Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 24

01‐08‐2019

2019‐2020/I

CE671A: Introduction to Remote Sensing
Dr. Salil Goel
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil Engineering

Email: sgoel@iitk.ac.in

Phone: +91 512 259 6179

Tutor/TA:  Prashant Chauhan (prashc@iitk.ac.in) 
Important Details Ashish Katiyar (ashkat@iitk.ac.in) 

Lectures:  L‐08

Laboratory: Varun Lab

1
01‐08‐2019

Quizzes (Surprise/Announced)

Mid Semester Examination (2 hours)

Course 
End Semester Examination (3 hours)
Evaluation Policy

Home Assignments (multiple)

Laboratories and Term Paper

Submission deadline for HA will be informed.

HA should be prepared in the given LaTeX 
template or hand‐written. It will be 
communicated.
Home 
Assignments
HA not prepared according to the given 
instructions will not be graded.

HAs will be evaluated for completeness, 
correctness and presentation.

2
01‐08‐2019

Held every Wednesday from 2‐4 PM either in GI lab or Varun 


lab.

Lab report to be submitted by 12:00 PM next Wednesday (1 
week).

Lab reports will be evaluated for completeness, correctness 
Laboratory  and presentation.

Exercises Lab reports should be prepared according to given template 
in LaTeX or hand‐written. This will be communicated to you.

One Lab exam will be conducted.

Those who miss the lab turn will not be permitted to submit 
the lab report.

Topics floated by me or suggested by you.

Term papers with a coding/programming component 
are encouraged.

Term Paper Term paper presentation will be scheduled sometime in 
October (probably last week).

You will be expected to write a term paper report, make 
a presentation and provide a live demo of your code.

Exact schedule will be informed.

3
01‐08‐2019

All submissions will be done online via google drive. (Email from TA).

All reports/HA should be in accordance with the given instructions 
(either in LaTeX template or hand‐written).

Reports/HA that are not according to the given instructions will not be 
graded.

Policy on 
Copied reports/HA etc. will be awarded zero marks.
Submissions
Plagiarism is unacceptable. Penalty: zero marks and issue will be 
reported.

Submissions made within 24 hours after deadline will attract 50% 
penalty.

Submissions made after 24 hours of the deadline will not be graded.

Lab reports/Term papers/HA

Should be written in  Many Tex MATLAB/Python  Use of other software  Plagiarism and copying 


LaTeX only. implementations are  Programming packages (Google Earth  is unacceptable.
available free of  Engine)
charge.

Texlive MikTex Overleaf ShareLatex

4
01‐08‐2019

Mid semester examination – 25%
End semester examination – 30%
Lab reports – 10%
Marks  Lab exam – 5%
Distribution Term paper – 10 %
Quizzes – 15%
Home Assignments – 5%

James B. Campbell & Randolph H. Wyne, Introduction to 
Remote Sensing, Guilford Press (5th Ed.)

Course 
Material/Reference  Arthur P. Cracknell & Ladson Hayes, Introduction to Remote 
Books Sensing, CRC Press (2nd Ed.)

Material from research papers

5
01‐08‐2019

Course Outline
Remote sensing: Brief Introduction & Applications
Remote sensing process
Passive Remote Sensing
Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR) & its interactions
Radiation laws & Scattering
Image formation process
Different types of resolution
Satellite orbits & Remote sensing satellites
Image processing and interpretation
Active Remote Sensing

Geoinformatics: An Overview

Chain & Tape
Total Station
LiDAR
Storage, Retrieval, 
Photogrammetry
Presentation,
Satellite imagery
Analysis, etc.
.
.
Geoinformatics: Measurement and Management of Geo‐Information

6
01‐08‐2019

Geoinformatics: Measurement Tools
Chain and Tape
Compass
Theodolite
EDMI
Total Station
Auto‐level

Land Surveying

Difficult for inaccessible areas

Chain and tape – can be cumbersome
Total station – Fast and accurate

Geoinformatics: Measurement Tools
Stereo images for 3D model generation and 
measurement.

Can be used to map inaccessible areas.

Generally weather dependent.

Can be quite costly

Aerial Photogrammetry

7
01‐08‐2019

Geoinformatics: Measurement Tools
Satellite Remote Sensing
• Altitude ~600 – 900 km
• Provides a synoptic view of the earth.
• Multiple sensor and multiple bands
• Resolution: meter to sub‐meter level resolution
• Repeatability: Observe same area at multiple time instant.

• Applications: Crop yield, soil mapping, glacier studies, LULC, 
change detection etc.

Geoinformatics: Measurement Tools
Global Navigation Satellite Systems
• Absolutely new concept to know one’s location
• Uses a constellation of satellites to estimate the receiver 
location.
• Minimum 4 satellites needed
• Minimum 24 earth satellites orbiting the earth for location 
estimation anywhere on earth.
• Requires open sky
• Applications: Navigation, mapping, etc.

GPS GLONASS GALILEO QZSS BEIDOU IRNSS

8
01‐08‐2019

Geoinformatics: Measurement Tools
Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)

• Can be performed from aircraft, drones or terrestrial.
• Provides a dense 3D point cloud.
• Multiple applications: Mapping, driverless cars etc.
• Other applications: Flood modelling, line of sight analysis 
etc.

Geoinformatics: Management
Requirement to store and retrieve information 
efficiently.
Requirement to present information.
Incorporate all information collected in analysis 
to suit modern application.

GIS allows easy storage, retrieval, management 
and transmission of geographic information 
across various users and systems.

Example: Google maps

9
01‐08‐2019

Geoinformatics: Management
Example: Flood Relief and Management
A flood relief operation needs:
• Flood extent
• Road network and types of roads Develop a model that uses all this data 
• Topographical information to locate sites on priority for rescue and 
• Distribution of one story or multi‐story houses
• Distribution of probable shelters should be able to make use of all data 
• Locations of rescue teams simultaneously.
• Other data

A GIS provides the platform for running 
the model and for processing the result.

Remote Sensing: An Introduction
“ Remote sensing is the science of 
obtaining information about objects 
or areas from a distance, typically 
from aircraft or satellites.”

Remote sensing could be performed 
through detection of sound, heat, light or 
force distribution.

10
01‐08‐2019

Remote Sensing: Applications
Urban planning
Environmental monitoring
Change detection analysis
Hydrological modelling
Soil moisture estimation
Snow cover estimation
Surveillance
Oil Spill detection
Surveying applications
LULC for decision making

Remote Sensing: Applications

Built‐up ‐> Red
Cultivated land ‐> Green

11
01‐08‐2019

Remote Sensing Platforms
Satellite Aircraft Drone(UAV)

Choice of the platform depends on:
• Required resolution
• Size of area (Coverage)
• Repeatability
• Cost limitations
• Other application dependent factors

Drones: Low coverage, High resolution

Satellites: High coverage, Low resolution

Active vs. Passive Remote Sensing
Active Remote Sensing Passive Remote Sensing
Use own energy source Measure naturally available energy

Generally unaffected by lighting conditions  Need proper lighting conditions and 
and/or cloud cover affected by cloud cover
E.g. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) e.g. Multi‐spectral Satellite Images

Energy requirements for target illumination  Targets illuminated by natural sources (e.g. 
are high Sun) are imaged.

12
01‐08‐2019

Remote Sensing Process

Passive Remote Sensing

Passive Remote Sensing

13
01‐08‐2019

Passive Remote Sensing
Energy source: Natural (external), e.g. Sun
River/Water body

The object is illuminated by the sun and the energy from the 
target is recorded by the sensor on the platform 
(aircraft/satellite).

Vegetation The sensor is called a ‘passive sensor’ (E.g. Camera).

The received radiation is processed to infer the parameters of 
the target (earth surface).
Urban
Using remote sensing, we would like to categorize, identify, 
classify or study the objects.

Electromagnetic Spectrum

EMR

Different objects will interact differently with different wavelengths.

We can study the target properties by measuring and studying the 
properties of EMR reflected or emitted by the target.

14
01‐08‐2019

Electromagnetic Spectrum

• Different wavelength ‐> Different interaction with matter.
• Example‐1: Vegetation reflects strongly in NIR.
• Example‐2: Water is an almost perfect absorber in NIR.
• This knowledge can be useful in ‘feature identification’, as well as studying the feature 
properties.

Electromagnetic Spectrum
Restricted to radiation that is emitted with 
reasonable intensity from the surface of the earth.

OR

Present in reasonable quantity in the radiation that 
is emitted by the sun and reflected from surface of 
earth.

EMR can get: Scattered, Absorbed, Reflected.

Visible light gets attenuated in the presence of fog, dust, mist or haze.
Can we use all the different wavelength 
Low‐wavelength radiation gets scattered easily.
available in the spectrum to design a 
High‐wavelength radiation has a low energy content. passive remote sensing system?

To sense longer wavelengths, larger areas need to be viewed.

15
01‐08‐2019

Electromagnetic Spectrum

The Complete Remote Sensing System

Source
Atmosphere: Effect varies with associated 
wavelength.
Energy interactions: Assume that spectral signature 
is known.
Sensor: Sensitivity, spatial resolution, etc.
Processing System

16
01‐08‐2019

Advantages and Disadvantages of Remote Sensing
Advantages Disadvantages
Large coverage (for satellite Interpretation is not
borne) straightforward ‐ Requires a certain
level of skill.
Remote and inaccessible areas
can be observed. Confusion due to data from
multiple sources.
Good repeatability – Allows to
observe changes in the Objects can be misclassified.
landscape.
Needs cross‐verification with
Easy and rapid data collection ground survey data.
Rapid processing for
interpretation

Basic Definitions
Radiant Flux
Rate at which photons strike a surface.
Measured in Watts and specifies energy delivered to a surface in a unit of time.

Irradiance
Radiant flux per unit area.
Measured in Watts per sq. m.
Measured radiation that strikes a surface.

Radiant Exitance
Rate at which radiation is emitted from a unit area.
Measured in watts per sq. m.

17
01‐08‐2019

Energy Laws

Energy Laws

18
01‐08‐2019

Emissivity

Blackbody Radiation

Stefan Boltzman Law
Wien’s Displacement Law

19
01‐08‐2019

Radiation

Atmospheric Interactions
As the energy passes through the atmosphere, it 
undergoes refraction, scattering and absorption.

Example: Effects of dust, smoke, haze and other 
atmospheric impurities due to their high concentrations.

The effect of atmosphere is minimal for aircraft or 
UAVs.

For satellites, the effect can be quite significant 
because the energy must pass through the entire 
atmosphere.

20
01‐08‐2019

Scattering
Defined as “redirection of electromagnetic energy by particles 
suspended in the atmosphere or by large molecules of 
atmospheric gases”. 
Rayleigh Scattering
Amount of scattering depends on:
◦ Size of particles Mie Scattering
◦ Abundance of particles
◦ Wavelength of radiation Non‐selective Scattering
◦ Depth of atmosphere

Scattering redirects the radiation so that incoming solar energy is 
directed back towards space or earth’s surface.

Rayleigh Scattering
Size of particle << wavelength of radiation
Amount of scattering is inversely proportional to the 
fourth power of wavelength.

Shorter wavelength is scattered more as compared to 
longer wavelength.
Blue wavelength scatters about 4 times as compared to 
red.
Molecules of oxygen and nitrogen cause this type of 
scattering in visible part of EMR.

21
01‐08‐2019

Mie Scattering
Size of particle is similar to wavelength of the radiation.
Caused by large particles including dust, pollen and water droplets.
Larger influence on wavelengths in and near visible spectrum.
Wavelength dependent but relationship is not as simple as Rayleigh scattering.

Question:

In which part of the atmosphere would you expect Mie scattering and Rayleigh scattering?

Non‐selective Scattering
Particle size >> Wavelength of radiation
Non‐selective scattering is wavelength independent.
All visible wavelength is scattered equally.
This scattering introduces a whitish or grayish haze in the image.

22
01‐08‐2019

Significance of Scattering in RS
Scattering causes atmosphere to have a brightness of its 
own and thus, shadows (or dark objects) do not appear jet 
black.

The radiation in blue and UV regions of spectrum is 
generally not considered useful for remote sensing.

Scattering directs energy from outside sensor’s FOV 
towards the aperture and may reduce contrast in the 
image.

Absorption
Process in which incident energy is retained by particles in the 
atmosphere, and thus causing a loss of energy.
Most of the absorption is done by:
◦ Ozone
Absorption occurs 20‐30 km above surface.
Absorbs short wavelength of UV spectrum.
◦ Carbon dioxide
Lower atmosphere
Absorbs mid and far infra red regions of the spectrum
◦ Water Vapor
Lower atmosphere
More effective in absorbing radiation than atmosphere gases.

23
01‐08‐2019

Atmospheric Windows
Atmosphere selectively transmits energy of 
certain wavelengths.
Depends on the absorption spectra of 
atmospheric gases.
Wavelengths that are easily transmitted are 
called ‘Atmospheric Windows’.
Atmospheric windows are important because 
they define those wavelengths that can be 
used for image formation.

Atmospheric 
Windows

24