearly identified and easily accessible switch(es) or circuit breaker(s) shall be
provided at a location remote from dispensing devices, including remote pumping
systems, to shut off the power to all dispensing devices in the event of an
emergency."
In addition, in accordance with N.F.P.A. 30A, 1990 Edition, Code #9-4.5:
"Emergency controls specified in 4-1.2 [listed above] shall be installed at a location
acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction, but controls shall not be more than
100 ft. (30m) from dispensers."

DISCLOSURE NOTICE
This document contains information proprietary to Tokheim Corporation. The data
contained herein, in whole or in part may not be duplicated, used or disclosed outside the
recipient or purchaser for any purpose other than to evaluate or operate the equipment
described within the document.

IMPORTANT
THIS EQUIPMENT MUST BE INSTALLED AND USED IN ACCORDANCE WITH ALL
APLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL CODES AND REGULATIONS INCLUDING
BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE (N.F.P.A. NO. 70) AND
AUTOMOTIVE AND MARINE SERVICE STATION CODE (N.F.P.A. 30A).

!!! FCC WARNING !!!


This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed
and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause interference to radio
communications. It has been tested and has been found to comply as a class “A” device
with Part 15, Subpart “J” of the FCC rules at date of manufacture.

DISCLAIMER
ALTHOUGH TOKHEIM CORPORATION, HAS ATTEMPTED TO COMPILE THE MATERIAL
IN THIS MANUAL WITH ACCURACY, NEITHER IT, ITS' EMPLOYEES, NOR ITS' AGENTS
CAN MAKE ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, WITH
RESPECT TO THE LIABILITY WITH REGARD TO THE USE OF THIS MATERIAL OR
ASSUME ANY LIABILITY FOR DAMAGES RESULTING FROM THE USE OF ANY
INFORMATION, APPARATUS, METHOD OR PROCEDURE DESCRIBED IN THIS
MANUAL.

iv The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993

! DANGER
REMEMBER, GASOLINE AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS ARE
FLAMMABLE. THEREFORE, TO AVOID DEATH OR INJURY TO PERSONS
OR DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT OR PROPERTY, THE FOLLOWING
PRECAUTIONS ARE MANDATORY AND SHALL BE FOLLOWED WHEN
INSTALLING, USING OR WORKING AROUND TOKHEIM EQUIPMENT.

Tokheim equipment must be Always turn off all power to the It is the owner’s and operator’s
installed and used in dispenser and submerged pumps responsibility to ensure that the
conformance with all building/ at the master panel and close any proper warning signs are posted
fire codes and all other safety impact valve before performing per N.F.P.A. 30A, 1990 Edition,
requirements applicable to its any maintenance or service to the Code #9-9. These include, but are
installation and use. dispenser, including the changing not limited to,
of any fuel filters or strainers. •“STOP MOTOR”
Also block islands so no vehicles
Tokheim dispensers shall not be can pull up to the dispenser when •“NO SMOKING”
used for direct fueling of aircraft the dispenser is being worked on. •“WARNING -- IT IS
without filters, separators and UNLAWFUL AND
other equipment necessary to DANGEROUS TO
ensure product purity. DISPENSE GASOLINE
Never permit the dispensing of INTO UNAPPROVED
gasoline or other petroleum CONTAINERS”.
products into a vehicle with its
motor running.
Check all liquid-carrying joints
of the dispenser and piping If fuel is spilled on a person or
system for proper tightness to their clothing, the person must
avoid product leaks prior to initial Never permit the dispensing of wash and their clothing must be
operation and daily thereafter. gasoline or other petroleum changed immediately. Do not go
products into unapproved near open flames, sparks or people
containers or into approved smoking.
containers in or on vehicles
including trucks. All approved
Dispensers must be anchored to containers must be filled on the
a concrete island as specified per ground to prevent static discharge.
appropriate foundation plan. Always use Tokheim approved and Do not reuse gaskets or seals when
U.L. listed hoses and nozzles with servicing or rebuilding Tokheim
this dispenser. equipment. Always use new
Tokheim furnished gaskets or
To reduce the risk of electrical seals.
shock when servicing, turn off all Never permit smoking or the use
power to all equipment. In of open flames in the dispensing
submersible pump applications area.
turn off power to the submersible
pump and any other dispensers Ensure dispensers are properly
which use that submersible Never permit hoses to drag on the grounded before using.
pump. AC power can feed back island or dispensing area.
into a shut-off dispenser when Someone may trip or fall.
dispensers share a common
submersible pump or starter Don’t destroy these pages. These
relay. Always clean up product spills on warnings are for your safety.
the driveway.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 v


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

Section 1
Introduction
Scope
This section introduces the types of re-fueling dispensers and stand alone
dispensing components covered in this manual.

General
There are two types of dispensers used, Mechanical and Electronic. This
refers to the computer/displays used in the dispenser, (mechanical has
numeric wheels and electronic has liquid crystal displays).

All systems used for re-fueling have three basic components. Each
system must have a technique for moving the fuel from a storage tank to
the dispenser (pumping device), a measuring unit (meter for accurate
measurement of fuels), and a registration unit (computer/displays) to
translate fuel flow thru the meter into a volume and/or monetary display.

Refer to the following pages for diagrams of Tokheim Dispensers and


components used and covered in this book.

Contents
Dispensers ................................................................. 1-2 — 1-3
Mechanical Dispensers ................................. 1-2
Electronic Dispensers ................................... 1-3
System Component Block Diagrams ........................ 1-4 — 1-8
Mechanical System Component Block
Diagrams....................................................... 1-4 — 1-5
Electronic System Component Block
Diagrams....................................................... 1-6 — 1-8

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 1-1


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

Dispensers
Some of the Tokheim dispensers are shown below:

Mechanical Dispensers
The Tokheim 785, 1248 and 1250 are mechanical dispensers. Any of
these dispensers can be ordered for Suction or Remote Pump operation.

1248
785

1250

Page 1-2 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

Electronic Dispensers
The Tokheim 262A, TCSA Series, and Premier are Tokheim's Electronic
Dispensers. These dispensers are available in remote operation and
selected models may be available in suction pump operation.

262A

TCSA

Premier

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 1-3


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION
System component block diagrams
Refer to the following system block diagrams for various pump/tank combinations. The basic
components shown below are used internally and externally with the dispensers shown on the
previous pages

Mechanical System Component Block Diagrams


Typical component diagram for Mechanical Suction system with Below Ground Tank

Reset Mechanical
Mechanism Computer Registration
System
Meter Meter

SUCTION Operation Pumping


Motor Device
Rotary Pump and Air
Separator

Below Ground Storage


Tank

Typical component diagram for Mechanical Suction system with Above Ground Tank

Reset Mechanical
Registration
Mechanism Computer
System
Meter Meter

SUCTION Operation Pumping


Motor Device
Rotary Pump and Air
Separator

Model 52 Pressure
Regulator

Above Ground Storage


Tank

Page 1-4 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

Mechanical System Component Block Diagrams continued. . . .


Typical component diagram for Mechanical Remote system with Below Ground Tank

Reset Mechanical
Registration
Mechanism Computer
System
Meter Meter

REMOTE Operation 585A-PM (pressure Pumping


monitor) Device
Pump Control Box Submerged Pump

Below Ground Storage


Tank

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 1-5


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

Electronic System Component Block Diagrams


Typical component diagram for Electronic Suction system with Below Ground Tank

Pulser and Electronic


Computer
Registration
System
Meter Meter

SUCTION Operation Pumping


Motor Device
Rotary Pump and Air
Separator

Below Ground Storage


Tank

Typical component diagram for Electronic Suction system with Above Ground Tank

Pulser and Electronic


Computer Registration
System
Meter Meter

SUCTION Operation Pumping


Motor Device
Rotary Pump and Air
Separator

Model 52 Pressure
Regulator

Above Ground Storage


Tank

Page 1-6 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

Electronic System Component Block Diagrams continued. . .

Typical component diagram for Electronic Remote system with Below Ground Tank

Pulser and Electronic Registration


Computer System

Meter Meter

REMOTE Operation 585A-PM (pressure Pumping


monitor) Device
Pump Control Box Submerged Pump

Below Ground Storage


Tank

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 1-7


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
INTRODUCTION

System Component Block Diagram for Booster System

Reset Mechanical Pulser and Electronic


Mechanism Computer Computer
Registration
System
OR

Meter Meter

SUCTION Operation Pumping


Motor Devices
Rotary Pump and Air
Separator

Model 52 Pressure
Regulator

REMOTE Operation 585A-PM (pressure


monitor)
Pump Control Box Submerged Pump

OR

Below Ground Storage Above Ground Storage


Tank Tank

Page 1-8 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS

Section 2
Typical Installations
Scope
This section covers some typical installation practices associated with
Tokheim dispensers and ancillary equipment used for stand alone appli-
cations.

General
Different factors will determine the type of system and installation re-
quired. Considerations will include overall system cost, flow rate re-
quirements (GPM), regulations and site lay-out , just to name a few.

IMPORTANT
ALL INSTRUCTIONAL DIAGRAMS SHOWN IN THIS
SECTION ARE INTENDED FOR REFERENCE ONLY.
CONTACT AN AUTHORIZED SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE
OR A LICENSED ENGINEER FOR DETAIL INSTRUCTIONS.

ALL INSTALLATIONS MUST CONFORM TO NFPA


(NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION AGENCY) 30, 30A, 70
AND APPLICABLE NATIONAL, STATE, & LOCAL CODE
REQUIREMENTS

Contents
Installation Problems ................................................. 2-2 — 2-4
Typical Installation Diagrams ................................... 2-5 — 2-12

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 2-1


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS

Installation problems
Don't expect a dispenser to operate satisfactorily unless the installation is
correct. Dispensing problems which at first seem to be caused by the
dispenser, are often traced to the installation. For that reason, it is wise
to check your installation carefully and keep in mind the following
"don'ts":

• DON'T experiment with a dispenser if you are not certain the installation
is correct.

• DON'T install any underground piping without first checking with fed-
eral, state, and local requirements.

• DON'T cover any lines until they have been tested for leaks.

• DON'T use any black iron pipe or fittings for underground installations.

• DON'T back-fill a tank or suction line with ashes or cinders.

• DON'T use too-light power line. (Use 12 gauge or better.)

• DON'T use a too-heavy fuse or breaker in the power line.

• DON'T install suction pump line in the "low" end of the tank where
water can be introduced to the system.

• DON'T connect more than one dispenser to a single suction riser in


storage tank unless check valves are installed (see typical installation
diagram # 3 on page 2-7 for instructions).

Page 2-2 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS

Friction Loss (Suction Systems)


Nature assists in lifting liquid from the storage tank. A dispenser with a
suction pump does not actually pump the gasoline from the storage tank;
rather, it creates a vacuum in the line. Atmospheric pressure pushes the
product to the pumping unit. Total G.P.M. (gallons per minute) will be
affected by the reid vapor pressure rating and the total adjusted lift
including friction loss.

Too much line friction in the suction pipe can overload the pump by
requiring too great a differential between the pump vacuum and atmo-
spheric pressure. In effect, the longer the pipe, the more ells, the more
valves, etc., the more friction there is and the harder the pump must
work. It is possible in an improper installation requiring to much lift to
actually pull the product apart (also known as Vaporization). If this
occurs you have exceeded the product limitations; your installation must
be changed. Adding more suction will not correct the problem.

The chart on page 2-4 shows friction losses. With this information, you
can make a rough determination if you are within safe criteria for effi-
cient pump operation. Keep in mind that this is for reference only. For
specific information on your application refer to a qualified expert for
systems installation.

Head Loss (Remote System)


In general, submersible pumps will push product farther than suction
pumps can pull product. Since the vacuum side of the submerged pump
is a fixed distance from the tank, atmospheric conditions are not consid-
ered relevant to submersible pumps. However, another type of friction
loss is called head loss. Head loss is the resistance acting against the
output of the sub pump (pressure side). This is a primary concern when
setting up an installation using a "remote" submerged pump. Some
concerns when determining head loss is fuel viscosity, line length, & line
components, etc. Again, for specific information on your application
refer to a qualified expert for systems installations.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 2-3


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
FRICTION LOSS IN PUMP INSTALLATIONS

Elbows 2 X .08 = .16


.32

.63
4 — Elbows 11/2"
Page 2-4 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
Typical Installation Diagrams
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0

The following diagrams are shown for reference only and to familiarize you with some typical installation procedures. Equipment
must be installed and used in accordance with Federal, State, local, and National Electrical code N.F.P.A. No.70 and Automotive
and Marine service station code N.F.P.A. 30A codes and regulations.

Typical Installation #1
Suction dispenser with an above ground tank

TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Page 2-5
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Suction dispenser with a below ground tank
Typical Installation #2
Page 2-6 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Connecting two suction pumps on one suction line
Typical Installation #3

Underground Storage Tank


The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 2-7
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Page 2-8

Typical Installation #4
Booster system with 52 pressure regulator
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0

Important :
Submerged pump and dispensers furnished by Tokheim. Piping,
fittings seals, valves, sumps, etc, to be furnished by customer.

WARNING:
Safety shear section must be even with the bottom of the pump
base, and securely anchored to the island so the shear section will
break if conditions warrant.
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
For the submerged 585A series pump
Typical Installation #5
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 2-9
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Typical syphon system for 585 & 585A series submersible pump
Typical Installation #6
Page 2-10 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0

Typical Installation #7
Typical manifold system for 585 & 585A series submersible pump
(example 1 of 2)

TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Page 2-11
TYPICAL INSTALLATIONS
Typical Installation #8
Page 2-12

Typical manifold system for 585 & 585A series submersible pump
(example 2 of 2)
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT

Section 3
Protecting Your Investment

Scope
This section describes some general procedures used for inspecting,
maintaining and cleaning your dispensers.

General
To protect your investment periodic maintenance and cleaning is re-
quired. Developing a regular maintenance and cleaning schedule will
greatly extend the like-new appearance and operation of your dispenser.

Contents
Hints for Better Pump Performance.......................... 3-2
Regular Inspection Notes .......................................... 3-3
Preserving the Finish of Your Pumps........................ 3-4 — 3-5
Preparing Used Pumps for Storage ........................... 3-6

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 3-1


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT

Hints for Better Pump Performance

+ Demand Competent Service


If your dispenser should stop or fail to operate properly, don't depend upon
the repair service of an ordinary mechanic — unless he is thoroughly
familiar with the system. Experience shows that the repair result will be
more satisfactory if you demand the services of a competent representative
of the dispenser manufacturer. Tokheim, for example has a large field
organization which services pumps in every section of the country.

+ Use Authorized Parts


Should excessive wear, rust, or corrosion of parts cause inefficient opera-
tion, it is always best to replace them immediately; but for satisfactory
results, and continuity of the Underwriters' Label on the pump, be sure they
are authorized parts made by the pump manufacturer. Every part of a
pump is carefully designed for a particular purpose. If it is replaced by an
inaccurate or substandard substitute, pump operation is usually unsatisfac-
tory.

+ Make Regular Inspections


In order to keep pumps operating smoothly and with maximum efficiency, it
is wise to have regular inspections at least twice a year — Spring and
Autumn. It is better to have an experienced serviceman make the inspec-
tion. If any adjustments are necessary, they can be made before expensive
breakdowns occur.

+ Operate with Reasonable Care


Like any machine, the gasoline pump that is operated with reasonable care
will last longer and give better service. Care should be taken not to drag
the hose across the concrete island or driveway, for this causes excessive
wear. Also, replace the nozzle as soon as possible after completing deliv-
ery, so that the motor is not kept running unnecessarily.

Page 3-2 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT

Regular Inspections Notes


4 Keep water out
Water tends to collect in underground and aboveground storage tanks.
This is due to moisture-laden air being drawn into the storage tank and
condensing, or to defective fill openings that are not properly protected
with watertight covers. Storage tanks should be checked at regular
intervals and water removed with a sump pump, to prevent serious
damage to equipment.

Note: If water gets into your suction pump, see instructions on Page 4-
15 for eliminating water.
4 Rotary Pump Lubrication
The rotary pump should be lubricated at indicated points every six
months or 100,000 gallons.
• Lubricate pumping unit with a light grade oil (S.A.E. 10.)
• Apply oil to the felt pad located between the pump body and pulley.
Note: Oil used should be suitable for temperatures ranging from minus
400 to plus 1800.

4 Motor Lubrication
All motors used today are self maintenance, sealed motors. Lubricating
is not necessary.

4 Retrev-A-Hose Mechanism
The cable reel assembly does not require lubrication. Check the cable
periodically and replace when worn or frayed.
CAUTION: This assembly contains a strong spring coil. Precautions
should be taken to avoid personal injury

4 Mechanical Computer Lubrication


For mechanical dispensers under normal usage, lubricate twice a year, or
after each 100,000 gallons. Follow the instructions on page 4-2.

4 Clean Suction Screen


Be sure to keep the suction strainer screen clean.
The symptoms of a dirty suction strainer are slow delivery, noisy opera-
tion, pulsation.
Important: Be sure to capture all fuel in an approved container.

4 Keep the drive belts adjusted


With the proper care the belts will give exceptionally good service. A
loose belt not only cuts down dispensing speed, due to slipping, but also
results in excessive wear.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 3-3


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT

Preserving the Finish of Your Pumps


Nearly all gasoline dispensers are installed outdoors where their surfaces
are constantly subjected to the action of weather. Even if protected
under a canopy, the exposed surfaces are subjected to rain, dirt, wind,
and all other elements of the outdoors. Materials used in Tokheim
dispensers are designed to operate under normal environmental condi-
tions to withstand the natural elements.

Cleaning Schedule
All locations should maintain a cleaning schedule that includes periodic
cleaning, rinse and wax cycles. You will want to maintain a cleaning
schedule dependent upon the dispensers degree of environmental expo-
sure. When unusual conditions (i.e., air born chemicals, acid rain, hail,
road salt, other road debris, etc.) occur, the exposed surfaces should be
cleaned as much as once a week. Also, consider a similar maintenance
schedule for geographical locations near coasts (salt spray from ocean).
In any degree of exposure, you will want to consider all factors when
adopting a cleaning schedule to give the finish a reasonable amount of
care.

Waxing of painted surfaces


The application of wax is very important as it retards the action of the
weather and the oxidation of the paint pigment on the outer surfaces of
the finish. Waxing is doubly important for pumps in industrial centers,
where smoke and gas contaminate the air, causing extra damage to the
pump finish.

Cleaning of severely weathered painted surfaces


If a pump has been badly neglected, it may not be possible to remove the
film of grime and oxidized paint pigment with a mild liquid polish. In
such cases, a mild abrasive, paste-type cleaner, such as Simonize cleaner
is recommended. This should be used in accordance with the
manufacturer's directions. After the surfaces have been thoroughly
cleaned, a protective coat of wax should be applied.

Cleaning of plastic and rubber surfaces


All plastic and rubber parts are eventually affected by the sun. Ultraviolet
rays can deteriorate the surface (even to the point of chalking or showing
small cracks). Plastic and rubber parts can be protected with the use of
products like Armor-All and others. These products are readily available
through automotive-related outlets.

Page 3-4 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT

Cleaning of stainless steel


To retain the unmarked finish on stainless steel, occasional cleaning is
required. In corrosive atmospheres, such as coastal areas, a more fre-
quent cleaning schedule is recommended. Under ordinary conditions,
washing with mild detergent or soap and water, followed by a clear-
water rinse, is sufficient. If hard water is used, the surface should be
wiped dry with a soft cloth to prevent the formation of water spots.

Marks or spots, such as grease, oily fingerprints and smudges that resist
soap or detergents, usually can be removed with Bon-Ami and water,
followed by a clear-water rinse. Two other products that have been
found effective for this purpose are: Lac-O-Nu, manufactured by Nu-
Steel Company, 1714 South Ashland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois; and,
Shaklee Basic 1, manufactured by Shaklee Corporation, 1990 Powell
Street, Emeryville, California. After cleaning, an application of paste
wax is recommended to protect the surface and extend the interval
between cleanings.

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES
SHOULD A HIGH PRESSURE
WASHER OR A PRODUCT
CONTAINING HARSH ABRASIVE
(SUCH AS SCOURING POWDER)
BE USED ON A PAINTED OR
STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE.

ORDINARY STEEL WOOL SHOULD


NEVER BE USED ON STAINLESS
STEEL, AS IRON PARTICLES MAY
ADHERE TO THE SURFACE AND
CAUSE CORROSION.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 3-5


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT

Preparing Used Pumps for Storage


Special care should be given used pumps that are being removed from
service to be stored for future use. Gasoline, moisture, and foreign
material that is left in the pumps will do extensive damage to the internal
working parts of the rotary pump unit, air separator, and meter.

Drain the entire pump


The damage can be prevented if the entire pump is drained of gasoline,
moisture, and foreign material before it is put into storage. To do this,
first remove the drain plugs: in the lower rotary pump head; in the top of
the meter cover; in the lower manifold outlet of the meter. Use sufficient
air pressure to force out all gasoline, moisture, and foreign material that
may be in the inaccessible cavities.

IMPORTANT: Be certain to capture any fuel exiting the dispenser


in an approved container.

Oiling the interior


Oiling of the interior working parts may be accomplished easily by using
a spray gun filled with light oil (free from gum content). The oil may be
blown in through the suction inlet located in the lower rotary pump head.

Sealing the unit


Be sure to put sealant on the drain plugs and replace them in their proper
positions. A cloth bag or wooden plug should be used to cover the
suction inlet and discharge outlet, to prevent dirt from entering the
interior.

Page 3-6 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Section 4

Technical Information and


Maintenance of System Components

Scope
This section will provide helpful information for understanding, trouble-
shooting and repairing dispensers and related equipment.

Contents
Mechanical Computer............................................... 4-2
The Reset Mechanisms ............................................. 4-3 — 4-5
Pulsers ...................................................................... 4-6
Meter Assembly ........................................................ 4-7 — 4-12
Pumping Devices ...................................................... 4-13 — 4-31
Suction system.............................................. 4-13
Remote system ............................................. 4-26
Relay control box ...................................................... 4-32
Model 52 Pressure Regulator ................................... 4-33 — 4-34

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-1


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

The Mechanical Computer


The Mechanical computer is the mechanical dispenser's registration
system as indicated in the system component block diagram shown in
section 1.

Maintaining the computer


Before it is installed in a pump, the computer is carefully adjusted
and lubricated so that it will require very little attention in actual opera-
tion. However, being of mechanical nature, it does require cleaning and
lubricating at intervals.

When adjustment or lubrication becomes necessary you will find it conve-


nient to remove the computer from the pump and take off the covers and
variator band — thus exposing the working parts.

Cleaning and Oiling


Individual cases vary, but under normal conditions it is necessary to clean and oil the com-
puter only once or twice a year — or after each 100,000 gallons dispensed.

• Remove the computer from the pump


• Clean with compressed air
• Wipe all accessible parts with a clean cloth; never use solvents as this will dissolve the new
lubricant when it is applied
• Apply a light, non-detergent type oil of No.10-SAE viscosity to all bearings, shafts, and
variator gears.

Setting the Price per Gallon


To set the price on the mechanical computer (for example to $1.289):

• Slide the slip cover which encloses the lower part of the
computer (thereby exposing the range setting plates and the
wheel characters — see instructions on slip cover)

• Set the wheel character display to “1” (Dollar amount)

• On plate 3, set the sliding gear lever to the hole marked “20”

• On plate 2, set the sliding gear lever to the hole marked “8”

• On plate 1, set the sliding gear lever to the hole marked “9/10”

Page 4-2 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

The Reset Mechanisms

Use two or three


drops of oil to
lubricate every six
months or as
required for smooth
operation

Manual Reset
The above illustration depicts the Manual Reset assembly. This mecha-
nism, like the Power Reset (described on the next page), is used to reset
the mechanical computer’s numeric wheels to zeroes. Since 1976, the
Power Reset has been standard on dispensers with the mechanical
computer.

Manual Reset Service


The manual reset shaft should be lubricated from the outside. Two or
three drops of oil every six months is recommended or as required for
smooth operation (drawing).

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-3


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

27
29
7
9
10

8
17
23

18
14 22
6

21

Power Reset Service (authorized service representative)


The following procedure is recommended should service ever be re-
quired on the Power Reset.

If the Control Lever (not shown) is turned to the “ON” position and the
dispenser fails to operate, proceed as follows:

1. Check all switches in the service station panel making sure they are
“ON”. This should include checking circuit breakers and/or fuses.

2. Check the 115 volt circuit at the lower pump connection box to make
certain proper voltage is being supplied to the Power Reset. The voltage
check should be taken with the Control Lever in the “ON” position. A
voltage reading of 70 - 80 v. while the computer is resetting indicates
improper installation wiring.

3. Check to make sure the Reset Couplings (not shown) are engaged
properly between the Power Reset and the computer.

4. Before attempting to remove the Cover Assembly (29), TURN OFF


ALL POWER to the dispenser. Disengage the Reset Coupling by
loosening the screw, nut, and lockwasher. Turn the Control Lever to the
“ON” position. Remove hex head cap screws and lockwasher. Pull the
cover assembly away from the case and disengage the male plug from
the female plug.

Page 4-4 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

5. To check the mechanical operation of the cover components, turn the


Idler Shaft Assembly (22) in a clockwise (CW) direction (DO NOT
TURN BACKWARDS DAMAGE COULD RESULT). This causes the
Drive (6) to rotate the Cam (18) in a counter-clockwise (CCW) direc-
tion. If not, check the Pinion (7) and Computer Drive Assembly (23).
The Cam (18) engages the Leaf Actuator (9) and Reset Switch (10).
Continuity of the switch can be checked with an ohm meter. Once the
switch is actuated, it should remain closed (actuated) until the Cam has
rotated far enough to cause Interponent Assembly (21) to move down-
ward and engage or close the Motor Switch (10).

6. Replacing the Motor Switch (10) can be accomplished in one of two


ways:

a. Rotate Idler Shaft Assembly (22) clockwise until the curved slot in
the Interponent Assembly (21) allows access to the bottom screw.

b. Or, remove the two #6-32 Screws securing the Switch Bracket to the
cover assembly and slide the entire switch assembly forward, which
allows easy access to the Reset Switch screws.

7. To replace Pinion (7) or Idler Shaft Assembly (22) - Rotate Idler Shaft
Assembly (22) counter clockwise until it unscrews itself from Pinion (7).
To replace Pinion (7), remove Gear Cover (17).

8. To replace Drive (6), Cam (18), or Computer Drive Assembly (23),


remove Tru-arc Ring. In reassembling, simply replace the parts in
reverse order from disassembly. No timing is required in reassembly.

9. To replace Interponent Assembly (21), first remove Idler Shaft Assem-


bly (22) as outlined in Step 7, and Tru-arc Ring (49). In reassembling,
one leg of Spring (8) should rest on hub for Idler Shaft Assembly (22)
and the other leg of the Spring must rest on the Interponent Assembly.

10. To replace the Power Reset Motor (27), first remove Idler Shaft Assem-
bly (22) as outlined in Step 7. Next, remove the two screws fastening
the motor to the cover. Disconnect the motor lead to the Reset Switch
(10) and also the lead from the Reset Switch to the Male Plug (14).
Note: All Power Reset motors are furnished with required wiring to the
Male Plug (14).

In reassembling the Cover Assembly (29) to the Case, care must be


taken to properly align the Male Plug (14) with the female plug. This
male/female plug is of a polarized design - in other words, the plug will
assemble in only one manner.

The cover assembly can be assembled to the case with ease if the Con-
trol Lever is in the “ON” position. NEVER FORCE THE ASSEMBLY
TOGETHER AS DAMAGE COULD OCCUR After the cover assem-
bly is secured to the case, turn the power “ON” and allow the Power
Reset to complete one cycle.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-5


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Pulsers
(FOR ELECTRONIC DISPENSERS)
The Pulsers are the heart of the electronic
registration system as indicated in the system
component block diagrams shown in section 1.

Types
By looking at the housing, you can tell
which type of pulser you have. The
Magnetic Wheel pulser has the cover
attached to the side (see left). The Opti-
cal pulser’s cover is attached to the top of
the housing (at right).

NOTE: Any maintenance of the pulsers


Magnetic Wheel Pulser Optical Pulser
should only be accomplished by authorized
service representatives.

Operation
The magnetic wheel pulser uses alternating magnetic poles on the wheel to
create dual-phase pulses. These pulses are detected by two sensors. The
optical pulser uses a slotted wheel to interrupt a beam of light inside an
enclosure to produce the dual-phase pulses. The optical pulser is standard
in Premier series dispensers.

Possible Problems
Magnetic Wheel Pulser
If nuisance pulse errors occur, and there are no problems with the installa-
tion (leaks or large hydrostatic shocks), then the pulser might be at fault.
Items to investigate would include:
• Defective circuit board
• Metal flakes or filings attached to the magnetic wheel (remove
particles by cleaning off the magnetic wheel)

Optical Pulser
Check for pulse output when the shaft is turned. If none are present,
replace the pulser assembly.

Both pulsers
Always check power supplies in the head of the dispenser for proper output
voltages. A low power condition produces erratic behavior.

Page 4-6 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Meter Assembly
The Meter is included in all Electronic and Mechanical dispensers as
indicated in the system component block diagram shown in section 1.
There are various meter designs in the pump industry. Tokheim has its
own three-piston vertical type positive displacement unit, and through
the years little change has taken place other than material, and the
methods in which the plunger assemblies are attached to the eccentric
plate of the meter.

The following diagram shows the fuel flow through the meter.

The pressure developed by the


rotary pump forces gasoline into
the top of the chamber. As the
pistons move on the up-stroke,
gasoline enters the cylinders.
When the filling cycle has been
completed, the piston begins the
downward stroke, dispensing a
measured quantity of liquid to the
discharge port located in the center
of the body casting. As the first
piston finishes a complete cycle,
the discharge valve rotates in
position for the second and third
pistons.

As the pistons move up and down,


they create the power to revolve the eccentric plate which, in turn,
rotates the discharge valve from one port to the other. As the eccentric
plate revolves on the bracket, the slack roller-post on top of the plate
drives the counter gear, which in turn actuates the Mechanical computer
or pulser. Four revolutions of the drive shaft are made per gallon deliv-
ery of gasoline.

After the liquid has been measured and registered on the computer, the
gasoline passes through the discharge tube into the hose and nozzle to
the customer’s tank.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-7


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
10

14
11

22
9
15
16

26
19

20
18
17
13

12

21

23
24
8
2
1

25
5

4
6

7
3
Page 4-8 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

To Remove Meter Assembly


The complete meter assembly shown on the previous page can be removed
from the pump by breaking seal wire and removing Coupling Drive As-
sembly attached to computer unit. Disconnect Inlet and Outlet connec-
tions; draining all fuel into an approved storage container. Remove four
hex head cap screws and nuts securing measuring unit to support frames.

To Adjust Measurement
The adjustment of measurement is accomplished by breaking the seal wire
and removing Seal Pin, Item No. 1. This will permit the Index Disc, Item
No. 2, to be turned either to the right, decreasing the measurement, or to
the left, increasing the measurement. A variation of approximately one
cubic inch in measurement is obtained by turning the index disc five holes.
After measurement has been properly adjusted, the seal pin and seal wire
should be replaced.

To Repack Drive Shaft


To replace the Packing, Item No. 3, around the Drive Shaft, Item No. 4,
extending from the top of the measuring unit, it is necessary to remove
Outer Packing Gland, Item No. 5, and Packing Gland, Item No. 6. Insert
O-Rings, Seals and Seal Retainers, as shown, into Gland recess. Force
Packing into place with Upper Bearing and Packing Gland Plate. Packing
Spring, Item No. 7, creates tension on the seal and prevents leaking.

Meter Troubles
The troubles usually experienced with measuring units are caused by
binding and failure to operate, or failure to measure correctly.

Binding
Binding is usually caused by parts that become rusted or corroded when
excessive water is run through the unit, or when a large amount of foreign
matter collects in it. In cold weather, if water is present in the system, ice
formations will stop the operation. Because the Tokheim measuring unit is
designed to handle more than a usual amount of water before corroding or
rusting enough to bind, Tokheim users do not experience as many troubles
along this line as users of other types of gasoline dispensing equipment.
HOWEVER, KEEP YOUR METER ASSEMBLY AS FREE FROM
WATER AS POSSIBLE - AT ALL TIMES! On rare occasions binding
may be caused when the meter is spun to fast, such as when air is purged
from the system upon start-up. Your Authorized Service Representative
may be able to provide helpful techniques for releasing a bound meter.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-9


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Overhauling (authorized service representative)


Refer to these instructions and the drawing on page 4-8 when overhauling
the Meter Assembly.

1 Repair work can best be accomplished if the Meter Assembly is first


removed from the pump.

2 Remove cap screws and lift off Meter Assembly Cover, Item No. 8.
This exposes the entire working mechanism of the Meter. Be careful
not to damage the Cork Gasket, Item No. 9, and do not shellac it when
reassembling.

3 Loosen Screws (Item No. 10) and disconnect Plunger Assembly (Item
No. 11).

4 Remove the three Round-head Machine Screws (Item No. 12) and lift
off Wobble Plate Assembly (Item No. 13). Mark the wobble plate
assembly at some point, because it is necessary that it be replaced in
exactly the same position when reassembling the Meter.

5 The plungers may now be taken out, and any work that needs to be
done on them can be accomplished without further dismemberment of
the Meter. New Plunger Cups (Item No. 14) may be installed if
needed.

6 The next step is dismembering the wobble plate assembly, which can
be done readily by removing the three Fillister-head Machine Screws
(Item No. 15) which hold Bracket to Wobble Plate. This permits the
whole assembly to come apart.

7 The Main Pivot Bearing (Item No. 17) can then be lifted off its loca-
tion, as well as the Compensating Cam Gear (Item No. 18). Adjusting
Screw (Item No. 19) and Compensating Cam Gear are assembled
together, requiring no timing - only engagement with Compensating
Pinion (Item No. 20) and mounted onto Main Pivot Bracket Assembly
(Item No. 21).

8 Do not attempt to remove Valve Seat (Item No. 22) from Meter Body
(Item No. 23) because these two parts are assembled together in the
factory before the valve seat surface is ground. Removal may cause
the seat to warp, causing meter inaccuracy

If these instructions are followed carefully, the measuring unit will be


completely dismembered, and any part of it can readily be adjusted. After
all parts are cleaned (and any in bad condition replaced with new parts),
re-assemble the meter and refer to the instructions on the next page for
reassembling the meter cover.

Page 4-10 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Replacing Cover
Position the Meter Body (Item No. 23) and mechanism, with Compensat-
ing Pinion Shaft, Item No. 20, to right side. Press Wobble Plate Assembly
(Item No. 13) down on right side.
The correct position of the cover is determined by a dowel pin in the top
flange of the cylinder body and a locating hole in the cover flange. Before
attempting to place the cover on the unit, turn the Compensating Pinion
Shaft (Item No. 24) in a position so that it will readily slide into the Com-
pensating Pinion (Item No. 20); also turn Gear (Item No. 25) in the cover
so that the driving lug is to the left.
Place cover squarely over the unit with the locating hole in the flange
directly over the dowel pin in the cylinder body flange.
If the flanges do not come together, never use force. Instead, turn the
Compensating Disc (Item No. 2) slightly one way or the other in order to
bring the coupling into alignment; or remove the cover and readjust the
parts if necessary.

Overmeasuring
This condition occurs when the meter is putting out more product than is
being registered. There are four conditions that will cause the Tokheim
positive displacement type Meter to over-measure, namely: leakage of
gasoline past sliding valve (item #26), leakage past the plunger cups (item
#14), leakage past valve seat (item #22), and excessive wear of parts.
These troubles can usually be remedied easily and inexpensively. The
following instructions will aid you in overcoming the trouble.
Testing the Sliding valve and Plunger cups
1 Remove meter and disassemble as per instructions 1 through 4 on Page
4-10.
2 Push all plungers to the bottom of the cylinders and cover the top of all
plungers with test fluid (thin oil or solvent). Then carefully center the
sliding valve, so that it closes all ports at the same time. Apply a
stream of SAE 10 oil along all three sides of the valve. Hold valve in
this position, bearing down on it firmly with one hand. With the other
hand, pull up on the three plungers, one at a time. If the plunger pulls
up easily, it indicates that either the sliding valve is not seating (lapped)
properly to the Valve seat (oil being pulled into the side of the valve) or
the plunger cup is leaking (test fluid being drawn into the cylinder).
However, if plunger does not move when you try to pull it up, you can
be sure the plunger cup and sliding valve are reasonably tight and
should not affect the measurement of the meter.
3 Lap the sliding valve by using only a very fine grinding compound such
as Bon-Ami or SAE 10 oil. If the valve seat is badly damaged in any
way so that lapping of low spots is impossible, it would be best to
install a new meter body.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-11


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

4 If the test proves, replace badly worn plunger cups with new ones
and apply Loctite 271 (or equivalent) to the screw threads. When
tightening the screws, be sure the plunger cup is evenly spaced on
the plunger disc and support.
5 Form the cup by turning the plunger cup assembly in your hand,
using your thumb to roll the edge slightly. After the cup is partially
formed, place the plunger assembly into the meter unit body and
press into the piston cylinder. Turn the assembly in the piston
cylinder to assure the cup is evenly formed to the cylinder.

Testing the Valve seat


1 Put a drop of oil on each of the six Screws securing the valve seat to
the meter body.
2 Bring the plunger assembly to the top of each cylinder. Center the
sliding valve so that it closes off all three ports and apply SAE 10 oil
along each side of the valve.
3 Holding the valve in a centered position, bear down on the center
with one hand. Push each of the plungers to the bottom of the
cylinder.
• If bubbling occurs at any one of the six screw heads, it indicates the
valve seat is not sealed and it will be necessary for you to remove it
and re-seal it using loctite.

Page 4-12 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Pumping Devices
Pumping devices, as indicated by the system block diagrams shown in section 1
include all component sub-assemblies required for the transport of fuel. The
following pages will discuss each of the components used in both Suction systems
and Remote systems.

Rotary Pump &


Air Separator Suction System
The suction system is used in applications where it
is preferred, (i.e., sites with a limited number of dispensers,
and sites not limited by vacuum installation requirements).
Motor
Refer to the diagram for a typical suction system located in
the dispenser.

Adjustment Pulley

Adjusting the belt


Make certain that the power is turned off so the pump cannot be turned on.
Set the adjustment pulley to the proper tension. The belt should deflect
approximately 1/4" in the longest span. Care should be taken not to tighten
the belts too much, because it could cause excessive wear on the rotary
pump and motor bearings.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-13


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Motor

Correct Wiring
Properly cared for, the motors furnished with Tokheim pumps will give
excellent service. Pumps are shipped from the factory with motors wired
according to the specifications given on the order as to kind of current,
frequency and voltage.

Very often, upon installation it becomes necessary to change the original


hook-up to suit the current supply. Many motor failures result from
improper setting or wiring. If set for 110 volts and a 220-volt current is
used, the motor will burn out after running only a short time. If set for 220
volts and a 110-volt current is used, the motor will run very slowly and the
starting field will soon burn-out.

Incorrect wiring of a motor is due to carelessness on the part of the indi-


vidual making the electrical connection. All motors are properly tagged at
the factory, and with ordinary precaution, any competent electrician will
find it easy to wire them correctly.

Most of the motors can be adjusted by changing the setting on the motor
change-over plate (located near the pulley); however, the ‘World’ motor
must be wired for 115 or 220 volt operation and clockwise or counter-
clockwise rotation. Please see the appropriate documentation for proper
wiring or settings for all motor

Page 4-14 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Rotary Pump and Air Separator Assembly


All Tokheim suction-type pumps are equipped with gear-type rotary
pumping units which are very simple in design and most efficient in opera-
tion. There are only two moving parts - the rotor and idler, both machined
to a very close tolerance. The diagram below shows the fuel and air flow
through the rotary pump and air separator.

Procedure for removing water or moisture from the system


1 Test the underground storage tank for water and remove.
2 Pump 50 gallons of product through the system to pull all moisture
from suction line.
3 Drain the pumping unit by removing the strainer cap (item # 20). Be
certain to catch any fuel into an approved container.
4 Before replacing the strainer cap, lightly coat the inside of the strainer
screen with light grease—#2 cup grease.
5 Replace the screen and tighten strainer cap.
6 Remove the separator cover (item # 64) and fill float chamber with
alcohol.
7 Replace the cover, open nozzle and then turn on motor and run 50
gallons of product to purge the unit of water.
Note: The Alcohol will flush out water. The grease will dissolve, lubricat-
ing all internal operating parts.
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-15
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
Page 4-16

Poppet Valve
Assembly

13 64
12
11 60
10

23 59

Strainer screen is to be
cleaned regularly using a
solvent cleaner and soft
brush
9 54
55
7

20 18
When replacing, always be 16
sure to insert the strainer 14
screen into the cap first.
46
15
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0

1
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Rotary Pump
The purpose of the rotary pump is to create a vacuum in the suction line
and allow the atmospheric pressure to push the gasoline up from the
storage tank to the unit. Liquid entering through the suction inlet fills the
spaces between the gear teeth in the idler, and is carried through the pump
body, transforming it into pressure. Because there is small clearance
between the gear teeth on the rotor and the pump body, and because gear
pumps are usually rotated at high speeds, the rotary unit will pump air and
vapor as well as liquid. Thus, the pumping action of gear-type units is
positive.

Priming
A new Tokheim pump will prime itself, unless it is connected to an ex-
tremely long suction line with an excessive vertical lift (over 12 feet),
provided that the suction line is otherwise correctly installed.

If the pump will not prime itself, remove the Strainer Cap, Item No. 20 (in
the Rotary Pump Body - see drawing on Page 4-16), and while turning the
pump pulley in reverse direction by hand, squirt a small amount of heavy
lubricating oil in the strainer cavity, then replace strainer cap and start the
pump. In practically all cases, this will provide a tight seal long enough to
enable the pump to prime. This procedure may be necessary when an old
pump, considerably worn, is moved to a different location.

End Play
Overhauling the Tokheim rotary pump is necessary only when the pump
has lost efficiency due to end play caused by excessive wear or when
damage has resulted from the pumping of foreign matter or water. Ordinary
end play can be taken up by removing Rotary Pump Head, Item No. 13,
and reducing the amount of Gasket material, Item No. 12.

Causes of Sticking
If a pump should stick while in operation, remember that it can be caused
by three things:

1 Foreign matter in the working parts

2 Working parts badly rusted by water

3 In winter, by ice formed from moisture that may have


gathered in the pump

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-17


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

If foreign matter is causing the trouble, it can be easily remedied by


removing the pump head and cleaning out all matter that has accumu-
lated. In case of ice, the pump can be thawed out by applying some safe
form of heat. Never use an open flame or a glowing electric heater!

If the working parts are rusted, it will be necessary to remove Head, Item
No. 13, and Idler, Item No. 11, as well as the Rotor, Item No. 10. After
the head and idler have been removed, take off the pump pulley from the
opposite end, and file off the burr caused by the pulley setscrew on the
shaft so that it will not damage bearings or packing when the shaft is
removed. Loosen the tension on packing by removing Cap Screws, Item
No. 14, Retainer Plate, Item No. 16, Oil Well Felt, Item No. 18, and
Bearing, Item No. 15. Clean all parts thoroughly with fine sandpaper
and rinse in clean solvent; then reassemble the pump.

If working parts are badly cut by large abrasives, such as sand, or badly
pitted by rust, to such an extent that ordinary cleaning will not correct
the problem, it will be necessary to replace the complete pumping unit.

Replacing Pump Head (Authorized Service Representative)


When replacing the rotary pump head, it is necessary to follow these
steps in order to obtain the correct results:

1 Be sure to drain the unit of fuel into an approved container

2 Relieve all tension on the packing bearing

3 Have pump pulley in position so that the shaft can be turned easily
by hand

4 Place a sufficient number of Thin Head Gaskets, Item No. 12, on


head

5 Tighten head securely and turn pulley.

Adjusting the pump head


If the pump binds, (metal to metal contact is felt) remove head and add
one gasket at a time (each time re-tightening head) until the pump is
free. Then remove head again and coat the top gasket with shellac, or
other gasoline-resisting compound, replace head on the pumping unit,
and tighten all cap screws.

Should the pump turn freely, remove one gasket at a time (each time re-
tightening head) until it binds (metal to metal contact is felt). Then
remove head, add one gasket, replace head on rotary pump, and tighten
all cap screws.

Following this procedure permits the end clearance to be adjusted very


closely, because the gasket material is only 3/1000" thick.
Page 4-18 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Replacing the Valves


In order to replace the by-pass and regulating valves you must remove the
float cover, float, and the valve hold down bracket. You may then lift out
the valves and replace them. Be certain that the by-pass valve is replaced
with the correct size as there are different valve sizes depending on which
type of pumping unit you have (high capacity or low capacity).

Replacing the Valve seats


In the event of very bad condition due to rust, corrosion, etc., it is best to
replace the valve seats with new ones. The regulating and by-pass valve
seats are pressed into the Rotary Pump Base, Item No. 1. To remove these
seats, it is first necessary to remove the entire rotary pumping unit from the
chassis. Then remove the hex head cap screws which secure the lower
pump base to the rotary pump body.

Repacking Rotary Pump Shaft


The rotary pump is packed with special “V” packings. Be sure that the
proper size and kind of packing is used whenever it becomes necessary to
repack the stuffing box. The packings are shown as Item No. 7. They can
be easily replaced by removing the Pump Pulley; remove Cap Screw, Item
No. 14, which allows the removal of Retainer Plate, Item No. 16, the
Bearing, Item No. 15, and Oil Well Felt, Item No. 18.

The packing glands of this unit are spring-loaded by Spring, Item No. 9, to
keep the proper tension on the packing at all times. For this reason, when
the Bearing, Item No. 15, is removed, the packing will be forced forward
by the Spring, Item No. 9, provided the unit has been properly lubricated,
as recommended by the manufacturer.

When old packing rings are removed, be sure to replace them with a like
number of new ones. This is important in order to prevent leaks in the
stuffing box.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-19


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Air Separator
The purpose of the Air Separator is to eliminate the air and vapors from
the gasoline before they reach the measuring unit. The device consists of
two chambers, the supply chamber and the float chamber.

CAUTION: Under no circumstances should an air separator be plugged.


This action will block off the air separator vent, possibly causing damage to
the float assembly and will result in metering inaccuracies.

Float Chamber
The float chamber is the area where air and vapors are separated from the
fuel before the discharge to the meter. Approximately 10% of all fuel
discharged enters the float chamber at the rate of one gallon per minute
through an orifice (Item No. 23) along with all air and vapors. The air and
vapor is then vented by means of a copper tubing run to an opening where
the vapors are vented to the atmosphere or to a vapor recovery system.
The Float, Item No. 60, and Needle Valve Assembly, Item No. 59, regu-
lates the liquid level in the float chamber. When the motor is running with
the hose open and the fuel level rises enough to lift the float to open the
needle valve, the fuel will pass back to the suction side of the pump.

Supply Chamber
The Supply Chamber contains two valve assemblies - By-Pass, Item No.
54, and Regulating, Item No. 55. It is easy to distinguish one from the
other because the by-pass valve poppet is all metal., while the regulating
valve poppet has a composition disc. Also, the by-pass valve spring is
heavier than that of the regulating valve.

Because gear pumps are positive in operation, some means must be pro-
vided to limit the pressure they build up when the hose from the pump is
closed. Otherwise, excessive pressure would create strains within the
pump or connecting pipe, and might cause leaks, or blow fuses by over-
loading the motor. By-pass valves are used to prevent excessive pressure;
surplus gasoline is detoured back to the suction side of the pumping unit.

The regulating valve function is threefold:


• It regulates the flow of fuel from the rotary pump to the meter;
• It stops the flow of fuel to the meter in the event the pressure drops in
the chamber (caused by a greater amount of air in the chamber than can
be handled by the separator), this eliminates the possibility of vapor or
air escaping into the meter.
• In addition to the surge check vale, it acts as a check valve to keep the
entire system full of gasoline as far as the hose nozzle.

Page 4-20 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

When the pump is started, both the by-pass and regulating valves are
opened by the pressure building up in the supply chamber and acting
against the small piston and cylinder assemblies located at the tops of
the valve assemblies. The cylinder caps have small holes in their tops to
release any gasoline that might leak past the cup disc of the valve pis-
tons, and also to allow the valves to open against atmospheric pressure.
The cup disc prevents an excessive amount of fuel leakage from the
supply chamber to the float chamber.

After starting, and when the hose opens, the pressure drops inside the
supply chamber. When the pressure falls the by-pass valve closes
completely. Fuel pressurized keeps the regulating valve open thus
allowing the fuel between the pressure rating of the regulating valve and
the pressure rating of the by-pass valve to pass through the discharge
area of the pump into the meter.

The spring tensions of the regulating and by-pass valves have no adjust-
ment, and the pressure ratings vary depending on what pump you have.

Surge Check Valve


Since the regulating and by-pass valves are hydraulically controlled, they
cushion the shock resulting from the functioning of the rotary pump.
Inasmuch as the regulating valve is open through the entire operation of
the pump, a Pressure Surge Valve, Item No. 46, is used in connection
with the regulating valve. This added valve prevents fuel from surging
through the open regulating valve when the nozzle is closed and the
motor is running. This safeguard eliminates the possibility of overflow-
ing in the air separator and the passage of gasoline through the vent line
in the pump. The surge valve closes the instant the flow of gasoline is
shut off.

Excessive pressure developed by the sudden closing of the nozzle valve


is allowed to escape through a relief valve built in the stem poppet,
equalizing the pressure in the system when the motor is turned off and
the rotary pump and air separator assembly is at atmospheric pressure.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-21


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Possible Troubles and Remedies


If the air separator, or any of its parts, fails to function properly, read the following
reasons and remedies carefully:

Symptom Cause Remedy


Bypass valve does not open; pump Presence of foreign material in a Remove the valve, clean all parts,
stalls completely. pump may cause the bypass valve to and replace.
become stuck in its seat or piston
assembly. This condition tends to
occur when a pump has been idle for
some time, when water is present,
when ice has formed, or the air
eliminator tube is blocked.
Fuel does not flow to the meter; Presence of foreign material in the Clean all parts and replace.
regulating valve does not open. valve, piston, and cylinder assembly.
Insufficient pressure in the supply Bypass valve stuck open or -Clean strainer screen
chamber. regulating valve stuck open -Replace worn parts
-Remove water if present.

Fuel discharges at the vent pipe at Float is filled with gasoline or the -Replace the float if it is bad
the top of the pump and the problem corrosion of parts within the needle -Clean the float chamber's needle
is not in the installation. valve mechanism. valve, replace if severely corroded.

The pump delivers the first gallon at Failure of float needle valve to -Make sure tank has product
full speed then slows down. close. -Clean needle valve seat
-Check for air leaks in the supply
line.

Page 4-22 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Vacuum and Pressure Tests (Authorized Service Representative)


Vacuum and pressure tests are made in combination or separately. The combi-
nation type is recommended because it permits the attachment of the vacuum
gauge to the suction side of the rotary pumping unit, and the pressure gauge to
the discharge side of pumping unit. In this way, both vacuum and pressure
readings may be obtained at the same time. See the diagram below.

For the best results in getting consistent vacuum readings, it is recommended


that a suction strainer cap be drilled and tapped for as 1/4" pipe thread size, so
that an elbow can be added to hold the vacuum gauge (as shown below).

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-23


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Vacuum Test
With the pump running, the nozzle closed, and the rotary pumping unit
primed, the vacuum gauge should show from 4 inches to 6 inches of
vacuum on a normal installation. If the vacuum gauge reading is in
excess of that indicated, the following could be wrong:
• Suction lift too high
• Suction line on bottom of tank
• Suction line restricted - too many elbow fittings in line
• Partially stuck poppet in check valve
• Insufficient venting of storage tank
• Suction line too small in diameter (at least 1-1/2" should be used)
• Check valve equipped with a too-heavy poppet spring
• Check valve poppet stuck shut, or valve strainer clogged at bottom
of tank
• Suction screen in pumping unit contaminated with foreign material.

If the vacuum reading is below those indicated, the following could be


wrong:
• Empty storage tank
• Broken suction line
• Loose connection at base of rotary pumping unit
• Suction strainer cap not airtight
• Excessive wear in pumping unit
• By-pass valve not seating properly or stuck open
• Needle valve not closing in air separator.

To determine the maximum vacuum efficiency of the pumping unit,


make sure the unit is wet and the suction line completely blocked off.
(A good pump should create at least 22-1/2 inches of vacuum.)

Page 4-24 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Pressure Test
To check for sufficient pump pressure, a pressure gauge should be
installed at the pipe plug on top of the meter cover, as shown on Page
4-22. With the pump running and the nozzle closed, the by-pass pres-
sure should read approximately 24-1/2 P.S.I. (this pressure will be a
higher value for the high capacity pumping units). The by-pass valve is a
self-adjusting type for all vacuum lifts, to assure proper delivery rate.

The pressure gauge can also be used to determine whether the regulating
valve is seating properly. Failure of the regulating valve to seat will be
indicated by either one of the following:
• fuel emptying from the system when the pump is standing idle
• advance of the computer when the pump is turned on and the nozzle
is closed.

To perform this test, the pump should be operated with the nozzle open
to make certain that the system is fully primed. As the nozzle is closed,
the pressure gauge should read approximately 24-1/2 P.S.I. This pres-
sure should not immediately drop to zero, but may level off to approxi-
mately 18 P.S.I. after an hour’s time, indicating that the regulating valve
is functioning properly.

However, if the pressure should drop rapidly to zero, and there is no


visible leak, it can be assumed that the gasoline is leaking back through
the regulating valve. If this is the case, the regulating valve assembly
should be removed and cleaned, or be replaced if necessary.
Other reasons for pressure drop in the rotary pumping unit are:
• By-pass valve stuck in open position
• Worn plunger cups on regulating and by-pass valve assembly
• Cracked valve cylinders
• Faulty gaskets under valve cylinders
• Excessive wear in rotary pump unit
• Too much clearance on head of pumping unit

Should the pressure gauge show excessive pressure, it would indicate


that the by-pass valve is stuck closed.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-25


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Remote Systems
The Remote system is used in applications where it is preferred,
usually to support more than one dispenser and in applications that
require more lift than a suction type pump can provide.

Submerged Pump
The Tokheim submerged pump has become a revolution-
ary factor in service station planning, because of the
tremendous equipment economies and improved service
demonstrated in thousands of installations.
In this improved system of gasoline handling, the Sub-
merged Pump and Motor Unit is completely submerged in
the storage tank where it is tamper-proof, weatherproof
and foolproof. From this central source of supply, gaso-
line is pushed to island dispensers at speeds actually
exceeding the rate of delivery of standard suction pumps.

Because one pump and motor unit is sufficient to supply


gasoline to six or eight dispensing pedestals, a substantial
savings can be realized in equipment cost, elimination of
individual suction lines, check valves, excavation, mainte-
nance, etc. In addition, operational difficulties encoun-
tered with conventional suction pumps while handling
highly volatile gasoline in extremely hot weather are
completely overcome.

Submerged Pump Ratings


Model Number Rated H.P. Phase Voltage GPM

585A-13 1/3 Single 208/230 V Up to 42

585A-34 3/4 Single 208/230 V Up to 60

585A-150 1 1/2 Single 208/230 V Up to 82

550-3 3 Three 230 V Up to 200

550-5 5 Three 230 V Up to 250

All motors are continuous-duty which at 60 Hz will turn at 3450 RPM

Page 4-26 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Operation
The motors and controls used in a Tokheim submerged pumping system
are precision designed instruments and should be handled with care.
Our recommendations must be followed in every detail; otherwise,
damage may occur to the units.
The Tokheim submerged pumping system must not be put into operation
without product in the storage tank. Fuel product serves as both lubri-
cant and coolant. If product is exhausted after initial start up, the sub-
merged motor will heat up and the thermal overload protector in the
motor will open, reducing the chance of damage to the motor windings.
A cooling period of at least one hour will be required after the storage
tank has been filled with product before the thermal overload will close,
and allow the motor to operate.

Emergency Shutoff Valve


The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) requires that an
approved emergency shutoff valve, incorporating a fusible link or other
thermally actuated device, designed to close automatically in the event
of severe impact or fire exposure, shall be properly installed in the
supply line at the base of each individual dispensing device. NFPA
further requires that upon completion of the installation, that section of
the pressure piping system between the pump discharge and the connec-
tion for the dispensing facility shall be tested for at least 30 minutes at
the maximum operating pressure of the system.

Use of a Multimeter
Select a reliable multimeter, such as Fluke and Beckman digital
multimeters or equivalent. A wide variety meters are available on the
market today and the choice is yours. A meter which has an auto-
ranging feature as part of the resistance measurement will prove to be
very helpful. A sure way to know a meter is accurate is to have it cali-
brated.

How to Measure Ohm Values Between Wires and Ground


This test can be performed by an authorized service representative and
will ensure that the insulation on the wires is good.
1 Make sure to disconnect power prior to this test.
2 Set the multimeter to resistance measurement.
3 Touch the red and black meter leads together. The meter
must display zero.
4 Disconnect the red, black, and orange wires in the extractor
section.
5 Connect one meter lead to the extractor housing and connect
the other lead to the wires (one at a time). The meter’s dis-
play should indicate an open circuit for each wire.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-27


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

How to Measure Ohm Values Between Wires


1 Set the meter to resistance measurement.
2 Disconnect the red, black, and orange wires in the extractor section.
3 Use the multimeter leads to check the resistance between the wires
as indicated in the chart below. Also included is the Amperage
readings to be performed by a Authorized Service Representative.

Line to Line Resistance (ohms)


HP. Phase Orange-Black Orange-Red Black-Red
1/3 1 7.1 - 9.6 14.2 - 18.9 21.3 - 28.5
3/4 1 2.6 - 3.5 13.1 - 17.7 15.7 - 21.2
1.5 1 1.8 - 2.2 5.4 - 6.6 7.2 - 8.8
3 3 1.7 - 2.2 1.7 - 2.2 1.7 - 2.2
5 3 .90 - 1.2 .90 - 1.2 .90 - 1.2

Maximum running Current (Amperes)


HP. Phase Orange Black Red
1/3 1 3.2 2.4 2.2
3/4 1 6.4 5.7 2.2
1.5 1 10.5 9.7 2.5
3 3 *11.0
5 3 *17.2
*For all three phase motor this number represents the average of the current
readings from all three leads.

Motor Bolt Torque Specification.


When replacing the motor, the Allen socket head bolts are to be tight-
ened to 70 to 80 inch-pounds. Any more torque will damage the bolts.

Pressure Tests
After piping is completed and before pipe lines are covered, the com-
plete system should be pressure tested for detection of possible leaks.
Pressure tests may be hydrostatic or pneumatic, depending on code
requirements and customers’ preference. Leaks are readily detected
visually in hydrostatic tests; however, time required for testing will be
longer since the piping system must be completely filled with test liquid.
Leaks are detected in a pneumatic test by brushing of joints with a soap
and water solution.

For further information on pressure testing the submerged pump system,


see the appropriate installation manual.
Page 4-28 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

Submerged Pump Syphon Test

Why perform this test?


Any time an installation takes place, this test must be performed. If a
station is experiencing operational troubles, this test will aid in deter-
mining which component is faulty. The test will help to isolate vacuum
leaks, air leaks, and problems with product that do not level properly.
Instructions for performing this test are on the next page.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-29


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
Page 4-30

Recommendations for Syphon Test


1 Submerged pump running at by-pass but not discharge product through
dispensing pedestals (Valve "A" Closed), observed vacuum reading on
gauge "B". A normal installation will develop a vacuum of 15 to 22
inches on the gauge.
2 Pump unit shut off check valve must maintain maximum vacuum for 2
minutes.
3 Vacuum to be reduced to 2 inches on gauge, check valve must maintain
this vacuum for 2 minutes.
4 A. When vacuum is not maintained as indicated above, the fault may
be caused by a damaged valve or foreign matter under poppet.
B. In the event vacuum is insufficient when submerged pump is
running the syphon jet may be plugged with foreign matter. See
view "C".
5 After the above test have been made with the syphon attachment working
satisfactorily and the system dies not operate, check the lines for leaks.
6 With sight glass installed, the submerged unit must be operated until
sight glass is full of liquid. Valve "A" must be closed and sight glass
checked for air bubbles. Air bubbles in sight glass indicates a leak in the
syphon header.

To Check Syphon Header in Case Submerged


Pump is Not in Operation.
7 Install a Model 787 high vacuum pump as shown in View "D" to the top
of the syphon header using a sight glass and shut off valve "A". Operate
the high vacuum pump until sight glass is full of liquid, close valve "A"
and check sight glass for air bubbles.
Note: This procedure can be used for checking suction lines
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0

on standard vacuum pumps.


Caution: Anytime a Vacuum is applied to a line attached
to a tank, vents must be open.
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

The Pressure Monitor - Model 585A-PM

General Description
The Pressure Monitor is a diaphragm operated valve that is extremely
sensitive to a pressure loss in the pipes. The Pressure Monitor is in-
serted directly into the submerged pumping system’s manifold. It
requires no special adapters or fittings on current model pumps. Should
a pressure loss occur, the flow rate at the dispenser slows to less than 3
GPM, the signal to check the system.

Tokheim Model 585A-PM

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-31


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

The Relay Control Box ( Models 168 & 268)


General Description
The relay control box is used as an interface to turn on up to four sub-
merged pumps. If more than four submerged pumps are used, additional
relay boxes will be needed. The relay control box can also be used as an
emergency stop interface when controlling suction pumping units (gen-
erally associated with use in console control).

The relay control box is available as a model 168 (coil voltage @


120VAC) or a model 268 (coil voltage @ 220VAC).

ACC

ACH

Motor Control line Dispenser

Motor
ACH
ACC

Main AC
Power
Circuit L1 M1
Submerged
Breaker L2 M2 Pump
Panel

Italics indicate connections found on the terminal


block inside the relay control box.

Page 4-32 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS

The Model 52 Pressure Regulator Valve


General Description
The Model 52 valve is a vacuum actuated valve. This means it will not
allow flow from the storage tank until vacuum generated by the suction
pump pulls the valve open. When the suction pump is turned off, the
vacuum goes away and the valve closes by means of an internal spring.

Use of the 52 Valve


A site condition which mandates the use of the Model 52 Pressure
Regulating Valve is one where the storage tanks are above ground.
Fuel held in an above ground storage tank will have what is known as
“Positive Head Line Pressure”. Due to the design of a suction pump,
the positive head line pressure can cause fuel to leak from the copper air
elimination tube when the pump is not running.

The Model 52 Pressure Regulating Valve will not allow flow from the
storage tank until vacuum generated by the suction pump pulls the
valve open. The valve is installed directly under the suction pump at its
inlet. It is equipped with a nipple containing a sheer section. If the
pump is accidently knocked from the island, the sheer section will
break — removing vacuum from the 52 valve causing it to close. In
this manner it doubles as an “Impact Safety Valve”.

Each 52 valve is equipped with a strainer screen to keep rust and sedi-
ment from damaging or hampering the operation of the valve.

Flow Chart
A flow chart illustrating fuel flow through the model 52 valve is on the
next page.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 4-33


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
SYSTEM COMPONENTS
Page 4-34 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0
TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
POSSIBLE TROUBLES & REMEDIES

Section 5
Possible Troubles & Remedies

Scope
This section describes some problems you may experience and some
possible things you can look for when troubleshooting a dispenser and
the system installation.

General
When trouble does occur it is a good idea to note the specific character-
istics. This will help to isolate the problem so that down time is kept to a
minimum. For more information on the operation of Tokheim equipment
contact your Authorized Service Representative.

Contents
Discharge with the switch turned off ........................ 5-2
Discharge from the vent line (during hot weather) ... 5-2
Mechanical Computer Creeping ................................ 5-2
Slow delivery ............................................................ 5-3
Slow delivery after first gallon of normal delivery .... 5-3

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 5-1


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
POSSIBLE TROUBLES & REMEDIES

Discharge with the switch turned off


• The pilot valve in the hydraulic control valve may be stuck wide open

• There may be an improper adjustment of control rod to pilot valve.

Discharge from the vent line (during hot weather)


• The suction line from the tank to the dispenser is too near the surface
causing gasoline to expand. (The line should be at least 18" under-
ground at the pump island so as not to be affected by the sun's heat.)

Mechanical computer creeping


Computer creeping in a remote control system is caused by a pressure
loss above the hydraulic control valve. To check the pressure, attach a
pressure gauge at the pipe plug located on the side of the control valve
casting just above the operating piston. The minimum pressure should be
25 P.S.I. Pressure loss may be caused by any of the following conditions:

• The pilot valve in the hydraulic valve sticking partially open due to
improper adjustment

• External leaks beyond the hydraulic valve assembly, such as unions at


discharge tube connection or hose, etc.

• Foreign matter getting under line pressure relief poppet in hydraulic


valve assembly

• Broken or leaky discharge line between submerged pump and dis-


penser

• Air not completely purged from the system

• Thermal contraction/expansion.

Page 5-2 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
POSSIBLE TROUBLES & REMEDIES

Slow delivery
Slow delivery may be due to:

• Improper wiring of the motor, or low voltage

• Pilot valve in hydraulic valve not opening sufficiently to allow full


flow delivery

• Installation of automatic nozzles. This will lower the delivery


approximately 30 percent

• Strainer screen clogged

• The relay board used in the Electronic dispensers.

Slow delivery after first gallon of normal delivery


• The Suction riser is too near the bottom of the tank

• The Rotary pump has a stuck needle valve. Usually caused by foreign
matter getting under the needle valve and holding it open. Remove float
and needle valve assemblies; clean needle valve parts; remove sediment
and foreign matter from the float chamber.

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 5-3


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
index

Index
Symbols E
1248 1-2 Electronic Dispensers 1-3
1250 1-2 Electronic System Component Block Diagrams 1-6
168 4-32 Emergency Shutoff Valve 4-27
262A 1-3 End Play, Rotary Pump 4-17
268 4-32
52 4-33 F
785 1-2 Float Chamber 4-20
A Friction Loss 2-3
Friction loss
Adjusting Diagram 2-4
Belt 4-13
Meter 4-9 G
Air Separator 4-20 Gauge, Vacuum 4-23
Assembly 4-15
Removing Water 4-15 H
Troubles 4-22
Amperage Head loss 2-3
Submerged Pump 4-28 Hints for Better Pump Performance 3-2

B I
Belt Impact Safety Valve 4-33
Adjusting 3-3, 4-13 Inspections Notes 3-3
Booster System Block Diagram 1-8 Installation
By-pass valve 4-20 Considerations 2-1
Diagrams 2-5
C DON'Ts 2-2
Friction loss, diagram 2-4
Check Valve 4-21 Problems 2-2
Cleaning Submerged pump 2-9
Dispenser 3-4 Manifold System (A) 2-11
Mechanical Computer 4-2 Manifold System (B) 2-12
Cleaning Schedule 3-4 Syphon System 2-10
Components, System 1-1 Suction
Computer, Mechanical 4-2 Above ground tank 2-5
D Below ground tank 2-6
Booster system 2-8
Diagram Connecting two to one riser 2-7
Friction loss 2-4 Typical 2-1
Installation 2-5 Introduction 1-1
Meter 4-7
Rotary Pump and Air Separator 4-15 L
System 1-4 Lubrication
Dispenser Mechanical Computer 3-3
Cleaning Schedule 3-4 Motor 3-3
Preserving the Finish 3-4 Rotary Pump 3-3
Storing 3-6
Types 1-1, 1-2
Draining the Pump 3-6
Drive Belt
Adjusting 3-3, 4-13

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 6-1


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
index

M
Magnetic Wheel Pulser 4-6
Price
Maintenance of System Components 4-1
Setting on the Mechanical Computer 4-2
Mechanical Computer 4-2
Priming the rotary pump 4-17
Lubrication 3-3
Problems
Maintenance 4-2
Air Separator 4-22
Price setting 4-2
Causes of Sticking 4-17
Mechanical computer
Discharge with the switch turned off 5-2
Creeping 5-2
End Play, Rotary Pump 4-17
Mechanical Dispensers 1-2
Installations 2-2
Mechanical System Component Block Diagrams 1-4
Mechanical computer creeping 5-2
Meter 4-7, 4-9
Meter 4-9
Cover 4-11
Pulser 4-6
Overhauling 4-10
Rotary Pump 4-22
Overmeasuring 4-11
Slow delivery 5-3
Plunger cups, testing 4-11
Vent Line, Discharging 5-2
Removal 4-9
Protecting Your Investment 3-1
Sliding valve, testing 4-11
Pulser 4-6
Valve seat, testing 4-12
Pump
Motor 4-14
Diagram 4-15
Motor Bolt Torque Spec. 4-28
End Play 4-17
Motor Lubrication 3-3
Repacking 4-19
Motor Unit 4-26
Suction 4-17
Multimeter 4-27
Pump Head
N Adjusting 4-18
Replacing 4-18
Needle Valve 4-20 Pumping Devices 4-13
Pumps (Dispensers)
O Preserving the Finish 3-4
Ohms R
Submerged Pump 4-28
Oiling Regulating Valve 4-20, 4-25
Mechanical Computer 3-3, 4-2 Relay Control Box 4-32
Motor 3-3 Remote System 4-26
Rotary Pump 3-3 Repacking, meter 4-9
The pump interior 3-6 Replacing
Optical Pulser 4-6 Pump Head 4-18
Overhauling, Meter 4-10 Valves 4-19
Overmeasuring 4-11 Reset Mechanisms 4-3
Manual 4-3
P Power Reset 4-4
Resistance
Plunger cups, testing 4-11
Submerged Pump 4-28
Possible Troubles & Remedies 5-1
Retrev-A-Hose Mechanism 3-3
Power Reset 4-4
Premier 1-3 Rotary Pump 4-17
Preserving the Finish of Your Pumps 3-4 Diagram 4-15
End Play 4-17
Pressure Gauge 4-23, 4-25
removing water 4-15
Pressure Monitor 4-31
Repacking 4-19
Pressure Regulating Valve 4-33
Troubles 4-22
flow chart 4-33
Pressure Test 4-25, 4-28 Rotary Pump and Air Separator Assembly 4-15
Preventative Maintenance Rotary Pump Lubrication 3-3
Rotary Pumping Unit 4-25
Inspections Notes 3-3

Page 6-2 The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
index

S
Schedule, Cleaning 3-4 W
Shutoff Valve 4-27 Waxing of painted surfaces 3-4
Sliding valve, testing 4-11 Winding Resistance 4-28
Slow delivery 5-3
Storage Tank 4-26
Storing
Preparing the Dispenser 3-6
Submerged Pump 4-26
Amperage 4-28
Head loss 2-3
Operation 4-27
Ratings 4-26
resistance 4-28
Siphon Test 4-29
Suction Screen 3-3
Suction System 4-13
Drive Belt 4-13
Friction Loss 2-3
Motor 4-14
Pump 4-17
Repacking 4-19
Removing Water 4-15
Troubles 4-22
Supply Chamber 4-20
Surge Check Valve 4-21
System
Block Diagrams 1-4
Components 1-1

T
TCSA 1-3
Technical Information 4-1
Troubles
Air Separator 4-22
Discharge with the switch turned off 5-2
Mechanical computer creeping 5-2
Meter 4-9
Rotary Pump 4-22
Slow delivery 5-3
Vent Line, Discharging 5-2
Troubles & Remedies 5-1
Types
Dispensers 1-1, 1-2
Typical Installations 2-1
V
Vacuum Gauge 4-23
Vacuum Test 4-24
Valve, Check 4-21
Valve seat, testing 4-12
Valve, Shutoff 4-27
Valves 4-20
Replacing 4-19
Vent Line, Discharging 5-2

The ONE Manual Form 1680B Version 1.0 Page 6-3


TOKHEIM CORPORATION February 1993
Purdue