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INTRODUCTION

EMPLOYEE WELFARE
Employee welfare activity in India was largely influenced by humanitarian principles and
legislation. During the early period of industrial development, efforts towards workers’ welfare
were made largely by social workers, philanthropists and other religious leaders, mostly on
humanitarian grounds. Before the introduction of welfare and other legislation in India, the
conditions of labour were miserable. Exploitation of child labour, long hours of work, bad
sanitation, and absence of safety measures were the regular features of factory life. The earliest
legislative approach could be traced back to the passing of the Apprentices Act of 1850. This Act
was enacted with the objective of helping poor and orphaned children to learn various trades and
crafts. The next Act was the Fatal Accidents Act of 1853, which aimed at providing compensation
to the families of workmen who lost their life as a result of “actionable wrong.” They came the
Merchants Shipping Act of 1859, which regulated the employment of seamen and provided for
their health, accommodation, and necessary articles of personal use. Earlier attempts at legislation
in this country were mainly aimed at regulation of employment.
BEFORE INDEPENDENCE
The movement to improve the working conditions of Indian labour started with the passing
of the first Indian Factories Act in 1881. The Mulock Commission was appointed by the
Government of Bombay in 1884 to review the working of the Factories Act of 1881. N.M.
Lokhande, founder of the Bombay Mill Hands’ Association brought the workmen together on two
different occasions in 1884 and presented on their behalf a charter of demands to the Commission.
The Royal Commission on Labour under the chairmanship of J.H. Whitley was appointed
in 1929 to enquire into and report on the then existing conditions of labour in industrial
undertakings, plantations, mines, and so on. The Commission made an in-depth survey of different
aspects of health, efficiency, welfare, standard of living, conditions of work and relations between
employers and employees and submitted its monumental report on March 14, 1931. It
recommended the enactment of a number of legislations relating to payment of wages in time,
minimum wages, need for health insurance for industrial workers, and improvement of working
conditions of plantation workers.

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AFTER INDEPENDENCE
After independence, the EMPLOYEE WELFARE movement acquired new dimensions. It
was realized that EMPLOYEE WELFARE had a positive role to play in increasing productivity
and reducing industrial tensions. The state began to realize its social responsibilities towards
weaker sections of the society. The emergence of different central trade union organizations like
INTUC (1947), HMS (1948), UTUC (1949), BMS (1955), CITU (1970), and NLO (1969) gave a
further fillip to the growth of EMPLOYEE WELFARE movement.
CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE FACILTIES
The Study appointed by the government of India in 1959 to examine EMPLOYEE
WELFARE facilities then existing, divided the entire range of these activities into three groups,
viz.

1. Welfare work within the precinct of an establishment – medical aid, crèches, canteens, supply
of drinking water etc. It means that the welfare facilities are undertaken within boundary of an
establishment.

2. Welfare work outside the precinct establishment – provision for indoor and outdoor recreation,
housing, adult education, visual instructions, etc., and;

3. Social Security measures etc. However, the committee of experts on Welfare Facilities for
Industrial Workers convened by International Labour Organization (ILO) in 1963 had divided
welfare services in two groups.

a) Within the precincts of the establishment and (b) outside the establishment – but the total
content of the activities was the same as had been included in three groups mentioned
above. Thus, the classification of welfare facilities as adopted by the ILP has been given as
follows

It should, however, be noted that the EMPLOYEE WELFARE facilities that are
provided within the precincts of industry (i.e. inside the industry) are also known as intra-mural
activities, and the welfare facilities that are provided outside the establishment are known as
extra-mural activities.

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INTRA-MURAL ACTIVITIES
According to the recommendations of the ILO, the welfare facilities within the precinct of
the establishment includes the facilities such as; (1) Latrines and Urinals, (2) Washing and bathing
facilities, (3) Crèches, (4) Rests shelters and Canteens, (5) Arrangement for drinking water, (6)
Arrangement for prevention of fatigue, (7) Health services including occupational safety, (8)
Administrative arrangement within a plant to look after welfare, (9) Uniform and protective
clothing and, (10) Shifting allowance.
EXTRA-MURAL ACTIVITIES
According to the recommendations of the ILO, the welfare facilities outside the
establishment include facilities such as; (1) Maternity benefits, (2) Social Insurance measures
including grauity, pension, provident fund and rehabilitation, (3) Benevolent fund, (4) Medical
faciltieis including programmes for physical fitness and efficiency, family planning and child-
welfare, (5) Educational facilities including adult education, (6) Housing facilities, (7) Recreation
facilities, including sports, cultural activities, library and reading room, (8) Holiday homes and
leave and travel facilities, (9) Workers cooperative including consumer cooperative stores, fair
price shops and cooperative thrift and credit societies, (10) Vocational training for dependents of
workers, (11) Other programmes for the welfare of women, youth and children and (12) Transport
to and from the place of work.
STATUTORY, VOLUNTARY AND MUTUAL WELFARE FACILITIES
Employee Welfare work may also be divided into three categories (1) Statutory; (2)
Voluntary and (3) Mutual.
Statutory Welfare work constitutes those provides of welfare work which are provided in
different factory Acts and it is obligatory on the part of the employers to observe these provisions.
Voluntary Welfare work includes those activities, which are undertaken by employers for their
workers voluntarily.
Mutual Welfare is a corporate enterprise of the workers themselves. For instance, if workers
decide to improve their lot on the basis of mutual help, it may be called a mutual welfare work.
Trade unions for this purpose undertake many provisions for the welfare of the workers.

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INDUSTRIAL PROFILE

A battery is an electro chemical device in which the free energy of chemical reaction is
converted into the electrical energy. The chemical energy contained in the active materials is
converted into electrical energy by means of electrochemical oxidation reduction reactions.

HOW A BATTERY WORKS


When your place the key in your car’s ignition and turn the ignition switch to “ON” a
signal sent to the battery. Upon receiving this signal, the car battery takes energy that it has been
strong in chemical form and releases it as electricity. This electrical power is used to crank the
engine. The battery also release energy to power the car’s light and others accessories.
It is the only device, which can store electrical energy in the form of chemical
energy, and science it is called as a storage battery.
SAALED MAINTENANCE FREE (SMF) BATTERY
Sealed maintenance free (SMF) batteries technologies are leading the battery industry in
the recent years in automobile and industry battery sector around the globe. SMF batteries come
under the rechargeable battery category so it can be used a number of times the life of a batter
SMF batteries are more economical than cadmium batteries. These batteries are more compact then
the wet type batteries. It can be at any position, these batteries are very popular for portable power
requirements and space constraint applications.
VALUE REGULATED LEAD ACID BATTERIES
In the recent years in automobile and industrial battery sector around the globe VRLA
batteries have become the preferred choice in various application such as uninterrupted power
supply, emergency lights, security systems and weighting scales.

VRLA batteries are leak – proof, splll-proff, explosion – resistant and having life duration
of 15-20 years. These batteries withstand the environmental conditions due to high technology,
inbuilt in the batteries. Each cell is housed in a power coated steel tray making them convenient to
transport and installation. So transits damages are minimized in case these batteries.

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CLASSIFICATION OF BATTERIES
Batteries are broadly classified into two segments viz., automotive batteries and industrial
batteries.
AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES
Apart from mopeds all other automobiles scooter need storage battery. So automotive
batteries are playing pre – dominant role in automobile sector by influencing the consumers in the
automobile market. Automobile batteries can be further distinguished as the original equipment
(OE) market and replacement market.
Original equipment in market is as low as 5-6% O. E Segment has the advantage of
securing continuous orders and enquires. This enables manufactures to stream line production
facilities, plan production schedules and attain certain level of operational efficiency.
The replacement market, on the other hand, is much longer. The replacement market is
characterized by the presence of large unorganized sector, which constitutes around 55-60% of the
total replacement market. This is possible due to low capital entry barrier. These players have the
advantage of inapplicability of excise duties and sales tax.
INDUSTRIAL BATTERIES
Industrial batteries can be basically classified into main categories
 AUTOMOTIVE BATTERIES
 STATIONARY BATTERIES
The automotive batteries are used in electric vehicles and fork lifts. The stationary
batteries used in Telecom, Railway and power industries have registered a growth in excess of 20%
and this trend in likely to be continuing in the next 5 years.
The industrial segment is highly technology is an important factor and is vital for
brand reference. The total demand for the industrial battery segment is met by indigenous
production with a small saves of about 10% of by imports. The demand for industrial batteries has
grown slowly and steadily.

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RECYCLING OF BATTERIES
Battery acid recycled neutralizing it into water of converting it to sodium sulphate for
laundry detergent, glass and textile manufacturing. Cleaning the battery cases, melting the plastics
and reforming it into uniform recycle plastic. Lead, which makes up 50% of every battery, is
melted, poured into slabs and purified.

PROSPECTUS OF SMS / VRLA BATTERIES IN INDIA


 The following factors are influencing demand of VRLA technology batteries.
 Entry of multinational in Telecom industry.
 DOTS policy decision to upgrade the overall technology base.
 Constrains in the use of conventional battery in Radio paging and cellular segments.

TELECOM

The government’s policy to increase the capacity from 10 million lines by 2000 increased
the demand for storage batteries considerably. The value added services like Radio paging and
cellular will increase the demand for storage batteries in future considerably.

RAILWAY

In railways, the demand estimate is based on the annual post production which comes to
2,500 numbers by railways itself and 1,000 numbers more by various other segments, plus
replacements demand and annual requirements for railway electrification.

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COMPANY PROFILE
Amara Raja Batteries Limited (ARBL) a company incorporated under companie’s act 1956
in 13th February 1985, and converted in to public limited company on 6th September 1990.
Hardly adecade agom Karakambadi in itself in descript, faceless village. There has been a
great tradition of industry in and around areas. The technocrat entrepreneur “SRI RAMA
CHANDRA NAIDU GALLA”, hailing from Chittoor dist. Of Andhra Pradesh has done MS in
control system at Michigan University, USA. He started his career as an engineer in the USA,
worked for 17 years specialized in the areas of UPS systems, battery chargers and batteries
promoted Amara Raja Batteries as a private limited company in the year 1985 by the inspiration of
his uncle Mr. P. Raja Gopal Naidu, to manufacture Value Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA) batteries
for the time in India at Karakambadi to develop this region.
Amara raja has a strategic tie-up with Johnson Controls Incorporation of USA. Amara Raja
went in the public in the year 1991. Amara Raja and Johnson Controls Inc. Both are having a
26% each shares in ARBL at the remaining is on public share Amara Raja is a company with
commitment to achieve excellence in all its activities.
Amara Raja is a largest manufacturer of maintenance free-Value Regulated Lead Acid
batteries (MF-VRLA) in the Indian Ocean rim and Johnson controls is the largest manufacture of
lead acid batteries in North America and a leading global supplier to major auto mobile auto
manufacturers and industrial customers. The synergy of Amara Raja Johnson controls
complements the strengths of both product design and market presence. This joint venture meets
the requirements for a global source for international quality batteries and support services for both
auto and industrial applications in this reason. By employing latest generation technology and with
a clear understanding of current back-up requirements, Amara Raja has become the bench mark in
the manufacturer of industrial batteries. In a brief span of five years since commencing commercial
operations, ARBL has emerged as a largest manufacturer of a stand by VRLA batteries in the
Indian Ocean rim comprising the area ranging from Africa and the Middle East to South East Asia.
Amara Raja has its registered office and head office in karakambadi near Tirupathi in A.P
karakambadi is located at an approximate distance of 12 kms from Tirupathi the manufacturing
campus at karakambadi is one of the most beautifully land scaped campuses and boasts of state of
the art manufacturing facilities. The factory employs more than 1000 employees and has fully
integrated manufacturing plants on single campus.

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Amaron lauched in January 2000, Amara Raja has pioneered the introduction of “hi-cube
automotive batteries” in India. The zero maintenance product uses the revolutionary patented
“silver x technology” developed by Johnson controls for high environments and incorporates many
superior features that makes it the most advantage batteries on roads any where in world.
CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT
Amara Raja is putting in place a number of HRD industries to foster spirit of together and a
culture of meritocracy involving employees at all levels in building organization support plans and
evolving our vision of the organization.
Encouraging initiative and targeted to secure the ISO-14001 certificate in the next year-
evidence of our concerned for the world around us and which our children will live.
AMARA RAJA GROUP OF COMPANIES
 Amara Raja batteries limited (ARBL), Karakambadi, Tirupati.
 Amara Raja power systems pvt limited (ARPSPL), Karakambadi, Tirupati.
 Harsha electronics pvt limited (HEPL), Karakambadi, and Tirupati.
 Mangal precious production pvt limited (MPPPL), Petamitta, Chittoor.
 Amara Raja electronics pvts limited (AREPL), Dighavamangam, Chittoor.
 Galla Foods pvt limited (GFPL), Rangam Peta Cross, Puthalapattu, Chittoor.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Amara Raja power systems pvt limited (ARPSPL)
Amara Raja power systems pvt ltd was incorporated in 1984, and was co-promoted by
Andhra Pradesh electronics development corporation (APEDC).
 By virtues of APEDC’S equity participation ARPSL has become a deemed public limited
company as per section 43 (A) of a companies at, ARPSL, it engaged in the manufacture of
uninterrupted power system (UPS), Battery Charges (BC).
 The company had a technical collaboration with “H.O.R” power systems inc.USA the
operation of the firm is highly satisfactory. The present credit rating of the company is “A”.

PRODUCTS
 Conventional Charges (CC)
 Switch Mode Rectifiers (SMR)
 Integrated Power Supply Systems (IPS)

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HARSHA ELECTRONICS PRIVATE LIMITED (HEPL)
Hasha electronics pvt limited was incorporated in 1990 for manufacture of MS Cabinets,
trays and racks for batteries, UPS battery charger, inventors etc and to manufacture small battery
parts.
It is having all the steel metal possessing machinery – starting from sheet cutting to final
painting with punching, pending, welding, prospering and power coating process.
The plant is located at Karakambadi (Tirupati) and is registered as ancillary units to ARBL
and ARPSL. The operations of the company are brisk and satisfactory.
MANGAL PERCISION PRODUCTION PRIVATE LIMITED (MPPPL)
MPPPL was started in the year (1996-1997) to produce battery components like copper
connectors, copper inserts, hardware required by ARBL and ARPSL. The unit is located at
Petamitta, Putalapattu mandal, Chittoor at a distance of 65 kms. From Amara Raja group of
companies, Karakambadi to develop backward villages. Amara Raja Batteries Limited, Chaiman,
managing director located the unique in petamitta and provided an employment to nearly 35
persons. It will also produce quality hardware for automobile manufacture company up near by
Chennai.
AMARARAJA ELECTRONICS PRIVATE LIMITED
It was recently established in 2000. It produces electronic card and power distraction boards for
UPS and inverters.

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PRODUCT PROFILE
A battery is an electrical storage device. Batteries do not make the electricity, they store it.
A battery in concept can be any device that stores energy for later use. Common use of the word,
“battery”, however, is limited to an electro chemical device that converts chemical energy in to
electricity, by use of galvanic cells. Batteries are not 100% efficient some energy is lost as heat and
chemical reactions when charging and dis-charging.
LIFE SPAN OF BATTERIES
The life span of a battery will very considerably with how it is used and how it is
maintained and charged, temperature and other factors.
INDUSTRIAL DEEP CYCLE BATTERIES
Some times called “fork lifts”, traction” or “stationary” batteries are used where power is
need for a long period of time, and are designed to be deep cycled or discharged down as low as
20% of full charge. (80% DOD or depth of discharge). These are often called traction batteries
because of their spread use in fork lifts, golf cars, and floor sweepers from which we get the GS
and FS series of battery sizes. Deep cycled batteries have much thickly plates then auto motive
batteries.
PRODUCT LINE
Types of VRLA batteries manufactured in the industrial battery division and their
applications are as follows.
POWER PLANT
Applications power plant process and service industries railways, telecommunications,
uninterrupted power systems, electronic private automatic branch exchange (EPBX), defense
(onshore & offshore wireless communications cellular radios), and motive power.
KOMBAT (UPS BATTERY)
Applications UPS, EPBS, engine starting, emergency lighting, SPB, portable power, fire
alarm, security systems.
BRUTE
Applications fork lifts, pallet trucks, stackers, platform trucks.
GENPRO
Applications Generators.

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XENONE
Amara Raja also launched a new household battery “Xenone” on 15th August, 05.

COMPETITORS
The major competitors for Amara Raja batteries products are
 Exide industries ltd
 Hyderabad batteries ltd
 Panasonic batteries ltd
 Hykon group of companies
 Lvory info Tech
 Chemisilicon companies
 Lava batteries and GNB
 Matsushita lakhanpal battery India ltd
AWARDS

 “The Spirit of Excellence” – Awarded By Academy of Fine Arts Tirupati.

 “Best Entrepreneur of the Year 1998” – Awarded By Hyderabad Management


Association.

 “Industrial Economist Business Excellence Award 1991” – Awarded By industrial


Economist Chennai.

 “Excellence Award” – By the institute of Economics Studies New Delhi.

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REVIEW OF LITERATURE

MEANING AND DEFINITION OF WELFARE MEASURES


MEANING
The concept of ‘Employee Welfare’ is flexible and elastic and differs widely with time,
region, industry, social values and customs, degree of industrialization, the general
economic development of the people and political ideologies prevailing at a particular
time, it is also molded according to the age – group, sex, socio - cultural background,
marital and economic status and educational level of the workers in various industries.
In the ‘broader sense’, employee welfare may include not only the minimum standard of
hygiene and safety laid down in general employee legislation, but also such aspects of working life
as social insurance schemes, me that the benefits of the employees will be increased.

Measures for the protection of women, limitation of hours of work, paid vacation, etc. In
the ‘narrow sense’, welfare in addition to general physical working conditions is mainly concerned
with the day – to – day problems of the workers and social relationships at the place of work. In
some countries, the use of the welfare activities provided is confined to the workers employed in
the undertakings concerned, while in others, the workers’ families are allowed to share in many of
the benefits which are made available.

NEED FOR WELFARE MEASURES: EMPLOYEE DEMANDS

a) The employer should not bargain Labor welfare as a substitute for wages or monetary
incentives. b) The employer should look after the welfare of his employees as a matter of social
obligation. c) There should be proper co-ordination, harmony and integration of all Labor welfare
services. d) There should be periodical assessment or evolution of welfare measures and necessary
timely improvements on the basis of feedback. AGENCIES OF LABOUR WELFARE: ROLE OF
THE STATE GOVERNMENT: The state government activities in the field of workers’ welfare
have been of a more direct nature....

“Welfare” is a broad concept referring to a state of living of an individual or group, in a


desirable relationship with the total environment - ecological, economic and social. Labor welfare
includes both the social and economic contents of welfare. Social welfare is primarily concerned

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with the solution of various problems of the weaker sections of society like the prevention of
destitution, poverty, etc.

It aims at social development by such means as social legislation, social reform, social
services, social work, social action, etc. The object of economic welfare is to promote economic
development by increasing production and productivity and through equitable distribution. Labor
welfare is a part of social welfare, conceptually and operationally. It covers a broad field and
connotes a state of well-being, happiness, satisfaction, conservation and development of human
resources.

Labor welfare may be viewed as a total concept, as a social concept and as a relative
concept. The total concept is a desirable state of existence involving the physical, mental, moral
and emotional well-being. These four elements together constitute the structure of welfare, on
which its totality is based. The social concept of welfare implies the welfare of man, his family and
his community. All these three aspects are inter-related and work together in a three dimensional
approach. The relative concept of welfare is relative in time and place. It is a dynamic and flexible
concept and hence its meaning and concept differ from time to time, region to region, industry to
industry and general standard of the socio-economic development of the people

Tags: Statutory welfare measures, Statutory and non statutory welfare measures, Employee
welfare concept.

Welfare includes anything that is done for the comfort and improvement of employees and
is provided over and above the wages. Welfare helps in keeping the morale and motivation of the
employees high so as to retain the employees for longer duration. The welfare measures need not
be in monetary terms only but in any kind/forms. Employee welfare includes monitoring of
working conditions, creation of industrial harmony through infrastructure for health, industrial
relations and insurance against disease, accident and unemployment for the workers and their
families. Labor welfare entails all those activities of employer, which are directed towards
providing the employees with certain facilities and services in addition to wages or salaries.

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DEFINITION

WELFARE

Welfare is defined as anything that is done for the comfort and improvement of employees
and is provided over and above the wages. Welfare helps in keeping the morale and motivation of
the employees high so as to retain the employees for longer duration, which helps the organization
to achieve its goals.

WELFARE MEASURES

The welfare measures involve three major aspects which are - occupational health care,
suitable working time and appropriate salary. It refers to the physical, mental, moral, and
emotional well-being of an individual (Aswathappa; 2004). The safe work environment provides
the basis for the person to enjoy working. The work should not pose a health hazard for the person.
The welfare measures aim at integrating the socio-psychological needs of employees, the unique
requirements of a particular technology, the structure and processes of the organization and the
existing socio-cultural environment. It creates a culture of work commitment in organizations and
society which ensure higher productivity and greater job satisfaction to the employees. The welfare
measures are defined in the same way as defined by the I.L.O. at its Asian Regional Conference "A
term which is understood to include such services, facilities and amenities as may be established in
or in the vicinity of undertakings to enable the persons employed in them to perform their work in
healthy, congenial surroundings and to provide them with amenities conducive to good health and
high morale."

Due to the welfare measures, the employees feel that the management is interested in
taking care of the employees that result in the sincerity, commitment and loyalty of the employees
towards the organization. The employees work with full enthusiasm and energetic behavior which
results in the increase in production and ultimately the increased profit.

The measures of welfare give result after a long period of time. It is a long process, so the
management has to keep patience while providing the welfare facilities for the employees. While

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deciding the welfare facility for the employees, the management has to do discussions with the
persons who are now going to avail the facilities. The communication increases the cohesiveness
between the management and the employees and thus industrial relations improve.

MONETARY AND NON-MONETARY FACTORS OF MOTIVATION!


The motivational factors that motivate a person to work and which can be used to enhance
their performance can be classified into two categories—monetary factors and non-monetary
factors.

..
MONETARY FACTORS
Monetary factors are extrinsic to work, such as the following
1. SALARY OR WAGES
This is one of the most important motivational factors in an organization. Salaries and
wages should be fixed reasonably and paid on time.
2. BONUS
Bonus is an extra payment over and above salary, and it acts as an incentive to perform
better. It is linked to the profitability and productivity of the organization.
3. FINANCIAL INCENTIVES
The organization provides additional incentives to their employees such as medical
allowance, travelling allowance, house rent allowance, hard duty allowance and children
educational allowance.

4. PROMOTION (MONETARY PART)


Promotion is attached with increase in pay, and this motivates the employee to perform
better.

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5. PROFIT SHARING
This is an arrangement by which organizations distribute compensation based on some
established formula designed around the company’s profitability.
6. STOCK OPTION
This is a system by which the employee receives shares on a preferential basis which
results in financial benefits to the employees.
NON-MONETARY FACTORS
Non-monetary factors are rewards intrinsic to work, such as the following:
1. STATUS
An employee is motivated by better status and designation. Organizations should offer job titles
that convey the importance of the position.
2. APPRECIATION AND RECOGNITION
Employees must be appreciated and reasonably compensated for all their achievements and
contributions.
3. WORK-LIFE BALANCE
Employees should be in a position to balance the two important segments of their life—work and
life. This balance makes them ensure the quality of work and life. A balanced employee is a
motivated employee.
4. DELEGATION
Delegation of authority promotes dedication and commitment among employees. Employees are
satisfied that their employer has faith in them and this motivates them to perform better.
5. WORKING CONDITIONS
Healthy working conditions such as proper ventilation, proper lighting and proper sanitation
improve the work performance of employees.
6. JOB ENRICHMENT
This provides employees more challenging tasks and responsibilities. The job of the employee
becomes more meaningful and satisfying.

7. JOB SECURITY
This promotes employee involvement and better performance. An employee should not be kept on
a temporary basis for a long period.

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MONETARY AND NON-MONETARY BENEFITS
MONETARY BENEFITS
 Expansion of Course Fee Waivers
 Employee Assistance Program
 Adequate and Affordable Health Care Benefits
 Short-Term Family Leave and Disability Benefits
 Expanded and Formalized Flextime Options
 Adequate Salaries
 Accessible Affordable Child and Adult Care
 Partner Benefits
NON-MONETARY BENEFITS
 Enhanced Communication
 Supervisor Training and Consistency
 Respect and Appreciation of Work Contributions
 Accessible and Confidential Grievance Structures
WELFARE MEASURES IN FACTORIES
After the independence, the Government of India makes strict rules and regulations to
safeguard the interest of the workers in the factories. The welfare facilities are provided to the
workers as per the provisions laid down in Chapter 5 (Section 42 to 50) of 'The Factories Act,
1948' for the benefit of employees of the factories. Analyzing the benefits of the welfare
provisions, the management bears the huge cost spend on the welfare activities. The experts have a
firm opinion that by providing the welfare facilities to the employees the productivity of the
employees increases and ultimately profit increases. According to Section 49 of 'The Factories Act,
1948' – "In every factory wherein five hundred or more workers are ordinarily employed the
occupier shall employ in the factory such number of welfare officers as may be prescribed". The
major role of welfare officer is to facilitate and observe the welfare measures for the employees in
the organization.

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Labour welfare has the following objectives:

1. To provide better life and health to the workers


2. To make the workers happy and satisfied
3. To relieve workers from industrial fatigue and to improve intellectual, cultural and material
conditions of living of the workers
The basic features of labour welfare measures are as follows:

1. Labor welfare includes various facilities, services and amenities provided to workers for
improving their health, efficiency, economic betterment and social status.
2. Welfare measures are in addition to regular wages and other economic benefits available to
workers due to legal provisions and collective bargaining

3. Labor welfare schemes are flexible and ever-changing. New welfare measures are added to the
existing ones from time to time

4. Welfare measures may be introduced by the employers, government, employees or by any social
or charitable agency.

5. The purpose of labor welfare is to bring about the development of the whole personality of the
workers to make a better workforce. The very logic behind providing welfare schemes is to create
efficient, healthy, loyal and satisfied labor force for the organization. The purpose of providing
such facilities is to make their work life better and also to raise their standard of living.

The important benefits of welfare measures can be summarized as follows: They provide
better physical and mental health to workers and thus promote a healthy work environment·
Facilities like housing schemes, medical benefits, and education and recreation facilities for
workers’ families help in raising their standards of living. This makes workers to pay more
attention towards work and thus increases their productivity. Employers get stable labor force by
providing welfare facilities. Workers take active interest in their jobs and work with a feeling of
involvement and participants

Employee welfare measures increase the productivity of organization and promote healthy
industrial relations thereby maintaining industrial peace. The social evils prevalent among the
labors such as substance abuse, etc are reduced to a greater extent by the welfare policies.
Organizations provide welfare facilities to their employees to keep their motivation levels high.

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The employee welfare schemes can be classified into two categories viz. statutory and non-
statutory welfare schemes. The statutory schemes are those schemes that are compulsory to
provide by an organization as compliance to the laws governing employee health and safety. These
include provisions provided in industrial acts like Factories Act 1948, Dock Workers Act (safety,
health and welfare) 1986, Mines Act 1962. The non statutory schemes differ from organization to
organization and from industry to industry.

Employee welfare defines as “efforts to make life worth living for workmen”. These
efforts have their origin either in some statute formed by the state or in some local custom or in
collective agreement or in the employer’s own initiative.

 To give expression to philanthropic and paternalistic feelings.

 To win over employee’s loyalty and increase their morale.

 To combat trade unionism and socialist ideas.

 To build up stable labour force, to reduce labour turnover and absenteeism.

 To develop efficiency and productivity among workers.

 To save oneself from heavy taxes on surplus profits.

 To earn goodwill and enhance public image.

 To reduce the threat of further government intervention.

 To make recruitment more effective (because these benefits add to job appeal).

PRINCIPLES OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE SERVICE

Following are generally given as the principles to be followed in setting up a employee


welfare service:

 The service should satisfy real needs of the workers. This means that the
manager must first determine what the employee’s real needs are with the active
participation of workers.

 The service should such as can be handled by cafeteria approach. Due to the
difference in Sex, age, marital status, number of children, type of job and the income level
of employees there are large differences in their choice of a particular benefit. This is

19
known as the cafeteria approach. Such an approach individualizes the benefit system
though it may be difficult to operate and administer.

 The employer should not assume a benevolent posture.

 The cost of the service should be calculated and its financing established on
a sound basis.

 There should be periodical assessment or evaluation of the service and


necessary timely on the basis of feedback.

TYPES OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE SERVICES


SAFETY SERVICES
Prevention of accidents is an objective which requires explanation.
The costs of accidents are enormous in suffering to the injured, in reduction or loss of
earnings, in disabilities and incapacities which afflict those involved and in compensation,
insurance and legal costs, in lost time, filling in reports and attending to enquiries, and in spoilage
of materials, equipment and tools to management.

Accidents are the consequence of two basic factors: technical and human. Technical
factors include all engineering deficiencies, related to plant, tools material and general work
environment. Thus, for example, improper lighting, inadequate ventilation, poor machine guarding
and careless housekeeping are some hazards which may cause accidents. Human factors include
all unsafe acts on the part of employees. An unsafe act is usually the result of carelessness.

Young and new employees, because of their difficulty in adjusting to the work situation and
to life in general, also have many more accidents than do old and nature workers. The
Phenomenon of Accident Proneness. Some persons believe wrongly in the theory that certain
individuals are accident prone, that is, they have some personality trait as opposed to some
characteristic of the environment which predisposes them to have more accidents than others in
work condition where the risk of hazards is equal to all.
COMPONENTS OF A SAFETY SERVICE
Among the many components of a safety service the following have proved effective when
applied in combination:
APPOINTMENT OF SAFETY OFFICER
20
In big organizations, the appointment of a safety officer to head The safety department is a
must. In small organizations, the personnel manager may look after the functions of this
department. The head of the safety department, who is usually a staff man, is granted power to
inspect the plant for unsafe condition, to promote sound safety practices (through posters and
safety campaigns), to make safety rules, and to report violations to the plant manager.
SUPPORT BY LINE MANAGEMENT
The head of the safety department, whether enjoying a staff or a functional position, by
him, cannot make a plan safe. His appointment lulls line management into assuming that all its
safety problems have been solved.
ELIMINATION OF HAZARDS
Although complete elimination of all hazards is virtually impossibility but following steps
can be taken to help reduce them.
JOB SAFETY ANALYSIS
All job procedures and practices should be analyzed by an expert to discover hazards. He
should then suggest changes in their motion patterns, sequence and the like.
PLACEMENT
A poorly placed employee is more apt to incur injury than a properly placed employee.
Employees should be placed on jobs only after carefully estimating and considering the job
requirements with those which the individual apparently possesses.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Endless variety of personal safety equipment is available now a day’s which can be used to
prevent injure.
SAFEGUARDING MACHINERY
Guards must be securely fixed to all power driven machinery.
MATERIALS HANDLING
Though often ignored, the careless handling of heavy and inflammable materials is an
important source of several injuries and fire.
HAND TOOLS

21
Minor injuries often result from improperly using a good tool or using a poorly designed
tool. Therefore, close supervision and instruction should be given to the employees on the proper
tool to use a proper use of the tool.

SAFETY TRAINING, EDUCATION AND PUBLICITY


Safety training is concerned with developing safety skills, whereas safety education is
concerned with increasing contest programmers, safety campaigns, suggestion awards, and
various audiovisual aids can be considered as different forms of employee education.
SAFETY INSPECTION
An inspection by a trained individual or a committee to detect evidence of possible safety
hazards (such as poor lighting, slippery floors, unguarded machines, faulty electrical installations,
poor work methods and disregard of safety rules) is a very effective device to promote safety.
HEALTH SERVICES
The prevention of accident constitutes only on segment of the function of employee
maintenance. Another equally important segment is the employee’s general health, both physical
and mental.
There are two aspects of industrial health services
1. Preventive
2. Curative, the former consists of
3. pre-employment and periodic medical examination,
4. removal or reduction of health hazards to the maximum extent possible,
5. Surveillance over certain classes of workers such as women, young persons and persons
exposed to special risks.
COUNSELING SERVICES

An employee very often comes across problems which have emotional content. For
example, he may be nearing retirement and feeling insecure or he may be getting promotion and
feeling hesitant to shoulder increased responsibility or he may be worried due to some family
problem.
EMPLOYEE WELFARE IN INDIA

22
The chapter on the Directive Principles of State Policy in our Constitution expresses the
need for lab our welfare thus:
1. The State shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as
effectively as it may a social order in which justice, social, economic and political, shall
inform all the institutions of the national life.

2. The State shall, in particular, direct its policy towards securing:

3. That the citizens, men and women equally, have the right to an adequate means of
livelihood;

4. That the ownership and control of the material resources are so distributed as to sub serve
the common good.

5. The State shall make provision for securing just and humane conditions of work and for
maternity relief.
FACTORIES ACT, 1948
The principal Act to provide for various labour welfare measures in India is the Factories
Act, 1948. The Act applies to all establishments employing 10 or more workers where power is
used and 20 or more workers where power is not used, and where a manufacturing process is being
carried on.
EMPLOYEE WELFARE OFFICER
Section 49 of the factories act provides that in every factory wherein 500 or more workers
are ordinarily employed the employer shall appoint at least one welfare officer.
The welfare officer should possess; (i) a university degree; (ii) degree or diploma in social
service or social work or social welfare from a recognized institution; and (iii) adequate knowledge
of the language spoken by the majority of the workers in the area where the factory is situated.

¯ Supervision

¯ Counseling workers

¯ Advising management

¯ Establishing liaison with workers

¯ Working with management and workers to improve productivity.

23
¯ Working with outside public to secure proper enforcement of various acts.

HEALTH OF EMPLOYEES

 Cleanliness. Every factory shall be kept clean by daily sweeping or washing the floors and
work rooms and by using disinfectant where necessary.

 Disposal of wastes and effluents. Effective arrangements shall be made for the disposal of
wastes and for making them innocuous.

 Ventilation and temperature. Effective arrangements shall be made for ventilation and
temperature so as to provide comfort to the workers and prevent injury to their health.

 Dust and fume. Effective measures shall be taken to prevent the inhalation and
accumulation of dust and fumes or other impurities at the work place.

 Artificial humidification. The State Government shall make rules prescribing standard of
humidification and methods to be adopted for this purpose.

 Overcrowding. There shall be in every work room of a factory in existence on the date of
commencement of this act at least 9.9cubic meters and of a factory built after the
commencement of this act at least 4.2 cubic meters of space for every employee.

 Lighting. The State Government may prescribe standards of sufficient and suitable
lighting.

 Drinking Water. There shall be effective arrangement for wholesome drinking water for
workers at convenient points.

 Latrines and urinals. There shall be sufficient number of latrines and urinals, clean, well-
ventilated, conveniently situated and built according to prescribed standards separately for
male and female workers.

24
 Spittoons. There shall be sufficient number of spittoons placed at convenient places in the
factory.

SAFETY OF EMPLOYEES

 Fencing of machinery. All dangerous and moving parts of a machinery shall be securely
fenced. Screws, bolts and teeth shall be completely encased to prevent danger.

 Work on or near machinery in motion. Lubrication or other adjusting operation on moving


machinery shall be done only by a specially trained adult male worker.

 Employment of young person’s on dangerous machines. No young person shall be allowed


to work on any dangerous machine (so prescribed by the state government) unless he is
sufficiently trained or is working under the supervision of knowledgeable person.

 Device for cutting off power. Suitable device for cutting of power in emergencies shall be
provided.

 Hoists and lifts. These shall be made of good material and strength, thoroughly examined
at least once in every six months and suitably protected to prevent any person or thing from
being trapped.

WELFARE OF EMPLOYEES

 The factories Act contain provisions about the welfare of employees. These are as follows:

 There shall be separate and adequately screened washing facilities for the use of male and
female employees.

 There shall be suitable places provided for clothing not worn during working hours and for
the dying of wet clothing.

 There shall be suitable arrangement for all workers to sit for taking rest if they are obliged
to work in a standing position.

25
 There shall be provided the required number of first-aid boxes or cupboard (at the rate of
one for every 150 workers) equipped with the prescribed contents readily available during
the working hours of the factory.

 The State Government may make rules requiring that in any specified factory employing
more than 250 employees a canteen shall be provided and maintained by the occupier for
the use of the employee.

 There shall be provided sufficiently lighted and ventilated lunch room if the number of
employees ordinarily employed is more than 150.

RESTRICTIONS IN THE FACTORIES ACT ON THE EMPLOYMENT OF


YOUNG PERSON’S

1. Prohibition as to employment of children (Section 67)

No child who has not completed his fourteenth year shall be required or allowed to work in
any factory.

2. Employment of Children and Adolescent (Section 68)

A child who has completed his fourteenth year or an adolescent shall not be required or
allowed to work in any factory unless following conditions are fulfilled

1. The manager of the factory has obtained a certificate of fitness granted to such young

2. While at work, such child or adolescent carries a token giving reference to such certificate.

3. Certificate of fitness (Section 69)

4. Before a young person is employed in the factory, a certifying surgeon has to certify that
such person is fit for that work in the factory.
WELFARE FUNDS
In order to provide welfare facilities to the workers employed in mica, iron, ore, manganese
ore and chrome ore, limestone and dolomite mines and in the beedi industry, the welfare funds
have been established to supplement the efforts of the employers and the State Government under
respective enactments.

26
The welfare measures financed out of the funds relate to development of medical facilities,
housing, supply of drinking water, support for education of dependents and recreation, etc.
VOLUNTARY BENEFITS
Benefits are also given voluntarily to workers by some progressive employers. These
include loans for purchasing houses and for educating children, leave travel concession, fair price
shops for essential commodities and loans to buy personal conveyance.

MACHINERY CONNECTED WITH EMPLOYEE WELFARE WORK


1. Chief inspector of Factories
It is the duty of the Chief inspector of factories (who generally works under the administrative
control of the labour commissioner in each state) to ensure enforcement of various provisions of
Factories Act i8n respect of safety, health and welfare of workers.
2. Central Labour Institute

The institute was set up in Bombay in 1966 to facilitate the proper implementation
of the Factories Act, 1948; to provide a centre of information for inspectors, employers, workers
and others concerned with the well being of industrial labour and to stimulate interest in the
application of the principles of industrial safety, health and welfare.
3. National Safety Council
The National Safety Council was wet up on 4th March, 1966 in Bombay at the
initiative of the Union Ministry of Labour and Rehabilitation, Government of India, as an
autonomous national body with the objective of generating developing and sustaining a movement
of safety awareness at the national level.
4. Director General of Mines Safety

The Director General of Mines Safety enforces the Mines Act, 1952. He inspects
electrical installation and machinery provided in the mines and determines the thickness of barriers
of 2 adjacent mines in order to prevent spread of fire and danger of inundation.
APPRAISAL OF WELFARE SERVICES
1. One of the main obstacles in the effective enforcement of the welfare provisions of the
Factories Act has been the quantitative and qualitative inadequacy of the inspection staff.

27
2. At present, a labour welfare officer is not able to enforce laws independently because he
has to work under the pressure of management.

3. Women workers do not make use of the crèche facilities either because they are dissuaded
by the management to bring their children with them or because they have to face transport
difficulties.

NATIONAL COMMISSION ON EMPLOYEE RECOMMENDATIONS

1. The statutory provisions on safety are adequate for the time being effective enforcement is
the current need.

2. Every fatal accident should thoroughly be enquired into and given wide publicity among
workers.

3. Employers should play a more concerted role in safety and accident prevention program me
and in arousing safety consciousness.

4. Safety should become a habit with the employers and workers instead of remaining a mere
ritual as at present.

5. Unions should take at least as much interest in safety promotion as they take in claims for
higher wages.

SOCIAL SECURITY

The connotation of the term “Social Security” varies from country to country with different
political ideologies. In socialist countries, the avowed goal is complete protection to every citizen
form the cradle to the grave.
There are some components of Social Security:
 Medical care

 Sickness benefit

 Unemployment benefit

 Old-age benefit
28
 Employment injury benefit

 Family benefit

 Maternity benefit

 Invalidity benefit and

 Survivor’s benefit

SOCIAL SECURITIES MAY BE OF TWO TYPES

1. Social assistance under which the State finances the entire cost of the facilities and benefits
provided.

2. Social insurance, under the State organizes the facilities financed by contributions from the
workers and employers, with or without a subsidy from the state.

SOCIAL SECURITY IN INDIA

At present both types of social security schemes are in vogue in our country. Among the
social assistance schemes are the most important.
The social insurance method, which has gained much wider acceptance than the social
assistance method, consists of the following enactments.
 The workmen’s Compensation Act, 1961.

 The Employee’s State Insurance Act, 1948.

 The employees’ State Insurance Act, 1948.

 The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961.

 Employees’ compensation Act, 1923

1. Coverage. This Act covers all workers employed in factories, mines, plantations, transport
undertakings, construction works, railways, ships, circus and other hazardous occupations
specified in schedule II of the Act.

The Act empowers the State Government to extend the coverage of the Act by adding any
hazardous occupation to the list of such occupations is schedule II.
29
1. Administration. The Act is administered by the State Government which appoints
Commissioners for this purpose under sec. 20 of the Act.

2. Benefits. Under the Act, compensation is payable by the employer to a workman for all
personal injuries caused to him by accident arising out of and in the course of his
employment which disable him for more than 3 days.

2. Employees’ State Insurance Act, 1948

1. Other than seasonal factories, run with power and employing 20 or more workers.

2. Administration. The Act is administered by the ESI corporation, an autonomous body


consisting of representatives of the Central and State Governments, employers, employees,
medical profession and parliament.

3. Benefits. The Act, which provides for a system of compulsory insurance, is a landmark in
the history of social security legislation in India.

 Medical Benefit. An insured person or (where medical benefit bas been extended to his
family) a member of his family who requires medical treatment is entitled to receive
medical benefit free of charge.

 Sickness Benefit. An insured person, when he is sick, is also entitled to get sickness
benefit at the standard benefit rate corresponding to his average daily wage.

 An insured woman is entitled to receive maternity benefit (which is twice the sickness
benefit rate) for all days on which she does not work for remaining during a period of 12
weeks of which not more than 6 weeks shall precede the expected date of confinement.

 The Act makes a three-fold classification of injuries in the same way as is done in the
workmen’s compensation Act.

 Dependant’s Benefit. If an insured person meets with an accident in the course of his
employment an dies as a result thereof, his dependants, i.e. his widow, legitimate or
adopted sons and legitimate unmarried daughters get this benefit.
3. The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961

30
Maternity benefit is one of the important benefits provided under the Employees State
Insurance Act, 1948. Another important legislation in this respect is the Maternity Benefit Act,
1961. The Act covers only those persons who are not covered by the Employees State Insurance
Act. The Act entitles a woman employee to claim maternity leave from her employer if she has
actually worked for a period of at least 160 days in the 12 months immediately proceeding the day
of her expected delivery.

RECOMMENDED THE FOLLOWING CHANGES IN THE ACT


1. The administration of the fund should follow the pattern already established by the
ESIC.
2. For casual labour a minimum of 3 months of service should be considered as
qualification service for this benefit.

3. This will provide greater incentive to women workers to participate in trade union
activities.

THE PAYMENT OF GRATUITY ACT, 1972

 Coverage. The Act applies to every factory, mine, oilfield, plantation, port and Railway
Company and to every shop or establishment in which 10 or more persons are employed, or
were employed, on any day of the preceding 12 months.

 Administration. The Act is administered by a controlling authority appointed by the


appropriate Government.

 Benefits. Under the Act gratuity is payable to an employee on the termination of his
employment after he has rendered continuous service for not less than five years. The
completion of continuous service of five years is, however, not necessary where the
termination of the employment is due to death or disablement Gratuity is payable at the rate
of 15 days’ wages based on the rate of wages last drawn by the employee for every
complete year of service or part thereof in excess of six months. But the amount of gratuity
payable to an employee shall not exceed Rs. 3.5 lakh.

31
NEED FOR THE STUDY
Welfare in the organization implies the condition of benefits to the employees in the work
environment etc. The need for providing such services and facilities, it is shows the
responsibilities of organization Welfare implies that providing better work conditions such as
Drinking water facilities, canteen, restroom, health care etc.,

32
SCOPE OF THE STUDY
The study is conducted by taking into account only the regular employees of Amara Raja
Batteries, Ltd., The casual and contractual employees have not been considered for this purpose.
Present study is undertaken by various departments like Mechanical, Electrical H.R, Marketing,
production in Amara Raja Batteries, Ltd.,

33
OBJECTIVES OF STUDY

 To study the different welfare measures undertaken at the company.

 To know the satisfaction level of employees regarding the welfare measures providing by
the company.

 To study the effectiveness of these measures in morale building and in increasing the
productivity of the organization.

 To study the social and welfare programmes followed by the amaraja batteries limited.

 To study organization culture effects on job satisfaction levels among the employees of
Amara Raja.

 To study organization culture effects on job satisfaction levels among the employees of
Amara Raja.

34
LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
 The information collected and data interpreted is based on the response of the employees.
 The respondents could be based on their opinions or could also have deliberately given
incorrect answers.
 If workers name is mentioned in questionnaire by collected the data this might have been a
negative approach on management

 At the time of taking the survey from the front line employees I faced some problems
because there is some organizational bias between the front line employees and
management.

 Due to time constraint detail information could not be gathered.

 Some of the employees did not give answers to some questions.

35
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research methodology: The study of materials and sources to reach the conclusions is called
“Research”, the system of methods used in this particular field is called “Methodology”. Hence the
study made with the help of sources by following certain system of methods to reach the
conclusions is called “RESEARCH METHODOLOGY”.

Data collection: Data Collection is an important aspect of any type of research study. Inaccurate
data collection can impact the results of a study and ultimately lead to invalid results. Data
collection methods for impact evaluation vary along a continuum. At the one end of this continuum
are quantitative methods and at the other end of the continuum are Qualitative methods for data
collection.

TYPES OF DATA COLLECTION:

PRIMARY DATA: The data collected which is firsthand information is called the primary data.

36
SECONDARY DATA: The data collected which is second hand information is called the
secondary data i.e., from books, company manuals, magazines and web sources.

SOURCES OF DATA
There are mainly two types of data collection methods. They are
1. Primary Data
2. Secondary Data
This project includes both types of data collections.
Primary Data
a Structured Undisguised Questionnaire.
b Observation Checklist.
c Interview Method.
Secondary Data
a Company Journals.
b Manuals.
c Records.
d Magazines.
e Websites.
f Previous Reports of ARBL.
SAMPLING
Random sampling method is used to select the system for conducting the survey
among workers in the company.
SAMPLE SIZE
The sample size for conducting the survey of total 5000 employees is about 100
employees are selected as sample on random basis for this study in ARBL.
CONTACT METHOD
To get on hand and timely information, it has been decided to collect data by
contacting the respondents directly.
DEVELOPMENT OF QUESTIONNAIRE
While preparing the questionnaire, keeping in view of suitability and applicability into
consideration, both closed and table type questions have been used.

37
TABULATION OF DATA
After the transcription of data is over, data is summarized in thesis compact form for
further analysis. Tabulation in the form of data and displaying them on compact statistically
tables in vertical columns and horizontal rows according to the suitable classification.
TOOLS OF ANALYSIS
Both primary and secondary data information collected through questionnaire and other
sources are meaning fully analyzed using appropriate statistical tools.

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION


“EMPLOYEE AWARENESS TOWARDS THE WELFARE ACTIVITIES
DEPARTMENT-WISE CLASSIFICATION OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES”

(N=100)
NO. OF PERCENTAGE
S. NO DEPARTMENT
EMPLOYEES TO TOTAL

1 Industrial battery division 36 36

2 Corporate office 36 36

Research and Engineering


3 28 28
center

Total 100 100

Source: Primary Data

38
Source: Above Table: 1
From the table 1 it is obvious that among of 100 sample employees, 36 employees are
drawn from IBD and corporate office each and the rest of 28 from REC.

39
“WELFARE ACTIVITIES PROVIDED BY THE COMPANY”

DIMENSIONS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE OF


RESPONDENTS
Statutory 45 45%
Both 10 10%
Non statutory 45 45%
Total 110 100%

CHART: 5.2

Inference:

From the above table and chart it is clear that both the statutory and non statutory welfare
activities are provided by the company.

40
SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: EDUCATION FACILITY

S. SATISFACTION LEVELS
DEPARTMENT TOTAL
NO GOOD AVG POOR
Industrial battery 26 8 02 36
1
division (72.2) (22.2) (5.6) (100.00)
28 7 1 36
2 Corporate office
(77.8) (19.4) (2.8) (100.00)
Research and 18 8 2 28
3
Engineering center (64.3) (28.6) (7.1) (100.00)
72 23 5 100
Total
(72.00) (23.00) (5.00) (100.00)
Note: Figures in parenthesis are percentage in row and column total
Source: primary Data

Source: Above table 3


Table 3 presents satisfaction levels of sample employees across departments with regard to
education facility 72 per cent of them are good, 23 per cent felt average and only 5 per cent poor.

41
SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: DISPENSARY FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 10 0 36
1
division (72.2) (27.8) (0.00) (100.00)
24 8 4 36
2 Corporate office
(66.7) (22.2) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 18 6 4 28
3
Engineering center (64.3) (21.4) (14.3) (100.00)
68 24 8 100
Total
(68.00) (24.00) (8.00) (100.00)
Note: Figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 4

Table 4 sets out opinionistic is to data collected from sample employees from the three
departments towards dispensary facility. 68per cent felt good 24 per cent average 8per cent poor.

42
SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: TRANSPORT FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 24 12 - 36
1
division (66.6) (33.3) (-) (100.00)
22 10 4 36
2 Corporate office
(61.1) (27.8) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 20 6 2 28
3
Engineering center (71.4) (21.4) (7.1) (100.00)
66 28 6 100
Total
(66.00) (28.00) (6.00) (100.00)
Note : figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: primary Data

Source: Above table 5


Opinions of sample employees toward transport facility are arranged in table 5. 66 per cent
opined that the facility is good 28per cent average and 6 per cent poor.

43
SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: CO-OPERATIVE STORES
FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 8 2 36
1
division (72.2) (22.2) (5.6) (100.00)
20 12 4 36
2 Corporate office
(55.6) (33.3) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 18 4 6 28
3
Engineering center (64.3) (14.3) (21.4) (100.00)
64 24 12 100
Total
(64.00) (24.00) (12.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 6


Attitudes of sample employees towards cooperative stores were shown in table 6. 64 per
cent of them expressed this facility is good, 24 per cent average and 12 per cent poor.

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SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: AMBULANCE FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 8 2 36
1
division (72.2) (22.2) (5.6) (100.00)
20 12 4 36
2 Corporate office
(55.6) (33.3) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 16 8 4 28
3
Engineering center (57.1) (28.6) (14.2) (100.00)
62 28 10 100
Total
(62.00) (28.00) (10.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 7


Opinions of employees towards ambulance facility are presented in table 7. Total of 100
employees 62 per cent expressed that the facility is good, 28 per cent average and10per cent poor.

45
SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: UNIFORMS AND SHOES

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 29 7 - 36
1
division (80.5) (19.4) (100.00)
30 6 - 36
2 Corporate office
(83.3) (16.7) (100.00)
Research and 21 7 - 28
3
Engineering center (75.00) (25.00) (100.00)
80 20 - 100
Total
(80.00) (20.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 8

Employees feelings toward uniform and shoes provided to them are incorporated in table 8.
80per cent of sample employees were of the view that this facility is good, and 20 per cent
average.

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SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: VEHICLE PARKING FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 20 16 0 36
1
division (55.5) (44.4) (0.00) (100.00)
16 12 8 36
2 Corporate office
(44.4) (33.3) (22.2) (100.00)
Research and 20 8 0 28
3
Engineering center (71.4) (28.6) (0.00) (100.00)
56 36 8 100
Total
(56.00) (36.00) (8.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 9


Opinions collected from sample employees toward vehicle parking facility in the factors
are shown in table 9. 56 per cent viewed this facility good 36 per cent average and 8 per cent poor.

47
AVAILING SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: WASHING
FACILITIES

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 10 0 36
1
division (72.2) (27.8) (0.00) (100.00)
24 8 4 36
2 Corporate office
(66.7) (22.2) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 16 9 3 28
3
Engineering center (57.1) (32.1) (10.7) (100.00)
66 27 7 100
Total
(66.00) (27.00) (7.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 10

Factories act, 1948 has provisions for washing facilities in the factory. Sample employees
attitudes towards this facility are given in table form 10. 66 percent of them opined this facility is
good, 27 per cent average and 7 per cent poor.

48
AVAILING SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: FIRST-AID
FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 8 2 36
1
division (72.2) (22.2) (5.6) (100.00)
20 12 4 36
2 Corporate office
(55.6) (33.3) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 18 4 6 28
3
Engineering center (64.2) (14.2) (21.4) (100.00)
64 24 12 100
Total
(64.00) (24.00) (12.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table: 11


Opinions collected from sample employees towards first aid facility provided in the factory
are incorporated in table 11. 64per cent opined it is good 24per cent average and 12 per cent poor.

49
AVAILING SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: CANTEEN FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 8 2 36
1
division (72.2) (22.2) (5.5) (100.00)
20 12 4 36
2 Corporate office
(55.5) (33.3) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 16 8 4 28
3
Engineering center (57.1) (28.7) (14.2) (100.00)
62 28 10 100
Total
(62.00) (28.00) (10.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 12


Table 12 set out opinion data of sample employees on canteen facility in the factory. 62per
cent of them were of the opinion that the facility is good, 28per cent average and 10per cent poor.

50
AVAILING SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: MATERNITY
BENEFITS
(N=40)

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 16 4 - 20
1
division (80.00) (20.00 (100.00)
6 4 - 10
2 Corporate office
(60.00) (40.00) (100.00)
Research and 4 6 - 10
3
Engineering center (40.00) (60.00) (100.00)
26 14 - 100
Total
(26.00) (14.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: Above table 13


Table 13 present sample employees’ feelings toward maternity benefit. Reading the table it
can be seen that out of 40 women employees who availed this benefit 26 per cent feel it good and
14 per cents average.

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AVAILING SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: VENTILATION
FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 29 7 36
1 -
division (80.6) (19.4) (100.00)
30 6 - 36
2 Corporate office
(83.3) (16.7) (100.00)
Research and 21 7 - 28
3
Engineering center (75.00) (25.00) (100.00)
80 20 - 100
Total
(80.00) (20.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: above table 14


In table 14 are presented attitudes of sample employees towards ventilation in the factory
which is statutory facility that employees is obligated to provide. 80 per cent of them felt good, and
20per cent average.

52
AVAILING SATISFACTION LEVELS OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES: LIGHTING
FACILITY

Si. Satisfaction levels


Department Total
No Good Avg Poor
Industrial battery 26 10 0 36
1
division (72.2) (27.8) (0.00) (100.00)
24 8 4 36
2 Corporate office
(66.7) (22.2) (11.1) (100.00)
Research and 12 10 6 28
3
Engineering center (42.8) (35.8) (21.4) (100.00)
62 28 10 100
Total
(62.00) (28.00) (10.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row and column total
Source: Primary Data

Source: above table 15


Employees’ attitudes towards lighting are aligned in table. 62 percent of them felt this
facility is good and 10 per cent poor.

53
DEPARTMENT – WISE CLASSIFICATION OF SAMPLE EMPLOYEES INTO
SATISFACTION AND DISSATISFACTION GROUPS
(N=100)

Sl. Satisfaction levels Total


Department
No Satisfied Dissatisfied
30 06 36
1 Industrial battery division
(83.3) (16.7) (100.00)
26 10 36
2 Corporate office
(72.2) (35.8) (100.00)
Research and Engineering 20 8 28
3
center (71.4) (28.6) (100.00)
76 24 100
Total
(76.00) (24.00) (100.00)
Note: figures in parenthesis are percentages in row wise and column wise total
Source: Primary Data

Source: above table 17


Overall opinions of employees on welfare facilities provided in the factory were collected
and shown in table 17. Employees feel into two groups namely satisfied and dissatisfied groups.
76per cent of employees are satisfied and only 24per cent of them are dis satisfied.

54
FINDINGS

 42 per cent of the employees were students before joining the company as much as 24
per cent of them were unemployed. Only small percentage of them, 24 per cent were
already employed and left their jobs for joining the factory.

 72 per cent of the employees felt educational facility is good. This percentage is high in
industrial battery division and 49 per cent corporate office

 68 per cent felt that dispensary is good. This per cent is high in (72 per cent) in
industrial battery division.

 66 per cent of the employees opined transport facility is good. This percentage is high
(71 per cent) in research and engineering center.

 For 64 per cent employees co-operative stores is good. This per cent is (72 per cent) in
industrial battery division.

 For 62 per cent of employees Ambulance facility is good. This per cent (72 per cent)
was high in industrial battery division.

55
SUGGESTIONS
 Satisfaction level is good with regard to washing facility (66 percent), first aid (64
percent), canteen facility (62 percent) maternity benefit (65 percent) and ventilation (80
percent). Since theses are statutory welfare measures a little more care should be taken
to improve these facilities further.

 There is high level of satisfaction with regard to wallentary welfare facilities.72, 68, 66,
64, 62&56 percent of employees felt educational facilities, dispensary, transport,
cooperative stores, ambulance, uniform and shoes and parking facilities are respectively
good. These facilities need to be improved a lot.

 The company needs to spend further for which a budget for welfare facility should be
increased.

 Employees are consulted before designing any new labour welfare facility.

 Employee represented to generated on welfare committee which can take up the


responsibility of administations the welfare programmes.

56
CONCLUSION

The organization found moderate levels of attrition being a service sector with growing
opportunity and trends. Employees were satisfied with the related trainings provided. Benefits at
various levels were provided based on performance, skill and contribution to the organization
ARBL can make considerable improvement in term of salary package, benefits and motivation
program, regular meetings then strategy will help to increase employee commitment and reduce
attrition in ARBL.

57
QUESTIONNAIRE ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE ACTIVITIES

Employee Name :
Qualification :
Experience :
Department :
Designation :
Q1. From how many years you are working with this Organization? [ ]
a. 0-5 Years
b. 5-10 Years
c. 10 to 15 Years
d. More than 15 Years
Q2. How do you rate the Working Environment of the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Averagely Satisfactory
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q3. How do you rate the medical benefits provided by the Organization for the employees & their
families? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q4. Does the company provide maternity leave to Female Employees? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No
Q5. How do you rate the working Hours of the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory

58
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q6. How do you rate the sitting arrangement of the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q7. How do you rate the Conveyance Allowance offered by the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q8. Rate the Overtime allowance offered by the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q9. How do you rate leave policy of the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q10. Do you get regular increments ? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No

59
Q11. Does the Organization offers sufficient number of toilets ? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No
Q12. Rate the canteen services provided by the organization. [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q13. Rate the Rest room and lunch room facility to the employees? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory
Q14. Does the organization provide creche facility? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No
Q15. Does the company takes care of the employees working in night shift ? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No
Q16. Does working in the organization give you a feeling of security? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No
Q17. Does the company take safety measures for employee safety? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No
Q18. Do you think an employee welfare activity of the Organization give a feeling of safety and
improve your performance? [ ]
a. Yes
b. No

60
Q19. Rate the overall satisfaction with employee welfare activities of the Organization? [ ]
a. Highly Satisfactory
b. Satisfactory
c. Average
d. Dissatisfactory
e. Highly Dissatisfactory

61
BIBLIOGRAPHY

AUTHOR BOOK TITLES EDITION

Essentials of Human Prentice Hall, 11th Edition


P.SUBBARAO resource management

KETH DEVIS Human relations in Tata McGraw Hill, 13th Edition


management

STEPHEN P ROBBINS Organization behavior Prentice hall of India, 7TH edition

L.M PRASAD Organization behavior Himalaya publishing house, 4th


edition

Websites:

www.google.com

www.amaraja.com

www.wikipedia.com

www.hr.com

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