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Sample Questions: Magnetism, Charges, & Electromagnetic Force

Made by GIAN KENRICK M. TUAZON


10 – St. Augustine S.Y. ‘18-’19
For Ms. Hannah Jane DR. Allesa
Science 10 – Physics
TOTAL: 75 points

I. Identification (5 points)

1. A type of force that electric charges exert in magnetic fields. (Electrostatic force)
2. The direction drawn in which a magnetic field occurs geographically. (North to
south)
3. Refers to the term used to call a theorically impossible event in magnetism where
magnetic poles could be separated. (Magnetic monopoles)
4. A phenomenon in which electric current is generated by applying magnetic fields.
(Electromagnetic induction)
5. One of the flaws in a transformer where energy is lost due of repeated reverse
magnetization of core. (Hysteresis loss)

II. True or False, with Reasoning (10 x 3 = 30 points)

1. A magnetic force must be perpendicular to the to the magnetic field but not
neccesarily with respect to the velocity of the charge.
FALSE – Magnetic force must be perpendicular to both the magnetic field and
velocity of the charge, just as demonstrated by the right hand rule.

2. If the current is parallel to the magnetic field, the maximum potential amount of
force is attained.
FALSE – A parallel current to the magnitude of the magnetic field’s strength yields
no force at all because no angles are made. For maximum force to be attained, it
must be perpendicular, not parallel.

3. The strength of a magnetic field is derived as the product of a certain constant


value in tesla meter per ampere all over the circumference of the field’s radius
where its endpoint is the distance of the point of interest.
TRUE – Consider the formula of the magnetic field which is the product of constant
𝜇𝑜 and current 𝐼, all over 2𝜋𝑅, aka the circumference of a circle formula (𝐶 = 2𝜋𝑅).
In magnetism, because the length spanning from the point of interest to the field
itself is equal to the radius of the magnetic ‘circle zone’, then it is true that the point
of interest is an endpoint of the magnetic radius.
4. Due to the nature of computing with a transformer, it is concluded that the
number of turns (N), voltage (V), and current (I) all have a direct proportionality.
FALSE – They are not all directly related. The number of turns (N) has a direct
relationship with voltage (V) but is inversely proportional to the current (I).

5. According to Lenz’ Law, an induced electromotive force has a polarity that tends
to produce a current which follows the alternations in the magnetic flux.
FALSE – A current produced by an induced EMF opposes any form of change or
alternation in the magnetic flux that caused it; this is why the negative sign exists
in Faraday’s Law.

6. Magnetic force in circular motion has constant kinetic energy because magnetic
force does no work and only motion changes with it.
TRUE – Magnetic force is perpendicular to the motion of the charge. Particle
velocity is also perpendicular to the magnetic field. Thus, there is no change in
kinetic energy even by the formula derivation.

7. A current that flows in an electrical circuit carries mechanical energy.


FALSE – A current does not carry mechanical energy, it first carries electrical
energy, and then it will be converted to mechanical energy by various processes.

8. If the magnetic flux through a certain region is changing with time, then an
electromotive force must exist within the boundary.
TRUE – Magnetic flux and EMF are co-dependent. One cannot exist without the
other so yes, an EMF must be within the boundary.

9. The magnetic flux is inveresely proportional to surface area. The smaller the area,
the larger the magnitude of its power.
FALSE – Magnetic flux is directly proportional to surface area, thus, a larger area
means a greater magnitude.

10. A magnetic force is exerted only if a component of the motion of the charge is
inclined to the field.
FALSE – Not neccesarily inclined to the field, but it has to be perpendicular.
‘Inclined’ includes all angles smaller than 90° whereas it only has to be strictly 90°
III. Problem Solving (40 points total)

1. What is the velocity of a photon traveling at an angle of 60° if the magnetic


field’s strength measures 3.5 × 10−12 𝑇 and the magnitude force is 1.2 × 10−5 𝑁?
(5 points)
2. An electron with standard mass and charge moves in a circular pathway
(diameter of 28m) with centripal force 12𝑁. Determine (1) the velocity of the
electron, and (2) magnitude of the magnetic field’s strength. (8 points)
3. The area of the circular radius of a given magnetic field is determined to be
220𝑐𝑚2 where its current was measured as 32𝐴. With the current being constant,
it flows in a wire 18m long in the presence of an unchanged magnetic field.
Calculate the magnitude force on the wire given that it is perpendicular.
(8 points)
4. A circular coil of circumference 344cm has 120 windings. The coil is first held
clockwise as such that it makes an an angle of 15° to a magnetic field of
strength 20 𝑇. The loop is then rotated in 2.5s so that the magnetic strength is
changed to −46 T. The EMF is measured to be −2𝑉 with electrical resistance 20Ω.
(12 points)
a. Determine its initial magnetic flux.
b. At what new angle was the coil rotated to for this happen?
c. Find the current of the loop.
5. A step-up transformer with a ratio of 5: 3 generates 540 turns with the secondary
coil using 75A of current. If the primary voltage is 55V, determine the ff.:
a. No. of turns in the primary coil
b. Amount of current in the primary coil
c. Voltage in the secondary coil
d. Power level in both the primary and secondary coil
(7 points)

ANSWERS:
1. GIVEN: SOLUTION:
𝜃 = 60° 𝐹 = 𝑞𝐵𝑣 sin 𝜃
𝐵 = 3.5 × 10−12 𝑇 𝐹
𝑣=
𝐹 = 1.2 × 10−5 𝑁 𝑞𝐵 sin 𝜃
𝑞 = 1.6 × 10−19 𝐶 1.2 × 10−5 𝑁
𝑣=
REQ’D: 𝑣 (1.6 × 10−19 𝐶)(3.5 × 10−12 𝑇)(sin 60°)
𝒗 = 𝟐. 𝟒𝟕 × 𝟏𝟎𝟐𝟓 m/s
2. GIVEN: SOLUTION:
𝐷 = 28m 𝑚𝑣 2 𝐷 = 28m 𝑚𝑣 = 𝑟𝑞𝐵 sin 𝜃
𝐹𝐶 = 12𝑁 𝐹𝐶 = 𝑚𝑣
𝑟 𝐷 = 2𝑟 = 28m 𝐵=
𝑚 = 9.11 × 10−31 kg 𝐹𝐶 𝑟 = 𝑚𝑣 2 28 𝑟𝑞 sin 𝜃
𝑞 = 1.6 × 10−19 𝐶 𝐹𝐶 𝑟 𝑟= m = 14m (9.11 × 10−31 kg)(1.36 × 1016 m/s)
= 𝑣2 2
REQ’D: 𝑣, 𝐵 𝑚 𝐵=
(14m)(1.6 × 10−19 𝐶)(sin 90°)
(12𝑁)(14m)
𝐹𝐶 𝑟 𝑣=√ 𝑩 = 𝟓𝟓𝟑𝟏. 𝟎𝟕 𝑻
𝑣=√ 9.11 × 10−31 kg
𝑚
𝒗 = 𝟏. 𝟑𝟔 × 𝟏𝟎𝟏𝟔 m/s

𝜇𝑜 𝐼
3. GIVEN: SOLUTION: 𝐵=
𝐴𝐶 = 2.2𝑚2 2𝜋𝑅
𝐴𝐶 = 220cm2 → 2.2𝑚2 (4𝜋 × 10−7 T m/A)(32𝐴)
𝐼 = 32𝐴 𝐴𝐶 = 𝜋𝑅 2 𝐵=
2𝜋(0.84𝑚)
𝐿 = 18m 𝜋𝑅 2 = 2.2𝑚2
2.2𝑚2 𝑩 = 𝟕. 𝟔𝟐 × 𝟏𝟎−𝟔 𝑻
𝜃 = 90° 𝑅2 =
𝜇𝑜 = 4𝜋 × 10−7 T m/A 𝜋
𝐹 = 𝐼𝐿𝐵 sin 𝜃
REQ’D: 𝐹 2.2𝑚2
𝑅=√ 𝐹 = (32𝐴)(18m)(7.62 × 10−6 𝑇)(sin 90°)
𝜋 𝑭 = 𝟒. 𝟑𝟗 × 𝟏𝟎−𝟑 𝑵
𝑹 = 𝟎. 𝟖𝟒m

4. GIVEN: SOLUTION: −𝑁 (Φ𝐵𝑓 − Φ𝐵𝑖 )


𝐶 = 2𝜋𝑟 = 3.44𝑚 𝜀=
𝐶 = 344cm → 3.44m Δ𝑡
3.44𝑚
𝜃𝑖 = 15° 𝑟= −120 ((−46𝑇)(0.94𝑚2 ) 𝑐𝑜𝑠 𝜃𝑓 − 18.19wb)
𝐵𝑖 = 20𝑇 2𝜋 −2𝑉 =
𝐴𝐶 = 𝜋𝑟 2 2.5𝑠
∆𝑡 = 2.5𝑠 (−2𝑉)(2.5𝑠) = 5198.184 𝑇𝑚2 cos 𝜃𝑓 + 2182.8wb
3.44𝑚 2
𝐵𝑓 = −46𝑇 𝐴𝐶 = 𝜋 ( ) −5𝑉𝑠 − 2182.8𝑤𝑏 = 5198.184 𝑇𝑚2 cos 𝜃𝑓
𝜀 = −2𝑉 2𝜋
𝑨𝑪 = 𝟎. 𝟗𝟒𝟏𝟕𝒎𝟐 𝟏 𝑽𝒔 = 𝟏wb
𝑁 = 120 turns −2187.8wb
Φ𝐵𝑖 = 𝐵𝑖 𝐴 cos 𝜃𝑖 = cos 𝜃𝑓
𝑅 = 20Ω
Φ𝐵𝑖 = (20𝑇)(0.9417𝑚2 ) 5198.184 𝑇𝑚2
REQ’D: Φ𝐵𝑖 , 𝜃𝑓 , 𝐼 −2187.8wb
(cos 15°) 𝜃𝑓 = cos−1 ( )
5198.184 𝑇𝑚2
𝚽𝑩𝒊 = 𝟏𝟖. 𝟏𝟗 wb
𝜃𝑓 = 114.89°
Φ𝐵𝑓 = 𝐵𝑓 𝐴 cos 𝜃𝑓
𝑉 = 𝐼𝑅 Because 0° < 𝜃 ≤ 90°, 𝜃 = 180 − 𝜃
𝑉 = 𝜀 = −2𝑉 𝚽𝑩𝒇 = (−𝟒𝟔𝑻)(𝟎. 𝟗𝟒𝟕𝒎𝟐 ) 𝜃 = 114.89 − 180
𝑉 (𝐜𝐨𝐬 𝜽𝒇 ) 𝜽𝒇 = 𝟔𝟓. 𝟏𝟏° counter clockwise
𝐼=
𝑅
−2𝑉
𝐼=
20Ω
𝑰 = −𝟎. 𝟏𝑨
5. GIVEN: SOLUTION: 5 55𝑉 𝑃𝑃 = 𝑉𝑃 𝐼𝑃
5 𝑁𝑃 𝑉𝑃 𝐼𝑆 =
𝑘𝑟 = 𝑘𝑟 = = = 3 𝑉𝑆 𝑃𝑃 = (55𝑉)(45𝐴)
3 𝑁𝑆 𝑉𝑆 𝐼𝑃 5𝑉𝑆 = 3(55𝑉) 𝑷𝑷 = 𝟐𝟒𝟕𝟓watts
𝑁𝑆 = 540 turns 5 𝑁𝑃 55𝑉 75𝐴 3
𝐼𝑆 = 75𝐴 = = = 𝑉𝑆 = (55𝑉)
3 540 𝑉𝑆 𝐼𝑃 5 𝑃𝑆 = 𝑉𝑆 𝐼𝑆
𝑉𝑃 = 55𝑉 5 𝑁𝑃 𝑽𝑺 = 𝟑𝟑𝑽 𝑃𝑆 = (33𝑉)(75𝐴)
REQ’D: 𝑁𝑃 , 𝐼𝑃 , 𝑉𝑆 , 𝑃𝑃 , 𝑃𝑆 =
3 540 𝑷𝑺 = 𝟐𝟒𝟕𝟓watts
5 5 75𝐴
𝑁𝑃 = 540 ( ) 𝑷𝑷 = 𝑷𝑺
3 =
3 𝐼𝑃
𝑵𝑷 = 𝟗𝟎𝟎 turns
5𝐼𝑃 = 3(75𝐴)
3
𝐼𝑃 = (75𝐴)
5
𝑰𝑷 = 𝟒𝟓𝑨