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Instructor Manual

Version 6.0
Instructor Manual

Authors

Vincent Herbillon (Training Coordinator)

Martine Colomb (Quality Department)

This version is based on the Instructor Manual created and updated by Eric Beaudonnat (IKO Co-
founder) and reviewed by David Dorn (Training Master).

Special thanks to Jon Dodds, Mariano Lorenzetti, Jens Nerbring, Tiago Rocha, Xavier Roussos
Stephan Zaat, for their contributions in the development of this manual.

An IKO Publication
Plaza Novus Mare
57600 Cabarete, Sosua, Puerto Plata
Dominican Republic
Tel: (+1) 809 571-9530
www.ikointl.com

© Copyright 2001-2017 IKO Instructor Training Course (ITC): All Rights Reserved
The content of this document is legally privileged. It is intended for the sole use of registered
Examiners. No reproduction of any sort is permitted without the IKO’s written authorization. IKO,
IKO Kiteboarding Center and ITC are copyrighted trademarks or service marks of IKO
International.
Instructor Manual
Table of Content
  Introduction .........................................1    Topic Presentation ........................... 76 
  Greetings! ...........................................2    Examiner Teaching Demonstration
  Introduction to the IKO ........................3  1/2 .................................................... 79 

  ITC General Schedule.........................4    Teaching Practice: 1 to 1.................. 79 

  About the Instructor Training Course   End of Day 2 .................................... 81 


(ITC) ...................................................6    Day 2 Exam ...................................... 82 
  Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation   Day 3 ................................................ 84 
Chart 1/3 .............................................8    Day 2 Review and Homework
  The IKO Standards .............................9  Correction ........................................ 84 
  The IKO Instructor ...............................9    General Teaching Organization ....... 85 
  The Student ......................................11    IKO Kiteboarder Student Certification
  The Equipment ..................................12  Standards ........................................ 92 

  The IKO Affiliated Center ..................17    IKO Member Card ............................ 94 

  The Safety Systems ..........................26    Topic Presentation ........................... 96 

  Spot Organization According to the   Examiner Teaching Demonstration


Wind Direction ..................................31  2/2 .................................................... 99 

  Spot Organization According to Water   Teaching Practice as Instructor with


Type .................................................35  Real Students 1/3 ............................ 99 

  Environment Caring ..........................37    End of Day 3 .................................. 102 

  Reason for Failure Analysis ..............38    Day 3 Exam .................................... 103 

  Topic Assignment .............................41    Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation


Chart 2/3 (Refer to Point 5.9 Evaluation
  Practical Skills Evaluation .................44  Chart Scoring References) ............ 105 
  End of Day 1 .....................................47    Day 4 .............................................. 106 
  Day 1 Exam ......................................48    Day 3 Review and Homework
  Day 2.................................................51  Correction ...................................... 106 
  Day 1 Review and Homework   Topic Presentation ......................... 107 
Correction .........................................51    Teaching Practice as Instructor with
  Professionalism .................................52  Real Students 2/3 .......................... 110 
  The IKO Teaching Concept...............53    End of Day 4 .................................. 111 
  The Learning Curve ..........................56    Day 4 Exam .................................... 112 
  The Mental State ...............................57    Day 5 .............................................. 114 
  The Principles of Communication .....58    Day 4 Review and Homework
Correction ...................................... 114 
  The IKO’s 8 Step Teaching Concept .61 
  Topic Presentation ......................... 115 
  The 3 ‘C’............................................68 
  Written Exam .................................. 115 
  The 8 Instructor Responsibilities .......68 
  Teaching Practice as Instructor with
  IKO Visual Lesson Plan Discovery –
Real Students 3/3 .......................... 115 
Intermediate – Independent –
Advanced .........................................71    End of the ITC and Final Evaluation117 
Instructor Manual
Table of Content
  Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation
Chart 3/3 and Final Evaluation Chart
(Refer to Point 5.9 Evaluation Chart
Scoring References) .......................118 
  Instructor Candidate Internship Goal
and Achievement Form ..................122 
  Appendix A: Complete IKO Discovery
Course Lesson Plan .......................124 
  Appendix B: Complete IKO
Intermediate Course Lesson Plan ..149 
  Appendix C: Complete IKO
Independent Course Lesson Plan ..160 
  Appendix D: Complete IKO Advanced
Course Lesson Plan .......................166 
Instructor Manual
Introduction

Introduction
Your Instructor Training Course (ITC)
Welcome to the worldwide community of professional kiteboarders, welcome to your ITC!
This manual will guide you through the course while being delivered to you by your IKO Examiner.
The schedule itself may vary slightly, depending on weather conditions and other considerations,
however ALL contents of the ITC will be covered during this 5-day course.
Most importantly, if you perform according to the criteria on the evaluation chart, you will qualify to
become an IKO Instructor and will be able to teach worldwide according to the IKO Standards.
Participation in this course offers you many advantages including exclusive access to specific
sections of the IKO website, access to job opportunities posted online and more!
If, upon completion of the course, you do not qualify, you will be required to complete an Internship
before being validated as an IKO Instructor.

Do not forget! In addition to this course, your qualification as a Level 1 Kiteboarding Instructor will
also depend on you meeting the following requirements:

You must:

 Be at least 18 years old.


 Be a certified IKO Kiteboarder Level 4 or equivalent level*.
 Have a valid IKO Assistant Instructor certification.
 Pass the online Assistant Instructor exam with a minimum score of 70%.
 Have a valid first aid and CPR certificate. (Neither online certification nor certificate older
than 2 years are accepted)
 Be able to read, write and speak fluently the language in which the course is given.
 Sign the ITC Candidate waiver and participation form.
 Have no disabilities prohibiting you to follow the course.

Enjoy your training and best winds!

On behalf of the IKO Training Department and IKO Team.

* IKO Level 4 Advanced main skills are: Jump with grab, ride toeside, ride upwind, recover a board and a rider
in deep water, make a self-rescue in deep water, self-launch and self-land.

To make sure your riding skills can be evaluated during the ITC, you can bring a video of you demonstrating
these skills. This is in case there is not enough wind during the course to perform the riding test.

If you do not wear the safety equipment, the video will not be validated.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Greetings!
Before we start, it is important to get to know each other. Your Examiner will introduce himself, and
then you will have the opportunity to introduce yourself.

Follows these guidelines and mention anything else you care to mention:

- Your name
- Where you are from and where you currently live
- Your kiteboarding experience, favorite kitespot, etc.
- Your experience teaching kiteboarding (if any)
- Your background in other sports
- Other teaching experience
- Your goals for this ITC and the future

Note each person’s name below:

Examiner’s Name:

Names of Instructor Candidates: Comments:

For the latest information on IKO Standards go to www.ikointl.com.

In order to keep the quality high, the maximum number of Instructor candidates allowed in an ITC
is eight (8).

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Introduction to the IKO


What Is the IKO?
The IKO was founded in 2001 and has its headquarters in Cabarete, Dominican Republic. We
have representation in 38 countries around the world! The IKO is the world’s leading kiteboarding
organization, specializing in educational programs, the promotion of safe kiteboarding practices,
and the enhancement of industry standards. The IKO strives to reach excellence in its students’
learning experiences, while finding the perfect balance of fun and safety for all IKO Members.

The IKO develops and improves kiteboarding instruction, certification methods and standards on
a yearly basis. Courses are designed for kiteboarders from beginner to advanced levels.
Professional training is constantly developed and improved from Assistant Instructor, Instructor,
Assistant Trainer, Examiner and Training Master (trainer of Examiners). The latest additions
include Coach and Coach Trainer certifications.
The IKO gathers and affiliates kiteboarding schools who wish to commit to higher quality safety
standards and procedures for the development of the sport and the training of kiteboarders.
More than 12,000 Instructors have been trained thanks to the IKO and over 600,000 kiteboarders
have been taught using our guidelines and courses.

The IKO provides a platform for kiteboarders to provide feedback regarding IKO Affiliated Centers
and Instructors. This feedback provides the public with rankings for each IKO School and
Instructor, which can assist them with their choice. This also influences and ensures quality control.

Find more information at the end of this manual or go directly to www.ikointl.com.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

ITC General Schedule


Your Examiner will have a quick review of the ITC schedule. It may vary slightly, depending on
weather conditions and other considerations. However, all the topics will be covered.

Morning Afternoon

Introduction Practical Skills Evaluation


Greetings  Kite and Rider Recovery from a
Boat
Introduction to the IKO  ITC Level 4 – Advanced Riding Skill
Evaluation
ITC General Schedule
End of Day 1
About the Instructor Training Course
(ITC)
Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation
Chart 1/3
Day 1

The IKO Standards


The IKO Instructor
The Student
The Equipment
The IKO Affiliated Center
The Safety Systems
Spot Organization According to Wind
Direction
Spot Organization According to Water
Type
Environment Caring
Reason for Failure Analysis
Topic Assignment

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Morning Afternoon

Day 1 Review and Homework Correction Examiner Teaching Demonstration 1/2


Professionalism Teaching practice 1 to 1
The IKO Teaching Concept End of Day 2
Day 2

The Learning Curve


The Mental State
The Principles of Communication
The IKO’s 8 Steps Teaching Concept
The 3 C’s
The 8 Instructor Responsibilities
IKO Visual Lesson Plan Discovery –
Intermediate – Independent - Advanced
Topic presentation

Morning Afternoon

Day 2 Review and Homework Correction Examiner Teaching Demonstration 2/2


Day 3

General Teaching Organization Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real


Students 1/3
IKO Kiteboarder Student Certification
Standards End of Day 3
IKO Member Card
Topic Presentation

Morning Afternoon
Day 4

Day 3 Review and Homework Correction Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real
Students 2/3
Topic Presentation
End of Day 4

Morning Afternoon
Day 5

Day 4 Review and Homework Correction Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real
Students 3/3
Topic Presentation
End of the ITC and Final Evaluation
Written Exam

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

About the Instructor Training Course (ITC)


The Instructor Manual
Your Instructor Manual is designed to guide you through your ITC. Keep it together with your
Assistant Instructor Manual. You must refer to them to find all the necessary information to teach.

Schedule and Timetable


The ITC will run for 5 days, 8 hours a day plus an hour break for lunch. There may be extensions
to this if required. Regular breaks are taken every 45 minutes or so, to keep everyone fresh and
alert!

Please complete and remember the agreed course times with your Examiner.

ITC Morning Lunch break Afternoon

Starts at:

Finishes at:

Wear a watch and make sure you are on time!

Outfit
Wear a shirt/t-shirt at all times, dress neatly and maintain a good level of personal hygiene. On the
beach and during teaching exercises, wear appropriate clothing.

Group Discussions
There will be lots of exchanges and explanations where everyone will want to give their opinion.
Critical feedback is often given at these points.

Follow these guidelines to help maintain a balanced and professional interaction:

 Ask when you want to speak.


 Do not speak while someone else is speaking.
 Do not hesitate to ask questions or express your point of view. There is no such thing as
a bad question!
 Allow others to express themselves.
 Be open-minded.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

How Your Examiner Can Help You?


Your Examiner’s job is to train, evaluate and certify you. Their knowledge is available to help you
learn and improve.
Your Examiner is interested in seeing you grow personally and professionally throughout the ITC.
They are not trying to make you feel uncomfortable, so do not take any remarks personally.

Tips to Improve Your Training


 Take notes on any subject you did not understand properly and ask for additional
explanations.
 Self-study in the evenings and/or early mornings:
- Read your notes and think about the things you have learned.
- Review the covered content.
 Ask your Examiner for a break when you feel you cannot focus any longer.
 Work as a team, it is not a competition; interact positively with the other Instructor
Candidates.

Daily Exams
Each day you will have to complete a short exam to help you self-evaluate.

Do the exam on your own, it is best to make a mistake and get the chance to discuss it on the
following day with your Examiner as a learning experience.

Self-Evaluation and Final Evaluation


You will be asked to complete a self-evaluation chart on days 1, 3 and 5.

At home, tonight, read and complete the chart on the next page to be fully aware of what will be
evaluated! If something is not clear, highlight it to discuss with your Examiner tomorrow.

Your Examiner will use the same chart on Day 5 for your final evaluation. You must reach the
minimum score in all sub categories in order to pass (see the green column). If you fail one of the
sub-categories, your Examiner will set an Internship with specific goals to achieve in order to
complete your training and become an Instructor Level 1.

Evaluation Chart Scoring References


According to the criteria formulated in the Instructor Candidate self-evaluation chart, the Candidate
is:

Very bad Poor Good Very good Excellent

2 4 6 8 10

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation Chart 1/3


My self-
Evaluation Score to
Sub-categories Instructor validation criteria pass
evaluation out
of 10 points

Instructor
responsibilities Knows and applies the 8 Instructor responsibilities. 8/10

Instructor and
student directives Knows and applies Instructor and student directives. 8/10

Prepared a lesson plan before teaching. Checked the weather and equipment
before students arrive. Candidate has their personal equipment ready before the
Lesson preparation lesson. 7/10

Lesson practical Follows the lesson plan. Adapts to students’ progress and failures. 8/10

Teaching skills Uses the IKO teaching principles (IKO’s 8 steps Teaching Concept). 8/10

Is able to communicate professionally with a positive attitude. Can handle


stress, and a long working day. Can empathize and deal efficiently with difficult
Emotional situations. Candidates who show emotional/attitude issues during the ITC may
competence fail the course and may not be allowed any further access to future ITCs. 8/10

Students’
satisfaction Receives a positive feedback from their student(s). 8/10

Interacts with fellow Instructor Candidates, students, the ITC organizer and
Interactivity Examiner during the ITC in an open minded and positive way. 7/10

Self-evaluates fairly according to their performance. The Examiner will


constantly ask for self-evaluation and will check each Instructor Candidate’s
Self-evaluation self-evaluation chart 1/3, 2/3 and 3/3 to evaluate it. 8/10

Written exam Has passed the Day 5 written exam with a minimum score of 70%. 7/10

Assistant Instructor
online exam Has passed the online exam with a minimum score of 70%. 7/10

Homework Has completed all the daily homework tasks. 9/10

Is able to demonstrate all the IKO Level 4 - Advanced skills in any suitable wind
Riding level conditions of the spot (according to the Examiner’s criteria) between 10 and 30kn. 8/10

Can assess and manage the environment according to other beach users and
Environment the spot’s individual characteristics. Does S.E.A. before each session. 8/10

Environment caring Has shown nature caring behavior and left the beach cleaner than he found it. 10/10

Chooses appropriate kite size and line lengths for teaching and takes care of the
Equipment equipment. 8/10

Is able to trim and fly a school kite (short/long lines) properly in any wind
Equipment trim conditions. 7/10

Keeps students safe, teaches safety aspects of kiteboarding (safety system use,
Student safety safety procedure). Makes the students independent. 10/10

The Candidate can recover a student and their kite in deep water, from a
Boat safety powerboat driven by a licensed pilot. 7/10

Shows safe behavior while riding. Respects ROW. Uses kite leash, helmet and
Personal safety buoyancy aid. 10/10

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

The IKO Standards


Each year, teaching, certification, safety and quality standards are improved to be in line with the
latest developments in equipment, teaching methods and market needs.
Quality standards benefit everyone. They are designed by the IKO and are set for IKO Affiliated
Centers, Assistant Instructors, Instructors and Examiners to strengthen their image and
professionalism.
Standards are the contract between the IKO, its members and the public. They are:

 A quality reference used to evaluate IKO members.


 A quality assurance for students who choose to learn with the IKO.
 The necessary qualifications needed for each member to acquire skills and related
certification.
 A unified quality teaching system to be applied worldwide.
 A protection for IKO members before the law.

By following this course, you commit to follow and stay up-to-date with the IKO Standards.
Standards may be updated without prior warrant. To be sure to always read the most up-to-date
version, access the “File” section of your account.

Updates are also given on the IKO Facebook page, ‘like’ the page so you won’t miss any.

The IKO Instructor


Local authorities may enforce special requirements to allow Instructors to work legally. You must
also respect these requirements.

What is a good kiteboarding Instructor? (Write your answers below)

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Instructor Safety Directives


The Instructor is the key to the students’ safety.

Your responsibility, as an Instructor extends beyond the actual course time. You must ensure
that you have fully delivered and that students have fully understood all the elements that lead to
safe and independent kiteboarding.

Your responsibilities are to:


 Teach according to the IKO Standards and adapt them to the constraints of your spot (if
any).
 Always be prepared to go in the water to help your students.
 Always teach with your full personal equipment.
 Teach your students to always respect the ‘student safety directives’ and to always equip
them with the ‘student safety equipment’.
 Work according to the Center’s Spot Risk Assessment (S.R.A), and Emergency Action
Plan (E.A.P).
 Ensure that your personal insurance policy is active and valid.
 Check weather and tide forecasts before each session and monitor them throughout the
lesson.
 Always fly and check a kite before letting your students fly it (even for advanced students).
Also do this each time you alter a setting on the equipment.
 Never leave your students out of your sight and always be able to reach them physically in
less than a minute.
 Have an on-field First Aid kit close at hand.
 Always make students aware of their real level and limitations.
 Only work within the Instructor-to-Student ratio set by the IKO:

- IKO Instructor Level 1: up to 2 students with 1 kite flying.


- IKO Instructor Level 2: up to 4 students with 2 kites flying (even with the assistance of an
IKO Assistant Instructor)
- IKO Instructor Level 3 or above: up to 4 students with 2 kites flying when teaching alone
or up to 4 students with 4 kites flying when teaching with the assistance of an IKO
Assistant Instructor.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

The Student
Student Safety Directives
These safety directives need to be taught during the lesson and repeated often.

 Always wear the full adequate equipment.


 Never walk between the kite and its pilot or within the wind window of somebody else.
 Never launch without the Instructor’s permission.
 Always connect the kite leash to the safety line before launching and keep it connected
until after landing when the kite is parked and secured with weight on it.
 Connect the kite leash on the front part of the harness (to permit access to the quick release
system at all times) with the kite leash quick release on the rider’s dominant hand side.
 Never wrap any lines around any part of your body.
 Avoid flying the kite on land, except during specific exercises (e.g. launching and landing).
 Respect the traffic rules set by your Instructor.
 Do not anchor yourself to any object or person.
 Do not jump on land using the kite.
 Never fly your kite between 11 and 1 o’clock in shallow water, close the beach or on land,
as it can lift you or stall, except during exercises specified by the Instructor.
 Drink plenty of water.
 Never use a board leash.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

The Equipment
It is your responsibility to use the right equipment for you and your student to avoid accidents.

Instructor Equipment
Instructors must wear the following:
 Harness with a handle.
 Kite leash with quick release attached to the front part of the harness.
 Line cutter.
 Buoyancy Aid when teaching from a boat.
 A helmet is highly recommended especially in crowded areas.
 On-water/beach First Aid kit if teaching away from the center.
 Radio or emergency communication, like a phone or radio worn in a waterproof pouch or
within one minute’s reach on the beach.
 Watch.
 3 spare ‘pigtails’ for line’ reduction/extension (more information in the kite bar exercise).
The following items should also be easily accessible:

 Pump.
 Spare bar or lines.
 Drinking water.
 Screwdriver for fins and foot-straps.
 Sun-screen.

Student Equipment
Students must always wear:
 A harness with a handle on the back.
 A kite leash with quick release attached to the front part of the harness.
 A helmet while flying a kite, even a trainer kite.
 A 50 Newton buoyancy aid when practicing in the water, even when the water is shallow.
 A wetsuit, booties, sunglasses and/or sunscreen when necessary.

It is highly recommended that the students’ harness is also equipped with a line cutter.

Students must know what kind of equipment they can handle without risk when they are
practicing on their own.
They must become independent kiteboarders who can safely choose the right equipment.

Regardless of the type of kite used in lessons, always start beginner lessons with trainer kites*

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

The Teaching Equipment


With recent developments in kites, along with the
use of trainer lines, Instructors have a very flexible
teaching package. The right choice of kite, length of
lines and control bar will enhance your students’
safety, fun, comfort and progression curve.

The IKO policy for kite use is that all kites must:

 Be appropriate for the exercise level, the


weather conditions, and the student’s weight.
 Not overpower the student at any time: On
land and until the first attempts of water-start
a trainer kite* with its genuine control bar
and safety systems must be used.
 Have fully functional safety systems: Eg. re-
ride on front line, chicken loop quick release
and a kite leash with a quick release.
 Be water relaunchable when used on the
water.

The Trainer Kite


It is an important tool for IKO Instructors. Any kind
of kite even a L.E.I. can become a trainer kite if it is
the right size and/or set up with trainer lines.
Trainer lines can be anywhere between 2 to 15
meters, for example:

 ¼ line length (5 m) for the beach exercises


(even smaller in some specific situations).
 ¼ to ½ line length (5 m - 10 m) for body-
dragging in the water.
 ½ to ¾ line length (10 m - 15 m) for steady-
pull and first water-start.
 Full length (20 to 25 m) lines for the water-
start and upwind riding.

* A trainer kite is a kite that cannot generate enough pull to unbalance its pilot. It can be 2, 4 or
5 lines, foil or LEI design.
Before giving a kite to a beginner, Instructors must test fly any kite to determine if this kite can
be considered as a trainer kite for the lesson of the day according to the student’s weight and
weather conditions.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Group exercise
Close your manual and try to list all the possible advantages of using trainer lines while teaching
kiteboarding.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Advantages of using trainer lines


 Reduces the size of the wind window, thus reducing the space needed for a lesson.
 Reduces the stress of both the student and the Instructor.
 Allow the Instructor to be closer to the student.
 Student mistakes have less negative consequences (physically and mentally).
 Stimulates discovery.
 Reduces the negative impact on other beach users.
 Reduces the kite’s power, so you can have a 4-line LEI kite flying without power and it can
be considered a trainer kite according to IKO Standards.
 Nearly impossible to loop the kite.
 Reduces the amount of time spent on equipment management*, (one kite and different line
lengths) according to the student’s level, weight and weather condition.
 Kite crashes are much softer, causing less damage to the equipment.
 Can be used up until the first water-start is attempted.
 Much safer in strong and/or gusty conditions.

* It is easier and faster to change the length of the lines than to change a kite. You should make
a gradual transition to longer lines when the student has demonstrated good control using the
shorter lines and you need to move on to other exercises that require more power in the kite.

Always have 3 pigtails with you to trim and/or shorten your lines if you need to.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

The kite-to-Instructor leash


For first flights, and to ensure full safety for the students, a kite-to-Instructor leash can be used (not
instructor-to-student). Connect a 5th line to the center of the leading edge and the other end to the
Instructor’s kite leash.
The Instructor must always have their leash in
their hand. This way they always have safety
control over the student’s kite. When the
student makes a mistake, the Instructor can
pull on this line putting the kite in a safer
position, releasing most of its power.

This technique can also be used in very narrow


spots, together with very short lines to divide
the wind window in two and only work on one
side at the same time.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

The IKO Affiliated Center


IKO Affiliated Center Safety Directives
IKO Affiliated Centers must:
 Ensure the IKO Standards are respected and all the students are trained to become
independent.
 Complete the online Spot Risk Assessment (S.R.A.) and Emergency Action Plan (E.A.P.).
 Ensure all teaching staff are IKO qualified with valid membership.
 Hold valid general liability insurance.
 Display, for public viewing:
- spot safety information (obstacles, organization, rules, etc.…)
- updated weather forecasts.
 Have an operational safety boat owned by the center or from a third party, available at all
times during teaching hours.
 Teach from a boat in offshore wind conditions.
 Ensure each Instructor has a communication device.
 Teach within a safe practice spot without:
- obstacles or surface hazards (rocks, slippery surfaces, poles, etc.)
- power lines within 100m of the beach,
- trees within 30m of the shoreline,
- a big shore break (above waist height),
- strong rips or currents.

Student Waiver Form


Ensure all your students read, understand and sign the Student Waiver Form* before starting a
lesson and ask about their medical background to help avoid potential safety issues. Always
suggest your customers are checked by a doctor if they are not sure about their ability to learn
kiteboarding.

* IKO Student Waiver Form is available in the ‘File’ section of your account.

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Spot Risk Assessment (S.R.A.)


The S.R.A. helps Instructors to be aware of the possible dangers of any chosen spot, decide
whether teaching there is safe, and calculate how to manage the risks adequately.
The S.R.A. should include:

 Name of Spot
 Spot details
 Activity
 Background information
 Safe / Unsafe wind directions
 Safe / unsafe tide/current conditions
 Hazards, who is at risk, steps to minimize the risk

One S.R.A. must be created for each teaching spot.
In case an incident occurs, the S.R.A. must be amended and measures taken to ensure that the
same type of incident does not occur again. The center must create a ‘culture of safety’.

Homework
This evening create an S.R.A. on the following pages for your ITC spot.

KEEP
CALM
AND

DO YOUR
HOMEWORK

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Spot Risk Assessment (S.R.A.)


Spot details
Name of the spot:

What are the other user groups for this spot? (Please describe in detail the types of activities and
how they use the beach):

What is the maximum number of Kiteboarders on this spot for safe practice?
Describe all the safe wind directions (example: Northeast wind = side-on-shore shore):

Describe all the unsafe wind directions (example: South wind = off-shore):

Describe all the safe tide/current conditions (Please give description and details):

Describe the typical air/water temperatures at this spot:

What type of wetsuit is required and what is the minimum temperature that you will teach in? (What
it the temperature when you stop the lessons?)

Do you display the safety signs at your school and teaching spot? Yes No
Do you display any local kiteboarding rules? Yes No

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Instructor Manual
Day 1

Spot Management Diagram


Please draw below a diagram of the spot of the ITC (if you want you can download a satellite view
from the spot and do this task on your laptop or smartphone/tablet) and indicate the significant
features: location of hazards, prevailing winds, spot organization (launching and landing areas,
training areas and any specific user areas, etc...), nearest emergency access points for rescue
and ambulance services.

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With on-shore winds:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

With off-shore wind:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

With submerged hazards:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

Obstacle on/near the spot:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

Other beach user:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

Tide and currents:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

Wind effect and special weather conditions:


 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

Other situations:
 Explain the specific danger(s) related to this?

 What are the groups at risks?


 What steps does your school take to minimize the risk?

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General Safety Information and Emergency Action Plan (E.A.P.)


The E.A.P. records safety information in case of emergency.
The E.A.P. should include:

 First aid equipment and location.


 Procedures to rescue a victim.

Organizing the safety procedures


 Safety rules and emergency procedures must be posted in the center, given out to the
students and followed and accepted by all.
 Emergency phone numbers, the center’s address and location should be displayed close
to the center’s main phone.
 First-Aid kit must be placed in easy reach for anyone looking for it.
 The teaching spot should be easy to reach for a rescue team.

Post-accident procedures:
Keep an ‘Incident report’ which records the student’s name, phone number, date, time, location,
Instructor name, injury/symptoms, what happened, action taken and follow up.

Insurance companies usually require notification of any incident. Complete the Incident report right
after the accident, with clear information. It should also mention the anticipated measures taken to
prevent further accidents (in case of new similar event it may have an impact on your responsibility
in case of a law suit/claim).

Homework
This evening fill in the General Safety Information and E.A.P. on the following pages for your ITC
spot.

KEEP
CALM
AND

DO YOUR
HOMEWORK

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General Safety Information


School Equipment
Does your school have functional safety equipment on ALL control bars? Yes No

Does your school use kite leashes (with quick release) connected to the front part of the harness
with all kite and including trainer kite? Yes No
Does your school check the functionality of the equipment before each use? Yes No

Does your school keep a track of your safety equipment, repairs and
maintenance? Yes No
Does your school provide a 50 Newton buoyancy aid (for water lesson, even shallow), a helmet, a
harness with handle and a kite leash connected to the front part of the harness to each student
and make sure they wears them at all time? Yes No

Do all students wear a wetsuit? Yes No, the temperature of the water at your
teaching spot is above 25 degrees Celsius

Do all Instructors have a harness with handle, a kite leash connected to the front part and a line
cutter? Yes No

Does your school own its own safety unit? Yes No


 Describe the brand/model, engine power
 Is it available for rescue within maximum 5 minutes of the practice and/or
teaching spot? Yes No
Does the school have a Safety unit from a third party at its disposal? Yes No
 Is it available for rescue within maximum 5 minutes of the practice and/or
teaching spot? Yes No
Does your school use the services of Lifeguards? Yes No
 Specify all Lifeguards services or others rescue services you use for an emergency:

 Is it available for rescue within maximum 5 minutes of the practice and/or


teaching spot? Yes No
Explain with details how you organize the safety of your spot without any boat support (your
case will be studied to evaluate the possibility of affiliating without boat support):

Weather Forecast
Does your school display a weather report on a daily basis? Yes No

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Accident Report
In the years prior to the affiliation request and only during teaching, did one or more of your
students have a serious accident requiring hospitalization, ambulance, surger)?
Yes No

Specify the numbers of accident(s)/incident(s) in each category:


 Minor injuries (no need for medical interventions):
 Medium injuries (wounds, such as a sprained ankle, that need medical interventions):
 Serious injuries (need emergency intervention and hospitalization):
 Death(s):

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Emergency Action Plan (E.A.P.)


Contacts
Mention the resources at hand for helping you to deal with incidents or accidents (phone numbers)

 For all emergency always call:


 Nearest Hospital (address and phone#):
 Ambulance:
 Lifeguards, Coastguards:
 Police:
 Fire Dpt.:
 Parks Dpt.:
 Harbor:
 Search and Rescue services:
 Others:
Is this information visible by the public? Yes No

Communication Equipment
What communication equipments do you use (Radio, Phones, Waterproof radio)? Where are they
located? Who is equipped with them?

First aid equipment


Do you have a first aid kit? Yes No

Rescue procedure
How do you get to a victim? (Give a detailed description of the procedure)

How do you bring a conscious victim back to shore? (Give a detailed description of the procedure)

How do you bring an unconscious victim back to shore? (Give a detailed description of the
procedure)

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The Safety Systems


Prevent any accident! To be independent, students must know how, when and why to use all the
safety systems.

The only safety systems recognized by IKO are:

 Re-ride safety system on a front line that allows the bar to slide further away than 1
kite span.
 5th line safety system that allows the bar to slide further away than 1 kite chord.

The IKO Instructor must


 Always stay up to date with the latest developments in safety systems from every
manufacturer.
 Test every safety device before starting to teach with it and train students to do the same.
 Be sure the kite leash is always connected to the student (or to you) and in the right place
so the kite fully flags out/depowers when the chicken loop is released (no suicide leash
allowed).
 Only use the bar corresponding to its designated kite brand and type.
 Do not modify the safety systems.

Flight Incident Simulation


Students must learn and practice repeatedly how to properly use the safety systems. It is important
to organize and repeat simulation exercises of flight incidents (to make it automatic) during all the
training process such as:

 Letting go of the bar (at least 5 times in each course level).


 Activating the chicken loop quick release (at least 4 times in the whole course).
 Self-landing (at least once in the whole course).
 Self-rescue (at least once in the whole course).
 Activating the kite leash quick release in case all the previous procedures do not work and
there is still too much tension in the kite (at least once in simulation on land while the kite
is not flying).

At the start of a beginner lesson, and before any kite flying, the following 3 safety steps must be
taught and practiced:

 Step 1: Let go of the bar.


 Step 2: Activate the chicken loop quick release.
 Step 3: Activate the kite leash quick release.

An IKO Instructor is not only in charge of their students’ safety during lessons, but is also
responsible for their future practice. Safety is also about making sure students know how to
choose, rig, check and use the equipment.

Train the use of safety systems and related procedures.

Inform your students of their abilities and limitations and remind them that not all the systems are
the same.

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Situation Action Student directives


Step 1: Let go of the bar!

 Open both hands at the same time to


let go of the bar.
Too much kite
The kite should drop and lose most of
power, out of 
its power. Evaluate the situation and:
control and/or you a) If everything is correct, relaunch
the kite.
are unsure of the b) If the kite still creates too
situation… much power and is not under
control, proceed with step 2.

Step 2: Activate the chicken loop quick release!

 Grab the chicken loop safety system


with both hands, trigger it (depending
on the brands you may have to push
Too much kite it away, pull it or turn it) and
power, out of immediately let go of everything.
control despite  The kite should drop with only one
step 1 and/or you line in tension and lose most of its
power, then:
are unsure of the a) If on land or shallow water, do
situation (kite or the self-landing procedure.
b) If in deep water, do the self-
line tangled with an rescue procedure.
obstacle) … c) If the kite still creates too
much power and is not under
control, proceed with step 3.

Step 3: Activate the kite leash quick release!

 Grab the kite leash quick release with


one hand and activate it (most of the
time you will need to push it away, but
some safety systems require you to
Too much kite pull in) and immediately let go
everything.
power, out of
control despite The kite will no longer be
connected to you and will fly away.
step 1 + 2 and you This is the very last step of safety.
Before doing ‘step 3’ be sure it is
are unsure of the the right solution. In deep water, an
situation… inflated kite is a buoy and makes it
easy for you to be spotted by
rescue teams. It can also work as a
sail to get you back to shore and a
life raft. Plus a loose kite may
become a hazard for others.
Step 4: Use your line cutter! (if still tangled/connected to any line)

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The Kite Bar Exercise

As an Instructor, you will work with a wide variety of equipment, so you should become familiar
with as many different systems as possible. The following exercise will give you an opportunity to
see a few different bar types.

Go outside and get your harness, leash and kite bar(s). Everyone will showcase their own kite bar
and explain its safety systems, trim adjustments and features.

In front of the group, perform a flight incident simulation and bar reset in pairs using your bar.
Explain the advantages of this bar/brand as well as its inconveniences.

Then your fellow Instructor Candidates can ask you any questions and give feedback.

Finally, your Examiner will give you some extra tips about that bar type.

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Set up Trainer Lines


The Examiner will show you how to
set trainer lines on your bars.
However it is easier to make up
sets of permanently short lines for
‘short lines teaching practice’.

You will learn how to double back


your lines (this can be done twice)
this means that at any time you can
transform a 20m lines bar to use
10m or even 5m lines.

To double back your lines, you


need a pigtail and you must:

 Steps 1 to 6: create your


pig tail (always have 3
attached to your harness).
 Step 7: Unwind and clear
your lines normally. Pick up
the line connection
knots/loops and bring them
back close to the bar
keeping them carefully
separated.
 Step 8: Loosen the knots on
the leader line ends and
place the back line
extremities there.
 Step 9 - Tighten the knot
again.
 Step 10 and 11: Place your pigtail at the end of the centerline where the 2 front lines
separate. Be careful not to affect the re-ride safety system! (The safety line must be able
to slide as usual).
 Steps 12 to 14: Connect the front lines to the pigtail.
 Have somebody holding the bar so you can adjust each line to be equal, pinch each one
of them to mark the right position. Connect them normally using the larks head loop.
 Launch the kite, trim it and check if the safety system works!

Important - When over-powered, if you divide the kite’s size by 2 you will reduce the power by 2
and it will take more time to pump up another kite and you need more equipment. If you divide
the line length by 2 you will reduce the power by approximately 4, it will take less time and need
less equipment.

Always wear 3 pigtails in case you want to lengthen your back/front lines to trim your kite.

To double back the lines twice, repeat the procedure explained above.

As always, before giving the kite to the student, pre-fly it and trim it. Be sure your
modification has not blocked the safety system. With some brands this method might not
be possible to achieve or will create a too big length difference between front and back
lines, in this case you will need extensions to compensate. Check it before the lesson.

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Spot Organization According to the Wind Direction


You must adapt your teaching organization according to your spot in order to keep everyone safe.
The Instructor must make sure the students understand the circulation path and that they stay at
a safe distance from each other.

Safety Distance
A standard safety distance of 3 line lengths between your students and other students,
kiteboarders, obstacles, and the shore, must always be ensured.

Organizing a Safe Practice Spot


Set a traffic plan to prevent collisions and accidents between students, kiteboarders and other
beach users. Organize the spot with the local riders and other centers.

 Define all bearings, key points and intervention settings for Instructors.
 A spot map should be available to all.
 Student training area: Define a training area for your students and make sure they know
and respect its limits. Experienced riders must stay clear of this area.
 Rigging area (1): This area is to prepare the kites before launching. Nobody should stay
in this zone.
 Water entry point (2): There should be a flag and an Assistant Instructor should stay there
to manage the circulation to provide good beach traffic. When teaching from a boat, the
water entry point is the boat, no need to mark it.
 Turn back point (3): At this point students should head back to shore. Make sure they
understand this before entering the water. The turning point should be marked on land or
on the water using a buoy or a flag.
 Water exit point (4): There should be a large flag at the end of the practice zone. Students
should exit the water here.
 Downwind limit line (5): This is the very last point where students must land their kite or
be recovered by a boat. It marks the limit of the training area and defines its boundaries.
As Instructor, you must stop your students before they pass this limit. Instruct and train
them to let go of the bar and release the chicken loop beyond this line.

Be aware of the strength and angle of the wind so it does not put your students in danger.

The ideal wind direction to teach and practice is side-on-shore (cross-onshore). The following
diagrams show how to manage the teaching spot according to the wind direction.
The closer the wind is to ‘onshore’ (90 degrees from the shore) the harder it will be for your
students to move away from the shore.

The closer the wind is to ‘side-shore’ (parallel to the shore) the harder it will be for your students
to come back to shore if they crash their kite and are not able to relaunch it.

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Side-shore winds

Side-on-shore winds

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On-shore winds

Off-shore winds

Boat teaching may be done without markers. The boat will act as your marker, so you must be in
position to stop students before they pass the downwind limit.

Always keep students within easy reach of the boat (less than 1 minute).

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Flag Code
A flag code is needed* to inform and protect the riders that are part of the Affiliated Center:

 Green flag: Practice is safe; area under surveillance.


 Yellow flag: Practice could be dangerous; area under surveillance.
 Red flag: Go back to land, no practice and danger; area under surveillance.
 No flag: Area is not under surveillance.
*Unless it is used for other reason or meaning by lifeguard or other entity. In that case coordinate with them.

The S.E.A. Assessment


Do the S.E.A. assessment described below before any lesson/practice and teach your students to
do the same.

 S = Spot: Upwind and downwind dangers, wind obstacles and surface dangers (on water
and under water, on the seabed and on the land).
 E = Environment: the weather, wind strength/direction and other factors such as tide.
 A = Activity: how your activity interacts with people and other activities around you (land
and water traffic - learn, anticipate and apply sea and land Right of Way rules).

Ensure that your students learn how to do an S.E.A. Assessment and demonstrate they can do
it.

You need to assess obstacles both upwind and downwind as both influence the wind pattern.

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Spot Organization According to Water Type


Shallow Water
Shallow water spots are the easiest for learning, however make sure that:

 Water is always at least waist deep.


 The seabed is clear of hazards.
 Even in shallow water, students must wear a buoyancy aid at all times.

Deep Water (from a boat)


When teaching from a boat, the Student-to-Instructor ratio must be reduced to 1:1 to ensure
Instructors can fully support their students.

 Students should show the necessary skills to leave from and return to the beach.
 The boat is not only for rescue, but also to act as a teaching platform and trajectory
reference point.
 The boat should never be placed directly downwind, or in the path of a student where it
might become a hazard.

Students that are only taught from a boat in deep water spots are not considered independent
and should be redirected to a spot where they could also practice on land to finalize their training.

Shore Breaks
Students should never be taught in spots with shore breaks waist high or above (from the base of
the wave). Precautions must be taken with small shore breaks (less than waist high):

 All training must take place at a safe distance from the pull of the break. Students must
body-drag out through the break until they are safely away from it.
 The Instructor can take the student out through the shore break and then hand over the
kite to the student once they are far beyond the reach of the waves. When using this
technique, an Assistant Instructor must stay on land to ensure the student’s safety in case
the Instructor let go the student and swims back to the shore.

Students must be particularly careful not to drop the kite in the shore break or whitewater. If this
happens in large shore breaks and the kite is not easily relaunched, students should activate the
chicken loop quick release straightaway and swim back to shore.

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Gusty Winds
Gusty winds are a key factor in many accidents. Extreme caution should be taken when teaching
in these conditions.

 Students must never fly their kite at the top of the wind window* as gusts will loft or drop
the kite.
 In order to avoid being lofted, smaller kites with shorter lines must be used.
 In gusty winds, a kite-to-Instructor leash may be used**.

* It is not recommended to keep a kite between 11 and 1 o’clock, and never on land with full
length lines, even if the wind is not gusty (except in special exercises). In this position, accidental
lofting may happen or the kite can suddenly stall.

Always fly your kite between 10 and 11 o’clock or 1 and 2 o’clock.

Narrow Spots
A training spot can be narrow but it must always have enough
room downwind.

The best way to teach in these spots is by having another


training spot where the students can learn to fly a trainer kite
and simulate what they will be doing in the water.

Use shorter lines for training on narrow beaches. If your beach


is 10 meters wide, you can use 4m lines and achieve a full wind
window. A kite-to-Instructor leash can also be used to divide the
wind window in 2**. Be sure to connect the leash to the center
of the leading edge.

** For more information go to the kite-to-Instructor leash


section.

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Environment Caring
Leave the beach cleaner than you found it!
This concept is easy to understand and there is nothing more to explain than the title itself!
Nature is our home, and for us Kiteboarders, nature is also our playground. The impact of mankind
over nature is very negative. Our responsibility as beach users for our professional activity and
passion is to show a good example and educate our students to do the same.
During the ITC, your Examiner will watch your behavior in this respect. It will count towards your
final evaluation! To score easy points, take an empty bag with you each time you go to the beach
during the ITC and bring it back full of litter at the end of the day.

Make your students help you, before and after the lesson and during the breaks too.

Ensure you do the same when you are in the classroom, and of course, not just during your ITC.

This must become a habit to be encouraged as much as possible.

Picture from Instagram @projectaworldwide

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Reason for Failure Analysis


The ‘observation/correction’ part of a lesson is one of the most important instructor skills. You must
be able to make keen observations and recognize why students cannot achieve the task, in order
to correct them.

At home this evening, complete the chart in the following pages:

1. In the first column, describe what you can see as the result of the failed attempt.
2. In the second column, explain the reasons for this failure.
3. In the third column, give solutions to correct the mistake.

During a failed What can you see? What could be the What solutions can
attempt of: possible reasons for you provide?
failure?
Assisted launching
- The pilot is walking - If not in the right - Demonstrate how to
backwards against position, walking pivot around the kite
Pilot: the kite pulling on the backward and pulling like a compass
bar, trying to put the bar will not put the walking towards wind,
Example tension on the lines. kite in the right to create line tension.
position nor the right
tension on the lines. - Once kite stops
flapping it is ready to
be launched.

To find reason(s) for failure and how to correct the student, start by observing the symptoms and
ask yourself for the reasons causing the failure.
Is the failure about?

 Equipment,
 Environment (water surface state, wind flow, circulation),
 Trainee’s knowledge (timing, flying pattern, stance, action sequence to follow...),
 Trainee’s physical abilities,
 Trainee’s emotional state,
 Etc…
Relate it to your own experience.

Repeat this exercise at home or in group every evening. It is crucial for your certification
on Day 5.

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During a failed What can you see? What could be the What solutions can
attempt of: possible reasons for you provide?
failure?
Assisted launching

Pilot:

Assistant:

Kite:

First piloting

Kite:

Body:

Legs:

Body-dragging

Kite:

Body:

Legs:

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During a failed What can you see? What could be the What solutions can
attempt of: possible reasons for you provide?
failure?
Steady-pull*

Kite:

Body:

Legs:

Water-start

Kite:

Body:

Board:

Upwind riding

Kite:

Body:

Board:

*Steady pull is the position of the student before the water-start (feet in straps, kite with slow movements between
11 to 1 o’clock. Piloting with one hand to stabilize drifting with the other hand when necessary).

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Topic Assignment
Your Examiner will assign one or more topics for you to prepare. You will be asked to present them
later this week to the rest of the group.
You will have up to 10 minutes (maximum, many topics require less than 10 minutes) to present
each topic followed by a 5 minute feedback session.

The purpose of this exercise is to evaluate and improve your communication and technical skills.

Tick the topics assigned to you:


 The 5 wind effects - Venturi effect, wind shadow, wind gradient, bay effect and compression
effect. What are their dangers and their advantages, if any?
 Sea breeze - day and night sea breeze concept, when we can expect a sea breeze, how
it is created. What are the necessary conditions to have a sea breeze? What are the
dangers?
 4 or 5 line kite set up - the steps and key points for downwind set up.
 How to trim a kite - trimming possibilities, how to check if is trimmed correctly.
 First time flying - after you rig the kite, which exercise a student must learn to be able to fly
a kite on land? (Include launching and landing with an assistant as pilot and assistant).
 Water re-launching - the steps and key points, the differences between a 4 and a 5-line
kite, potential reasons for failure and tips.
 Body-dragging - prerequisites, basic theory and exercises, potential reasons for failure and
tips. What is the exact purpose of the body-drag? Which body-drags should we teach?
 Steady pull - prerequisites, basic theory, exercises, potential reasons for failure and tips.
What is the exact purpose of the steady pull?
 Self-rescue - prerequisites, basic theory, exercises, potential reasons for failure and tips.
What is the exact purpose of the self-rescue?
 Water-start - prerequisites, basic theory, exercises, potential reasons for failure and tips.
What is the exact purpose of the water-start?)
 Riding upwind- prerequisites, basic theory, exercises, potential reasons for failure and tips.
What is the exact purpose of riding upwind?)
 First jumps - prerequisites, basic theory, exercises, potential reasons for failure and tips.
 How to self-launch and self-land - what are the key steps? When is it taught?
 Tide - what and why is important to know about tides for kiteboarding practice? How are
tides created (simple explanation)?
 Basic principles of aerodynamics - why do kites fly and pull (simple explanation)?
 Current – what and why is important to know about currents for kiteboarding practice? How
are currents created (simple explanation)?

After your topic presentation


1. You will carry out your self-evaluation,
2. The group will give feedback,
3. Your Examiner will evaluate your communication skills and correct or complete the topic if
necessary.

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Topic preparation
Use the guide below to prepare it.

Theoretical contents are available in your Assistant Instructor manual and in this manual. You can
also use other research sources.

Topic Make sure you read (several times) and understand the topic
knowledge contents

Prepare a lesson plan that you will follow:


 Take notes on your topic.
 Do not write a script - write key points, which you can expand on.
 Prepare diagrams or required equipment.

Your lesson should include:


 An introduction: Describe what the lesson OBJECTIVE is and
Lesson plan:
why it is important. Ask the students what they know about the
topic.
 Key points: Think of 3 or 4 important key points that the student
must remember at the end. Use them in the introduction,
throughout the lesson and at the end to summarize.

Use the ‘Theoretical presentation observation chart’ (point 32.1).

 Speak loudly and clearly but not too much.


 Use different communication channels.
 Use different tools like a white board or 3D wind window and/or
Communication:
kite gear to help the group understand.
 Always maintain eye contact.
 Remember KISS! Keep It Short and Simple… and fun too!

 Include your students in the lesson so they will stay focused on


the topic. Ask them to demonstrate what they got from what you
said, conduct an experiment or simulation.
Interaction:
 Feedback: Throughout your lesson, ask open questions (which
require more than a ‘Yes / No’ answer) to be sure the lesson was
understood.

Always relate it to kiteboarding.


Your goal is to teach as if you were teaching a real student (or several).

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Topic notes

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Practical Skills Evaluation


Both the kite and rider recovery, and the riding test will not be done this afternoon. Depending on
the weather conditions you will do one this afternoon and the other later during the course.

Kite and Rider Recovery from a Boat


While you are at a kiteboarding spot, you may need to rescue a kiteboarder with a boat even if you
do not own a boat.

When seeing someone in trouble offshore you should take the decision to help with the support of
a boat from a third party (fisherman, tourist, etc.).
In this situation, you should not drive the boat but guide its pilot, who knows how to drive a boat,
but may have no kiteboarding skills.

You will be trained to do this during your ITC and evaluated on your understanding of the
procedure, and your ability to perform it.

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Procedure evaluated
Remember to talk clearly and loudly to the pilot and ensure they understand. There are many
noises onboard so communication is not always easy. Use key words.

1. Go upwind of the kiteboarder and stop the boat at a safe distance from them (not less than
5 meters). Ask him how they feel and what the problem is.
2. If the kiteboarder is conscious, not injured and only has equipment trouble, tell him clearly
to let go of the bar and activate the chicken loop quick release. Tell him he must then wait
in this position so you can first recover the kite and then come back for him.
3. Go downwind of the kite passing far outside the wind window, then go upwind toward the
kite at an angle of 45⁰ then:
 Grab the leading edge, flip the kite over and deflate it as fast as possible. Tell the
driver to stop the engine at the same time.
 Fold the kite in 2, take the wing tips and roll the kite up toward the deflate valve
and put it in the boat.
 Grab all the lines, pull them onboard and put them into a bucket (if there is no
bucket onboard, put them between your legs on the floor and avoid walking on
them). This will bring the kiteboarder to the boat.
 Tell the kiteboarder to grab the boat, release their leash if they have not already
and help them to come onboard.
 Wind the lines around the bar, close the valve and secure the equipment.

If the kiteboarder is injured, he must be rescued and transported to a safe location before
recovering the kite.

However, to avoid the kite or its lines causing further accidents, the rescuer must secure the kite.
For example:

 Deflate the kite.,


 Attach the kite or leash to an anchor or a buoy.
 Have an assistant take over the kite and take it back to shore.

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ITC Riding Skill Evaluation – Level 4 - Advanced


You need to demonstrate all Level 4 – Advanced skills on demand with regularity and consistency
in all wind conditions suitable for the spot (according to the Examiner’s criteria) from 10 to 30 knots.
The time limit is 1h30.

Your Examiner will expect full competence in the following areas:

You must:
 Choose the right equipment for the conditions.
 Set-up and rig your equipment correctly and quickly.
 Use a helmet and a buoyancy aid (impact vest accepted).
 Choose a launching site and self-launch in safety.
 Respect the Right of Way rules.
 Ride upwind.
 Ride toe-side going upwind.
 Successfully land a jump with grab.
 Jibe.
 Recover a board and a rider in deep water.
 Crash less than 3 times.
 Perform a self-rescue and pack-down in deep water.
 Self-land in safety.
 Remember to leave the beach cleaner than you found it…

If you think the conditions are not appropriate for to your equipment, body weight and level, it is
better to tell your Examiner before you launch rather than get into trouble on the water.

This is not a competition, there are no extra points for performing your latest tricks. Your Examiner
will be observing your attitude towards safety and your cooperation with the other riders.

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End of Day 1
Feedback on the Day
It is now time for a recap of the day and to talk about the things you enjoyed and what you had
difficulties with.

Express your thoughts and ask your Examiner questions on anything you would like to know more
about.

Self-Study
Learn together as a group to gather knowledge more effectively and efficiently. Take notes on the
things you do not understand, so you can ask your Examiner tomorrow morning.

Tick the boxes once done, complete all the tasks first and finish with the exam.

 Review the contents of Day 1.


 Read, understand and complete the ‘6 Instructor Candidate self-evaluation chart 1/3’.
 Do the ‘11.4 Homework’. Complete the S.R.A. for your ITC spot.
 Do the ‘11.6 Homework’. Complete the Safety Information and E.A.P. for your ITC spot.
 Complete the ‘16 Reason for failure analysis’.
 Prepare your first topic listed on the ‘17 Topic assignment’.
 Read and study the contents of Day 2.
 Complete the ‘20 Day 1 exam’.

See you tomorrow relaxed and rested!

Homework must be done. The Examiner will check it. A Candidate who does not do their
homework will not be certified as an Instructor Level 1 at the end of the ITC.

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Day 1 Exam
Answer the following questions.
1. Which type of kite is required to teach according to IKO Standards?
 A: Any kite with enough power to jump.
 B: Foil kite only.
 C: Inflatable kite only.
 D: Any water relaunchable kite. It can be inflatable or/and foil.

2. When should the Instructor ensure the students wear a helmet?


 A: When first flying a powerful kite.
 B: Right before using standard line length.
 C: From the beginning of any practical lesson until the end of it.
 D: From the moment they start flying a 4-line L.E.I. kite.

3. Which student skill should be acquired with the highest priority?


 A: Ability to self-evaluate limits.
 B: Ability to fly the kite for the water-start.
 C: Ability to use the safety systems.
 D: Ability to fly a kite on land.

4. S.E.A. is an acronym to help remember what to assess in practice area. What does it
mean?
 A: Spot, Environment, Assessment.
 B: Site, Equipment, Activity.
 C: Site, Equipment, Assessment.
 D: Spot, Environment, Activity.

5. What is the S.E.A. assessment for?

6. What does S.R.A. mean?


 A: Self-rescue, Rules, Agreement.
 B: Safety, Respect, Aspect.
 C: Spot Risk Assessment.

7. Students who only learn in deep water from a boat and can ride upwind are?
 A: Fully independent and can be certified accordingly.
 B: Riders who will not be independent, who must be informed about the risks and
will need training related to land practice.
 C: Riders who should be certified and who can go to a higher-level course.

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8. What key safety steps must you ensure your students know, understand and master?
 A: 1/ trigger the leash quick release, 2/ let go of the bar, 3/ trigger the chicken loop
quick release.
 B: 1/ let go of the bar, 2/ trigger the chicken loop quick release, 3/ trigger the leash
quick release.
 C: 1/ trigger the chicken loop quick release, 2/ let go of the bar, 3/ trigger the leash
quick release.

9. When practicing and teaching the self-landing with a re-ride safety system, the Instructor
must ensure that students?
 A: Keep tension on any of the lines.
 B: Keep equal tension on all lines.
 C: Keep tension on the line that the leash is connected to.
 D: Keep equal tension on two lines.

10. When teaching body-dragging from the beach, with side-on-shore wind, the turning point
mark on the water (to go back to shore) should be at?
 A: 1/3 of the distance between the water entry and exit points.
 B: 2/3 of the distance between the water entry and exit points.
 C: 1/2 of the distance between the water entry and exit points.
 D: It does not really matter as long as it is somewhere in between the water entry
and exit points.

11. Which of the following situations is the safest way to approach the kite for a recovery from
a boat?
 A
 B
 C
 D

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12. In the IKO flag code what does a red flag mean?
 A: Area safe to practice.
 B: Area under surveillance.
 C: Proceed with caution.
 D: Danger, stop and return to shore.

13. Why should students be provided with a harness at all times?


 A: To learn how to adjust the kite power using the bar positioning on the center line.
 B: To get used to it and to be able to connect the kite leash.
 C: To enable the Instructor to keep them safe and stable.

14. A student kite is backstalling, what can you do to solve this issue?
 A: Make the front lines longer.
 B: Make the back lines shorter.
 C: Use another kite.
 D: Make the front lines shorter.

15. The maximum student/kite ratio per Instructor Level 1 is:


 A: 2 students with 1 kite.
 B: 4 students with 4 kites.
 C: 1 student with 1 kite.
 D: 2 students with 2 kites

16. When two riders are on a collision course, who has the Right Of Way?
 A: The rider going port.
 B: The rider going starboard.
 C: Both should change direction.
 D: The fastest rider.

Score out of 16:

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Day 2

Morning Afternoon

Day 1 Review and Homework Correction Examiner Teaching Demonstration 1/2


Professionalism Teaching practice 1 to 1
The IKO Teaching Concept End of Day 2
Day 2

The Learning Curve


The Mental State
The Principles of Communication
The IKO’s 8 Steps Teaching Concept
The 3 C’s
The 8 Instructor Responsibilities
IKO Visual Lesson Plan Discovery –
Intermediate – Independent - Advanced
Topic presentation

Day 1 Review and Homework Correction

 A quick review of Day 1


 The ‘20 Day 1 Exam.’
 The ‘11.4 S.R.A.’
 The ‘11.6 Safety Information and E.A.P.’
 The ‘16 Reasons for failure analysis chart’ will be corrected later.

If you have any questions, this is a good time to ask them.

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Professionalism
Professionalism is the key in any job and there is no exception with kiteboarding Instructors.

Professional Conduct
An IKO Instructor should always behave in a professional manner. The code of conduct includes,
but is not limited to:

 Be on time and prepared for the lesson.


 Be respectable:
- Keep a clean image.
- Wear a shirt and clean clothes.
- Have good personal hygiene.
- Always use good manners.
- Do not get too close to the students.
 Respect how students learn and adapt your lessons to their learning curve and mental
state.
 Always remember that students are your clients and you work for them!
 Ensure your students enjoy their lessons.
 Help your students to stay positive and motivated about the sport and become their mentor.
 Respect and teach to respect the environment - encourage the motto ‘Leave the beach
cleaner than you found it’.
 Work as a team with the other Instructors at your school and teaching spot.
 Listen to customer comments and suggestions to adapt and improve.

Client Satisfaction
Satisfied clients are the best publicity you can have. They will come back to you and recommend
you to their friends or on social networks as well as on your IKO online profile. To ensure student
satisfaction, make sure to:

 Ask each student’s name at the beginning, remember it and use it throughout the
lesson.
 Be positively positive. Never overdo it, but it is important to be encouraging and positive
at all times.
 Do not compare one student to another. Everyone has their own level of practice and
aspiration.
 Evaluate your students’ goals. Ask them why they want to learn and what level they wish
to achieve, to help them manage and meet their expectations.
 Listen. Let your students speak before and after each exercise. It will reinforce their
learning and make them feel that you care about their improvement.
 Respect the contract. If you have sold a two-hour package, then you must teach for two
hours. Your contract must be totally clear and every student must be aware of what they
are buying. Always wear a watch.
 If there is no wind, offer to teach one of the themes available in your Instructor Manual,
the Kiteboarder Handbooks and the IKO online courses or reschedule the remaining time.
 Offer further services. Always be available to answer any questions, not only from your
trainees but from other people too.
 Always maintain professional conduct and be a role model.

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The IKO Teaching Concept


The IKO Teaching Concept is designed to help each Kiteboarder reach a set of goals while creating
and securing their independence.

Your goal is to:

 Teach your students to become independent in each of the steps described in the IKO
Certification Standards.
 Build your students’ confidence.
 Make it easier for your students to learn.
 Adapt your teaching to each student (every student will learn differently), but use the same
steps - the IKO Standards.

Overall, have empathy for your students. Try to understand what they are feeling and
experiencing during their lesson with you. Listen to them and try to understand the messages
their body language is giving you.
This comes mainly with experience and will help them learn faster and enjoy more.

The IKO teaching concept is based on the feedback loop principle, which means the Instructor and
students interact continuously.

Students should be encouraged to ask questions and experiment, to self-evaluate and to set
achievable, yet challenging tasks. This creates a constant source of motivation, challenge and
reward for the students, and for the Instructor. Remember:

 Do not speak for too long.


 Give your students time to talk.
 Set exercises that make small but achievable goals.
 Give small breaks to students to let them visualize and remember what they just did.
 Allow your students to improve by repeating skills.

Honesty
Always provide honest feedback, and remain fair and encouraging at all times.

The IKO Student Certification Standards are established to make the teaching and evaluation of
students’ levels easier and more efficient. Each Certification Standard is a step to experiment
and learn. This will enhance the necessary skills for a constant learning curve.

The Standards have been created after assessing worldwide input, experience and feedback to
support the learning process that engages both short-term memory and muscle memory.
Do not omit or skip any skill that might not seem relevant to your spot or conditions, the
student may need those skills in the future.

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The 4 Steps of Learning


We learn by taking steps. The time spent on each step depends on the student, their background
and their level. It is a general learning cycle.

4 Steps of Learning
Steps How? Why?

1. Visualization of Students get their first idea Activates the student’s motivation. Also helps to generate
the action. of how to do something by an understanding of the key points given by the Instructor
seeing someone else before practice begins.
practicing it, or by receiving
an explanation.

2. Trial and error. Students try the task and Trying and failing is an important step of learning. Each
make errors. failure is a lesson in what not to do and establishes a
landmark in helping to find the way to succeed.
With teaching, correction,
and self-evaluation, Trial and error allows self-evaluation and correction and
students learn to helps to build internal bearings (sensations).
understand the task/skill.
To facilitate this process, the Instructor must give an
‘To know what to do, we exercise (not too difficult) that will challenge the student.
must know what not to A clear goal must be defined.
do.’
The Instructor must help the student to think about the
real problem that is the reason for failure. You need to
provide reference points and solutions to help them
perform better.

3. Completion. Students do the task for the Completion is the ‘eureka moment’ as the student enjoys
first time. the discovery.

The Instructor congratulates and asks the student why


they succeeded. The Instructor rewords each student’s
feedback with key points (if needed). The student
practices the exercise again to help them remember.

4. Automation Students have repeated the It is a form of procedural memory involving the
(or muscle task and can perform it consolidation of a specific motor task into memory
memory.) without having to think through repetition. Automation means the student has
about it. acquired the ability to do a task (adjusting the power trim)
or several tasks (a water-start). When the automation is
done, they can move on to the next challenge.

Automation must start right after the first time a task is


completed. Make the student repeat the task again
straight after they first succeed.
Then back to #1 to
learn something The more difficult the task, the more the student may
new need to repeat the exercise to reach the automation level.

In reality, the Instructor may not have enough time to make a student achieve automation for
every skill in a beginner course.
But every student MUST reach the automation level for ALL safety procedures.

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Short-Term Memory

Adapted from: Joyce & Showers 1981.

Short-term memory is the capacity to


Training components Skills attained remember sensations, words or visual
inputs that occurred in the last few
Theory
10-20% minutes. This information is stored in the
+
brain for only a short period of time. It will
Demonstration be lost unless it can be transferred to the
30-35%
+
long-term memory, where it will be stored
Practice and recalled at a later date.
60-70%
+
Feedback The key to teaching is to help students
70-80% transfer their newly acquired knowledge
+
from short-term to long-term memory.
Coaching 80-90%
To help students integrate an action into
long-term memory, they should express the action just learned or carried out, along with their
feeling right after doing it.
Taking the time to obtain your students’ feedback right after attempting each exercise will help
them remember much more (let them talk, rephrase and explain what they just understood or
achieved, and make them do it again).

The whole learning process is stronger if students analyze a skill or situation, and develop an
understanding around it. This is much more powerful than just copying a skill, which invariably
leads to less memory and skill retention.

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The Learning Curve


Everyone learns at their own pace, but there is a general learning curve that can be observed:

 The improvement at the beginning of an activity is exponential.


 Once it reaches a certain level, the ability to learn reduces as tasks become more technical.
 In time, students gradually recall what was learned before, this time forever.

When the learning curve drops off, students look for reasons for this drop. This is a critical
moment. They must be reassured and understand that everyone passes through this at one time
or another. If not explained, students will think they do not have the ability to improve or that you
are not teaching correctly. Never end a lesson in this phase.
If students stop practicing for a long time during the drop, you may have to teach them from the
beginning again.

Each student has their own learning curve path. Below you have three possible examples. ‘A’ starts
learning faster but their level drops fast while ‘B’ and ‘C’ are more consistent at the beginning. In
the long term, however, ‘A’ achieves a higher level.

This is just an example, as there could be as many learning curves as students having a lesson.

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The Mental State


How to Manage Mental State?
Your goal is to monitor and regulate each student’s mental state if they are acting irresponsibly,
and to encourage them to keep going when they are struggling. The most effective way to do this
is by getting them to express their ideas and feelings, and set progression exercises accordingly.

An Instructor’s behavior is directly linked to the mental state of their students. Always respect
students’ perceptions and explain the difference between danger and fear, or when overconfidence
puts them in danger.

It is important to monitor each student’s mental state, to be able to say ‘no’ in order to avoid
accidents, or to reassure when needed.
A: Self-learning: When learning on their own,
students do not know their abilities or mental
limits yet. By trying to find skill boundaries, they
may take larger risks or they may become over-
confident, which in itself can cause accidents
(1) and/or lead to a mental block (2). Either
could result in the end of their kiteboarding
practice as well as negative publicity for
kiteboarding as a sport.

B: Learning with an IKO Instructor: At the


beginning, most students feel some
apprehension before starting (3). During the
first steps of learning, a student’s mental state
may go up and down very quickly as they are
in the trial and error stage. But as they practice
in safety with the IKO Instructor, the student’s
mental state will stay in the ‘pleasure and
confidence’ zone (4), where students will learn
the most, while avoiding risks.

Each student’s mental state must be taken into consideration, while evaluating their level and
capacities.

Part of your teaching goal must be to take your students from a state of lack of knowledge, to the
point of awareness of inherent risks, without scaring them.

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The Principles of Communication


Communication is an exchange of information between two persons and it is directly related to the
learning process.

IKO Instructors must structure the course in order to receive constant feedback from their students.
One-way communication, where students are just given information or where they copy an action,
is not very effective. Students gain a lot through interaction and feedback. It helps them understand
why and how a task is performed.

The following table describes the communication principle.

Element Definition

Sender The person who emits a message.

Receiver The person to whom the message is directed.

Channel of
The way in which the information is sent.
communication

General environment The area, context and surroundings.

Anything that confuses or prevents sending and receiving a message


Noise
correctly.
Receiver reviews and confirms the message. Allows the sender to
Feedback know whether the message was received and understood by the
receiver.

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The diagram below shows the model for two-way communication

Name some different channels of communication that an Instructor can use while teaching:










Name different noises that could be obstacles to good communication while teaching:











Name different ways to get feedback
(check the student’s understanding):










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To create more efficient and effective communication with your students you
must:
 Learn their names quickly.
 Always get their attention before starting to talk.
 Speak up, change the tone of your voice and use key points.
 Always try to position yourself upwind to them, and if possible have the sun at their back.
 Stand by the side of your students when they are flying a kite. Extra information and clarity
is gained when the Instructor is located at the student’s side vision.
 Change location and go indoors if you need to teach specific background information.
 Use different channels to give information if required.
 Create interactivity - get the students to repeat as often as possible, ask them questions
and encourage them to ask questions too.
 Land or take over your student’s kite when communicating critical information.
 Talk for short times and check for understanding every time you speak.
 KISS (Keep it Short and Simple).

Research has demonstrated that we remember:


Learning from exchanges

Reading a text without receiving any


 10% of what we read
explanation

 20% of what we hear Spoken explanation

 30% of what we see Showing a movie, demonstrating

Showing a movie, demonstration while


 50% of what we hear and see at the same time
explaining
Having students tell you what they have just
 70% of what we say
been told, seen or read
Having a student talk and evaluate an
exercise they have just performed, whether
 90% of what we talk about right after doing it
they did it well or not, will help them memorize
a technique or understand an error.

100% of a skill when we reach automation and by practicing it often

Source: Changingminds.org Bobbi DiPoter

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The IKO’s 8 Step Teaching Concept


The IKO Teaching Concept is based on a physical skill being achieved through a mix of the
student’s Trial and Error and the Instructor’s corresponding Evaluation and Correction.

This is complemented by developing the student’s background knowledge and skill retention by
making sure they understand why they are performing a task.

The 8 steps are:

1. Evaluation
2. Set a goal
3. Incentivize and motivate
4. Give reference points
5. Get student’s feedback (1)
6. Observe
7. Get student’s feedback (2)
8. Correct
This Teaching Concept works in closed loop and must be reiterated for each new learning step.

Evaluation
At the beginning of a lesson introduce yourself
and get to know your students.

The initial evaluation:


 Opens up communication between the
Instructor and their students.
 Enables the Instructor to select the right
exercises and equipment.
 Allows them to find out why students want to
learn kiteboarding.

What can be evaluated?


 Past sporting experiences - do they have a
background in kiting? Any other sports?
 If they are not beginners, ask them about the
difficulties they encountered in their previous
training. It is helpful to understand their fears
and/or possible weaknesses.
 Ask questions related to their health,
physical abilities and mental state.
 Ask the student if he is able to comfortably
swim in deep water.
Instructors must always evaluate their students throughout the course.

It is always good to build up a relationship - students learn better from people they can relate to. It
will increase their confidence and they will focus more on what you are teaching them.

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Transfer of Learning
Students also learn from existing skills/knowledge. Some skills from other activities are identical
or similar and can be reused for kiteboarding. This is why snowboarders and skateboarders can
learn edging and riding upwind more easily, or paragliders can learn faster to pilot a kite.
In other cases it can be an inconvenience too, for example a windsurfer will have the tendency to
always pull hard on the bar, as when windsurfing they need to pull hard on the wishbone.

Take this in consideration when evaluating your students. Make sure you have asked them about
sports they have mastered, to avoid the mutual frustration of teaching too slow or too fast.

Set a Goal
Once you have evaluated the student’s level
and expectations you will be able to set a
goal that fits their expectations. They must
clearly understand what the goal is and
already have the skills to be able to attempt
it.
In order to maintain the student’s motivation,
the goal must be well balanced. Neither too
easy nor too difficult for them to be able to
learn and improve at their own pace.

It is better to have easy-to-reach goals.


Students will really feel they are getting
better and you can set new goals throughout
the lesson. Unreachable goals will quickly
get the student’s motivation down.

Quantify the goal, explain how many times to repeat the exercises, how far to go, how long to do
it for, etc.

Examples of goals:

1. Fly your kite on the right side of the wind window.


2. Body-drag out and come back.
3. Body-drag upwind.
4. Achieve the steady pull.
Only set one goal at a time so the student can focus and achieve it.

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Incentivize and Motivate


Once the goal is set, the Instructor
must help their students to find the
motivation to reach it. The
motivation to learn is often brought
by the ability to project ourselves
as someone different in the future.
Without this, learning is more
difficult and sometimes impossible.

 Get your students to


visualize themselves performing
the task successfully and ask them
to tell you how they achieved it.
This will help you build motivation
based on their understanding of
the goal, and allow you to make
corrections before trial and error, to reduce the possibilities of failure.
 Adopt a positive attitude, congratulate and encourage them, whether they have performed
well or not.
 Talk to your students as if they were already one-step further. Do not say ‘If you
make it….’ Instead, say ‘When you make it…’
Give value to the exercise by explaining why it is important, for example (related to the previous
goals given):

1. To be able to go to the right using your kite.


2. To be able to move away from the shore and come back to it independently even without
your board.
3. To be able to recover your board in deep water,
4. To be able to maintain a correct pre-water-start position.

Lesson rhythm and harmony


We all get bored when doing repetitive, unchallenging or non-goal orientated tasks. To maintain
the student’s motivation, make sure to keep a good lesson rhythm.

The lesson delivery rhythm depends on the student’s reactions. Adapt the information delivery
speed and type of activity (practice, theory, demo…) to suit each student.

Rhythm is also a matter of variation of activity:

 Have short talks or theoretical lessons.


 Be sure to have a good ratio of Instructor/student participation time.
 Let the students experiment and discover from time to time.
 Allow time for fun.
 Allow a part of on-demand lesson/practice.
 Create calm times for discussion and observations.
 Be more dynamic and energetic when you feel the students are losing motivation.

Rhythm is also important in the way you present yourself. Being overly expressive all the time
can be as boring and disruptive as being shy and not making the necessary inputs when you
should.

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Pygmalion Effect
Look at yourself! ‘There are no bad students, only bad Instructors!’
If an Instructor believes that their students are ‘not good’ or have preconceptions about their ability,
the student will notice this without either of them being consciously aware of it. They will perform
poorly as a result. However, if the Instructor has high expectations, students will perform better. In
short, ‘people rise to meet high expectations’. An Instructor’s emotional state may reflect on
their student as well. Eg. If you are afraid, the student might feel insecure and lose confidence in
you.

It is more about being than talking - positive talk with opposite thinking will not result well. Teach
yourself not only to speak positively, but also to believe in your students whoever they are.

To enhance the Pygmalion Effect, start by believing in your student’s potential and expressing
positively about them as rider in the future. For example, you can say:
“When you succeed…”

“Once you master the next step…”

“When you are independent…”

Give Reference Points


Providing reference points is essential for instructors to
teach effectively. For example, saying to your student ‘Fly
the kite from 1 to 2’, or ‘bend your knee’, or ‘apply pressure
on your front foot’, etc.

To be effective, an IKO Instructor must have a wide


knowledge relating to kiteboarding, and be able to
communicate it in a clear and simple way to students,
depending on their ability to understand it.

Remember KISS. Keep It Short and Simple! Get straight


to the point using key points and do not extend your
explanations.
Be careful to make your inputs at the appropriate time, or students will not understand or absorb
them. Reference points can either be provided by the Instructor (in this case information to help
the student succeed), or pointed out by student (using their own wording) during feedback. In this
case the Instructor must review and reword the student’s feedback using the right terminology.
This will establish whether the student understood or succeeded in a task and will build memory.
How do you build references?

 Use imagery filled language.


 Give elements of comparison.
 Compare to a known activity that is similar, eg. ‘steer the kite like a bike, not like a car’.
 Organize simulation exercises.
 Give a time frame.

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 Observe other riders.


 Describe a position.
 Give external bearings.
 Show a diagram.
 Use the Kiteboarder Handbooks.
 Demonstrate.
References are pieces of information that allow the realization of a task to reach a goal.

IKO Instructors must ask the student to do a task that will be challenging, yet achievable, based
on the reference points given.

Get Student’s Feedback (1)


Before letting students do an exercise
(a new small challenge), you must
make sure they have understood the
information you gave them, the goal
to reach and references that will allow
them to perform. Ask your students:

 Open questions that require


full answers, using words like how,
why and what. Avoid closed
questions that can be answered with
a single Yes or No.
 To reword what you have
explained.
 To demonstrate it.

Create systematic feedback by


maintaining eye contact, take regular
breaks, reword your explanations.

If the information has not been clearly understood, adapt your way of communication to enable
your students to better understand the references.

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Observe
This is one of the most important aspects of an Instructor’s job, while the student is practicing.

The interpretation of the observation, and therefore the evaluation, is related to the knowledge the
Instructor has about kiteboarding (equipment, maneuvers, terminology, personal experience, etc.).
The more you know, the better you can evaluate and correct your students.

To be able to define the reasons for failure, and determine the correct tips to help the student
perform well, you must always observe your student.
Nothing is more disappointing to a student than answering ‘NO’ to the question ‘Did you see me?’

Homework Correction
Let’s correct yesterday’s homework ‘16 Reason for failure analysis’

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Get Student Feedback (2)


After the observation period, whether
your student succeeded or not, it is
greatly beneficial to ask your student
for feedback again.
Remember that a student will
remember 90% of what he talks about
right after doing it.
Feedback sessions are used to
reinforce understanding. There is no
bad feedback, only information to
be used to learn.
When students fail to succeed, change
your channels of communication,
references or questions to help your
students find the correct solution for
the problem.
When students succeed, reinforce their memory by repeating what they just expressed and
understood, using different words.

Remember that trial and error works better with the student-to-Instructor feedback loop.
Get used to asking open questions about their experience when students have just performed an
exercise, and refrain from giving them the answer straightaway. You will often find, even after a
failed exercise, that students will know why they have failed and therefore will progress.

It is much more constructive for them to say it themselves and then you confirm it.

Remember the ‘learning from exchanges’ chart (section 24.2 Short-term memory), we remember
90% of what we talk about right after doing it.

Correct*
Correct your students when:

 They are not able to


progress according to the goal(s)
and reference(s) provided.
 They do not self-evaluate
accurately, whether they succeeded
or not.

This means you need to reword the


references provided, change the
channel of communication, explain
further and/or set simpler tasks. You
may also use simpler terminology.

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In order to make the necessary corrections, it is important:

 To SELF-EVALUATE.
 To express observations in a constructive and positive way.
 Never to project your frustrations into your criticism.

*If the feedback they give is accurate then you do not need to ‘correct’, only encourage them to
continue. This will give them more time for trial and error. Remember that students learn much
more by practicing than listening to someone.

Instructors should try to reduce the explanation – remember KISS!

The 3 ‘C’
The 3 ‘C’ are an easy way to remember the IKO Teaching Concept:

 Check: ‘Do I see what I need to see?’ (According to my evaluation, goal, reference points
given, or feedback). If not, determine the reasons for failure.
 Compliment: Always start with a compliment before correcting your student. This will keep
your student’s motivation high: ‘Very good!’, ‘You’re really improving’, or ‘That was
awesome!’
 Correct: Correct the failed part with new explanations that will lead to improving the
student’s understanding.

The compliment/correction ratio should be around 80% -20%, meaning that you compliment your
student 80% of the time while correcting them 20% to ensure optimal learning progression.

The 8 Instructor Responsibilities


There are 8 Instructor responsibilities relating to the reasons for failure and symptoms.

In some cases, they will be part of the psychological make-up of an individual and they could be
very challenging for you during the course.

Group Exercise
Close your Manuals and try to guess what the 8 Instructor Responsibilities are.

Homework - Complete the Instructor Responsibilities Charts


Look at the following situations that demonstrate learning challenges. What actions would you take
as the Instructor to solve each situation? Think of different examples and write them down in the
column ‘Help the Instructor can provide’.

A student can fail, but should not fail because of the Instructor’s failure to teach correctly!
Remember that in addition to these 8 responsibilities, there are also the Instructor’s own
communication skills, behavior, self-organization, knowledge of the IKO Standards, ability
to follow the IKO lesson plan, etc.

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Instructors Responsibilities Related to Their Students


Help the
Reasons for
Instructor Example of what the Instructor may observe Instructor can
failure (the
responsibilities (symptoms) provide (the
diagnostic)
solution)
 The student performs the exercise with
1:
the first attempt, or does more than Student’s
requested. level is too
Student
 The student is not interested, gets high for the
knowledge
bored, and looks around during the lesson
explanation.

 The student does something other than


requested. Student’s
 The student becomes frustrated with level is too
others (especially younger people). low for the
 The student does not react when the lesson
Instructor asks them to do something.

2:  The student ignores the safety


instructions. The student
Student  The student always wants to do more is
emotional than they are asked to. overconfide
state  The student is not able to self-evaluate nt
according to their level.

 The student is looking for the Instructor’s


eye contact.
 The student grips the bar tightly. The student
 The student stops moving and their eyes is scared
are wide open.
 The student wants to stop.

3:
 The student gets tired after just a few
Student minutes of flying the kite.
physical state Overweight,
 The student does not have the strength
unhealthy,
to hook in alone.
weak,
 The student is acting strange.
intoxicated
 You smell alcohol on the student’s
breath.

4:  The student is late. Course


Student  The student does not listen. offered or
Motivation  The student wants to stop early. provided by
 The student gets easily frustrated. a friend or
 The student is not interested or has no family
goal. relative

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Instructors Responsibilities related to the Equipment and the


Environment
Help the
Reasons for
Instructor Example of what the Instructor may observe Instructor can
failure (the
responsibilities (symptoms) provide(the
diagnostic)
solution)

5:  The student ‘tea bags’ in the water when


the kite is flying between 11 and 1.
Equipment  The student gets pulled up and over their Wrong
selection board right after doing the water-start. choice of
 The student cannot water-start, even equipment
though they have a good technique. or in bad
 The bar is always far away from the condition
student.
 The safety system does not release.

 The student cannot keep the kite stable.


6:  The student can fly the kite to the left but
not to the right.
Equipment  The kite does not depower when the bar
trim is released. Equipment
 The kite turns too quickly or does not poorly
turn. adjusted
 The kite always stalls backward in the
window.
 The student cannot put his feet into the
footstraps.

7:  The kite always stalls. Gusty wind,


 The kite always luffs. bad wind
Weather  The kite will not water re-launch. direction,
 The student cannot get out into the water choppy
to a safe distance. water, big
 The student struggles in the shore shore
break. break…
 The student has to wait a long time to
8: find an open area to enter the water.
 The student cannot launch the kite
Spot without standing close to dangerous
Spot too
objects.
crowded or
 People keep walking inside the
too small
student’s wind window.
 The kite gets stuck in a tree.
Dangerous
 There are rocks, reefs or buildings
(Remember to objects
downwind of the student.
leave the  The student has power on land but none
beach cleaner Currents or
in water and moves very fast downwind.
than you  rips
Kite lines go slack when the kite is in the
found it…) water.

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IKO Visual Lesson Plan Discovery – Intermediate –


Independent – Advanced
On the following pages, you will find a basic IKO visual lesson plan to use while you teach. It gives
you the steps you should carry out before, during and after your lessons.

This is a guideline that will help you remember each step your students must pass in order to
complete the IKO program. It corresponds to the complete IKO Lesson Plan (see Appendix A, B,
C, and D).
Following this lesson plan allows you to cover all the IKO Student Certification Standards a
beginner should follow to become an Independent Kiteboarder.

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IKO Kiteboarder Level 1 – Discovery 1/2


1/ First Contact 4/ Student Inflates the 5/ Holding and Carrying the 6/ Kite Handling to Secure it (for Set-up and ‘After 7/ Unwind the Lines
2/ Course Introduction kite Kite on Land Landing’)
3/ S.E.A. Assessment

8/ Connecting to the Bar / 9/ Flight Incident Simulation (3 Safety Steps) 10/ Lines Set-Up 11/ Pre-Flight Check
Simulating Flying a 4-Line
Kite & Kite Power Control

12/ Launching and Landing as an Assistant 13/ Instructor Tests the Kite 14/ First Piloting
in Flight and Trims it 15/ Explore the Edge of the Wind Window

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IKO Kiteboarder Level 1 – Discovery 2/2


16/ Let Go of the Bar 19/ Power Adjustment Using 20/ Walking While Flying the 21/ Landing to an Assistant 22/ Wind Window Theory
17/ Twist and Untwist the Lines Bar / Trim Experimentation Kite (also with the Board)
18/ Flying One-Handed (Basic)

23/ Launching with an Assistant 25/ Activate the Quick 26/ Self-Landing (How to
24/ Piloting Practice (Review of Release and Let the Kite Recover and Secure the Kite) 27/ Post-Flight Check (for Next
all the Steps Covered) Drop Flight or Storage)

28/ Equipment Packing

29/ Lesson Feedback / Student


Level Assessment and Set Next
Objectives

30/ Schedule the Next Lesson


or Student Certification

31/ Equipment Storage or


Maintenance

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IKO Kiteboarder Level 2 - Intermediate


32/ Enter and Exit the Water 33/ Water Relaunch 34/ Side Body-Drag with Both 36/ Body-Drag Upwind 37/ Body-Drag with the Board
While Controlling the Kite Hands
35/ Body-Drag with Power
Strokes Both Sides

38/ Self-Rescue and Pack Down Discovery 39/ Steady-Pull 40/ Right of Way (R.O.W.) Rules Introduction
41/ Water-Start

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IKO Kiteboarder Level 3 - Independent


42/ Controlled Stop 45/ Sliding Transitions 48/ Self-Launch 49/ Self-Rescue and Pack Down in Deep
43/ Control Riding Speed by 46/ Toeside Riding Water
Edging 47/ Toeside Turn
44/ Riding Upwind

IKO Kiteboarder Level 4 - Advanced


50/ Basic Jump 51/ Jibe 52/ Jump with Grab 53/ Rider Recovery 55/ Theoretical contents:
54/ Board Recovery  International
Kiteboarding signs
 ROW rules
 Equipment
 Weather and Tide
 Aerodynamics

IKO Kiteboarder
Level 5 - Evolution

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Topic Presentation
On Day 1, you were asked to prepare a topic(s). This practice session is about experimenting and
learning how to present a topic, as if to a student, but to the group.
Your goals are:

 To show the knowledge you have about the given topic.


 To gain experience and improve your information delivery performance.
Your Examiner will observe and will provide you with feedback on how to improve where
necessary.
Remember:

 Your presentation should not last more than 10 minutes.


 KISS: Keep It Short and Simple… and fun!
 Create interactivity.
The group must listen and take notes on the ‘topic presentation observation chart’ for the
debriefing.

Keep your comments/feedback for the end of the topic.

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Topic Presentation Observation Chart

Instructor Candidate
name:
Topic:

Introduces the topic.

Checks students’
knowledge levels.
Uses eye contact,
keeps students’
attention.
Lets students ask
questions or talk about
the topic.
Asks open questions.

Keeps it simple.

Has good knowledge


about the topic.
Interacts with the
group to trigger
understanding.
Uses demo, white
board, or other
equipment.
Makes a final topic
review with a few key
points.
Makes a good self-
evaluation at the end.

Comments:

Score out of 10

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Instructor Candidate
name:
Topic:

Introduces the topic.

Checks students’
knowledge levels.

Uses eye contact,


keeps students’
attention.
Lets students ask
questions or talk about
the topic.

Asks open questions.

Keeps it simple.

Has good knowledge


about the topic.

Interacts with the


group to trigger
understanding.
Uses demo, white
board, or other
equipment.
Makes a final topic
review with a few key
points.
Makes a good self-
evaluation at the end.

Comments:

Score out of 10

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Examiner Teaching Demonstration 1/2


Your Examiner will demonstrate how to teach a ‘land lesson’ to a beginner student covering the
skills of the IKO Discovery Course. The demo will last approximately 1 hour.

It is a good time to integrate many useful practical tips that will help you to succeed as an Instructor.

Instructor Candidates should observe and take notes. The Examiner may make some mistakes on
purpose to check if the group is observing well, and will tell you what they were in the debriefing.

After the demonstration, the Instructor Candidates and the Examiner will share their feedback in
the debriefing session.

In case there is not enough wind for the demonstration, the Examiner will use the ‘Teaching
Basics Video’ that is available in the eLearning section of your account to make the
demonstration.

It is a good idea to watch this video at home to gain automation for teaching.

Teaching Practice: 1 to 1
It is time to put into practice what you have just observed.

This practice involves simulated and real live teaching situations with a beginner student (simulated
by one of the Instructor Candidates). Your Examiner will assess your performance as part of your
overall practical teaching ability. This part of the ITC gives you the opportunity to put into practice
your teaching skills, as well as observe a lesson. You should exchange constructive feedback and
improvement points throughout this process.

It is recommended that you have a lesson plan prepared in advance.

Organization
The Examiner will divide you into groups of two. One of you will be the Instructor and the other will
act as a beginner student. You will then alternate.
There will be two sessions of 1 hour each.

The Instructor
You must teach your ‘beginner student’ the Level 1 - Discovery Program, following all the steps
outlined in the IKO Lesson Plan. Your Examiner will be observing and giving you helpful tips and
advice when necessary.

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Acting as a Beginner
 You must pretend to be a beginner student.
 Do not give advice or tips to your Instructor.
 Do not be deliberately bad, or uncooperative.
 Try to be a good student.
 Make mental notes for the feedback session after the lesson on anything your Instructor
does well, or things you think could have been done better. Ask yourself, ‘Did the
Instructor…’
- Set clear goals for the student (you) to achieve?
- Use the right equipment and adjustments?
- Let the student ‘do and discover’ or did they always demonstrate?
- Take time to evaluate the results of their teaching?
- Teach safely?
- Make the student independent?
- Keep it simple and fun?

Work as a team and make it a fun experience too.

The Goals of Teaching Practice are to:


 Select, trim and discover the school equipment.
 Practice flying a trainer kite on short lines.
 Follow the steps of the Discovery Program Lesson Plan.
 Communicate clear information to your student. Avoid talking too much!
 Discover and make learning mistakes. It is safe to experiment as the ‘student’ is not a
real beginner student.
 Practice passing/taking the kite to/from your student both on land and in the water.
Experiment with the kite at 9 or 3 o’clock and 11 or 1 o’clock.
 Take time to go into the water with the trainer kite, drop it into the water and relaunch
it. It is different from a kite on long lines.
 Leave the beach cleaner than you found it!

Feedback
After each session, the Examiner will gather the group and debrief. This is an essential time for
you to learn from your teaching experience. The feedback will include:
 Instructors’ self-evaluations.
 Feedback from the students on their Instructor’s performance.
 Feedback from the Examiner offering comments on what you did well, and advice on
where you can improve!

Extra Time for Practice


Depending on the time remaining and wind conditions, the Examiner can decide to give the group
more time to continue with this exercise.

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End of Day 2
Feedback on the Day
It is now time for a recap of the day and to talk about the things you enjoyed and what you had
difficulties with.

Express your thoughts and ask your Examiner questions on anything you would like to know more
about.

Self-Study
Learn together as a group to gather knowledge more effectively and efficiently. Take notes on the
things you do not understand, so you can ask your Examiner tomorrow morning.
Tick the boxes once done, complete all the tasks first and finish with the exam.

 Review the contents of Day 1 and 2.


 If you have not presented your first topic listed on the ‘17 Topic Assignment’, improve it
according to what you have learned today.
 Prepare all your remaining topics listed on the ‘17 Topic Assignment’.
 Do ‘30.2 Homework - complete the Instructor Responsibilities chart’.
 Watch the video ‘Teaching basics’ http://ikointl.com/teaching-basics-video
 Read and study the contents of Day 3.
 Complete the ‘36 Day 2 Exam’.

See you tomorrow relaxed and rested!

Homework must be done. The Examiner will check it. A Candidate who does not do their
homework will not be certified as an Instructor Level 1 at the end of the ITC.

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Day 2 Exam
Answer the following questions.
1. How does an Instructor help students to remember?
 A: Asking them to explain what they did right or not, in their own words, right
after they have done it.
 B: By making a complete theoretical explanation at the end of the course.
 C: By demonstrating the required exercise.
 D: By mentioning each mistake they made and correcting them.
2. What are the 4 steps of learning, in the correct order?
 A: Trial and error, failure, success.
 B: Trial and error, completion, repetition, automation/muscle memory.
 C: Theory, demonstration, trial and error, completion.
 D: Visualization, trial and error, completion, automation/muscle memory.

3. What is the progression of the learning curve?


 A: Always goes up as we practice.
 B: Globally goes up with time, with possible drops of progression over
extended periods of time.
 C: Always goes down.
 D: Goes up and stays at a level according to each person’s potential.

4. Short-term memory IS NOT strengthened when?


 A: The Instructor asks the student to feedback on an exercise right after doing
it.
 B: The student’s progress is only debriefed at the end of the lesson.
 C: The student progresses very fast.
 D: The Instructor asks for feedback and completes or corrects the information
given.
5. Why is ‘trial and error’ a path of learning?
 A: Because it makes students acquire references even when they do not
succeed.
 B: Because not everyone can succeed at the first try.
 C: Trial and error is not a path of learning, students must always succeed if
the Instructor is good.
 D: Because students can try to understand by themselves.

6. In communication, what is a channel?


 A: Information to transmit.
 B: A way used to transmit information.
 C: A context in which one communicates.
 D: Something that disturbs communication.
 E: A message to transmit.
7. In communication what is a noise?
 A: Information to transmit.
 B: A way used to transmit information.
 C: A context in which one communicates.
 D: Something that disturbs communication.
 E: A message to transmit.

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8. What are the 8 Instructor responsibilities


1) 5)
2) 6)
3) 7)
4) 8)

9. What is the best way to behave when students fail?


 A: Congratulate them and ask them to try again whatever the reason for
failure.
 B: Ask their feelings and understanding of the situation and give information
to resolve the part they failed.
 C: Explain again how the exercise should be done.
 D: Demonstrate.
10. Why should Instructors evaluate students before and during the lesson?
 A: To know the time students will need to learn.
 B: To set the right exercises and to know what must be corrected.
 C: To define if students fit with kiteboarding and the center’s spirit.
 D: All of the above.
11. In which direction can a cumulonimbus move?
 A: In any direction.
 B: Only downwind.
 C: Only upwind.
 D: 90 degrees to the wind.
12. What happens in the long term if students do not repeat what they have learned the
previous days?
 A: They forget most of it and have to learn again.
 B: They do not forget anything and are better prepared to continue their
learning.
 C: Nothing changes.
 D: They will be overconfident the next time they try kiteboarding.

13. What are the 8 steps of the IKO’s Teaching Concept?


1) 5)
2) 6)
3) 7)
4) 8)

Score out of 13:

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Day 3

Morning Afternoon

Day 2 Review and Homework Correction Examiner Teaching Demonstration 2/2


Day 3

General Teaching Organization Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real


Students 1/3
IKO Kiteboarder Student Certification
Standards End of Day 3
IKO Member Card
Topic Presentation

Day 2 Review and Homework Correction

 A quick review of Day 2


 The Day 2 Exam.
 The Examiner will check your answers on the ‘30.2 Homework - Complete the Instructor
Responsibilities Chart’.

If you have any questions, this is a good time to ask them.

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General Teaching Organization
This chapter is a quick review of how to prepare, run and debrief a kiteboarding lesson. It will help
you review and remember the most important part of the job you will do.

Resource Assessment
Consider assessing the following before programming a course at any new spot.

 What are the pros and cons of my teaching spot?


 Are there limitations that influence the way you can teach?
 What equipment is available, and how might this help or prevent full teaching of the IKO
Lesson Plan meeting the IKO Standards?
 What teaching aids may I need other than the kites, boards and student equipment to help
the students learn more clearly?
 How would the regular weather and tide patterns of my spot affect my programming?
 Where are most of my students from, are they local people or tourists? How would this
affect the timing and length of my course?

Before Each Lesson


You must always:
 Check the wind and the weather.
 Prepare the Lesson Plan.
 Do a S.E.A. assessment and prepare the spot.
- Be sure that the spot is safe and that there are no dangerous obstacles.
- Prepare flags or zone markers that you will use to define the practice area.
 Check the equipment.
 Prepare the rescue boat or ask the boat driver to get it ready.
- Make sure there is fuel in the tank, that the motor starts and that the kill switch is
working.
- Check that the battery of your mobile phone or radio is fully charged.
- Check the First Aid kit.
 Prepare yourself (equipment, sunscreen, drinking water, etc.)
 Greet your students and make them sign the Student Waiver Form (a standard form is
available in the ‘File’ section of your account). If students are under 18, their parents must
sign it.
 Give a brief description of the day’s lesson and how long it should last.
 Prepare the students for the lesson, give them the right equipment according to their level,
body size and weight, and weather conditions.
 If students have special health conditions, or are not adults, be sure you can teach them
by following the corresponding online eCourses.

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Lesson Plan
It is a good idea to have your visual lesson plan with you while you teach. Consider laminating it
and carrying it with you.

For each lesson you should break down the Kiteboarder Levels into Lesson Plans to be sure to
deliver each skill, especially if you are new to instructing or if it is a new subject area you are about
to teach.
A lesson plan preparation sheet template is provided on the following page as an example.

Group Exercise in Class


In a group, you will choose a specific skill/trick and you will complete the lesson plan on the next
page.

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IKO lesson plan preparation sheet


(complete this before teaching any new skill)

1. What is the goal of the lesson?

2. What needs to be prepared (equipment, spot, etc.)? What are the potential dangers, risks
and problems (refer to the 8 Instructor responsibilities and possible failures)?

3. What are the pre-requirements to this goal? What should the student be able to do before
attempting this goal?

4. What are the key points to teach? Describe the ideal progression and list the exercises
step by step.

5. What are the potential reasons for failure? What to do if the student does not perform the
task after a few attempts?

6. What steps have been taken to manage and avoid these dangers, risks and problems
(give solutions to the issues identified above)?

7. What is the next goal once this goal is achieved

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During the Lesson
You must always:
 Respect the IKO Standards.
 Evaluate your students throughout the lesson.
 Ensure the 8 Instructor responsibilities are always respected:
- Student knowledge
- Student emotional state
- Student physical state
- Student motivation
- Equipment selection
- Equipment trim
- Weather
- Spot

 Always follow the 8 steps of the IKO’s Teaching Concept:


- Evaluation
- Set a goal
- Incentivize and motivate
- Give reference points
- Get student’s feedback (1)
- Observe
- Get student’s feedback (2)
- Correct

 Teach according to the 4 steps of learning:


- Visualization
- Trial and error
- Completion
- Automation

 Adapt the lesson’s rhythm to the student’s failures and abilities. Follow the IKO Lesson
Plan and move to the next step after your students achieve the goal.

By following the previous steps, the correction will be always related to either the kite, the body
and/or the legs.
When a teaching situation does not work, you must assess the reason for failure and change
something.
Teach and entertain! Never forget that kiteboarding is for fun and your students want to enjoy the
experience in safety.
Keep it safe and fun at the same time and leave the beach cleaner than you found it.

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Teach independence!
It is very important for everyone’s safety that your students become independent, They must
quickly become able to:

 Do the S.E.A. assessment.


 Choose and rig the right kite according to the conditions.
 Launch and land with an assistant, and as an assistant.
 Explain to a non-kiter how to help them launch and land.
 Master and know when and how to use the 3 safety steps (under your guidance students
must repeat these steps often in different situations: simulation, on land while flying the
kite, in the water…)
 Self-land.
 Self-rescue.

If one of these skills is not provided to the student, the chance of accidents is greatly increased.

Do not forget to:

 Always be open minded and positive with your students. Explain that Trial and Error is an
important step in the learning process that helps them to understand that failures give
important information on what to do and what not to do.
 Let your students practice as much as possible.
 Act with empathy.

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Too windy, or not windy enough? What can be done?
Learning kiteboarding is not only related to practicing kite flying. Many accidents over the years
have been due to riders not having basic background knowledge in areas like weather, tides,
currents and wind effects from obstacles.
Unsuitable conditions for kite flying are opportunities to teach those topics.

It is critical for your students’ future safety, as well as their enjoyment of the sport, that they have
the required minimum understanding and awareness in the following key areas.

Suggested learning topics Too windy Not windy


Equipment set-up X X
Wind effect: theoretical lesson and observation X X
Use the IKO video for visual complement and learning preparation X X
Explain how to analyze the spot and the wind effects over obstacles X X
Safety systems: set-up & usage X X
Kiteboarder Handbook exercises X X
Body-dragging with short lines X*
Winding the lines in the water X
Self-rescue pack down procedure X
Water start theory X X
Tides and currents theory X X
Flying with short lines X*
Weather and wind theory X X
Wind effects X X
Riding upwind: Theory X X
Jump: Theory X X
Right Of Way rules X X
Different harnesses: Choosing the right one X X
How to: Repair a hole in a bladder X X
How to: Choose a second-hand kite and board X X
How to: Keep a kite in good condition X X

Each one of these topics is a part of the IKO Teaching Program, so you must cover their basics
during your course. More extended learning is done during the IKO Level 4 – Advanced program
which is also included in the Assistant Instructor Training Course Plus.
* As long as the kite with short lines is still underpowered (will not lift the student).

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After Each Lesson
You must always:
 Check the equipment for damage when students pack it down.
 Give feedback, check what was learned and where the students are in their progression
and define the next steps for them.
 Manage your students’ mental state, if necessary.
 Give your students self-study using the Kiteboarder Handbooks and online videos.
 Set the time for the next lesson.
 If it is the end of their training course and your students are leaving your supervision:
- Tell them whether they must continue with another Instructor or if they are now
ready to ride independently.
- Certify them according to the IKO Students Certification Standards. Record it on
their IKO Member Card.
- Ask them about the spot where they will practice to make sure it is suitable, and
suggest an IKO Affiliated Center if possible. In case they are interested in buying
some equipment, take time to explain the different types of boards and kites
available and which size and design would most suit their level, weight and
prevailing wind in their practice area.
 Self-evaluate and make notes to improve your teaching.

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IKO Kiteboarder Student Certification Standards
These Standards are designed to validate a student’s progression together with the IKO Member
Card.

See the full IKO Student Certification Standards online www.ikointl.com/kiteboarder-discovery-


independant-intermediate-course
The Standards are made up of 5 Levels each including a number of different skills. Each Level can
be completed either fully as a unit, or in part during a course. Every course carried out by an IKO
Instructor will follow the IKO Standards, and they will certify the student’s achievements with the
IKO Member Card accordingly.

Level 1 - Discovery
Entry level for this and any IKO course is:
 Waiver form signed,
 12 years old, for younger students, the Instructor must follow the online course ‘teaching
to children’,

Level 2 - Intermediate

Level 3 - Independent
 Minimum level required to sign up for an AITC-Plus

Level 4 - Advanced
 Minimum level required to sign up for an ITC

Level 5 - Evolution
This course is only given by an IKO Coach during an Evolution Course, or a 5-day Evolution Clinic.
It permits kiters to improve their riding skills and become better riders performing freeride, freestyle,
wave riding and hydrofoil.

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Students Certification Standards

Level 1 Discovery Level 3 Independent


S.E.A. (Spot, Environment, Activity) Controlled Stop
Assessment J
Control of Riding Speed by Edging
A Holding, Carrying and Securing a Kite on K Riding Upwind
Land
L Sliding Transitions
Kite Set Up
Toe-Side Riding
Safety Systems Use M
B Toe-Side Turn
Pre-Flight Check
Self-Launching
Launching and Landing as an Assistant
N Self-Rescue and Pack Down in Deep
First Piloting and Explore the Wind Water
C Window's Edge
Level 4 Advanced
Let Go of the Bar
1 Basic Jump
Twist and Untwist the Lines
2 Jibe
Flying One-Handed
3 Jump with Grab
Trim Discovery
4 Rider Recovery
D Walking While Flying the Kite
5 Board Recovery
Launching and Landing as a Pilot
International Kiteboarding Signs and
Wind Window Theory 6 ROW
In flight Quick Release Activation 7 Equipment
E Self-Landing 8 Weather and Tides
Equipment Packing 9 Aerodynamics
Level 2 Intermediate
Enter and Exit the Water While
F Controlling the Kite
Water Relaunch
Side Body-drag with 2 Hands
G Body-drag with Power Stroke on Both
Sides
Body-drag Upwind
H Body-drag with the Board
Self-Rescue and Pack Down Discovery
R.O.W. Rules Introduction
I Steady-pull
Water-start

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IKO Member Card


All IKO Affiliated Centers and
Instructors must provide an IKO
Member Card to every student at the
end of their lessons. It registers their
certification according to the IKO
Standards and keeps track of their
progress. Students can only be certified
according to the level they have
mastered.

IKO Affiliated Centers should ask to see


a card before renting out equipment, or
to check a student’s certified level
before continuing their training.
If students lose their Member Card the
Affiliated Center will be able to find their
level online on the IKO web page, as
long as students have answered the feedback request from the IKO and created an account.
This is linked to the Instructor’s feedback credits. You will only be able to register a student if you
have the credits on your account to do so. If you work in an IKO Affiliated Center, you can use the
Center’s credits (however, the Center must register you first on their school’s profile) if not, you
can buy online in the IKO shop.

An Affiliated Center (or another Instructor) can also transfer credits from their account into yours.
In this case, they must also provide you with the same number of IKO Member Cards.
Thanks to the students you certify and register, you will reach higher levels inside the IKO and be
able to become:

 Instructor Level 2 (35 students, 280 hours and pass the L2 online exam).
 Instructor Level 3 (100 students, 800 hours and pass the L3 online exam).

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How to Certify Your Students
When your students have finished their lessons with you, you must:
1. Validate their level and give them their IKO Member Card (the steps mastered should be
left blank and everything that has not been mastered should be blacked out.)
2. Register the hours and acquired level online via your account in the ‘My Students’ section.
3. Your students will then receive a feedback request for quality control. It is important to
remind them that their level will not be validated online until they send their feedback on
the lesson.

It’s important for you to remember that these feedback will go on your public profile and will be the
best personal advertising when you will be looking for a new job.

Complete the following IKO Member cards:

Martine Smith

Level 2F
Instructor ID: 1234

Center ID: 5678

Jon Colomb
Level 3L

Instructor ID: 4321

The IKO Member Cards are protected by Copyright. Only official and approved IKO Affiliated
Centers and IKO Instructors are allowed to use them.

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Quality Control
Quality control is crucial to maintaining high standards and to keep improving our teaching
methods.

Thanks to students’ feedback, the IKO can check the quality of your lessons. The feedback will be
visible on your profile and affect your ranking.

Instructors who work better will appear higher on the online ranking.

If you see an IKO Member or Affiliated Center not respecting the IKO Standards, please always
complete the ‘Quality Feedback Form’ with as much information as possible from
https://www.ikointl.com/content/quality-assurance-department. This form will always stay
confidential. The Quality Department will check the information but will never reveal your
identity. Only by working together we can ensure that the IKO Standards are maintained and
respected.

Topic Presentation
On Day 1, you were asked to prepare a topic(s). This practice session is about experimenting and
learning how to present a topic, as if to a student, but to the group.
Your goals are:

 To show the knowledge you have about the given topic.


 To gain experience and improve your information delivery performance.

Your Examiner will observe and will provide you with feedback on how to improve where
necessary.

Remember:
 Your presentation should not last more than 10 minutes.
 KISS: Keep It Short and Simple… and fun!
 Create interactivity.
The group must listen and take notes on the ‘topic presentation observation chart’ for the
debriefing.

Keep your comments/feedback for the end of the topic.

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Topic Presentation Observation Chart
Instructor Candidate
name:
Topic:

Introduces the topic.

Checks students’
knowledge levels.
Uses eye contact,
keeps students’
attention.
Lets students ask
questions or talk
about the topic.
Asks open questions.

Keeps it simple.

Has good knowledge


about the topic.
Interacts with the
group to trigger
understanding.
Uses demo, white
board, or other
equipment.
Makes a final topic
review with a few key
points.
Makes a good self-
evaluation at the end.

Comments:

Score out of 10

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Instructor Candidate
name:
Topic:

Introduces the topic.

Checks students’
knowledge levels.

Uses eye contact,


keeps students’
attention.
Lets students ask
questions or talk about
the topic.

Asks open questions.

Keeps it simple.

Has good knowledge


about the topic.

Interacts with the


group to trigger
understanding.
Uses demo, white
board, or other
equipment.
Makes a final topic
review with a few key
points.
Makes a good self-
evaluation at the end.

Comments:

Score out of 10

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Examiner Teaching Demonstration 2/2
Your Examiner will now demonstrate how to teach a ‘water lesson’ to a beginner student covering
the skills of the IKO Intermediate Course.

The demonstration will include how to teach the self-rescue, body-dragging, steady-pull and water-
start using a trainer kite.
Instructor Candidates should observe and take notes. The Examiner may make some mistakes on
purpose to check if the group is observing well, and will tell you what they were in the debriefing.

After the demonstration, the Instructor Candidates and the Examiner will share their feedback in
the debriefing session.

Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real Students 1/3


It is time to put into practice what you have learned and observed today and yesterday with real
students.
You will work in pairs with real beginners who have no previous kiting experience. Their success
and safety depend on you. You will start their training today and continue tomorrow and the next
day, to get them as far as possible in their progression towards independence.
This is not a race between Instructor Candidates as some students may learn faster than others
according to their experience and personal abilities.

Start and finish on time within the guidelines set by the Examiner.

Lesson Preparation
 Make sure you arrive at the teaching spot early.
 Prepare the equipment.
 Prepare yourself and get ready to teach and observe. (Personal needs, clothing, harness
with line cutter and leash…).

Instructor Directives
 Safety first - keep the student safe at all costs.
 If you need it, ask your Examiner for guidance and assistance.
 Follow the IKO Lesson Plan.
 Adapt the rhythm to the student’s progress and failure.
 Teach all aspects of kiteboarding so your student can become independent.
 Be open minded and positive.
 Leave the beach cleaner than you found it and teach your student(s) to do the same.
 Wear a helmet.
 Be a good role model.

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Observer Directives
 Look, listen and take notes using the ‘live teaching observation chart’.
 Observation starts 10 minutes before the student arrives at the school.
 Stay close enough to the lesson to hear everything, but not too close that you make the
Instructor or student nervous.
 Do not interact with the student or Instructor unless there is a safety issue and/or
someone is in danger. In this situation, stop the lesson and call the Examiner for a debrief.
 During the debriefing, stay professional by offering constructive criticism.
 Stay focused on the lesson, the Examiner will also grade your attitude.
 Leave the beach cleaner than you found it.

The observer’s task results are evaluated and taken into consideration by the Examiner for your
final evaluation.

The observer’s job is as important as the Instructor’s during the ITC.

Live Teaching Observation Chart


To be completed by the observer during each teaching session.

During and after the teaching session answer these questions:


‘Did the Instructor?’

 Set clear goals for the student to achieve?


 Communicate clearly with the student and ask for feedback regularly?
 Were they able to trim the kite properly?
 Follow the Lesson Plan?
 Let the student do and discover or did they always demonstrate?
 Take time to evaluate the results of their teaching?
 Promote all the safety aspects of kiteboarding?
 Etc.

Feedback
After each session, the Examiner will gather the group for feedback.

1. The Instructors will self-evaluate.


2. The Observers share their notes and give feedback.
3. The Examiner assesses the Instructors’ and Observers’ actions and gives tips for the next
session.

After session 1, session 2 will start with the roles exchanged.

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Live teaching observation chart

Instructor name: Steps of the lesson:

Student name:

Positive points: Constructive points:

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End of Day 3
Feedback on the Day
It is now time for a recap of the day and to talk about the things you enjoyed and what you had
difficulties with.

Express your thoughts and ask your Examiner questions on anything you would like to know more
about.

Self-Study
Learn together as a group to gather knowledge more effectively and efficiently. Take notes on the
things you do not understand, so you can ask your Examiner tomorrow morning.

Tick the boxes once done, complete all the tasks first and finish with the exam.
 Review the contents of Day 1, 2 and 3.
 Complete the ‘47 Instructor Candidate self-evaluation chart 2/3’.
 Improve the remaining topic you have to prepare ‘17 Topic Assignment’.
 Complete the ‘46 Day 3 Exam’.

See you tomorrow relaxed and rested!

Homework must be done. The Examiner will check it. A Candidate who does not do their
homework will not be certified as an Instructor Level 1 at the end of the ITC.

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Day 3 Exam
Answer the following questions.
1. At which point of their progression is your student able to launch a kite that can generate
power on land?
 A: Never give a kite with power to a student until they get in the water.
 B: Never give a kite with power to a student until they are hooked into the harness.
 C: Never give a kite with power to a student who is learning how to fly a kite.
 D: Never give a kite with power to a student who does not know how to use the safety
systems, and has not shown good flying abilities in all parts of the wind window.
2. How do you verbally evaluate your students?
 A: By asking ‘open questions’ and listening to the students’ answers.
 B: By telling them what to do and demonstrating.
 C: By giving 80% compliments to 20% criticism.
 D: By asking several questions that can be answered by ‘yes’ or ‘no’ related to what
you want to evaluate.

3. A student shows up for a lesson smelling strongly of alcohol and is slightly slurring their
words, what do you do?
 A: Teach them anyway adapting the lesson according to the situation. Using a smaller
kite and shorter lines to lower the risks.
 B: Ask them if they think they can take the lesson, and make them sign a special
waiver form.
 C: Simply cancel the lesson.
 D: Reschedule the lesson and explain that it is unsafe for them to take a lesson in this
condition.

4. What is a possible reason for the kite falling backward in the wind window and what
solutions could you provide?

 A: The kite could be over sheeted, so tell the student to sheet out. The back lines
could be too short, so you have to pull the trim strap to shorten the front lines.
 B: The kite could be under sheeted, so tell the student to sheet in. The backlines could
be too long, so you have to release the trim strap to lengthen the front lines.
 C: The kite sinks back in the window because the wind got stronger, so you should
depower the kite.
 D: The kite falls back in the window because the wind got lighter, so you should power
up the kite.

5. Which example does NOT describe the importance of the IKO Standards?
 A: They set the necessary qualifications for a professional Instructor.
 B: They encourage creative and spontaneous teaching techniques.
 C: They give quality and level achievement criteria to the students.
 D: They give credibility to the Instructors operating under the IKO logo.

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6. Which of the following signs shows that your students are bored and/or are losing
motivation?

 A: They are looking around.


 B: They are asking lots of questions.
 C: They are happy and making jokes.

7. What are the 8 steps of the IKO’s Teaching Concept?

 A: Motivation, give reference points, get student’s feedback, self-evaluate, observe,


correct, validate, certificate.
 B: Evaluate, set a goal, incentivize and motivate, give reference points, get student’s
feedback (1), observe, get student’s feedback (2), correct.
 C: Evaluation, cooperation, incentive and motivation, reference points, get student’s
evaluation (1), observe, get student’s evaluation (2), certification.
 D: Discovery, incentive and motivation, discussion, evaluation, completion, repetition,
observation, correction.
8. What is the minimum number of hours a Level 1 Instructor must log to be eligible to become
a Level 2 Instructor?
 A: 100 hours.
 B: 150 hours.
 C: 200 hours.
 D: 280 hours.
9. How many students does a Level 1 Instructor need to log to become a Level 2?

 A: 20 students.
 B: 25 students.
 C: 35 students.
 D: 40 students.

10. What is the safest distance between students (one being upwind of the other) in the
practice zone?

 A: 3 kite line lengths.


 B: 50 meters.
 C: 30 meters.
 D: 2 kite line lengths.
11. What is the drop zone?
 A: The zone where a rider drops after a jump.
 B: It is everywhere underneath the wind window.
 C: It is everywhere underneath the wind window + the size of the kite leash in
extension.
 D: It is everywhere underneath the wind window + the size of the kite leash in extension
+ the size of the kite span.

12. According to the IKO Standards, what is the minimum buoyancy a buoyancy aid must
have?
 A: 25 Newton.
 B: 50 Newton.
 C: 100 Newton.
 D: 150 Newton. Score out of 12

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Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation Chart 2/3
(Refer to Point 5.9 Evaluation Chart Scoring References)

My self-
Evaluation Score to
Sub-categories Instructor validation criteria pass
evaluation out
of 10 points

Instructor
responsibilities Knows and applies the 8 Instructor responsibilities. 8/10

Instructor and
student directives Knows and applies Instructor and student directives. 8/10

Prepared a lesson plan before teaching. Checked the weather and equipment
before students arrive. Candidate has their personal equipment ready before the
Lesson preparation lesson. 7/10

Lesson practical Follows the lesson plan. Adapts to students’ progress and failures. 8/10

Teaching skills Uses the IKO teaching principles (IKO’s 8 steps Teaching Concept). 8/10

Is able to communicate professionally with a positive attitude. Can handle


stress, and a long working day. Can empathize and deal efficiently with difficult
Emotional situations. Candidates who show emotional/attitude issues during the ITC may
competence fail the course and may not be allowed any further access to future ITCs. 8/10

Students’ Receives a positive feedback from their student(s). 8/10

Interacts with fellow Instructor Candidates, students, the ITC organizer and
Interactivity Examiner during the ITC in an open minded and positive way. 7/10

Self-evaluates fairly according to their performance. The Examiner will


constantly ask for self-evaluation and will check each Instructor Candidate’s
Self-evaluation self-evaluation chart 1/3, 2/3 and 3/3 to evaluate it. 8/10

Written exam Has passed the Day 5 written exam with a minimum score of 70%. 7/10

Assistant Instructor
online exam Has passed the online exam with a minimum score of 70%. 7/10

Homework Has completed all the daily homework tasks. 9/10

Is able to demonstrate all the IKO Level 4 - Advanced skills in any suitable wind
Riding level conditions of the spot (according to the Examiner’s criteria) between 10 and 30kn. 8/10

Can assess and manage the environment according to other beach users and
Environment the spot’s individual characteristics. Does S.E.A. before each session. 8/10

Environment caring Has shown nature caring behavior and left the beach cleaner than he found it. 10/10

Chooses appropriate size, line lengths for teaching and takes care of the
Equipment equipment. 8/10

Is able to trim and fly a school kite (short/long lines) properly in any wind
Equipment trim conditions. 7/10

Keeps students safe, teaches safety aspects of kiteboarding (safety system use,
Student safety safety procedure). Makes the students independent. 10/10

The Candidate can recover a student and their kite in deep water, from a
Boat safety powerboat driven by a licensed pilot. 7/10

Shows safe behavior while riding. Respects ROW. Uses kite leash, helmet and
Personal safety buoyancy aid. 10/10

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Day 4

Morning Afternoon
Day 4

Day 3 Review and Homework Correction Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real
Students 2/3
Topic Presentation
End of Day 4

Day 3 Review and Homework Correction

 A quick review of Day 3


 The Day 3 Exam.
 The Examiner will check your self-evaluation chart 2/3.

If you have any questions, this is a good time to ask them.

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Topic Presentation
On Day 1, you were asked to prepare a topic(s). This practice session is about experimenting and
learning how to present a topic, as if to a student, but to the group.

Your goals are:

 To show the knowledge you have about the given topic.


 To gain experience and improve your information delivery performance.

Your Examiner will observe and will provide you with feedback on how to improve where
necessary.
Remember:

 Your presentation should not last more than 10 minutes.


 KISS: Keep It Short and Simple… and fun!
 Create interactivity.

The group must listen and take notes on the ‘topic presentation observation chart’ for the
debriefing.

Keep your comments/feedback for the end of the topic.

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Topic Presentation Observation Chart


Instructor Candidate
name:
Topic:

Introduces the topic.

Checks students’
knowledge levels.
Uses eye contact,
keeps students’
attention.
Lets students ask
questions or talk about
the topic.
Asks open questions.

Keeps it simple.

Has good knowledge


about the topic.
Interacts with the
group to trigger
understanding.
Uses demo, white
board, or other
equipment.
Makes a final topic
review with a few key
points.
Makes a good self-
evaluation at the end.

Comments:

Score out of 10

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Instructor Candidate
name:
Topic:

Introduces the topic.

Checks students’
knowledge levels.

Uses eye contact,


keeps students’
attention.
Lets students ask
questions or talk about
the topic.

Asks open questions.

Keeps it simple.

Has good knowledge


about the topic.

Interacts with the


group to trigger
understanding.
Uses demo, white
board, or other
equipment.
Makes a final topic
review with a few key
points.
Makes a good self-
evaluation at the end.

Comments:

Score out of 10

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Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real Students 2/3


You will continue yesterday’s experience with the same students if they are available, if they are
not, you will teach to new students.

The groups may change or stay the same depending on the Examiner’s criteria. The goal is to
continue the students’ progression toward independence.

Start and finish on time. Everyone should start at the same time, within the guidelines set by your
Examiner.

Live teaching observation chart

Instructor name: Steps of the lesson:

Student name:

Positive points: Constructive points:

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End of Day 4
Feedback on the Day
It is now time for a recap of the day and to talk about the things you enjoyed and what you had
difficulties with.

Express your thoughts and ask your Examiner questions on anything you would like to know more
about.

Self-Study
Learn together as a group to gather knowledge more effectively and efficiently. Take notes on the
things you do not understand, so you can ask your Examiner tomorrow morning.
Complete the ‘53 Day 4 Exam’ on the following pages. Review all the contents of the Instructor
Manual and AITC-Plus Manual to get ready for the written exam.
You will have 2 hours to complete the written exam, and will have to score over 70% to pass it.
This Exam has no ‘surprises’ everything has been covered during the ITC.

See you tomorrow relaxed and rested for the last day of your ITC.

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Day 4 Exam
Answer the following questions.
1. If two kiters want to catch the same wave, who has the right of way?
 A: The downwind kiter.
 B: The kiter on starboard tack.
 C: The kiter on port tack.
 D: The first kiter riding the wave.

2. When a boat (B) overtakes another boat (A), which is the INCORRECT action?
 A: Boat B can pass both sides and stays clear of A.
 B: Boat A must changes direction.
 C: Boat B can only pass to starboard while boat A moves to port.
 D: Boat A maintains speed.

3. Weather and wind changes can be anticipated with a barometer.


 A: True
 B: False

4. What do isobars represent on a weather map?


 A: Pressure.
 B: Location.
 C: Wind.
 D: Rain.
 E: Temperature.

5. What is the name of this knot? (Do you know


how to do it?)
 A: Round turn and two half hitches.
 B: Bowline.
 C: Sheet bend.
 D: Clove hitch.
 E: Cleating off.
 F: Sheep shank.
6. What do you do if the beach you are landing on is overcrowded with people?
 A: Land your kite in the water using the self-landing technique.
 B: Wait for the people to leave before landing.
 C: Go on the beach, pilot the kite to 12 o’clock and pull the quick release.
 D: Land the kite on the people, they will move.

7. What is the starboard tack?


 A: Riding away from the beach.
 B: Riding with the kite on the right hand side of the wind window.
 C: Riding with the kite on the left hand side of the wind window.
 D: The give way side.

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8. When two vessels meet, which is the correct action?


 A: Both maintain their course.
 B: The fastest must give way.
 C: Both pass starboard to starboard.
 D: Both pass port to port.

9. When should a sailing boat give way to a powerboat?


 A: When the powerboat is displaying a ‘diver below’ flag.
 B: When the powerboat is towing.
 C: When the powerboat is doing a rescue.
 D: All of the above.
10. What are the 8 Instructor Responsibilities?
 A: Student’s physical ability, student’s emotional stress, student’s physical aptitude,
student’s motivation, Instructor’s ability to teach theory, equipment design, equipment
trim, weather assessment.
 B: Student’s knowledge, student’s learning ability, student’s physical stress, student’s
attitude, student’s patience, equipment selection, equipment design, weather
condition.
 C: Student’s knowledge, student’s emotional state, student’s physical state, student’s
motivation, equipment selection, equipment trim, weather, spot.
 D: Student’s knowledge, student’s emotional state, student’s physical ability, student’s
motivation, equipment condition, equipment trim, weather, user groups.
11. When is self-launching taught to students?
 A: During the Discovery Course.
 B: During the Intermediate Course.
 C: During the Independent Course.
 D: During the Advanced Course.

12. When is the self-rescue taught to students?


 A: During the Discovery Course.
 B: During the Intermediate Course.
 C: During the Independent Course.
 D: During the Advanced Course.

13. When is self-landing taught to students?


 A: During the Discovery Course.
 B: During the Intermediate Course.
 C: During the Independent Course.
 D: During the Advanced Course.

Score out of 13:

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Day 5

Morning Afternoon
Day 5

Day 4 Review and Homework Correction Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real
Students 3/3
Topic Presentation
End of the ITC and Final Evaluation
Written Exam

Day 4 Review and Homework Correction


The day will start with a quick review of Day 4 and the correction of the Day 4 Exam.

If you have any questions, this is a good time to ask them.

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Topic Presentation
If some topics have not been presented yet, they will be done this morning before the Exam.

Written Exam
Before the Exam starts, you must complete the last self-evaluation chart on the next page (only
complete the column ‘My self-evaluation’) and give it to your Examiner.
Your Examiner will now hand out your exam. All Instructor Manuals, Handbooks, laptops, tablets
and smartphones should now be put away. You have 2 hours to complete the Exam.

You need to score 70% or higher to pass.

Teaching Practice as Instructor with Real Students 3/3


This will be the last teaching session of the ITC, following the pattern of Day 3 and 4.

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Live teaching observation chart

Instructor name: Steps of the lesson:

Student name:

Positive points: Constructive points:

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End of the ITC and Final Evaluation


Feedback on the ITC
The Examiner will gather the group and ask your feedback about the ITC. Please be open minded
even if it is not 100% positive. It will not change the result of your final evaluation and might be
very helpful for the ITC Organizer, the Examiner and the IKO in order to make improvements for
the future.

Final Evaluation
You will have a 10 minute one-on-one meeting with your Examiner.

During this time, the Examiner will review your ITC self-evaluation with you, present their own
overall evaluation, give you the results of your Exam and give the final results of your ITC.

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Instructor Candidate Self-Evaluation Chart 3/3 and Final


Evaluation Chart
(Refer to Point 5.9 Evaluation Chart Scoring References)

Examiner
Evaluation Score My self-
Sub-categories Instructor validation criteria to pass evaluation
Final
Evaluation

Instructor
responsibilities Knows and applies the 8 Instructor responsibilities. 8/10

Instructor and student


directives Knows and applies Instructor and student directives. 8/10

Prepared a lesson plan before teaching. Checked the weather and


equipment before students arrive. Candidate has their personal
Lesson preparation equipment ready before the lesson. 7/10

Lesson practical Follows the lesson plan. Adapts to students’ progress and failures. 8/10

Teaching skills Uses the IKO teaching principles (IKO’s 8 steps Teaching Concept). 8/10

Is able to communicate professionally with a positive attitude. Can


handle stress, and a long working day. Can empathize and deal
efficiently with difficult situations. Candidates who show
Emotional emotional/attitude issues during the ITC may fail the course and may
competence not be allowed any further access to future ITCs. 8/10

Students’ satisfaction Receives a positive feedback from their student(s). 8/10

Interacts with fellow Instructor Candidates, students, the ITC


organizer and Examiner during the ITC in an open minded and
Interactivity positive way. 7/10

Self-evaluates fairly according to their performance. The Examiner


will constantly ask for self-evaluation and will check each Instructor
Self-evaluation Candidate’s self-evaluation chart 1/3, 2/3 and 3/3 to evaluate it. 8/10

Written exam Has passed the Day 5 written exam with a minimum score of 70%. 7/10

Assistant Instructor Has passed the online exam with a minimum score of 70%. 7/10

Homework Has completed all the daily homework tasks. 9/10

Is able to demonstrate all the IKO Level 4 - Advanced skills in any


suitable wind conditions of the spot (according to the Examiner’s
Riding level criteria) between 10 and 30kn. 8/10

Can assess and manage the environment according to other beach


users and the spot’s individual characteristics. Does S.E.A. before
Environment each session. 8/10

Has shown nature caring behavior and left the beach cleaner than he
Environment caring found it. 10/10

Chooses appropriate size, line lengths for teaching and takes care of
Equipment the equipment. 8/10

Is able to trim and fly a school kite (short/long lines) properly in any wind
Equipment trim conditions. 7/10

Keeps students safe, teaches safety aspects of kiteboarding (safety


Student safety system use, safety procedure). Makes the students independent. 10/10

The Candidate can recover a student and their kite in deep water,
Boat safety from a powerboat driven by a licensed pilot. 7/10

Shows safe behavior while riding. Respects ROW. Uses kite leash,
Personal safety helmet and buoyancy aid. 10/10

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Instructor Candidate’s final result for the ITC

Candidate surname: Name: ID

*Needs to improve specifics skills during an

*Blacken the incorrect solution. Keep


ITC Location: Internship.

in white the other one.


Date: / / Due date (6 months from now): / /
Examiner Name:

ID:
*Is certified as IKO Instructor.
Examiner signature and stamp:

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If you are Certified


If you have all the ITC pre-requisites and you have been validated in all the sub-categories of the
Instructor Candidate Final Evaluation Chart, your Examiner will certify you as an IKO Instructor
Level 1. Congratulations!

However, to finalize your certification and make it valid, the last step is to complete the feedback
request that will be sent to the email linked to your IKO account. If you do not do this, your IKO
Instructor Level 1 certification will remain ‘pending’.

This allows the IKO to maintain quality standards.

You will be qualified to work as an IKO Instructor. Be sure you always know and respect the IKO
Standards and keep in mind the following:

 While you are an Instructor Level 1, you can only teach a maximum of 2 students with 1 kite
at the same time.
 To become Instructor Level 2, you must log your students and teaching hours (35 students
and 280 hours) in your IKO online account using the certification credits that you can buy
from the shop. If you are registered in the school team of an IKO Affiliated Center, then you
can use the school credits and the certification will appear both on your profile and the
school’s profile. You must also pass the Level 2 Online Exam.
 Do not forget to renew your membership each year to keep your IKO Instructor Certification
valid. You will receive reminders in your profile and email.

If you are Not Certified


If you do not have all the ITC pre-requisites and/or you have not been validated in all the sub-
categories of the Instructor Candidate Final Evaluation Chart, your Examiner will not certify you
yet, but do not worry; you will still be able to get your IKO Instructor Level 1 Certification.

Your Examiner will complete the Instructor Candidate Internship Goal and Achievement form on
the following pages. This is a record of what you must achieve to get your IKO Instructor Level 1
Certification.

Your certification will be set as ‘pending’ in your profile. From there, you will be able to check at
any time the missing requirements to get your certification.

 You will have to do some requirements, such as extra teaching practice or training, during
an Internship, along with an Internship Manager.
 Other requirements may need you to provide documents or videos, which you will need to
upload on your profile.

To finalize your certification and make it valid, you also need to complete the feedback request
that will be sent to the email linked to your IKO account. If you do not do this, your IKO Instructor
Level 1 certification will remain ‘pending’.

This is very important as it allows the IKO to maintain quality standards.

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The Internship
Internship means that you will teach a certain number of hours under the direct supervision of an
IKO Internship Manager. Your Internship Manager will log your Internship hours on their account
along with the Kiteboarder certification of the student you have taught.

Once the Internship Manager has logged the requested amount of Internship hours, and if you
comply with all the other requisites, you will be automatically certified as an IKO Instructor Level 1.

You have 6 months from the end of your ITC to complete the Internship. If for any reason you are
not able to do it in time, please do not hesitate to contact the IKO Head Office at
office@ikointl.com prior to the due date in order to request an extension.

For more information about the Internship, please read the Internship Guide that you can
download directly from the ‘File’ section of your account.

Special Cases:
The conditions did not allow the ITC teaching practice to be fully completed
During an ITC, Instructor Candidates must teach at least 10 hours (including 2 hours of Examiner
demonstration, 2 hours of 1-to-1 teaching practice and 6 hours being both Instructor and
Observer). If it cannot be done due to wind conditions, you will have to complete 20 hours of
Internship to be certified.

The conditions did not allow the ITC riding test to be completed
In this case, Instructor Candidates must upload a video of the missing skills to their account profile.
Candidates must be easily recognizable and wearing the correct safety equipment. Once the
Examiner has checked it, they will certify you (as long as there are no other missing requisites). It
is also possible to show your Examiner a video made before the ITC, but to be valid all the skills
must be shown.

You fail the ITC riding test


In this case, you will also have to upload a video of the missing skills to your account profile for the
Examiner to check. You may also be asked to complete an Internship of 20 hours or more, however
it is not mandatory for the Examiner to give these hours. It depends on the mistake you made
during the Evaluation. If related to safety, Internship must be given. If related to a jump not
performed well, for example, only practice is advised, and a video must be sent to prove it.

You fail the written exam


You will automatically receive 20 Internship hours and must study both the Assistant Instructor and
Instructor Manuals. Then you can retake the Exam with an Examiner (can be done verbally on
Skype). If you fail the Exam a second time, you must attend another ITC.

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You do not have First Aid and CPR certification by the end of the ITC
You must pass a First Aid and CPR course and upload the certificate to your profile. No online
courses are accepted.

The Internship Manager thinks a Candidate is still not ready to become


Instructor Level 1 at the end of an Internship
The Internship Manager must consult the Examiner and explain their reasons. The Examiner can
extend the Internship time until the Candidate reaches the required level.

What happens if Candidates fail the course?


It is possible to fail the course. Candidates must wait 12 months before taking another ITC.
Candidates who fail the ITC because of personality issues or lack of ability/willingness to follow
safety procedures will not be allowed to attend another ITC. In all cases, the final decision lies
with the IKO Training Department, taking into consideration the Examiner’s reasons, the
feedback of the Candidates themselves, and the ITC Organizer’s feedback.

Instructor Candidate Internship Goal and Achievement Form


How to use this form:

1. The Examiner will complete this form if Candidates are not validated in one or more of the
sub categories on the Instructor Candidate Final Evaluation Chart.
2. The Examiner will complete the sections the Instructor Candidate failed to achieve during
the ITC, with the number of Internship hours required, as well as other requirements. Eg.
‘needs to produce valid First Aid and CPR certification’, ‘must send a video demonstrating
the following riding skills’, etc.
3. The Instructor Candidates will give this form to their Internship Manager who will use it as
a reference for the Internship.
4. At the end of each kiteboarding course, the Internship Manager is responsible for certifying
the student and applying the Internship hours to the Instructor Candidate.
5. Once Internship hours are completed and correctly logged on the IKO website, Instructor
Candidates will automatically receive their certification if all other requirements are
completed.
6. If the Internship Manager thinks that additional Internship hours should be given to the
candidate, they must contact the Examiner explaining the reason. The Examiner will make
the decision along with the IKO Training Department if necessary.

For more information on Internships, please download the Internship guide from the ‘File’ section
of your account.

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Evaluation Number

Sub-categories
of hours
to achieve
Internship goals
Instructor
responsibilities

Instructor and student


directives

Lesson preparation

Lesson practical

Teaching skills

Emotional competence

Students’ satisfaction

Interactivity

Self-evaluation

Written exam

Assistant Instructor
online exam

Homework

Riding level

Environment

Environment caring

Equipment

Equipment trim

Student safety

Boat safety

Personal safety

Documents/video to be provided by
the Candidate:

Total of hours (Minimum 20h):

Candidate’s name, surname and ID: Due date (6months Examiner name, signature and stamp: ITC location:
after ITC):

__ / __ / ____

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Appendix A: Complete IKO Discovery Course Lesson Plan

Appendix A: Complete IKO Discovery Course Lesson Plan


You will find examples of exercises and important key points in this detailed lesson plan. All these
skills must be taught to a beginner to make him an independent rider. However the order of the
steps may vary slightly depending on the spot configuration, wind conditions, etc…
For more detailed explanation use the Kiteboarder Handbooks in the eLearning section.

General guide to teaching:

- Always use a trainer kite with short lines (a kite that cannot generate enough force to pull or
unbalance its pilot. It can be an inflatable, of foil design, or have 2 or 4 lines).
- Learn your student’s name as soon as you meet him and use it every time you want to get
his attention.
- Demonstrate proper procedures (as you expect the student to perform them).
- Do not speak too much but just enough to provide the student with enough information to
reach the goal.
- Take control of the kite to transmit information to your student most effectively.
- Use references such as “towards the sky,” “towards the sea," rather than up and down or
right and left to make visual references easier to understand.
- Ask questions that lead your student to think about the right answer rather than giving them
all the answers.
- Set small progression steps (follow the lesson plan).
- Make your student independent: Let him do as much as possible. Avoid over- demonstrating.
- Remember the 3 Cs: Check, Compliment, Correct.
- Focus on your student safety: always observe him, others and the weather.
- Take short breaks often.

Before the Lesson Starts


▪ Check the weather forecast and make the S.E.A. assessment.
▪ If you know the student, prepare all of the equipment necessary to fit his size, weight
and ensure it is appropriate for the weather conditions before he arrives. Ask for your
supervisor’s (Level 2 or above) confirmation on the equipment you have chosen.
▪ Be ready (personal equipment, sunscreen, etc…) prior to your students arrival.

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1/ First Contact with the Student


The first impression is very important! Be professional, have a positive attitude and be a good role
model!

 Introduce yourself. Ask your students for their names (and remember them!) as well as a
little about themselves!
 Remain calm and smile! Your students may be stressed or insecure... Help them feel at
ease before the lesson.
 Act with empathy*.
*Empathy is the capacity to understand what another person is experiencing from within the other
person’s frame of reference.

Be sure that students:

 Have signed the waiver form.


 Have eaten and drank plenty of water.
 Are not under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
 Are wearing appropriate attire for the day and the conditions.
For example, a wet suit, booties, sunglasses and/or sunscreen
if necessary
 Are wearing all of his personal equipment: helmet, harness with
a handle and has a kite leash with a quick release.

Equipment pick up:


Help the student to carry the equipment, introduce the name of equipment provided (kite, pump,
harness, bar, leash, helmet)

To be accessible in any situation; the student’s kite leash anchor point must be attached on
spreader bar area (side, middle).

The kite leash should never be on the back of the harness.

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2/ Course Introduction
Ask your students questions first to evaluate their level:

 Do you have any kite flying experience?


 Do you practice any board or air sport? (to define if they can
transfer knowledge and use other sports as a reference
when explaining things)
 Do you feel comfortable and can you swim in deep water?
 Do you know upwind and downwind terms?

The Instructor Level 2 sets the objectives for the lesson.

Notes:

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3/ S.E.A. Assessment
Each spot has a different configuration; therefore it is necessary to evaluate in order to minimize
the risks. The S.E.A. assessment is an easy reminder to be sure you do not forget any aspect
while assessing your spot.

Each kiter must be taught to do a S.E.A assessment before any kite session.

S = Spot: E = Environment: A = Activity:


 Upwind and Downwind  The weather?  How does your activity
dangers? interact with people and
 Wind strength and other activities around you?
 Wind obstacles and orientation? (Land and water traffic:
surface dangers? learn, anticipate and apply
 Tide?
 Are there rocks, sharp sea and land right of way
objects, or slippery or  Currents? rules.)
rough surfaces on the
beach?

 Are there obstacles, such


as walls, rock piles, trees,
cars, or boats impeding
your kiting?

The students do the S.E.A. assessment. Ask them open questions to orientate themselves. For
example:
 What is the wind direction today?
 Do you think it is a safe wind orientation? Why? How did you figure it out?
 Do you think it is a good day for kiteboarding?
 Are there any danger in this spot?
 Are there other beach users to take care of?
 Is there a no-go zone where kiteboarding is forbidden/dangerous?
 Etc.

Let them make mistakes. Guide them to find the right answer and only correct them if
necessary.

Determining the wind direction


As an exercise ask the students to:
‘Close your eyes and turn until you feel the wind equally on both ears. Now you know exactly the
wind direction as you face it.

The direction you are looking at is called ‘upwind,’ what is at your back is called ‘downwind.’ This
is relative to the observer (you in this case).
You can also look for flags, trees, leaves, smoke, and anything else that can give you clues about
the wind.

Do not use clouds to determine the wind direction as high-level clouds can move in the opposite
direction of the wind you feel on land.

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Wind orientation
Explain to your student that the wind directions have different names (relative to the shore).

 Side-shore wind: Wind is blowing parallel to the beach from one side or the other of the sea.
 Side-on-shore wind: Wind is blowing from the sea towards the land, from one side.
 On-shore wind: Wind is blowing from the water and is pushing you directly to the beach.
 Off-shore wind: Wind is blowing from the land to the water and is pushing you away from the
land.
 Side-off-shore wind: Wind is blowing from the land towards sea from one side and is pushing
you away from the land.
Safest wind directions: Side and side-on-
shore are the safest wind directions for
kiteboarding because it is easy to get away
from the shore, you have plenty of water
downwind and you can come back to the
beach with ease.

Hazardous wind directions: On-shore


winds make it difficult to get away from the
shore, while off-shore and side-off-shore
winds push you away from the beach and
make self-rescue impossible. These winds
are dangerous and should only be
Ask the students where the safest place would be attempted if you have boat rescue.
to set up their kite for launching and flying it.

Correct if necessary.

4/ Student Inflates the Kite


 Position the kite:
 One-pump system: Leading Edge (L.E.) facing the
wind.
 Standard inflation: L.E. parallel to the wind, with
sand on the upwind tip. First inflate the struts, then
turn the kite, put the L.E. in front of the wind and
pump it.
 Always have the wind at your back and use your legs
and/or arms (back stays straight) to go up and down
while pumping.
 Always connect the pump leash to the center of the L.E.
before pumping the L.E.

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5/ Holding and Carrying the Kite on Land


 Always stay upwind of the kite and keep the L.E. facing the
wind.
 Hold the kite by the center of the L.E.
 While walking, the kite is in the ‘smiling’ position. (Tips
toward the sky)

6/ Kite Handling to Secure It (for Set-Up and for ‘After


Landing’)
1/ Flip the kite over

2/ Secure the kite using sand or sand bag (even in light wind conditions)

 Put a large amount of sand (enough so that the canopy touches the ground where you put
the sand) on the extrados once the kite is parked to be sure it does not move.
 While a kite is parked, watch for changes in wind direction.

7/ Unwind the Lines


Explain to the students how to put the front lines (or power lines)
between their legs and the back lines (or sidelines or steering lines)
on each side of their body and how to use one finger to separate the
front lines.

Let the students try it and assist if necessary.

Explain and demonstrate how the front lines connect to the leading
edge bridles while the back lines connect to the kite tips. Show color-
coding if applicable.

Do not connect the lines yet to the kite to avoid any risks during the following simulations.

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8/ Connecting to the Bar / Simulating Flying a 4 Line Kite and Kite Power Control
Always respect the following order even for the simulation:

The pilot:

1. Pre-flight checks the kite and lines before connecting.


2. Connects the kite leash to the safety line.
3. Hooks into the chicken loop and secures it to the spreader bar using the chicken loop
finger.
4. Grabs the bar and checks that the lines are not twisted.

If the school has a simulator (bar with pulley setting), this can be used instead.

Once the student is connected, the Assistant Instructor takes the 4


lines and puts tension on them to simulate the kite is flying. He
makes sure that the student has good piloting principles:

 Handles the bar gently using only the fingertips


 Steers it like a bike, not like a car
 Does not move the bar up, down or sideways

Check and correct body position when necessary

No trimming explanation is given at this point. The Assistant


Instructor is in charge of trimming the kite; the student will learn it
later.

Keep it short and simple, do not talk too much.

Notes:

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Kite power control simulation
Introduce the power adjustment by sliding the bar up or down on the centerline. Initially set up the
bar so its sweet spot is all the way down so the kite will not stall when the student pulls on it.
Obviously it should have enough tension on the back lines to steer the kite.

Sheeting out / reducing the power: Sheeting in / increasing the power:


The pilot slides the bar away from him. The pilot slides the bar towards him.

Tune the kite for unhooked first piloting is an option: do not hesitate to do it, if your student is
uncomfortable hooked in or that he does dissociate the sliding of the bar and push pull to pilot.

9/ Flight Incident Simulation (3 Safety Steps)


Once piloting basics are understood, the Assistant Instructor explains that he will simulate a flight
incident. (When the kite pulls too much or is out of control and its pilot feels unsafe.)

These procedures must be repeated many time during the course and in different situations to
create automation. Simulation, while flying on land and/or while in the water. The Instructor
decides when to practice it.

Step 1 - Let go of the bar


The Assistant Instructor simulates an incident by pulling hard enough
on the lines so the student feels it in the harness.

The student immediately lets go of the bar.


He must understand that in most situations, once the bar is released,
the kite will crash smoothly and it will stop pulling. He will likely be able
to re-launch and fly the kite once again.

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Step 2 – Release the chicken loop quick release


When the kite still pulls too much without control after letting go of the
bar and the pilot still feels unsafe he releases the chicken loop.

The student lets go of the


bar as above, and the
Assistant Instructor once
again pulls hard on the
lines to simulate the
situation.

The student immediately


activates the chicken loop
quick release and lets it
go away.

Remind the student of the importance of checking the safety systems during the pre-flight check.
It can save a life!

Step 3 - Release the kite leash quick release


When letting go of the bar and releasing the chicken loop is not effective, the ultimate safety is to
let go of the kite leash.

The Assistant Instructor pulls the lines again with the bar and chicken
loop quick release activated to simulate the situation.

The student must immediately trigger the kite leash quick release.

Inform the student that


after this last step he
will have lost his kite
and cannot do a self-
rescue or be seen from
far away. Before doing
it he must be sure that
this is the right
solution. It can also
cause accidents
downwind.

Both the pre-flight check and the flight incident simulation are the cornerstones of safe
kiteboarding practice. Every rider must master these skills before flying a kite.

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10/ Lines Set-Up


Both upwind and downwind setup procedures can be done, however the IKO strongly
recommends teaching the downwind setup as it is safer in many aspects

Ask the student to connect the lines and correct or explain if needed.

Downwind set-up
Put some sand over the lines extremity so they do not move with the wind.

Unwind the lines starting from the kite walking downwind.

Match the bar ends with the kite lines colors (red on red for example).
Advantages:
 Easy to do the preflight check
 There will not be power in the kite until you walk to the launching position
 It is much safer.
Disadvantage:
 When it is very windy the lines are pushed away while you unwind them. It can be
easily solved by putting sand on the lines ends and/or placing them underneath the
kite.

Upwind setup
Unwind the lines starting from the kite and walking upwind.
Match the bar ends with the kite lines colors (red on red for example).

Disadvantages:
 Not as easy to pre-flight check.
 The kite is directly in the power zone if tension is put on the lines (danger).
 During launching, the back line could wrap around the kite.
 The assistant has to walk between the kite and its pilot to lift it, it is more challenging
to do it right especially for non-kiteboarders.

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Which kites is rigged correctly?

Write your answer here

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11/ Pre-Flight Check


Show the student how to hold the leader lines up at shoulder
height and verify that the lines are well connected and clear for
take-off.
Let him do the bridles and lines pre-flight check:

 Check again that the kite is still well pumped (always the
last check before launching a kite).
 Check that the chicken loop quick release is functional
(activate it and reset it).
 Verify that the helmet strap is attached and that the
harness is on correctly.

A preflight check must be done each time you launch a kite.

12/ Launching and landing as an Assistant


Let’s fly that (trainer) kite! (With short lines)

How to hold the kite:


Explain how to hold a kite one tip up, one tip down
(in a ‘C’ position) with one hand on each side of
the leading edge. Student should be standing
upwind letting the kite move or flap with the wind.

Explain when and how to release the kite:


 When? Only when the pilot gives a
clear ‘thumbs up’ signal, any other
signs means ‘do not let it go’.
 How? Do not throw it, just open your hands and step away from the kite.
Have a look at the bridles and the lines and make sure they are correct. Sometimes a pilot cannot
see them clearly from a distance. If they are not correct, put the kite down to make the necessary
adjustments. You may have just avoided an accident! Remember to mention that the angle for
launching (between the wind and the lines) will depend on the wind strength, so there is no
“theoretical launching angle”. This is why students must be able to find it out in each situation to
become independent.

Demonstrate how to launch


1. The student holds the kite in the middle of the L.E. (one hand inside, one hand outside).
2. The Assistant Instructor shows how he checks that the lines are correctly set up by putting
some tension on and pulling up the centerline. (Making sure that the back lines are not tangled
with the front lines).
3. The Assistant Instructor demonstrates how he moves around to find the right angle to the wind
and what the effects of his movements are on the kite (a flapping or pushing kite is not ready
to be launched). Show how the kite should be reacting for the best position for launching.
4. Once the Assistant Instructor is in position, he needs to do a final check for any people/danger
and then he gives a clear ‘OK to launch’ signal and you can then go ahead and launch the kite!
5. Repeat it and practice landing too.

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13/ Instructor Tests the Kite in Flight and Trims It


When the Assistant Instructor performs the in-flight check
on the kite he makes sure that:

 The steering lines (back lines) are


symmetrical (bar at 90⁰ from the centerline)
while the kite is at 12 o'clock.
 The kite size is appropriate for the weather
conditions and student’s weight to be
considered a trainer kite. At this point in the
lesson, a kite cannot generate enough
force to pull or unbalance its pilot.
 The kite is not backstalling when he pulls the
bar all the way down with the kite at 11 or 1
o'clock.
 The kite should be stable when it flies at the
wind window’s edge, making sure that the
wind is strong enough for kiting!

During the in-flight check, the Assistant Instructor explains and demonstrates the basics of piloting
(both right and wrong ways of doing things).

 Grabs the bar gently.


 Keeps his body in a relaxed position.
 Steers the kite properly; ‘like a bicycle not like a car’ (see drawing).
 Has the student guess the different clock
positions (no need at this point to give extra
explanations about the wind window).
 Explains the sweet spot (natural position of the
bar on the centerline for the easiest steering).
 Ensures that the front of his body is always
toward the kite.
 Puts the kite at 9 or 3 o’clock and let go of the
bar. The kite will stay stable there with no
tension. It is a good position to take a break
or switch the pilot…

At the end of the in-flight check, the Assistant Instructor can make the student pilot the kite while
connected to the kite (the Assistant Instructor). This way the student is more relaxed and can
take mental notes for the upcoming first flight in a real situation.

Notes:

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14/ First Piloting (Student Connects to the Bar and Safety Systems / Holds the
Kite in One Position)
Before the student is connected, introduce these communication signs:

Let go of the bar Release your chicken loop Put your kite at…

Student connects to the bar and safety systems


With the kite at 9 or 3 o’clock, stable and the bar released,
the student comes upwind and next to the Assistant
Instructor. He:
1. Connects his kite leash to the safety line

2. Removes the Assistant Instructor’s kite leash

3. Hooks the chicken loop into his harness and


secures it using the chicken loop finger.

The Assistant Instructor lets the student experiment and helps by giving information if necessary.
He makes sure the student does not touch the bar until he tells him to do so. If you use a foil kite
or the wind is very light you will have to pass the kite to the student while it is at 11 or 1 o’clock
because it will not stay stable without controlling it at 9 or 3 o’clock.

Kite choice:
Both Foil and L.E.I kites can be used, always without power and on short lines.

A small foil kite allows the student to experience flying unhooked for the first phases of piloting.
This helps to build good steering reflexes. It can also be done with a 4 line kite using short lines,
flying unhooked if you adjust the trim strap properly.

For rough ground a small foil kite is best.


In shallow water a L.E.I. or water re-launchable foil kite must be used.

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First piloting (student holds the kite in one position)
The Assistant Instructor positions himself behind the student and puts his hands on the student’s
elbows/forearms to assist and reassure him if necessary. He then tells him to grab the bar. He
assists the student in bringing the kite up and keeping it stable in one position of the wind window’s
edge. In some situations the Assistant Instructor can be connected to the kite while the student
pilots and focuses on steering.

Respect the student and leave appropriate space between you and him. Always ask before doing
any physical contact (putting your hand on his elbows, forearms or shoulders) as it is offensive in
many cultures.

Remember to stay positive, encouraging and calm!

These counterproductive actions can often be seen with


beginners. Watch out for them and make the student aware
of any incorrect positions or actions. Correct them during the
first flights.

 Pulling simultaneously on both sides of the bar


 Turning the bar like a steering wheel
 Moving the bar backward, forward or sideways

 Pushing the bar too far out


 Having the elbows too far apart
 Having too much tension in their body, straining
their muscles
 Their body does not face the kite at all times

The kite must be small with short lines to prevent the student from falling even if the kite passes
into the power zone.

Using short lines makes kite-loops less likely.


The Assistant Instructor or Instructor does not have to hold the student’s harness handle all the
times. Nonetheless, he should always stay close to the student and be ready to assist. At this
time, pay more attention to the pilot (body position, movements, etc.) than the kite. There will
likely be more to correct.

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15/ Explore the Edge of the Wind Window


Challenge the student to:

 Pilot the kite into various clock


positions
 Hold the kite at each clock
position at your request
 Pilot the kite gently from 12 to 1,
from 1 to 12, from 11 to 10, from
10 to 12, from 12 to 2, etc…
 Fly the kite at 9 o’clock, (or 3
o'clock), to keep it stable, and
then release the bar. Take the bar
back and bring the kite gently up.
Then repeat the exercise again

Repeat the exercises until the student can stop the kite at any clock position requested and he
shows signs that he is relaxed.

Signs to look for are their shoulders being down, holding the bar loosely, elbows close to the
body and he may even be looking around.
If the student has his body in tension ask him to fly the kite with one hand and come back to this
exercise later. This will probably relax him.

Notes:

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16/ Let Go of the Bar


Without forewarning, the Assistant Instructor
should say ‘let go of the bar!’ and make the
corresponding sign. If the student does not let
go, reassure him and try it again later.
Explain that when any Instructor or Assistant
Instructor says to let go of the bar or makes the
signal to do so, he must let it go without thinking
because he could be in immediate danger!
Remind him that this is the first safety step to
reduce the kite’s power in case he loses control
and that he can do it anytime he feels it is
appropriate.

This exercise must be repeated randomly along the learning path of each student to guarantee
his safety and will also help avoid accidents during and after the courses.

Repetition will make this a habit and he will remember it in the long term!

17/ Twist and Untwist the Lines


With the kite positioned at 9 or 3 o’clock (one wingtip touches the ground):

 Challenge the student to move the bar away from him and twist the lines (the bar must
do a 360⁰ turn).
 Explain that as long as there is one full turn (not half a turn so the red is still on the left
side) in the lines, the piloting will not be affected.
 Let the student experiment flying the kite with the lines twisted.
 On the Assistant Instructor's command, the student is challenged to bring the kite to 9
or 3 o’clock again, release the bar, and untwist the lines.

The Instructor must make sure the student does one full turn with the bar.

Notes:

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18/ Flying One-Handed


Ask the student, ‘When is piloting with one hand required?’

 To trim the kite with the power trim.


 To carry the board on land or in the water.
 To do the ‘OK to launch’, ‘I want to land’, ‘I need
help’ or any signal.
 To put the board on.

A good exercise is to have the kite at 9 or 3 o’clock in the


«waiting position» (with the bar released). The student
gently grabs the bar with his upper (opposite) hand, brings it
to 45⁰ and holds it stable there for a while. Then releases
some of the tension so the kite goes down with gravity.

The next step is to bring the kite to 12 and once the kite
passes over the student’s head, he switches his hands and
holds the kite at 45⁰ on the other side.

Try all clock positions!

To fly one-handed, always steer your kite with the upper hand. When the kite is flying in a
position between 9 and 12 o’clock your upper hand would be the right one. When the kite is flying
between 12 and 3 o’clock, your upper hand will be the left one.

Prioritize piloting the kite and put BOTH hands on the bar at any time when necessary!

19/ Power Adjustment Using Bar and Trim Experimentation (Basic)


Power adjustment
The student will learn how bar movement on the centerline and the trim strap adjustment influence
the power of the kite.

Practice moving the bar up or down on the centerline.


Explain that for piloting on land and in the wind window’s edge, it helps to understand how to
position the bar in order to prevent the kite from front or backstalling; as well as for safety reasons.

Remind him he can let go of the bar. Let the student experiment with different bar positions and
learn how steering can vary the kite’s reactions.
Also explain that sheeting in and out also permits a direct adjustment of the kite’s power by its pilot.
Tell him, for example, that it acts like the throttle of a car.

 Moving the bar up on the centerline (also called sheeting out) decreases the kite’s
power and control.
 Moving the bar down on the centerline (also called sheeting in) increases the kite’s
power and control.

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Trim experimentation
Set the kite to back-stall. Trim at the
maximum (even make some adjustments
on the lines if necessary).
Let the student experiment with the kite that
is backstalling.

Ask the student how he can prevent this


backstalling? He should answer ‘by pushing
the bar away.’
Then ask the student if this is a comfortable
position.

Upon completion of the above, the student should pull on the trim to feel the difference. He should
then set up the kite correctly.
Land the kite and explain that the trim is used to:

 Optimize the rider’s position according to his body size. The lower the bar is, the easier
it is to have a correct position (shoulders backwards).
 Increase the wind range of the kite.
 Make adjustments to the bar position when more or less power is needed for a trick
(one hand, going upwind, unhook…).

Key Points:
 If a kite back stalls, it means that the pilot is over-sheeting: push the bar away until the
kite stabilizes then pull the trim strap.
 Practice trim adjustment first with the kite at 9 or 3 o’clock with the bar released. Once
you are more confident, practice while piloting one-handed and with the kite at 11 or 1
o’clock.

20/ Walking While Flying the Kite (also with the board)
Ask the student to put the kite at 1 or 11 o’clock and to walk. (You
should be following closely).

Explain that when he walks to the left the kite should be on the
left side (and vice versa for the right).

Practice in real kite traffic (if there is any).

Practice carrying a small object to simulate the board and switch


hands without letting it go.

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21/ Landing to an Assistant


While keeping the kite in the air, the student must explain to you (the
Assistant Instructor) the procedure for landing a kite! However, he
must pretend to do so as if you are someone on the beach with no
knowledge of, or experience in kiteboarding!
Be sure the student knows the sign on the picture beside.

 ‘Hi can you help me?’


 ‘Stay to this side (upwind) of the lines.’

 ‘I will pilot the kite down to you.’


 ‘Once you can, grab the big inflated tube in the center of
the kite.’

 ‘One hand should be inside and the other hand should be outside (like you are giving
it a big hug).’

 ‘Do not let it go once you have it! I will run toward you,
catch it and finish the procedure!’
 ‘Thank you so much for helping me!’

After the 1st successful attempt, the Assistant Instructor draws a 2


m diameter circle on the beach right next to the student and tells
him:
‘OK now you have to land your kite to me here,’ (pointing to the large
circle).
This is a good exercise that will help your student to become
independent and safe in narrow or crowded spots. Repeat this
exercise multiple times from both sides.

Notes:

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22/ Wind Window Theory


Ask open questions to your student to check
his knowledge and complete if necessary.

 Where does the kite fly with


more/less power? (More power in
the center of the wind window
and less power on the edge of
the wind window).
 Where can you position a kite in
the wind window to launch/land it
safely? (On the edge of the WW
at either 9 or 3 o’clock).
 If your kite falls, where can it go?
(In the drop zone that
corresponds to the zone under the WW = the line lengths plus the kite leash in
extension and the kite span).
 Do we need to keep a clear zone beyond the drop zone? Why or why not? (Yes, for
safety reasons. (Hence the reason this is also called ‘the safety zone’).
 Where are the safe clock positions for flying on land?’ (Between 10 and 11 or between
1 and 2 o’clock).
This theoretical three-dimensional concept might be hard to visualize. Use tools, drawing, or a
simulation to create a visual.

This should be already understood at this point as you have already made many references to the
wind window during previous exercises.

23/ Launching with an Assistant


To launch a kite safely, teach the student how to find the
right launching angle (between the wind and the lines):

 Set the lines at 90 degrees to the wind. The pilot has


to be a bit downwind of the kite.
 Set the kite in the assistant’s hands and brief him not
to let go until the thumbs-up signal is given. Also
explain that as the pilot, the student must tell his
assistant that he will first check that the lines are OK.
 The student goes to the bar. Lifts the chicken loop and
checks the lines. Connects the kite leash and hooks
in the chicken loop.

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 The student walks away from the kite until all lines
have some tension (the kite must be flapping).
 The student does not touch the bar, walks upwind until
the kite stops flapping and adds one or two more steps
upwind.
 The student performs the last check making sure that
the lines and the kite are OK for launching.
 The student looks around the area making sure it is
also clear for launching.
 The student grabs the bar, makes the ‘OK to launch’
sign (thumbs up) to the assistant then steers the kite
up slowly.
 Repeat the procedure on the both sides.

The Instructor only lets go of the kite if the lines are OK, the safety systems are connected, there
is no one in the wind window and the kite is at a right angle to the wind. To do this exercise, be
sure your student can control the kite one-handed in the wind window’s edge alone. While you
can assist him, he will be on his own for the first time.

24/ Piloting Practice (Review of all the Steps Covered)


Give the student free time to practice. He can pilot it in all the areas of the wind window he wishes,
to walk around with the kite at different clock positions to review all the skills he has learned.

Practice/repetition is important to reinforce confidence and knowledge acquisition.

25/ Activate the Quick Release and Let the Kite Drop
While the student flies the kite the Assistant Instructor says (and make the corresponding signs):
 ‘Let go of the bar.’
 ‘Activate the chicken loop quick release.’
 ‘Wait and see what happens.’

This step can be practiced before in the lesson and must be repeated.
It is important to repeat the safety steps so the procedures become automatic.

Once the kite is stabilized on the ground, remind him that this is the second safety step after letting
go of the bar, and it can be used to land alone or anytime he feels he is in danger.

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26/ Self-Landing (How to Recover and Secure the Kite)


The last step of the IKO Level 1 – Discovery is being able to self-land. Find the complete procedure
in the ‘Safety skills – Day 2’.

The Assistant Instructor explains the procedure and lets the student:
1. Climb the safety line, hand over hand with fingers and thumbs up over the line until reaching
the kite (not touching the bar). Student keeps lines to the side and downwind of himself and
remains connected to the safety line by the kite leash. This is in case the kite starts to pull
again and he has to let it go which will reactivate the safety system.

2. Grab and secure the kite with sand.

Make sure the student does not tangle any line around his hand and leaves the bar and lines to
the side (not behind) of his body!
At the end of the procedure do the pre-flight check again and do not disconnect the lines.

27/ Post-Flight Check (for Next Flight or Storage)


After a self-landing, the lines are likely tangled or twisted.
Ask the student to reset the bar and assist if necessary:

 Never disconnect the lines to untangle them.


 Pull the bar toward the end of the safety line (untangling if necessary).
 Reset the chicken loop.
 Do a pre-flight check (verify that back and front lines are not tangled).

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28/ Equipment Packing


This is just an example in case the lesson stops here, however it is not a rule. If there is more
time, continue with the Intermediate course and to the steps 28 to 31 at the end of the lesson.

Packing down the equipment is also part of the lesson.

The student learns how to wind the lines correctly around the bar (making figure eights to avoid
tangling).
He learns how to pack the kite down the proper way and place into its bag in a way to avoid
damaging it and so that it will be easy to set up for the next user.

29/ Lesson Feedback / Student Level Assessment and Set Next Objectives:
At the end of each lesson it is always good to do an assessment:

Together with the Instructor Level 2 (or above), ask the following questions:
 What did you enjoy about the lesson?
 When did you feel less comfortable with?
 Can you explain to me the concept of the wind window?
 Can you demonstrate to me the signals you have learned today?
 If the wind is side-off-shore, where will the wind be coming from? Is this considered a
safe wind for kiting?
 Can you tell me the 3 safety steps you learned today in the correct order?
 Etc…

Show the student the Students Certification Standards from the Internet, the Instructor Manual, or
the Kiteboarder’s Handbook and show him where he is according to the chart. Give positive
feedback and mention areas that need improvement.

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30/ Schedule the Next lesson or Certification of Student by Instructor


Prior to the student leaving, the Instructor will explain to him what to expect at the next lesson and
what he hopes to accomplish so he can prepare himself.

Schedule the next lesson with the manager looking at the appointment calendar, the weather
forecast and the student’s availability.

When the lesson is over, the Instructor will give the student a Kiteboarder Card and log the
student’s hours online.

Congratulate the student once again and tell him you will see him next time!

31/ Equipment Storage or Maintenance


If necessary, fix the equipment as soon as possible. Others may need it!

The better the equipment is maintained, the more kites are available! This also means less
frustration for you. Better equipment means better lessons for students. More students for the
school, means more students for you!

Remember to pack and store it properly so it is ready for the next lesson!

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Appendix B: Complete IKO Intermediate Course Lesson Plan


The Intermediate Course has many key steps to learn. In the normal timeframe of a kiteboarding
lesson, students cannot reach automation for each exercise. This is not a problem as each exercise
is linked to the next one and will be repeated again and again.
For example, at the same time as practicing the water-start, students are also practicing:

1. The kite water relaunch, as they will probably crash their kite and have to relaunch it.
2. The upwind body-drag, as they may lose their board and need to recover it.
3. The body-drag with the board, as they may have to go away from the shore to be in a
good zone to practice the water-start.
4. The steady-pull, as they will need to be in steady pull position to attempt the water-start.
Remember to avoid too much demonstration. Nonetheless it is OK to demonstrate when it is useful
and not for too long, so the student still has time to practice. Students learn much more by
practicing and talking about it than observing.

Communication in the water is much more challenging than on land.

Before students go into the water for the first time, be sure they have learned and understood the
following signs:

Land your kite to me, Go this way Make a U-turn Release your chicken loop
I will catch it.

Notes:

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Keep your kite in the Stop! Come closer Look!


water, I will catch it

Here! Release your kite leash I need help I NEED HELP!


(International sign for S.O.S.)
I am in trouble
32/ Enter / Exit the Water While Controlling the Kite
Students will enter the water for the first time, be sure they wear their
helmets and buoyancy aids of at least 50 Newton. If there is a shore
break, it should not higher than their waist. At this stage, you must still
use a trainer kite as no power is needed.
Students must be able to walk forward until they have water over their
waist with the kite around 45⁰, controlled with one hand, looking in the
direction they are walking, then slowly change direction, passing the
kite over their head, and come back to the shore.
Depending on the student’s abilities and the weather conditions, it is
good to leave them some space to practice but remember:
 Always stay close enough to reach them in less than 1 minute.
 If you evaluate that they still need assistance because they
are not confident or because the beach is crowded, you
should go with them*.
 Do this exercise a couple of times. Remember that it is very exciting for most students to
go towards the ocean while being attached to a kite for the first time.

* This is only possible if there is an Assistant Instructor staying on land and downwind of the
lesson to ensure the safety of the students in case they go away from the Instructor who will be
placed upwind and cannot ensure their safety.

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33/ Water Relaunch


Students should learn how to relaunch their kite in
shallow water. If there is a shore break, it is
recommended to pass it and practice where the
waves are not breaking. The Instructor can pass
the shore break while body-dragging and pass the
kite to the student in the practice zone. This
technique can only be done with the same rule
explained above*.
Students must learn that to relaunch a
trainer/school kite (kite that is easy to relaunch)
they must:

 Never swim/walk toward the kite when it is


in the water, rather stand still as an anchor
or even swim backward with their legs to
have more tension in the lines.
 Always sheet out the bar and keep it in its
natural position (red to the left) even if the
lines are crossed. (with some kite you may
need to sheet in a bit).
 If the leading edge is facing the water (usual position when a kite is in the water) they must
apply constant tension to one of the leader lines (if they pull on the right the kite will
relaunch on the left side) until the kite
comes up onto its tip and moves to the
edge of the wind window. When the kite is
at the edge of the window, gently launch it
keeping it at the edge. Once the kite starts
to fly, let go of the leader line and control it
with the bar.
 If the leading edge is facing the sky (trailing edge in the water), they must swim backward
with their arms and legs until the kite flips and comes back with the leading edge down.
Then apply the above procedure.

There are other relaunching methods and more complicated kites (eg. C-shape kites) to
relaunch. These can be explained later to the student, as a beginner should not fly these
‘advanced’ kites at the moment.

Please refer to the Kiteboarder Handbook for more explanations.

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34/ Side Body-Drag with Both Hands


This body-drag aims to be easy so the students have their first body-drag feeling. They must keep
the kite stable at around 45 degrees, with both hands on the bar. They must go out to a position
defined by the Instructor. Once they reach that point, or at the Instructor’s signal, they must bring
the kite through 12 o’clock to the other side, around the edge of the window (without passing
through the power zone) and come back. The body must stay straight without unwanted rotation.

35/ Body-Drag with Power Strokes Both Sides

Depending on the orientation of the wind, they may need to body-drag away from the shore and
have enough space to practice. In this case refer to the next step first; the body-drag upwind.
This body-drag is critical for the upcoming water-start. Students will learn the different ways to
create power, increase it, and decrease it, to manage power levels for the water-start.
The Instructor can explain the figure of 8 on land and, if necessary, demonstrate in the water.

Students must learn how to:


 Fly a kite up and down on one side of the wind window only, and ensure a vertical flight
path to generate enough power, following the sequence shown in the drawings above:
1. Moving the kite between 11 and 12 to start to feel the power.
2. Slowly increasing the ‘8 figures’ to experiment with more power.
3. Making the ‘8 figures’ wider depending on wind strength.
 Balance their body position, on their stomach, stabilized with legs open.
 Stop the exercise where the Instructor asks them to, position themselves toward the other
side and start again.
 Stop before they reach the shore at the Instructor’s signal (around 3 line lengths).
 Create power by moving the kite without crashing it (if they crash, it is not an issue as
they can practice their water relaunch).
 At the end of this exercise they must be able manage the kite’s power.
 Then students must practice the pattern below to learn another way to create power
using the same logic. Starting small and getting bigger to feel the differences and learn
how to manage the power.

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36/ Body-Drag Upwind


Give your students
an incentive by
reminding them that
this is the way they
will be able to
recover their board
independently.
Students must learn
how to:

 Pilot their kite


while keeping it
stable with one
hand while
body-dragging.
 Maintain the right tension on the lines (not enough will make the kite crash, too much will
make them travel downwind).
 Use their legs to stabilize themselves.
 Keep the front arm extended underwater (in the picture it is out of the water to show the right
angle) pointing in the direction they wish to go to act like a rudder (just like a centerboard of
a sailing boat).
 Keep their body straight at an angle of 45⁰ to their kite lines.
 Change direction very slowly passing the kite through 12 o’clock (going fast will make them
travel downwind).

The Instructor can use a landmark or position himself as one, so students can easily self-evaluate
their ability to go upwind while body-dragging.

On land, the Instructor can make the students practice the position with the kite landed. The
Instructor pulls the lines to simulate the kite flying and the students practice while lying on the sand.
When you practice with the board, if the student struggles you can attach an inflatable buoy around
the board’s handle. This way the board will drift faster downwind allowing the student to recover it
easier.

In certain conditions (current, little waves, gusty wind, light wind), this is a difficult task for
beginner students to achieve.
For each body-drag, make sure the students know the necessary communication signs. You
must also clearly define the practice zone.
Students may gain speed for the first time with a kite and so must know where to start and where
to finish. The Instructor must always be positioned downwind and in sight, so students can easily
see them, and they can take care of safety during all the exercises.

If necessary, the Instructor can demonstrate with the students holding their harness handle.

For Instructor Level 2 and above, when having 2 kites flying, the Instructor must always
be on land and downwind of the training zone to always be visible for the students and to
be able to reach them faster in case of a problem (they will be pushed in your direction).

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37/ Body-drag with the Board


Never use a board leash under any circumstance. Instead, you can use a buoy that you fix on
the handle to make it easier for students.

Before attempting to body-drag with the board in the water, students must
practice the following on land with a trainer kite, if not done already:
 Carrying the board while standing on land and flying the
kite.
 Switching hands:
A. First progression: place the board on beach and
change the kite to the other side of the wind window
with two hands on the bar then pick up board with
new windward hand.
B. Second progression: steer the kite slowly towards
the other side of the wind window, when the kite is
at 12, students can let go of the bar, switch hands
with the board and take the bar with the other hand.
C. Third progression: walk while flying the kite,
recover a board on the way, continue walking,
switch direction and hands and come back.

Students must know that in case of trouble while flying a kite and carrying a board at the same
time (both on land and in the water), they must immediately let go of the board and give priority
to getting the kite under control. Once this is achieved, they can recover the board (walking if on
land, body-dragging upwind if on the water).

Once in the water students must learn how to:


 Pass small waves with the board in hand (they will have to lift the board up and push it
through the waves).
 Start body-dragging as soon as possible (waist deep) to get away from the break.
 Hold the board with the handle* and create pressure with the forearm and elbow on the
board so that its nose is out of the water making them edge upwind.
 Have their body straight and keep the kite under control.
 Instantly let go of the board if they lose kite control, recover/relaunch the kite and then
recover the board by body-dragging upwind.

*A beginner board should always have a handle, but if there is not one, this technique can be
achieved by holding the front foot strap.

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38/ Self-Rescue and Pack Down Discovery


Before practicing this procedure in deep
water, students must learn and practice it
on land or in water up to waist deep if the
spot allows it, with their Instructor. The
whole procedure must be done at least
once during any kiteboarding course by
every kiteboarder as it can save lives.

The Instructor must set a simulation,


where students fly their kite, let go of the
bar and release their chicken loop quick
release at the Instructor’s signal. Then
the Instructor explains the key points
while students complete the exercise
until the pack down.
This step can be done before or later in the lesson, as long as it is done before the water-start.

An IKO Instructor who does not teach the Self-Rescue and Pack Down could be
suspended by the IKO. Students come to learn with an IKO Instructor to be independent
and safe, not just to ride on a board.
Be careful in cold water spots. It might not be a good idea to do this exercise when the
student is wet and will get cold. In this case, it is best to do it at the beginning of the
lesson or the end of the discovery course when he is still dry.
See the complete procedure on the next page.

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Self-rescue and pack down steps


1. Let go of the bar. This will depower the kite, causing it to drop.
2. Activate the chicken loop quick release. This will fully depower the kite and cause it to
flag out.
3. Climb the safety line (the one attached to the kite leash), hand over hand, until you reach
the bar. Always have hands facing down, thumbs up and never wrap any line around
any part of your body.
4. Lock the safety line with two half-hitch knots around the end of the bar. Then wrap the
loose part of the safety line in a figure of 8 around the bar back to the leash. Lock it with
two half-hitch knots. If this is done correctly the kite should not be able to power up
anymore as the safety line will stay shorter than the others.
5. Pick up all the other lines and continue wrapping in a figure of 8 while moving towards the
kite. Lay on your stomach to have less tension on the lines and make it easier.
6. When you are about 3 meters from the kite, lock the lines to the bar with two half-hitch
knots. You can now let go of the bar but always keep the leash connected. Then grab
the kite.
7. If the kite is not lying with the intrados facing upwards (the smiling or ‘U’ position), you will
need to flip it over. You do this by folding one wing tip under, then pushing the leading
edge up with your shoulder. The wind and the pressure in the Leading Edge will help you
flip the kite.
If you are going to self-rescue follow to ‘step 8’ if you are directly going to pack down
because the rescue boat is waiting close to you, directly follow the procedure from ‘step
9.’ If self-rescue is not an option because the wind is offshore, wait inside the kite inflated
in smiling (U) position until a rescue boat arrives. If you are standing on your own depth
carry the kite out of the water.
8. Fold the kite by starting at one tip and pulling it back to the other using either its front or
back line, or the bridle. Use the self-rescue handles or bridle to control the kite and sail
back to shore. You can use one leg or arm out to help control your sailing direction, like
when you put one arm out to body-drag upwind. If it is a large kite, you can fold the wing
tip just half way and lay on the leading edge.
This method enables a self-rescue in onshore or side-onshore wind conditions.
9. Once you are absolutely sure the boat has seen you and comes to rescue you, or
you are getting close to the breaking waves, you can start the pack-down
procedure. Open the deflate valve, fold the kite over and take hold of the 2 wing tips. On
one-pump systems, close the struts’ hoses before starting the procedure.
10. Roll the kite until you reach the center strut. Squeeze out the remaining air with your
hands.
11. Close the deflate valve to avoid the water getting inside.
12. Place your bar over the center strut of your kite and secure it by putting your harness
around it.
If you are being rescued by a boat, go to step 13. If you reach the shore and need to
pass the shore break, go to step 14.

13. Make sure you hand the kite up to the boat, leading edge first. This will allow the water
trapped in the kite to drain out, making it lighter to lift. It also prevents the wind catching
the trailing edge and opening the kite up again.
14. Release your leash but stay with your equipment until you reach the breaking wave.
When this happens, push it away from you and swim back to the shore. The wave will
bring your packed-down equipment to the shore.

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39/ Steady-Pull
The Instructor can simulate the
steady pull on land without the
kite flying. Pull the lines to
simulate a flying kite so the
student understands the
position.

Students must know how


to:
 Reach the location
defined by the Instructor,
stop their body-drag and
do the steady pull, as
described below:
 Keep the kite under
control with one hand (at 11 if steering the kite with the right hand, at 1 if steering the kite
with the left hand) while bringing the board in front of them.
 Tip the board towards them, foot-straps in the correct position, while they sit down in the
water.
 Put one foot in one foot-strap and then the other, trying not to always watch the board, and
keeping an eye on the kite.
 Maintain the steady pull position, board and
bar perpendicular to the wind, kite at 11 or 1
with very slow movement between these
positions.
 Use their legs (extend one leg, bend the other
and swap) to maintain balance.
 Use one arm (if the board and body go to the
right, swim backward with the left arm) to
come back into the right position.
 Have their body grouped together, legs bent
and back rounded for stability.
 Stop doing the exercise once they have reached the end of the practice zone or at the
Instructor’s signal.
 Come back to the shore body-dragging safely with all the equipment.

Once achieved, an easy progression to introduce the water start is to slowly create power using
the patterns learned in the ‘body-drag with power strokes’.
When students lift out of the water, they should push the bar away and stop moving the kite to
get back into the steady pull position.

This will help them generate the power and manage it while maintaining the right position with
the board, body, legs and kite.

It is preferred to do this with short lines.

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40/ Right of Way (R.O.W.) Rules Introduction


With the next step (water-start) students will start to interact more with their environment and soon
they will even start to ride away. The Instructor must ensure they have basic knowledge of Rights
of Way:

1. Defining ‘port’ and ‘starboard’.


2. General priority to the starboard rider who should keep their course and speed, the port
rider must avoid them (give way).
3. The Golden Rule: If you pass upwind keep your kite HIGH, if you pass downwind keep
your kite LOW.
4. Other beach users have priority over kiters.

Instructors must remind students that now they have a higher level than other beginners they
must respect them and avoid them at all costs.

This step of the lesson is only to check that students understand the R.O.W. rules. The
Instructor must start to introduce the R.O.W. rules to their students earlier in the lesson.

41/ Water-Start
A simulation workshop can be held
on land (kite landed) where the
Instructor gets students to practice
their body position and weight
distribution.
The Instructor must be careful not
to over explain the water-start
before the first attempt. Rather give
basic necessary explanations,
make a quick simulation with the
students on land and practice on
the water. After each attempt, the
Instructor can give more
explanation and detail to each
student.
If the Instructor talks too much and gives too much explanation to the students, it may become
confusing for them.

At this stage, for the first attempts a trainer kite can still be used with line lengths of around 10 to
15m. However, after the first attempts, and once students have clearly understood and are not
crashing the kite constantly, lines must be extended to 20 to 25m (be sure the kite is not too
powerful).

For the first attempts at the water-start, you can also use a directional board with straps, it will be
much easier for the student to stand up. Directional are harder to turn with but at the beginning
students do not turn.
If you use a twin-tip, use a large/wide one.

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For the first attempts, students must be able to:


 Have a good steady pull position. If not, they must first focus on getting this position.
 Ensure they have space downwind before any attempt.
 Point the board diagonally downwind during the power stroke. Extend the front leg and
bring the back leg underneath them so they are positioned correctly to start riding
downwind.
 Use the power of the kite through the centerline and chicken loop to stand up on the board,
rather than trying to stand up using their arms.
 Once standing up on the board and before they have reached 10m, they must sheet out
the bar with the kite at 11 or 1, and sit back in the water to stop and come back to the
steady pull position. They can then attempt a water-start in the other direction if there is
enough room downwind.
 Once the Instructor gives a signal or they reach the end of the practice zone students must
stop at a safe distance from the shore (3 line lengths) and exit the water safely with their
equipment.

Remember this step can be frustrating for many students. The ratio of congratulation to
correction is 80%:20%. It is very important to keep this in mind as your students may lose
motivation at this stage, especially if the weather conditions are a bit tricky. Use positive
reinforcement often, explain what is happening and why they may be failing. Take breaks as they
might get tired quickly, set easy-to-reach goals, change exercises and constantly adapt.

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Appendix C: Complete IKO Independent Course Lesson Plan


At this stage, students can water-start on demand in both directions. They have learned to stabilize
their kite once they have enough speed to ride away.

42/ Controlled Stop


As students start to achieve their
first water-starts and understand
the R.O.W. rules, they must also
learn how to stop. At this stage,
and to make it easy to stop, they
must learn to do the following:

1. Sheet out the bar.


2. Put more pressure on
the back edge, to turn
upwind.
3. Sit down in the water.

These 3 actions will make a rider


stop.

43/ Control Riding Speed by Edging


The next step for them is to understand the ability to accelerate or slow down using the board.

 The more they edge by pushing on their heels (on the back/heel edge), the more they will
go upwind and slow down. If they edge too hard they will stop (this is also the way to do a
more advanced controlled stop, while sheeting out the bar, see the red arrow below).
 The less they edge, by
applying slightly more
pressure on the toes, the more
they will go downwind and gain
speed (yellow arrow). If they
put too much pressure on their
toes, they will go toward the
kite, lose the tension in the
lines and stop (with the risk of
crashing their kite and getting
tangled in the lines). Or they
may catch a front/toe edge and
face plant into the water.

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44/ Riding Upwind


Riding upwind is the key to staying in the water for longer. To achieve this, students must:

 Control their speed by edging.


 Watch a point upwind where they want to go.
 Stabilize the kite around 45⁰ once they start riding after a water-start.
 If possible, release the front hand from the bar.
 Turn the hips and shoulders in the direction they want to go.
 Slightly sheet out while cruising.

It is easier for beginner students to go upwind using a big twin-tip or a directional board with
straps.

45/ Sliding Transitions


To achieve this skill, students must:
1. Have their kite at 11 or 1, hands
at the center of the bar, slow
down using the board (edging
more) and start to straighten up
the body.
2. Slowly pull on the backhand to
bring the kite to 12 while edging
harder.
3. Slightly sheet out, flatten the
board, extend the body and look
in the new direction.
4. Sheet in and do a power stroke
with the kite in the new direction,
extend the new front leg to point
the board downwind.
5. Ride away.

Do not go too fast, rather try to break down the trick while doing it.

Before they turn, students must remember to look behind them to be sure they have enough
space without other riders around.

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46/ Toeside Riding


Toeside riding opens the door for other riding possibilities, especially for more advanced turns and
basic wave riding.

The easiest way to learn toeside riding is to try it first with the student’s ‘best foot’ in front (when in
the toeside position).

A regular rider (left foot in front) will need to start the following procedure with the right foot (wrong
foot) in front, and vice versa.
1. While cruising at a constant speed with the kite stable at 11 or 1 o’clock, students should
remove their front hand from the bar.
2. They should then slightly sheet in the bar and release heel pressure on the back foot to
flatten the board.
3. They should then bring the back foot in front by sliding the board under the kite lines and
extending the back leg that will now become the new front leg.
4. Once the toeside position is reached, they must apply more pressure on the toes especially
on the new back leg, extending and leaning forward with their body.

A typical mistake during the first attempts is for students to not turn the board a full 180⁰, so the
board ends up pointing toward the kite, they lose tension in the lines and therefore power and
speed.

The problem being the muscle memory; at first this position does not seem natural for the body
so even if the students think they are in the right position, they probably are not. The body is
struggling against the willing of the mind. To achieve it, tell them to over exaggerate it.

If this happens they can try to steer the kite up and down to create power again, or come back to
the heel side position, gain speed again and try again.

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47/ Toeside Turn


At first, the easiest way to attempt this
turn is while learning to ride toe-side.
Students may struggle to maintain
riding speed in the toeside position, so
they can ride a short distance toeside
and if they lose speed, attempt the
toeside turn to come back to the heel
side position and gain speed again.

1. While being in the toeside


position (preferably with the
student’s good foot in front for
the first attempts), students
should start pulling on their
backhand to bring the kite over
their head while releasing the
pressure from the toes to flatten the board.
2. They should continue pulling on the backhand so the kite passes over them to the other
side of the wind window while starting to look in the new direction and straightening their
body.
3. Then bring their second hand on the bar if not there yet to power stroke the kite in the new
direction while they transfer their weight from their toes to their heels.

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48/ Self-Launch
Self-launching is never considered a safe maneuver. Students must be taught to always launch
their kite in pairs. When alone in a spot, it is not recommended to go riding. However, it is best
for a student to learn the self-launch with a professional Instructor than on their own.
Before teaching self-launching to students, the Instructor must ensure they can easily perform all
the earlier skills. Without these they cannot learn self-launching.

To teach this skill follow the procedure from the AITC-Plus Manual as well as the one detailed in
the Kiteboarder’s Handbook - Independent.

Notes:

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49/ Self-Rescue and Pack Down in Deep Water


The last step of the Independent Course is to perform a Self-Rescue and Pack Down in deep
water. For the first time, students will do it in a real situation. Be sure they know the full procedure
learned earlier in the Intermediate Course.

Before practicing it in deep water, repeat the procedure once again on land or in shallow water.

Before going in the water, check your safety systems work and be sure you are either using a 4-
line re-ride or a 5th line safety system.

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Appendix D: Complete IKO Advanced Course Lesson Plan


50/ Basic Jump
To land a basic jump, students must:
a. Gain more speed while cruising, release
the edge (going slightly downwind),
sheet in and pull on the backhand. Start
to edge hard while slightly sheeting out
slightly and pulling hard on the backhand
to bring the kite over their head. When
they feel a lot of pressure on the board
they must release the edge, push on their
legs and sheet in the bar.
b. Once in the air they must tense their
abdominal muscles, bring the board
closer to their body, keep the kite over
their head, keep sheeting in, and look for
their landing spot.
c. Once the landing spot is spotted
(between 1 to 2 meters above the water)
they must extend their legs (front is
slightly bent) pointing the board
downwind while power stroking the kite. Once they land on the water, they must bend their
legs to absorb the landing. Then they need to start edging again.

It is important to attempt first jumps in light and steady wind conditions (with a big kite, which
moves slower). A little wave/chop can be used to help the jump.

Students must always practice in an empty zone, with a clear 50m downwind and 30m upwind.

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51/ Jibe
The Jibe is an advanced toeside turn with more speed and power. Jibes are the basics for more
advanced wave riding:

 Jibe a twin tip or a


directional board.
 Jibe from toeside
to heel side or
from heel side to
toeside.
To make a jibe, students
must pull harder on their
back hand (compared to
the toeside turn, the kite
must cross the wind window much lower) to send the kite from one side of the wind window to the
other side passing through the power zone. Students must aggressively change their edging from
heel side to toeside (or the opposite) following the kite movement.

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52/ Jump with Grab


The concept of jumping with a grab
is to add more style to a normal
jump. The jump needs to be of a
higher level to achieve a grab.
The easiest grab to start with, is the
tail grab (the rider grabs the back of
the board with their back hand while
in the air).

To land it, students must


learn how to (first separately,
then all together):
 Jump higher to stay in the air
longer, then (3 steps to
succeed):
1. Let go of their back
hand while reaching the top of their jump.
2. Bend the back leg and extend the front leg while in the air, without losing balance.
3. Grab the board!

Notes:

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53/ Rider Recovery


An Advanced rider must also be able to assist other riders/persons by bringing them to shore if
they are in trouble off-shore.

Read and follow the procedure from the AITC-Plus Manual or Kiteboarder Handbook -
Advanced.

Notes:

54/ Board Recovery


An Advanced rider must be able to assist other riders by taking their board and bringing them to
shore.

Read and follow the procedure from the AITC-Plus Manual or Kiteboarder’s Handbook -
Advanced.

Notes:

55/ Theoretical Contents


The final elements of Level 4 Advanced is delivered by an Assistant Trainer or Examiner during an
AITC-Plus, and covers International Kiteboarding Signs, R.O.W. rules, Equipment, Weather, Tides
and Aerodynamics.

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Thanks for following this training and good luck in your new career!
The IKO Team

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