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1.

The London Dungeon (lie) in the oldest part of London - in an old subterranean

prison (that's what the word Dungeon (stand) for).

2. The museum (take) its visitors on a journey through England's bloody history.

3. It (demonstrate) the brutal killings and tortures of the past.

4. You (experience / can) for example how people (die) on the


Gallow or during the Plague of 1665.

5. The Dungeon also (show) scenes of Jack the Ripper or the beheading of Anne

Boleyn, who (be) one of Henry VIII’s six wives.

6. The atmosphere at the Dungeon (be) really scary - nothing for the faint-hearted.

7. While you (walk) around the Dungeon, watch out for creepy creatures - the

Dungeon (employ) actors to give its visitors the fright of their lives.

8. The actors, dressed as monsters, ghosts or executers, (hide) in the dark corners

of the Dungeon and then suddenly (jump) out and (grab) one of the
visitors.

9. And the horror (end / not) at the exit of the exhibition.

10. The museum (want) to provoke, shock, educate and delight.

11. And this it (do) extremely well.

12. Besides the regular opening hours, the Dungeon sometimes also (open) at night.

13. If you (have) enough money and nerves of steel, you (book / can)

the Dungeon for parties, conferences or charity events at night.

14. And on 31 October, a frightfully good Halloween Party (take place) at the
Dungeon every year.
15. The London Dungeon liesin the oldest part of London - in an old subterranean prison (that's what
the word Dungeon stands for).
16. The museum takes its visitors on a journey through England's bloody history.
17. It demonstrates the brutal killings and tortures of the past.
18. You can experience for example how people died on the Gallow or during the Plague of 1665.
19. The Dungeon also shows scenes of Jack the Ripper or the beheading of Anne Boleyn, who was
one of Henry VIII’s six wives.
20. The atmosphere at the Dungeon is really scary - nothing for the faint-hearted.
21. While you are walking around the Dungeon, watch out for creepy creatures - the Dungeon
employs actors to give its visitors the fright of their lives.
22. The actors, dressed as monsters, ghosts or executers, are hiding in the dark corners of the Dungeon
and then suddenly jump out and grab one of the visitors.
23. And the horror does not end at the exit of the exhibition.
24. The museum wants to provoke, shock, educate and delight.
25. And this it does extremely well.
26. Besides the regular opening hours, the Dungeon sometimes also opens at night.
27. If you have enough money and nerves of steel, you can book the Dungeon for parties,
conferences or charity events at night.
28. And on 31 October, a frightfully good Halloween Party takes place at the Dungeon every year.
29. The British explorer James Cook was born in the village of Marton, Yorkshire, on 27 October,
1728. But his family soon (move) to another village, called Great Ayton, where

Cook (spend) most of his childhood.

30. As a teenager James Cook (develop) a fascination for the sea and (travel)

to Whitby where he (find) employment on a coal ship.

31. While he (serve) in the Royal Navy during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763),

Cook (have) the command of a ship.

32. After the war (end) , Cook (take) command of the vessel

Grenville and (go) to Newfoundland to survey the coasts there.

33. While he (map) the coasts of Newfoundland, he (observe) a


solar eclipse off the North American coast.

34. Cook (send) the details to the Royal Society, England's leading scientific

organisation, and (win) their attention.

35. After Cook (publish) his observations of the solar eclipse, the Royal Society

(ask) him to lead a scientific expedition to Tahiti and (put) him


in command of of the HMS Endeavour.

36. From Tahiti Cook then (go on) to explore the South Pacific.

37. He also (reach) New Zealand, which only the Dutchman Abel Tasman (visit)

before Cook.

38. After Cook (map) New Zealand's complete coastline, he (sail)


to Australia's east coast.

39. Cook (name) the area New South Wales as it (remind) him of
the south coast of Wales in Great Britain.

40. In 1772, one year after Cook (return) from his first voyage to the Pacific, the

Royal Society (hire) him for another expedition to find the mythical Terra
Australis.

41. On his journey, Cook (discover) several islands and almost (go)

as far as the continent of Antarctica.

42. He (make) maps of the South Pacific and (prove) that Terra

Australis (exist / not) .


43. His third and last voyage for the Royal Society (take) him to the west coast of

North America where he (try) to find a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific.

44. He (not / can / pass) the Bering Strait, however; the ice (force)

him to return to Hawaii, which he (discover) earlier.

45. While he and his crew (rest) in Hawaii, some Hawaiians (steal)

one of his boats.

46. When cook and his men (try) to get the boat back from the natives, a violent

fight (break out) in which the natives (stab) James Cook to


death.
47. The British explorer James Cook was born in the village of Marton, Yorkshire, on 27 October,
1728. But his family soon moved to another village, called Great Ayton, where Cook spent most
of his childhood.
48. As a teenager James Cook developed a fascination for the sea and travelled to Whitby where he
found employment on a coal ship.
49. While he was serving in the Royal Navy during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763), Cook had
the command of a ship.
50. After the war had ended, Cook took command of the vessel Grenville and went to
Newfoundland to survey the coasts there.
51. While he was mapping the coasts of Newfoundland, he observed a solar eclipse off the North
American coast.
52. Cook sent the details to the Royal Society, England's leading scientific organisation, and won
their attention.
53. After Cook had published his observations of the solar eclipse, the Royal Society asked him to
lead a scientific expedition to Tahiti and put him in command of of the HMS Endeavour.
54. From Tahiti Cook then went on to explore the South Pacific.
55. He also reached New Zealand, which only the Dutchman Abel Tasman had visited before Cook.
56. After Cook had mapped New Zealand's complete coastline, he sailed to Australia's east coast.
57. Cook named the area New South Wales as it reminded him of the south coast of Wales in Great
Britain.
58. In 1772, one year after Cook had returned from his first voyage to the Pacific, the Royal Society
hired him for another expedition to find the mythical Terra Australis.
59. On his journey, Cook discovered several islands and almost went as far as the continent of
Antarctica.
60. He made maps of the South Pacific and proved that Terra Australis did not exist .
61. His third and last voyage for the Royal Society took him to the west coast of North America where
he tried to find a passage between the Atlantic and Pacific.
62. He could not pass the Bering Strait, however; the ice forced him to return to Hawaii, which he had
discovered earlier.
63. While he and his crew were resting in Hawaii, some Hawaiians stole one of his boats.
64. When cook and his men tried to get the boat back from the natives, a violent fight broke out in
which the natives stabbed James Cook to death.
1) Every afternoon Jack a cup of tea. (to have)

2) We a computer game at the moment. (to play)

3) Pat often to concerts. (to go)

4) I a nice film now. (to watch)

5) Angela sometimes a museum. (to visit)

6) Look! The boys to the playground. (to run)

7) Listen! Anne and Susan a song. (to sing)

8) The cat seldom on the sofa. (to sleep)

9) They from Tokyo. (to be)

10) Tom never picture postcards. (to write)

While I , the school bus . (to text) (to arrive)

2) Cindy her leg while she . (to break) (to snowboard)

3) He to the radio while he breakfast. (to listen) (to prepare)

4) My father at 70 km/h when a policeman him. (to drive) (to


stop)

5) The girl that the boy her. (to notice) (to watch)

6) My dad the ladder while he the carport. (to fall off) (to
paint)

7) While we , we crossword puzzles. (to wait) (to do)

8) Nick sick while he in Texas. (to become) (to travel)

9) What when you about 9/11? (to do) (to hear)

10) She said that she happy, so I to her. (not/to feel) (to talk)
1) Every afternoon Jack has a cup of tea.
2) We are playing a computer game at the moment.
3) Pat often goes to concerts.
4) I am watching a nice film now.
5) Angela sometimes visits a museum.
6) Look! The boys are running to the playground.
7) Listen! Anne and Susan are singing a song.
8) The cat seldom sleeps on the sofa.
9) They are from Tokyo.
10) Tom never writes picture postcards.
1) While I was texting, the school bus arrived.
2) Cindy broke her leg while she was snowboarding.
3) He was listening to the radio while he was preparing breakfast.
4) My father was driving at 70 km/h when a policeman stopped him.
5) The girl noticed that the boy was watching her.
6) My dad fell off the ladder while he was painting the carport.
7) While we were waiting, we were doing crossword puzzles.
8) Nick became sick while he was travelling in Texas.
9) What were you doing when you heard about 9/11?
10) She said that she was not feeling happy, so I talked to her.

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