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The Anniversary

The King James Bible is near it's four-hundredth year anniversary in the year 2011. Here
are some interesting facts about it. If you have not read the Bible, it can be read aloud in
70 hours.
Total Books in the King James Bible
66

Total Chapters in the King James Bible


1,189

Total verses in the King James Bible


31,102

Total Books in the Old Testament


39

Total Chapters in the Old Testament


929

Total verses in the Old Testament


23,145

Total Books in the New Testament


27

Total Chapters in the New Testament


260

Total verses in the New Testament


7,957

Middle Book in the King James Bible


None – There are 2 – Micah & Nahum

Longest Book in the King James Bible


Psalms

Shortest Book in the King James Bible


2 John (verses) & 3 John (words)

Middle Chapter in the King James Bible


Psalm 117

Longest Chapter in the King James Bible


Psalm 119
Shortest Chapter in the King James Bible
Psalm 117

Middle verse in the King James Bible


None – There are 2 – Psalm 103:1 & Psalm 103:2

Longest verse in the King James Bible


Esther 8:9

Shortest verse in the King James Bible


John 11:35
Note: Total verses: 31,102. 3+1+1+0+2 = 7
(completeness, spiritual perfection, pure)
Total Books - 66 Total Chapters 1,189 Total Verses...31,102
Total words in the 31,102 verses - 788,258 (not including the Hebrew Alphabet in Psalm
119 or the superscriptions listed in some of the Psalms)
Total words in the Hebrew Alphabet in Psalm 119 - 22
Total words on the cover - 2 (HOLY BIBLE)
Total words in the Book Titles - 85 (the full titles as written in the 1611 edition - 374)
Total times the word "CHAPTER" is listed - 1,034 (in 5 books the word is not listed
because they only have one chapter)
Total times the word "PSALM" is listed - 150

The longest chapter in the Bible is Psalm 119, and the middle and shortest chapter is
Psalm 117. The middle chapter of the Old Testament is Job 29 and the middle chapter of
the New Testament is Romans 13. The middle verse of the Bible is Psalm 118:8. It reads
as follows: "It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in man." Wow, what a
verse to be right in the middle of your Bible. Then they tell you to count the words in this
middle verse. There are fourteen. That's seven plus seven. That's the number of
completeness and spiritual perfection doubled. Then they direct you to the middle two
words and they read "the Lord." The King James Bible has the words "the Lord" right in
the center of it. The middle verse of the Old Testament is 2 Chronicles 20:17, and the
middle verse of the New Testament is Acts 17:17. Isn't amazing that God used about 40
authors to write the Bible, and yet the flow of the Bible is consistent and unchanged? It
all points to Jesus Christ The prophecies point to Him. The miracles He performed
remind us that He is God. His teachings were amazing, and His control of nature was
real. The entire Bible is about Him. It is about our God.
How did the King James version Bible come about? After the death of Queen Elizabeth I,
Prince James VI of Scotland became King James I of England. The Protestant clergy
approached the new King in 1604 and announced their desire for a new translation to
replace the Bishop's Bible first printed in 1568. They knew that the Geneva Version had
won the hearts of the people because of its excellent scholarship, accuracy, and
exhaustive commentary. However, they did not want the controversial marginal notes
(proclaiming the Pope an Anti-Christ, etc.) Essentially, the leaders of the church desired a
Bible for the people, with scriptural references only for word clarification or cross-
references.
This "translation to end all translations" (for a while at least) was the result of the
combined effort of about fifty scholars. They took into consideration: The Tyndale New
Testament, The Coverdale Bible, The Matthews Bible, The Great Bible, The Geneva
Bible, and even the Rheims New Testament. The great revision of the Bishop's Bible had
begun. From 1605 to 1606 the scholars engaged in private research. From 1607 to 1609
the work was assembled. In 1610 the work went to press, and in 1611 the first of the huge
(16 inch tall) pulpit folios known today as "The 1611 King James Bible" came off the
printing press. Starting just one year after the huge 1611 pulpit-size King James Bibles
were printed and chained to every church pulpit in England; printing then began on the
earliest normal-size printings of the King James Bible. These were produced so
individuals could have their own personal copy of the Bible. The King James Bible is still
found in many homes and churches today, and it is living proof that the beauty and
inerrancy of God's Word has been safeguarded over the centuries.