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VE464

V2.0
User’s Manual

Ref. No. 0311464 February 16, 2010

Ahead of the Curve SM


To contact SERCEL
Europe Larbert, U. K. (Vibtech™)
Nantes, France Sales; Customer Support
Sales; Customer Support; Tel: +44 1324 556 777, Fax: +44 1324 556 222
Manufacturing & Repair. Russia
B.P. 30439, 16 rue de Bel Air Moscow, Russia
44474 Carquefou Cedex Customer Support; Repair.
Tel: +33 2 40 30 11 81, Fax: +33 2 40 30 19 48 Tel: +7 495 644 08 05, Fax: +7 495 644 08 04
Hot-Line: Land: +33 2 40 30 58 88 E-mail: repair.cis@geo-mail.org
Marine: +33 2 40 30 59 59 support.cis@geo-mail.org
Navigation: +33 2 40 30 69 87 Surgut, Russia
E-mail: sales.nantes@sercel.com Tel: +7 3462 28 92 50
customersupport.land@sercel.com
customersupport.marine@sercel.com North America
customersupport.navigation@sercel.com Houston, USA
www.sercel.com Sales; Customer Support;
St Gaudens, France Manufacturing & Repair;
Vibrator Customer Support; Tel: +1 281 492 66 88, Fax: +1 281 579 75 05
Vibrator Manufacturing & Repair; Hot-Line: +1 281 492 66 88
Streamer Manufacturing & Repair. E-mail:
Tel: +33 5 61 89 90 00, Fax: +33 5 61 89 90 33 sales.houston@sercel.com
Hot Line: +33 5 61 89 90 91 HOU_Customer.Support@sercel.com
Les Ulis, France HOU_Training@sercel.com
Sales; Customer Support Calgary
Sales; Customer Support; Manufacturing.
Tel: +33 1 69 93 83 60, Fax: +33 1 69 81 78 09
Tel: +1 403 275 3544, Fax: +1 403 295 1805
E-mail: sales.nantes@sercel.com
E-mail:
Hot Line: +33 6 15 54 13 96
Cal_Customer.Support@sercel.com
Brest, France
Sales; Customer Support Middle East
Tel: +33 2 98 05 29 05; Fax: +33 2 98 05 52 41 Dubai, U. A. E.
E-mail: sales.nantes@sercel.com Sales, Customer Support, Repair.
Toulon, France Tel: +971 4 8832142, Fax: +971 4 8832143
Hot Line: +971 50 6451752
Sales; Customer Support
E-mail: dubai@sercel.com
Tel: +33 4 94 21 69 92; Fax: +33 4 94 21 73 44
repair.dubai@sercel.com
E-mail: sales.msd@sercel.com
support.msd@sercel.com Far East
Toulouse, France Beijing, P. R. of China
Sales; Customer Support R & D.
Tel: +33 5 61 34 80 74; Fax:+33 5 61 34 80 66 Tel: +86 106 43 76 710, Fax: +86 106 43 76 367
E-mail: sales@metrolog.com E-mail: support.china@geo-mail.com
support@metrolog.com repair.china@geo-mail.com
Alfreton, U. K. Xian, P. R. of China
Streamer Manufacturing & Repair; Manufacturing & Repair.
Customer Support. Tel / Fax: +86 29 8222 9504
Tel: +44 1 773 605 078, Fax: +44 1 773 541 778 Xushui, P. R. of China
E-mail: sales@sercelengland.com Manufacturing & Repair.
customer.support@sercelengland.com Tel:+86 312 8648355, Fax:+86 312 8648441
Liphook, U. K. Singapore
Quest Geosolutions Ltd Streamer Manufacturing & Repair;
Tel: +44 1 428 751565, Fax: :+44 1428 751566 Customer Support.
E-mail: enquiries@qgsl.com Tel:+65 64 17 70 00, Fax:+65 6 545 1418
VE464 User’s Manual

In no event shall SERCEL be liable for incidental or consequential damages or related expenses
resulting from the use of this product, or arising out of or related to this manual or the information
contained in it, even if SERCEL has been advised, or knew or should have known of the possibility of
such damages.
The information included in this documentation is believed to be accurate and reliable. However,
SERCEL reserves the right to make changes to its products or specifications at any time, without notice,
in order to improve design or performance and to supply the best possible product. This documentation
does not form in any way a contractual agreement of sales promise on the part of SERCEL.
Software mentioned in this documentation is sold under a precise licence agreement and as such the
documentation may cover technical areas for which the user may not have a final licence.
No part of this documentation, or any of the information included herein may be modified or copied in
any form or by any means without the prior written consent of SERCEL.

© 2007 Sercel. All Rights Reserved.


Printed in France.

Sercel, 428XL, 428XLS, AIB, DPG, DSD, DSU1, DSU3, DSU3-428, e-428, eSQC Pro, FDPA428, FDU,
FDU-428, HSU, LandPro Bin, LAUL, LAUL-428, LAULS, LAUX, LAUX-428, LAUXS, Link, LL428,
LLIU, LLX400,LRU, LSI, LSS, LT428, LX, MGA, MRU, MSI, QT428, SGA, TMS428, TMU428, VE432,
VE464, VQC88, WPSR are all trademarks of Sercel. All rights reserved.

HYPACK® is a registered trademark of Hypack, Inc.


Microsoft and Windows are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the
United States and/or other countries. Other product and company names mentioned herein may be the
trademarks of their respective owners.

February 16, 2010 3


VE464 User’s Manual

Revision history

Chapters or
Date of
pages
revision Description of revision or reason for change
affected
V 1.0 release
Jan. 2008 p. 282 - Reviewed SFU software installation.
p. 302, 305 - Updated Extended QC and Signal Archive file formats.
Feb. 2008 p. 185 - Updated time-slot allocation.
p. 122 - Sweep timing.
p. 131 - Vib. Ready signal management.
Apr. 2008 Appendix D Analog radio interfacing.
Aug. 2008 p. 267 Ready/Down cable.
Sep. 2008 Chap. 2 - All devices to be grounded.
p. 50 - Replaced AS2 by AS1.
Oct. 2008 p. 38 - Connector mating information.
p. 122 - Recording system is assumed ready.
Chap. 9 - Connector references.
Nov. 2008 p. 274 Slave recorder cable pinout
Dec. 2008 Chap. 9 Corrected for connector pinout view side.
Feb. 2009 Version 2.0
Sep. 2009 p. 30 - Standalone DPG configuration.
p. 168 - Different configurations for DGPS correction broadcast-
ing.
p. 291 - Migrating to/from Standalone DPG software.
p. 302 - GPS strings.
Oct. 2009 p. 35 - Ready/down cable.
p. 66 - Servo control parameters (Min GV).
p. 143 - Slave DSD (updated).
p. 295 - DVCx lockup recovery procedure.
p. 65, 305 - Signal local archive (filtered force).
Dec. 2009 p. 94 Default “Table” sweep type #1.
Jan. 2010 p. 120, 121 - DPG and DSD status code 25 (Overrun error).
p. 148 - Autonomous DSD.
Feb. 2010 p. 180, 209, Baud rate for UHF Tracs TDMA (only 9600 or 12000).
211

4 February 16, 2010


Software Licence Agreement

Sercel is willing to license the accompanying soft- agreement between Licensee and any third
ware package to you only upon the condition that parties.
you accept all the terms contained in this licence If Licensee is located in a country which requires
agreement. registration of software licences with govern-
Read carefully the following terms and conditions ment authorities, Licensee shall be responsible
before opening the software media package. By for meeting all requirements of such registration.
opening the software media package you agree to II. PROPRIETARY RIGHTS
the terms and conditions of this agreement. Licensee acknowledges that the Software is and
I. SOFTWARE LICENCE remains the property of Licensor and contains
Software acquired under these terms and condi- trade secret information and Know How propri-
tions is not sold, but merely licensed under the pro- etary to Licensor and that any breach of the provi-
visions of this Article I. sions of this Article by Licensee would cause
Licensor to suffer immediate and irreparable
1.Licence Grant: Subject to the terms and condi-
harm. In the event of such breach, Licensor shall
tions of this Agreement, Licensor grants to Lic-
have, in addition to any and all remedies at law, the
ensee a personal, non exclusive, non transferable
right to an injunction, specific performance or oth-
licence to use the object code version of the Soft-
er equitable relief.
ware solely for licensee's own internal use.
Title to Software remains with Licensor at all
2.Number And Type Of Licences: In consider-
times and no title or ownership of Software is
ation of payment of the licence fee, Licensor will
transferred under this Agreement. Licensee shall
provide Licensee with (a) password(s) corre-
take no action that might impair any right, title or
sponding to the Software.
interest of Licensor in or to the Software. Licensee
3.Use Of Software: In support of its own internal shall not have any rights in or to any trademark or
use of the software, Licensee may only: trade name owned by Licensor with respect to the
(a) Use the object code version of the Software, Software.
(b) Copy the Software into machine readable or Licensee shall not disclose the Software to any
printed form for backup purposes only (2 third party without Licensor's prior written agree-
copies maximum), provided that all copies ment. Licensee shall inform all its employees hav-
and partial copies include Licensor's copy- ing access to the Software of the Confidential
right notices, nature of the Software and their obligations with
(c) Except with regard to training books and respect thereto. Licensee shall ensure that its em-
materials, copy the documentation as re- ployees and any third party to whom disclosure is
quired for Licensee's own use, provided that authorised strictly abide by the confidentiality re-
all copies shall include Licensor's copyright strictions set forth in this Agreement.
notices.
Except as expressly provided herein, Lic- III. WARRANTY
ensee may not: Software warranty period is ninety (90) days from
(a) Copy, modify, merge, reverse engineer, re- the date of installation. Licensor warrants that
verse assemble, decompile, or disassemble Software was developed with reasonable diligence
the Software, and skill and that it substantially conforms to pub-
(b) Remove any labels or notices from the Soft- lished documentation. Licensor's sole responsibil-
ware, ity under this warranty shall be to correct or
(c) Distribute, publish, transfer, sublicense, or replace any Software which does not so conform,
make the Software or program documenta- provided that Licensee notifies Licensor in writing
tion available to other organisations or per- during the warranty period. Licensee has had the
sons, opportunity to inspect Software: except as ex-
(d) Create or attempt to create derivative works pressly provided above, Software is deemed to be
from the Software, accepted "AS IS" without further warranty.
(e) Transfer the Software to another Hardware The warranty does not cover, and Licensor shall
without approval of Licensor and payment not be responsible for any failure or defect and re-
of the applicable fee, sulting damage caused by installation or use of
(f) Use the Software to violate the terms and Software not furnished by Licensor, accident (in-
conditions of any other software licensing cluding damage during shipment), neglect, misuse

VE464 User’s Manual 5


February 16, 2010
Software Licence Agreement

or abuse, or exposure to conditions beyond the en- tions thereof, provided Licensee has been given
vironmental power and operating constraints spec- ten (10) days notice prior to termination, during
ified by Licensor. The warranty does not cover which Licensee has failed to cure the breach to Li-
defects or failure resulting from modification or censor's reasonable satisfaction. Upon termina-
installation by someone other than Licensor or its tion, Licensee shall return to Licensor all Software
authorised representative. and copies thereof, including merged portions in
any form, or provide written confirmation that
IV. PATENTS AND COPYRIGHTS Software and such copies/portions have been de-
Licensor shall defend, at its expense, any claim or
stroyed. Termination is without prejudice to any
suit brought against Licensee alleging that Soft-
other rights or remedies available to Licensor at
ware infringes upon a patent, copyright or other
contract or at law.
proprietary right, and shall pay all costs and dam-
ages finally awarded, provided that Licensor is Termination does not relieve Licensee of its obli-
given prompt written notice of such claim, reason- gation to pay the licence fee(s), the maintenance
able information and assistance, and sole authority fees up to and including the running period, as well
to defend or settle the claim. In the defence or set- as any other charges and fees due to Licensor. In
tlement of the claim, Licensor may obtain for Lic- addition, if any act by Licensee causes the cancel-
ensee the right to continue using Software, replace lation or rescheduling of Licensee's order, Licens-
or modify Software (without substantially chang- ee shall reimburse Licensor for the resultant costs
ing the original functions of Software) so that it incurred.
becomes non-infringing, or, if such remedies are VII. GENERAL
not reasonably available, grant Licensee a refund Except for the obligation of payment, neither party
for Software (net of reasonable depreciation) upon shall be liable for non-performance caused by cir-
its return. Licensor shall not have any liability if cumstances beyond their reasonable control in-
the infringement is based upon modifications of cluding, but not limited to, work stoppages, delay
Software or the use or sale of Software in combi- in transportation, delay in delivery by vendors,
nation with products not furnished by Licensor. fire, civil disobedience, war or acts of nature.
V. LIMITATION OF LIABILITY Except as provided herein, this Agreement consti-
Except as expressly set forth herein, there are no tutes the entire agreement between the parties with
representations of warranties by Licensor, ex- respect to the subject matter hereof, and shall su-
pressed or implied, including but not limited to im- persede and cancel all prior agreements or under-
plied warranties of merchantability and fitness for standings either oral or written, including any
a particular purpose. Licensor does not warrant different, conflicting or additional terms and con-
that the operation of Software shall be uninterrupt- ditions which may appear on any contract, pur-
ed or error free, that the functions contained in the chase order or form submitted by Licensee.
Software shall meet Licensee's requirements or During the term of this Agreement, the relation-
operate in the combinations selected by Licensee, ship of Licensor to Licensee is that of an indepen-
or that every error or defect may be corrected pur- dent contractor only.
suant to the warranty or maintenance services. In This Agreement shall be governed, construed and
no event will Licensor or its suppliers be liable for interpreted in accordance with the laws of France.
indirect, consequential, incidental, punitive, spe- The Tribunal du Commerce of Nantes (Trade
cial or exemplary damages (including loss of data, Court of Nantes) France, shall have the exclusive
production, profits or use of hardware) to Licensee jurisdiction to resolve any dispute or disagreement
or any other party. Under no circumstances will between the parties relating to this Agreement.
Licensor or its suppliers be liable for damages ex-
ceeding the amount of the licence fee paid for All notices, authorisations and requests in connec-
Software to Licensor by Licensee. These limita- tion with this Agreement shall be in writing and
tions will apply regardless of the form of action, shall be deemed given on the day they are received
whether in contract or tort. by hand, first class mail, "FAX" or "TELEX" at the
addresses herein or thereafter notified by either
VI. TERMINATION party to the other in writing.
Licensee may terminate the Agreement at any
time. Licensor may terminate the Agreement if
Licensee fails to comply with the terms and condi-

6 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Table
of
Contents

Revision history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

1 Introduction
The VE464 system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18
Digital Pilot Generator (DPG) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
Digital Servo Drive (DSD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
VE464 Main features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Deployment topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Large crew, TDMA and GPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Very large crew, dual-TDMA and GPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
Large crew, analog radio and GPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Small crew, analog radio and GPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Slave DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Standalone DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Standalone DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Unpacking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

VE464 User’s Manual 7


February 16, 2010
Table of Contents

2 Hardware installation
Connector mating information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Installing a DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
DPG mounting dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Connecting a DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Installing a DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
DSD mounting dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Connecting a DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Break-Out Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Lift Box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Acceleration Sensors (AS1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Accelerometer Sum Box option (ASB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Vibrator Sensor Probe Box option (VSPB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54

3 VLI user interface


Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Power-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
VLI main window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
The status bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
The Setup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
The Installation function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
Running the Installation function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74
The Identification function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Running the Identification function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Taking a local sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
About the Filtered/Raw option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84

8 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Table of Contents

Sweep types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85


Launching a sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Voltmeter function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
Ohmmeter function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Mass Offset Adjust function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Valve Offset Adjust function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100
Torque Motor Offset Adjust function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
Pressure switch test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
The Network menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Remote Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
DSD Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
DSD Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
DSD Initialisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
The Update menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Loading DSD software to the DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110
Loading Custom sweeps to a DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Warning and error messages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
DSD power-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115
During the Installation function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116
During the identification function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
When taking a local sweep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118
Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

4 Reference information
VE464 Status codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Status generated by DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120
Status generated by DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121
Sweep timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

VE464 User’s Manual 9


February 16, 2010
Table of Contents

Using a TDMA datalink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122


Using a conventional analog radio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .128
Vibrator Ready signal management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131
Sweep Definition Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133
Signal Local Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134
Enabling the Signal Local Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135
Disabling the Signal Local Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Error handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136
Standalone DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
Slave DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Master/Slave configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Master acquisition system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Slave acquisition system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Autonomous DSD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
How to use the Autonomous mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
Slip-sweep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Vibrator signal recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Ground Viscosity and Stiffness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Conversion To Normalized Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155

5 TDMA radio datalink


Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Time Division Multiple Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Built-in GPS receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159
Differential GPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160
Comparison to “standard” TracsTDMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160

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Table of Contents

Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .162
TDMA attached to a DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
TDMA attached to a DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .165
Two TDMAs attached to a DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166
Broadcasting Differential GPS corrections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168
External GPS receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
TracsTDMA settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Configuration supplied by SERCEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174
Using SercelTDMAconfig to configure a TDMA . . . . . . . . . .174
DGPS reference station configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176
Using a TDMA radio datalink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
Choosing a radio channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179
Choosing a radio Baud rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180
Radio messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
Differential GPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182
Real Time Kinematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
Vehicle Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
Time-slot allocation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185
Interpreting the LED indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
GPS indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
Time-slot allocation indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
Specific serial port wiring for VE464. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Command port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
Auxiliary port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196

6 TracsTDMA repeater
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
Single-Frequency repeater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Dual-Frequency repeater, No-Scan mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
Dual-Frequency repeater, Scan mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .207

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Table of Contents

Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Single-Frequency Repeater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
Dual-Frequency Repeater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211
Channel information displayed on DSD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215

7 DSD Network management


Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Installing the radio unit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
DSD networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .220
Radio settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .221

8 Vibrator guidance
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .224
Equipment supplied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226
Installing the Guidance option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .227
Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230
Using the Guidance GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .231
File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238
Setup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .240
Standard GIS functions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .243
Obstacles layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245

9 Wiring specifications
DPG wiring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
ANALOG PILOTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .250
NAV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .251
RECORDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .252
RADIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .254
Pilot 1 BNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
Pilot 2 BNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256
TB BNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .256

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Table of Contents

DSD wiring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257


POWER connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
LIFT connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257
VIBRATOR CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .258
NAV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260
RADIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .261
USB port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263
Ethernet port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .264
REMOTE CMD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .265
SIMILARITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .268
PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .269
Ref Adjust BNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .270
Force BNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .270
TB BNC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .270
SERVO cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .271
Accelerometer Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
Guidance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .273
Slave recording system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274

A Software installation
Tablet PC first-time Power-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276
Creating a SERCEL account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .276
Changing the TCP/IP Network Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . .276
Installing VLI software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278
Configuring the Tablet PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .280
Installing SFU software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .282
DPG software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .290
DPG window in the recorder’s GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .290
Uploading a new software release to a standard DPG . . . . . . .290
Migrating from/to Standalone DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .291

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DSD software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .294


DVCx lockup recovery procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295
On a DPG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295
On a DSD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .298

B VE464 file formats


Extended QC file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
Signal Local archive files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .305
Signal archive file format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .305
Custom sweep file. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308

C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .312
DGPS transmission check procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317
Configuring the radio circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .319
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .322
AsteRx GPS receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .322
DG14 GPS receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .323
Setting up the GPS receiver as “Mobile” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .324
Setting up the GPS receiver as “Base” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .326

D Analog radio interfacing


Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .332
MOTOROLA GM 360 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333
Radio Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333
“Radio” connector pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333
VE464 “Radio Management” parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .333
MOTOROLA GM300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334
Radio Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334
VE464 “Radio Functions” parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .334

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Table of Contents

E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347

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16 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Chapter

1 Introduction

This chapter provides a general description of the VE464


DPG and DSD. It includes the following sections:

• The VE464 system (page 18)


• Specifications (page 24)
• Deployment topology (page 25)
• Unpacking (page 32)

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1 Introduction
The VE464 system

The VE464 system


The VE 464 is a powerful Vibrator Digital Control System, using a fully
auto-adaptive servomechanism. It enables the use of all advanced
Vibroseis techniques such as:
- pseudo-random sweeps
- multiple simultaneous sources in flip-flop or slip-modes
- HPVA(1)
- coded sweeps
- cascaded (2) sweeps
The VE 464 is fully compatible with most satellite DGPS and Glonass
receivers, for integrated tracking of source positions.
The VE464 includes a Digital Pilot Generator (DPG) —a control unit
attached to the recorder— and Digital Servo Drives (DSD) —vibrator
control units.

Figure 1-1 VE464 DPG and DSD

1. CGGVeritas Patent
2. Exxon Patent

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Introduction
The VE464 system

For communications between the DPG and DSDs, Time Division


Multiple Access (TDMA) radio systems are used rather than standard
analog radio units (analog radio is supported, however). The TDMA
1
Radio link, due to its full duplex protocol, increases the capacities of the
system allowing:
- no interference when using more than 2 fleets in navigation mode,
- the use of an increased number of fleets (32 fleets max.)
In addition, the TDMA Radio link has its own integrated GPS system
used for both synchronizing the sweeps and tracking the vibrators with
differential corrections for guidance options. External satellite DGPS
and Glonass receivers can still be used with VE464 for integrated
tracking of source positions.

Digital Pilot Generator (DPG)


The DPG connects to the data acquisition system through an Ethernet
link and acts as a master control unit for the VE 464 system.
The DPG can be
- fully integrated with SERCEL acquisition systems (428XL),
- or connected to any other type of acquisition system, using its
own graphic user interface.

Digital Servo Drive (DSD)


Installed in each vibrator, the DSD performs real-time control of the
vibrator ground force. It also computes and transmits a complete set of
attributes for a QC database. Maintenance modes are available that
make it possible to easily check the performance of the vibrator
hardware and the GPS system.
The DSD can also be used
- as a slave source controller to control a slave acquisition system
(in that case it does not control any vibrator),

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February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
The VE464 system

- as a standalone unit controlling both a vibrator and an


acquisition system (e. g. for borehole seismic).
The VE464 DSDs can be equipped with an external Tablet PC acting as
a QC terminal and a monitor for the GPS guidance option. With its large
screen, the Tablet PC provides effortless programming of the DSD and
allows efficient comparison of servocontrol parameters from one DSD
to an other. Furthermore, the Tablet PC allows Wi-Fi connection
between DSDs to make sure they all benefit from the same consistent
set-up.

VE464 Main features

Signal generation
The DPG can generate up to 32 digital pilot signals and 2 different
simultaneous analog pilot signals. The 24-bit digital pilots allow for
better quality and lower noise signal generation.
A pilot or a sweep signal is generated from an operator-defined library
of 32 basic signals combined with high-line parameters.
Basic signals are defined by their frequency range, frequency vs. time
law, sweep length, initial phase value, tapers and amplitude vs. time law,
or any custom law.
A single DPG can handle up to 32 vibrators whether used independently
or in some combination of multiple vibrator fleets.

Digital vibrator control


By an automatic identification procedure, the VE464 digital model is
adapted to any type of vibrator without the need for manual adjustment.
The fully digital auto-adaptive servomechanism performs with optimal
control minimizing the phase and distortion while maximizing the
fundamental output. The use of GPS allows a high level of precision in
signal synchronization and in particular a T0 accuracy better than 10 µs.

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Introduction
The VE464 system

Optimal digital control allows:


- fast sweep rate, 1
- combination of sweep segments with no dead time, used in
cascaded(1) sweeps or multiple simultaneous source application,
- pseudo-random sweeps, for environmentally friendly vibration,

Enhanced real-time Quality Control


The DSD integrates a complete set of functions for automatic sensor
tests. The check for coherence between all the measurements
contributes to quality assurance, ensuring that the vibrator generates the
proper sweep, without any risk of polarity inversion.
A complete QC database is generated for real-time or post-processing
analysis including:
- phase,
- distortion,
- fundamental ground force.
In addition, the digital control identifies the ground viscosity and
stiffness, which regularly provides information on the ground
absorption model and can be used to enhance seismic data.
Other QC measurements can be sent to the acquisition system in real
time or stored on a local hard disk or a USB memory stick for further
analysis and treatment requested by some particular acquisition
methods, e.g. HFVS(2). These measurements include:
- fundamental ground force;
- reference signal;
- mass acceleration;
- baseplate acceleration.

1. Exxon patent
2. Mobil patent

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1 Introduction
The VE464 system

Bar-graph QC display
All the QC information is displayed within colour bar-graphs with
automatic threshold detection. For each vibrator, current values and
average values over the last 50 vibrations are shown.

Complete graphic display


In addition to the QC database information, the VE 464 has the
capability to graphically display the Phase, Distortion and Force results
vs. Time or Frequency, for each vibrator in real time.

QC Statistics
On request, statistics on the QC database can be performed, for daily or
longer time analysis, to detect any drift in vibrator performance or to be
used as a preventive maintenance tool.

Slip-Sweep (1) capability with a single DPG


With a recording system from SERCEL, there is no need to wait until a
sweep is complete to start the next one. (The Slip-sweep technique
allows substantial production increase to be achieved). See page 153.
Slip-sweep requires a single DPG, regardless of how many vibrator
fleets are involved.

GPS Vibrator Guidance


Each vibrator can be guided by its Sercel acquisition systems from one
pre-planned VP to the next one by using the GPS guidance option of the
VE464.

Recording system's automatic start of acquisition


With a recording system from SERCEL, acquisition by the recording
system can be started automatically as soon as the vibrators are ready,
using the DSD Ready signal via radio.

1. invented by PDO

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Introduction
The VE464 system

DSD Network
This feature allows the acquisition system (428XL) to automatically
start acquisition as soon as all vibrators in a fleet are ready (with their
1
pads down). There are no delays to be adjusted any more. Everything is
automatically started at maximum speed. See DSD Network
management (page 217).

Fleet navigation
With the fleet navigation option, associated with the DSD Network
option, the geographical location of the fleet is relayed to the 428XL
system, which selects the corresponding VP (shot point) from its
operation table and shoots it automatically. VPs can be shot in any order
by any fleet.
The navigation option is also supported in slip-sweep mode, allowing
acquisition to start as soon as any fleet is ready at any VP.

Fleet location feedback in Positioning window


When the shot sequence is controlled by the geographical location of
the fleet on the acquisition system, the fleet location is displayed in the
Positioning window before acquisition is launched. (With no DSD
network, the fleet location displayed is the location of the “leader”
vibrator).

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February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
Specifications

Specifications
Signal length: up to 64 s in 1-s steps.
Frequency vs. time law: linear, logarithmic, pseudo-random, Tn,
Pulse, compound, dedicated, user-
defined.
Frequency range: 1 to 300 Hz in 1-Hz steps.
Amplitude Vs time law: linear interpolation.
Tapers: up to 1/2 signal length, Blackman Law.
Max. Num. of Vibrators: 32.
“T0 accuracy”: better than 10 µs.
Clock accuracy: no drift (GPS accuracy).
QC database format: Positioning data SPS file.
QC attributes APS file.
Physical: (including mounting parts)
Size (W × D × H) Weight
DPG 440 × 385 × 88 mm 3.6 kg
DSD 168 × 427 × 283 mm 11 kg

Temperature range: Operating 0°C to 45°C.


Storage -40°C to 70°C.
Power supply: DPG 110 V or
220 VAC / 30 W.
DSD 9 to 32 VDC / 30 W
without LIFT system (add
about 50 W with Lift
system ON).

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Introduction
Deployment topology

Deployment topology
Large crew, TDMA and GPS
1

GPS
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Wireless
Ethernet
GPS DSD Fleet 1
WIFI
TDMA

GPS
DSD WIFI
GPS TDMA TDMA
Radio link
DPG

428XL GPS
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Wireless
Ethernet
GPS Fleet 2
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Note: Typically,
the GPS receiver
is housed in the GPS
TDMA box. DSD WIFI
TDMA

Figure 1-2 Large crew, TDMA and GPS

• TDMA radio link (bi-directional with one DSD in each fleet,


uni-directional with the others);
• WIFI wireless network (DSD Network option);
• Synchronization using GPS time.

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February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
Deployment topology

Very large crew, dual-TDMA and GPS

GPS
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Wireless
Ethernet
GPS DSD Fleet 1
428XL WIFI
TDMA

GPS TDMA 1 GPS DSD


WIFI
TDMA
DPG Radio link

GPS GPS
TDMA 2 DSD WIFI
TDMA

GPS DSD WIFI


TDMA Fleet 5

GPS DSD
WIFI
TDMA

GPS
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Note: Typically,
the GPS receiver Fleet 6
is housed in the GPS DSD WIFI
TDMA box.
TDMA

Figure 1-3 Very large crew, dual-TDMA and GPS

• TDMA radio link (bi-directional with one DSD in each fleet,


uni-directional with the others);
• Extra TDMA box allows shorter latency to be achieved (higher
recurrence rate of each DSD’s talk time-slot);
• WIFI wireless network (DSD Network option);
• Synchronization using GPS time.

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February 16, 2010
Introduction
Deployment topology

Large crew, analog radio and GPS


1
GPS
DSD WIFI
Radio
Wireless
Ethernet
GPS Fleet 1
DSD WIFI
Radio

GPS
DSD WIFI
Radio
GPS Radio
Radio link
DPG

428XL GPS
DSD WIFI
Radio

GPS
DSD WIFI Fleet 2
Radio

GPS
DSD WIFI
Radio

Figure 1-4 Large crew, analog radio and GPS

• Analog radio link (half-duplex bi-directional with one DSD in each


fleet, uni-directional with the others);
• WIFI wireless network (DSD Network option);
• Synchronization using GPS time.

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1 Introduction
Deployment topology

Small crew, analog radio and GPS

GPS
DSD
Radio
Fleet 1
GPS
DSD
Radio

GPS Radio
Radio link
DPG
GPS
DSD
428XL Radio
Fleet 2
GPS
DSD
Radio

Figure 1-5 Small crew, analog radio and GPS

• Analog radio link (half-duplex bi-directional with each DSD);


• No wireless network;
• Synchronization using GPS time.

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Introduction
Deployment topology

Slave DSD
1
GPS TDMA Radio link
428XL GPS 428XL
DSD
DPG TDMA

(Master) (Slave DSD)

Figure 1-6 Slave DSD

• TDMA or analog radio;


• Synchronization using GPS time;
• A Slave DSD can be used to control a Slave recorder.
See Slave DSD on page 143 for details.

Standalone DSD

428XL FO
DSD
TB

Figure 1-7 Standalone DSD

A standalone DSD is used both as a DPG and for controlling a vibrator


(typically for downhole acquisition), simply using a cable between the
seismic recorder and the DSD.
See Standalone DSD on page 138 for details.

VE464 User’s Manual 29


February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
Deployment topology

Standalone DPG
The Standalone DPG configuration (software version 10.0) allows
using the VE464 with a seismic acquisition sytem other than a 428XL
(e. g. 408XL), with a number of restrictions however: sync by
hardwired FO/TB rather than Ethernet, no Slip-sweep, no “SQC Dump”
mode, no Navigation-driven shooting, no simultaneous sources, no
“Numeric” pilot, no similarity function.
See the specific documentation (Standalone DPG User’s Manual).

GPS
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Wireless Fleet 2
Ethernet
GPS DSD WIFI
TDMA

Radio
link GPS
DSD WIFI
TDMA
Wireless Fleet 1
Ethernet
GPS DSD WIFI
TDMA

TDMA GPS

GUI windows:
- JStart
- JInstall
- JOperation
- JPositioning
Standalone DPG - JVE464
FO TB - JLog
Ethernet
See Note
Seismic recorder below

Analog
Auxiliary Blaster Ethernet port
Pilots
channels connector

Figure 1-8 Standalone DPG

30 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Introduction
Deployment topology

Note: if the acquisition system used with the standalone DPG is a


408UL or 408XL and the cable used to connect the system to the DPG
is a “408 Master cable” (P/N 1C14078465A), that cable must be
1
modified as follows: on the 14-19S plug to connect to the “Blaster”
connector, unsolder the conductors from pins C and D.

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February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
Unpacking

Unpacking
The VE464 system is composed of one or more of the following pieces
of equipment (depending on the configuration to be implemented):
- Digital Pilot Generator: DPG. (P/N 1731083970)
- Digital Servo Drive: DSD (P/N 1730084177).

DPG
The VE464 DPG is supplied along with the following accessories:

Table 1-1 Accessory kit Part No. 1731084563


Item Quantity Part No.

Ground cable 1 1716075996


Recorder cable 1 1C14078465
Radio cable 1 1730084564
Analog Pilot cable 1 1731084587
RJ45 plug 1 5011427
Fuse, 2.5 A, 5x20 10 5330119
Power cord, 2.50 m 1 6050039
RJ45 cord, 5m 1 6050047
NAV GPS cable 1 605084575
TDMA radio cable 1 605084579
Shock-absorber 4 7550352
Screw, Hex, M4x8 4 9330283
Lockwasher, dia. 4 4 9920031
RS232 SUBD9 cord 1 3170333

To install the DPG, see Connecting a DPG (page 40) and DPG wiring
(page 250).

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February 16, 2010
Introduction
Unpacking

DSD
The VE464 DSD is supplied along with the following accessories: 1
Table 1-2 DSD Accessory kit (Part No. 1730084562)
Item Quantity Part No.

Wrench, male, size 5 1 0010085


Ground cable 1 1716075996
PC cable 1 1730084451
Radio cable 1 1730084564
Remote Standalone cable 1 1730084578
Diode, rectifier, 1N4007 4 4340058
Plug, 14-pin 1 5011210
Fuse, 32 A, ultra fast 5 5330196
Fuse, 5 A. 10 5330232
Relay, 60 VDC, 5 A, 1T 1 54002421
USB cord 1 605084449
TDMA radio cable 1 605084574
NAV GPS cable 1 605084575
Lug, dia. 8.0 4 6450310
Cable tie, max. dia. 16 5 6520160
Cable clamp, L 359 mm 15 6520233
Screw, Hex, M6X30 6 9330232
Nut, Hex, M6 6 9810152
Lockwasher, dia. 6 6 9920026
Field Remote Shell cable 1 605086474

Table 1-3 DSD Set of cables (Part No. 1730084723)


Item Quantity Part No.

Lift Box 1 1716075258


Battery Box 1 1716075264
Battery cable 1 1716076059
Break Out Box 1 1730084724
Screw, hex, M4x20 4 9330110
Screw, hex, M6x30 8 9330232
Nut, hex, M6 8 9810152
Nut, hex, M4 4 9810154
Lockwasher, dia. 6 8 9920026
Lockwasher, dia. 4 4 9920031

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February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
Unpacking

See Lift Box (page 48) Battery Box

See Break-Out Box (page 46) Battery cable

Figure 1-9

For other cables, see Wiring specifications (page 249). See also
Connecting a DSD (page 43).

Accelerometers

Figure 1-10 AS1 accelerometer

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February 16, 2010
Introduction
Unpacking

Optional equipment
Table 1-4 DSD Network (P/N 1730085251) 1
Item Quantity Part No.
Clamp, dual-lock, adhesive 44 0450108
Battery cable 1 1716083090
Antenna, 3 dB, omni. 1 3310226
WIFI Ethernet bridge 1 3310237
Converter, PD40-12-LC 1 3530251
Coax. cord, 50 ohm, L 3 m 1 5050283
Ethernet cord 1 605084573
Cable tie, max.dia. 16 1 6520160
Cable tie, max.dia. 45 5 6520163
Mount plate for cable tie 1 6520167

Table 1-5 Guidance (P/N 1730085250)


Item Quantity Part No.
VE464 Tablet PC 1 1730085654
Guidance cable 1 1730086362
Guidance NAV cable 1 605084576
PC dock kit 1 7510474
Packing 1 880084781

Table 1-6 VE464 Tablet PC (P/N 1730085654)


Item Quantity Part No.
Duo-Touch Tablet PC 1 170256
10-28V/18V charger/adapter 1 3440018
Stylus, set of 3, for Duo-touch 1 3170257
USB/serial cord 1 3170288
Banana plug, dia. 4, red 1 5110014
Banana plug, dia. 4, black 1 5110051
Power cord 1 6050300

Pushbuttons to be fastened to the steering


wheel, allowing remote control of Ready and
Down buttons on DSD. See page 267

Figure 1-11 Ready/Down cable (P/N 1730084584)

VE464 User’s Manual 35


February 16, 2010
1 Introduction
Unpacking

36 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Chapter

2 Hardware installation

This chapter provides the necessary information to install


DPG and DSD hardware. It includes the following sections:

• Connector mating information (page 38)


• Installing a DPG (page 39)
• Installing a DSD (page 42)

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Connector mating information

Connector mating information


Whenever you plug or unplug any self-latching FISCHER connector, be
sure to grasp the latching sleeve rather than the attached cable, and push
or pull lengthwise.

Latching
Clamp
sleeve
nut

Figure 2-1 Self-latching connector

Figure 2-2 Plugging

Figure 2-3 Unplugging

Pulling the cable or clamp nut causes the locking fingers to hold more
tightly into the receptacle’s latching groove. The more the cable or
connector body is pulled, the more the locking pressure increases.

Figure 2-4

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February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DPG

Installing a DPG

2
IMPORTANT Ground
cable
The housing of each piece of equipment (DPG,
TDMA radio) must be grounded.

DPG mounting dimensions


440.5 mm
88.1
21

35.9 Four shock-absorbers to be


bolted to mount plate

Eight M3 screws

Eight holes
35.9 (dia. 3.9 mm)
385.2 mm

260 mm

310 mm

440.5 mm

Figure 2-5 DPG mounting dimensions

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DPG

Connecting a DPG

Pilot 1 Pilot 2 TB

Power On/Off RS232 port USB port

Figure 2-6 DPG front panel

GPS receiver Recorder Ethernet port


Fuse
GUI

Ethernet switch
DPG rear panel

Ground
AC Power In
TDMA or analog radio
See TDMA radio
datalink (page 157)
Blaster

Trimble LCI-428
Accutime Gold
GPS receiver

Figure 2-7 Typical cabling to 428XL recorder

If you want to use digital pilots, you have to attach a GPS receiver to the
LCI-428.

40 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DPG

Analog Pilots Recorder


GUI

Ethernet

2
VE464 DPG

Ground
Blaster

Inputs 1, 2

AIB
Aux 1, 2
LCI428

Low Line or
High Line

Auxiliary channels

Figure 2-8 Using analog pilots

Analog Pilots Recorder

Ethernet

Standalone DPG GUI


FO TB
Ground
Modification required if
408 system and
“408 Master cable”
P/N 1C14078465A

Auxiliary Blaster Ethernet port


channels connector

Figure 2-9 DPG cabling to other type of recorder

See Standalone DPG User’s Manual.


VE464 User’s Manual 41
February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Installing a DSD
DSD mounting dimensions

427

283.5

182.5 168 55
6 holes,
dia. 6.5
168

All dimensions
in mm

50,
or 30
or 70

220
275

Figure 2-10

42 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Connecting a DSD

IMPORTANT
The housing of each piece of equipment (DSD, TDMA radio) must be
2
grounded.

Figure 2-11 Ground cable

Ethernet
(WIFI)

USB stick GPS

Lift switch
Ready/Down or
Recoding system TDMA or
(standalone Analog radio
DSD)
Lift Box

Ground
Break-Out Box wing nut
or slave
Recording
Battery
System

Ground

Figure 2-12

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Similarities differential
outputs PC (Guidance)
(Reference, Force, Mass
acceleration, Baseplate Force BNC
acceleration

Display
TB BNC

Ref Adjust
Keypad
BNC

Down Up
pushbutton pushbutton

Ready
pushbutton

Figure 2-13

See also DSD wiring (page 257).

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February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

switch switch
2
(3) 5 m Up
Lift Box
5m (3) 5 m
Down
(3) 5 m
Pressure
switch
switch

9 to 32 VDC
(14 m)
Fuse box Battery

Ground including an ultra-fast blow


35 A, 240 V fuse
(Part No. 5330196)

Mass
accelerometer
5m

(2)

7 m (2)
(2) 7 m (1)
Mass LVDT
Plate 1 (2) 7 m (2) Break Out (2) 7 m (1)
accelerometer Box Valve LVDT
7 m (2) (2) 7 m (1)
Torque motor

(2)
Plate 2
(1) 14S-2 plug supplied along with socket
accelerometer
(2) 12-10S plug
(3) 2-conductor cable

Figure 2-14

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Break-Out Box

Three 12-10P plugs


(P No. 5030187)

(5 metres)

cable P No. 1716075239


22-55S plug (P No. 5011231)

Three 12-10P plugs (P No. 5030187)

(viewed from front face)


(solder side)
22-55S plug

Figure 2-15 Break-Out box (Part No. 1716075219)

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February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Terminal Terminal
strip strip

Mass Acc sensors


A B
C

2
B D
C E
D
E
F
DD
F
G
H
EE K
J
GG

Plate 1 Acc sensors


A
B
C
N D
P E
R
S
T
U F
G
H
K
J

Plate 2 Acc sensors


A
B
V C
W D
X E
Y
Z
-a
FF F
G
H
K
J

-Z
AA
BB
CC

Mass LVDT
C
E
A
B
F
G
J

-V
-W
-X
Valve LVDT

-U
C
E
A
B
F
G
J

-t
-u
Torque Motor

A
B
C
D
F
E
G
J

Figure 2-16

VE464 User’s Manual 47


February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Lift Box
(*) add wires
as shown below

4 metres

5 metres

16-8P plug
P No. 5010784

On terminal strip:
(*) add wires as shown below
4 should be wired to 8
6 should be wired to 7

Lock 1 (*)
F should
be wired Lock 2 (*)
to G Down

1/2 Up (*)
Up

Pressure switch

Add diodes supplied in


accessory kit

Figure 2-17 (Part No. 1716075258)

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February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

NOMAD Lift box

DSD Lift
connector
NOMAD
Lift box 2
Emergency
1 shutdown
Down A 2
NU B 3
Lift relay
Up C 4
1/2Up D 5
Pressure switch - E 6
1/2 Up switch
Ground F 7
Ground G 8
Pressure switch + H GND 9 Up
10 coil
11
12
13
14 Down
15 coil
16

Pressure switch

Figure 2-18 Nomad Lift box

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Acceleration Sensors (AS1)

8
16.75
74
8

56.5

41
16.75

Dia. 9

All dimensions in mm

Figure 2-19 AS1 accelerometer (Part No. 1716077451)

To attach the accelerometer to the mass or baseplate, use the four


HM860 mm bolts and washers provided.
The AS1 accelerometer has two independent, differential acceleration
outputs varying between +10 v and -10 V, with a differential sensitivity
of 180 mV/g.
It also has another differential output (OK) resulting from a comparison
between the two acceleration channels and indicating whether the
sensor is present and working properly.
The OK output is high (i. e. +10 V on OK+ terminal and -10 V on OK-
terminal) if the inside comparator does not senses any discrepancy

50 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

exceeding 5% between the two acceleration channels within the


frequency band from 0.74 to 106 Hz.
The OK output is low (0 V) if the inside comparator senses a
discrepancy greater than 5%. 2

Figure 2-20 AS1 Accelerometer cable (Part No. 1716075225)

For the wiring diagram of the cable, see page 272.

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Accelerometer Sum Box option (ASB)


This option makes it possible to connect up to three accelerometers to
the same acceleration input on the DSD, with a view to increasing the
precision of acceleration measurements.
For instance, two sensors may be fitted on the mass via an ASB, and six
sensors on the baseplate via two more ASBs, one connected to the
Baseplate-1 channel and the other connected to the Baseplate-2
channel.
The two acceleration outputs from the ASB box supply the average
value of the acceleration inputs from the sensors installed. The OK
output from the ASB is a combination of the three OK inputs from the
sensors, computed as follows:
0.8754OKin1 2OKin2 OKin3
OKout 
7

This allows the DSD to recognise the configuration during the


Installation procedure. The configuration identified by the system is
displayed on the Husky terminal so that the operator can check
connections.
If any problem arises during a sweep, then the DSD is able to display
the number of the faulty sensor. This information is relayed to the HCI
workstation.
The ASB is designed to be mounted under the Break Out Box. The ASB
option includes long securing screws provided for that purpose.

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February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

8.5

140
23.5

110
2
8.5 23.5

35

157
(Dimensions in mm)

Figure 2-21 ASB box

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February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Vibrator Sensor Probe Box option (VSPB)

Internal connector (1)


Internal plug (3)

Output Vib Control


plug (2)

Vib Control plug


(to DSD)

Figure 2-22

This box can be used in two different ways, depending on the internal
connection:
1. When the Output Vib Control plug (2) is connected to the Internal
connector (1), the box works as a spy inside the vibrator: output
BNCs can be connected to a recording system (e.g. VQC88).
Available single-ended outputs are: Mass acceleration, Base-plate
accelerations (1 & 2), demodulated Mass LVDT output,
demodulated Valve LVDT output, input Torque Motor current
(converted into voltage output).
This is helpful for tests within the vibrator itself.

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February 16, 2010
Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

Valve LVDT
Mass
Vibrator
VSPB Torque Motor
Control

DSD BOB
2
Baseplate Acceleration
Force Ref
Mass Acceleration

VQC88

Figure 2-23

2. When the Internal plug (3) is connected to the Internal connector


(1), the box provides all the signals the DSD needs. It allows all
DSD modes to be run without the need for a real vibrator (e.g.
Installation, Identification, Sweeps, etc.).
This is helpful for maintenance or tests outside the vibrator.
The same signals as above are available from the BNCs.

Vibrator
Control VSPB

DSD

Figure 2-24

Conversion factors for signals available from the VSPB box:


Accelerations: 545 ms-2 / V.
LVDTs: depending on LVDT type.
Excitation (torque motor current): 19.6 mA / V.

VE464 User’s Manual 55


February 16, 2010
2 Hardware installation
Installing a DSD

56 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Chapter

3 VLI user interface

This chapter is a guide to using the Vibrator Local Interface


(VLI) software tool on a computer attached to a DSD. The
VLI interface allows you to set a DSD’s parameters to
match the characteristics of the vibrator it is attached to.
This chapter includes the following sections:

• Getting started (page 58)


• The Installation function (page 72)
• The Identification function (page 78)
• Taking a local sweep (page 82)
• Maintenance (page 96)
• The Network menu (page 103)
• The Update menu (page 110)
• Warning and error messages (page 115)

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February 16, 2010
3 VLI user interface
Getting started

Getting started
In this section:
• Power-on (page 58)
• VLI main window (page 60)
• The Setup menu (page 63)

Power-on
1. Prerequisites:
- VE464 software is assumed installed on the computer (if
required, see Installing VLI software on page 278).
- The DSD is assumed connected to the computer and the vibrator
(see Connecting a DSD on page 43).
2. Power on the DSD (press the ON key on the keypad). This causes
the DSD to boot up, with the following message on its display
panel:

POWER ON
IN PROGRESS

Figure 3-1

Depending on the history of the DSD, different messages may


appear after the DSD boots up. If any error message appears,
make sure the DSD is properly connected to the computer. See
Warning and error messages (page 115) for a description of the
possible messages.
You do not need to power off the computer or the DSD to plug or
unplug the Ethernet cable between them.
The DSD will not be able to take sweeps unless and until the
following message is displayed after it boots up:

58 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
VLI user interface
Getting started

VE464 v--.--
DSD - -

Figure 3-2

3. Power on the computer. Click on VLI icon on the desktop or


select it from the Start menu, or press the “Rotate” button (1). 3
This opens the VLI main window (page 60).

Figure 3-3

If the computer fails to communicate with the DSD, a warning box


shows up, asking you to make sure the DSD is powered up and the
Ethernet cable between the computer and the DSD is properly
connected.

Figure 3-4

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February 16, 2010
3 VLI user interface
Getting started

VLI main window

Toolbar

Uploads your settings


to the DSD
Maximizes/ minimizes the
window
Status bar

Closes the
window

Figure 3-5

Typically, VLI software is hosted on a Tablet PC. The VLI interface can
be used with a mouse and keyboard but none is required, as all windows
have been optimized for use with only a stylus. If you (exceptionally)
have to type in anything on your Tablet PC, a keyboard icon is available
at the foot of the main window, displaying a virtual keyboard for you to
click with the stylus.
The VLI interface is typically used with the DSD in Local mode, but
with the DSD in Remote mode, the VLI main window can still be used
to display the results, Extended QC data and GPS positions of sweeps
triggered by the recorder’s GUI, and some commands from the Setup
menu are still available.
Unless the DSD has been initialized at an earlier date, not all functions
are available from the toolbar. If you are starting from scratch, the
typical way of using the VLI main window is as follows:

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February 16, 2010
VLI user interface
Getting started

Figure 3-6
3
1. Set the DSD to the Local mode (press its Local button).
2. Use The Setup menu (page 63) to assign a Crew number and
Vibrator number to the DSD, and also set your crew options as
required.
3. Run The Installation function (page 72).
4. Run The Identification function (page 78) .
The Sweep command allows you to take a local sweep and display
vibrator QC information (see Taking a local sweep on page 82).
The Measure command allows you to check some signals controlling
the vibrator machinery and adjust transducer offsets (see Maintenance
on page 96).
The Network menu allows you to connect to a distant DSD and import
its settings, compare settings between vibrators, and duplicate settings
from a DSD to another one in just a few clicks (see The Network menu
on page 103).
The Update command is used to load a new software release to the
DSD and to load user-defined sweep signals (see The Update menu on
page 110).
The File menu allows you to choose whether or not the system should
save the workspace when you close the main window.

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February 16, 2010
3 VLI user interface
Getting started

The status bar


The status bar at the foot has three status fields.

VLI connection status DSD control mode Vib GPS position and
DSD time-keeper status

Figure 3-7

VLI connection status


This field tells you if communication is established with the attached
DSD (the DSD must be powered on and the Ethernet cable connected
between the DSD and the computer) and if you are connected to a
distant DSD.
• Status of the attached DSD: if the attached DSD is ready to sweep,
nothing is displayed ahead of the DSD number, otherwise
- “uninitialised”: the DSD has no identification number; see The
Setup menu (page 63);
- “uninstalled”: you have to run The Installation function (page 72);
- “unidentified”: you have to run The Identification function
(page 78).
• Connection to a distant DSD: if a WIFI network is used and you are
connected to a distant DSD, the mention “distant” appears (in red)
ahead of that DSD’s identification number. See The Network menu
(page 103).
• Software release: loaded in the DSD you are connected to (not to be
mistaken for the VLI software release appearing in the window’s
title).

DSD control mode


This field tells you whether the Local or Remote mode is selected on the
DSD appearing in the connection status field.
62 VE464 User’s Manual
February 16, 2010
VLI user interface
Getting started

Time-keeper status
The GPS position is displayed in black if the PPS signal is available
from GPS receiver and used to control the DSD clock, otherwise in red
(meaning that because the GPS time cannot be used, it is emulated using
the DSD’s crystal oscillator instead).
3
The Setup menu
If you are starting from scratch, you have to set up a number of crew
parameters (e. g. choosing the type of radio, type of DSD, etc.) by
selecting Setup from the Functions menu or clicking on this icon.

DSD
You will not be allowed to access “Installation” or “Identification” or
“Sweep” parameters unless and until you assign a Vibrator number and
Crew number to the DSD.

NO
DSD ADDRESS

DSD 5
DSD ADDRESS

Figure 3-8

• Crew: (1 to 4) assigns a crew number to the DSD (when you click


OK). This determines which crew the DSD belongs in.
• Vibrator # (1 to 32) assigns a vibrator number to the DSD (when you
click OK). This determines which vibrator the DSD is attached to.

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February 16, 2010
3 VLI user interface
Getting started

• Type:
- DSD: this is the typical option for a DSD used to control a
vibrator,
- Slave: for a DSD used as a DPG to control a recording system.
See Slave DSD (page 143) for details.
- Standalone: for a DSD used to control both a recording system
and a vibrator (e. g. for borehole seismic operations). See
Standalone DSD (page 138) for details.
- Autonomous: allows simultaneous-source shooting with
sweeps being launched independently (by pressing the Ready
button on the DSD of each fleet leader or each vibrator).See
Autonomous DSD (page 148) for details.
After you click on OK, the DSD number should be visible on the
display of the DSD as shown above.

RS Info
This menu is used to set the serial port parameters for communications
with the GPS receiver.

DSD - -
RS-INFO

Figure 3-9

Select the appropriate settings to match those of the GPS receiver. Click
OK to save your settings.

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VLI user interface
Getting started

For communications with the GPS port of the TracsTDMA unit, use the
following settings:
• Baud Rate: 9600
• Data bits: 8
• Stop bits: 1 3
• Parity: None.

Options

DSD - -
OPTIONS

Figure 3-10

• Units: the system automatically converts all results to your favourite


units (Imperial or Metric) selected with this option button.
• Use pressure sensor: if you choose to use a pressure sensor
(indicating whether or not the vibrator’s pad is down), see Pressure
switch test (page 102).
• BNC Ref: used to select which signal is to be available from the “Ref
Adjust” BNC connector (either the Reference signal or the Filtered
Force signal).
• Saved signals: you can choose to record one or more vibrator motion
signals, either on the computer’s disk (if you choose NFS from the
Media Type option button) or on a USB stick plugged to the DSD
itself. You can record the Extended QC data and up to four of the

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February 16, 2010
3 VLI user interface
Getting started

following signals: Mass acceleration (Macc); Baseplate acceleration


(Placc); Force; Reference (Ref), Filtered Force.
Note For vibrator motion signals to be recorded on the computer’s
disk, see also Installing SFU software (page 282) .
• Sample Rate: (0.5, 1, 2, 4 ms) allows you to choose the same Sample
Rate as used for seismic acquisition channels.
• Filter Type: allows you to choose the same type of filter as used for
seismic acquisition channels (8N Lin. or 8N Min.) , or the default
filter (DSD_300 Hz).
Click OK to save your settings.
See Signal Local archive files (page 305) .

Servo Control

Figure 3-11

• Dither: allows you to specify a level (2 to 20%) and frequency (400,


500 or 666 Hz) for the mass control signal used during idle periods of
time. Set as required.
• Excitation Ponderation: the default value for this parameter is 4.
Increasing the setting will decrease distortion. Decreasing the setting
will decrease the phase shift of the Force signal.
• GV: Minimum Ground Viscosity, adjustable from 3 to 256 (this
requires expertise and careful consideration). Default value: 8.

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Click OK to save your settings.

Radio

Figure 3-12

GPS GPS
DSD DSD
TDMA1 TDMA2
)))
(((
(((
)))
GPS GPS
Channel 1 DPG Channel 2
))) TDMA1 TDMA2
(((
GPS (((
))) GPS
DSD DSD
TDMA1 TDMA2
For more information, see TDMA radio datalink
(page 157)
Fleet 1 Fleet 2

Figure 3-13 Two TDMAs attached to the DPG

• TDMA Radio Type: Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)


allows multiple users to share the same frequency channel by
dividing the signal into different time-slots. This allows a higher data
rate to be achieved, hence a better response time, and full duplex
communications. The user has to choose which frequency channel to
use, and choose the Baud rate. The system automatically assigns a
distinct time-slot to each device (DSD or DPG) so that all radio units
on this channel can transmit with no risk of collision with one

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Getting started

another. In addition, the TDMA system has a built-in GPS receiver


that can be used as high-accuracy time-keeper for the DSD.
- Radio Channel: choose the same radio channel as on the DPG.
If two TDMA systems are attached to the DPG, each uses a
distinct radio channel. In that case, choose the radio channel
associated with the TDMA box you want to use, bearing in mind
that all the DSDs belonging in the same vibrator group (fleet)
must communicate with the same TDMA box on the DPG and
therefore must use the same channel.
- Baud rate: used to set the Baud rate of the TDMA radio.
- Repeater Scan: only choose this option if a dual-frequency
repeater is used. This causes the DSD to scan both radio
channels and automatically select the best one to use. See
Channel information displayed on DSD (page 215).
• Analog Radio Type: this option is for a traditional radio system.
Click OK to save your settings.

Display

Figure 3-14

This menu is used to adjust the light on the display of the DSD
depending on the lighting conditions, for better legibility. Set as
required (0 to 8). Click OK to save your settings.

Set Servo
This menu allows you to set the parameters used in the vibrator's servo
control loop.

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Figure 3-15

• Servo Input: this option determines what to use as input to the servo
control — either the estimated states from the Kalman filter
(“Filtered” option) or raw measurements of baseplate and mass
accelerations (“Raw” option). See About the Filtered/Raw option
(page 84) for more information.
• Lift Up Delay: time interval between the end of a sweep and the
moment when the vibrator's pad will lift if Auto Lift is enabled.
Adjustable from 0 to 99 seconds. If no delay is required, set the Lift
Up Delay to 0.
• Random: if you choose this option, then the delay for the vibrator to
lift up its pad is variable from 0 to the value selected in the Lift Up
Delay field, meaning that not any two vibrators will lift up their pads
at the same time. Not having vibrators lifting up their pads at the same
time results in less noise being generated — and recorded.
• Low Drive Level: Lower amplitude, in percent, of drive level. The
scale is adjustable from 0 to 100% in 1% steps. The following
condition is required: Low Drive Level < High Drive Level.
• High Drive Level: Upper amplitude, in percent, of drive level. The
scale is adjustable from 0 to 100% in 1% steps.
• Auto Level: ticking this option enables the Auto Level function. If
you enable the Auto Level function, then you must specify lower

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Getting started

limits for both High and Low drive levels. A DSD that uses the Auto
Level function operates as follows:
- The Drive level is decreased for the next sweep if an overload
condition is detected. However the drive level cannot go below
the values specified in the Min High Drive and Min Low Drive
fields.
- The Drive level is increased for the next sweep if no overload
condition is detected. However the drive level cannot exceed the
values specified in the High Drive Level and Low Drive Level
fields.
A DSD that does not use the Auto Level function operates only within
the limits of “High Drive Level” and “Low Drive Level”.

QC Limits

Figure 3-16

This dialogue box allows you to set alert thresholds for some of the
Quality Control data.
Average Phase Error Maximum limit (0 to 45 degrees).
Maximum Phase Error Maximum limit (0 to 45 degrees).
Average Distortion Maximum limit (0 to 50%).
Maximum Distortion Maximum limit (0 to 80%).

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Average Ground Force Minimum limit (0 to 100%).


A red warning appears on the VLI if the QC data from any sweep (local
or remote) overrides any of these limits.

Figure 3-17

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The Installation function

The Installation function


In this section:
• Overview (page 72)
• Running the Installation function (page 74)

Overview
The Installation function is not available until you set up the DSD
Crew number and Vibrator number (using the Setup menu).
Select Installation from the Functions menu or click on the associated
icon in the toolbar.

The “Installation” function is used to update a number of parameters to


match with the characteristics of the vibrator attached to the DSD.

Figure 3-18

The “Installation” function is typically used as follows:


1. The first time you run the “Installation” function, choose “From
DSD” from the Use Parameters option button.
2. Make any changes needed to the parameters (depending on the
type of vibrator to control), and then click Start. This uploads the

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The Installation function

installation parameters to the attached DSD and also saves them to


the computer’s disk.
3. When you next run the Installation function, you can choose
either “From DSD” or “From Terminal” from the Use
Parameters option button. Typically, you will use the “From
Terminal” option for the other DSDs controlling the same type of 3
vibrator, in order to load them with the installation parameters you
previously saved for this type of vibrator.

Use Parameters From DSD


If you choose this option, then the parameters recorded in the attached
DSD appear in the left-hand pane. If the Installation function has
already been run on that DSD, these are the latest values uploaded to it,
otherwise default values are displayed.
• Hydraulic Force;
• Hold Down Weight;
• Mass Mass;
• Baseplate1 Mass;
• Baseplate2 Mass;
• Mass Stroke;
• Usable Stroke;
Make any changes required to match the vibrator’s specifications.
You can enter whatever vibrator name or number you like for this type
of vibrator in the Vibrator Serial Number field.

Use Parameters From Terminal


Use this option if you have already run the Installation function and
you want to run it on the same type of vibrator. The values appearing in
the left-hand pane are those saved on the computer’s disk.

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Check AS
You can use this button if you want to quickly check the performance of
the Acceleration Sensors (AS), for example after replacing an
accelerometer on a vibrator.

After clicking
Check AS button

Figure 3-19

Running the Installation function


1. After you click on Start, you are requested to pressure down the
vibrator. Unless already done, pressure down the vibrator. Click
Continue.

Figure 3-20

2. Then you are requested to pressure up the vibrator. After doing


that, click Continue.

Figure 3-21

3. Check to see if the baseplate is down. If that is not the case, make
sure the Lift toggle switch is set to ON, and press the Down key
on the DSD.
4. Check to see the actual position of the mass on the vibrator, and
select the Mass position option accordingly on the computer.

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The Installation function

Figure 3-22

5. Click Continue. This launches the “Installation” function. If any 3


error message appears, see page 116.
6. With the baseplate in the down position the Installation function
executes. The following messages should appear in the upper-
right pane, reporting the successive measurements done:

Figure 3-23

Sensors test in progress The values returned by this test


are displayed in the right-hand
pane of the Installation window.
Computing polarities If any error message appears, see
page 116.
Prior to proceeding with the
Installation process, the system
checks for the state of the lift
machinery. Again error messages
may appear. See page 116.
Mass displacement in progress If any error message appears, see
page 116.
First servo control in progress If any error message appears, see
page 116. The system makes a

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The Installation function

first attempt at centring the mass


and takes the mass back to the up
position.
Limits measurement in progress If any error message appears, see
page 116. The mass slowly
changes from the up position to
the down position.
Second servo control in progress If any error message appears, see
page 116. The system centres the
mass.
7. Finally, the Installation function checks the performance of the
accelerometers and displays the results in the right-hand pane.

Figure 3-24

If the Mass Offset exceeds ±0.500 cm (±0.200 inch), then re-adjust the
Mass LVDT. See page 100.
The polarity of the Mass and Valve LVDTs and torque motor depends
on how each of those devices is wired. You can compare the polarity
signs with those of the other vibrators in the crew to isolate any
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The Installation function

discrepancy. All vibrators in the crew should be wired in the same


manner.

Update
You are allowed to change the Mass back gain and Valve back gain
values. You may have to change them if the mass is unstable or if you
want to enter values more consistent with those of the other vibrators in
3
the crew. The following values are allowed: 0.0156, 0.0313, 0.0625,
0.1250, 0.2500, 0.5000, 1, 2, 4, 8.
Clicking Update uploads these parameters (as adjusted) to the DSD:
• Mass Offset,
• Mass back gain,
• Valve back gain.
After the Installation function is complete, the Identification function
in the Functions menu is accessible.

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The Identification function

The Identification function


In this section:
• Overview (page 78)
• Running the Identification function (page 80)

Overview
The Identification function is not available until the Installation
function is completed.
Select Identification from the Functions menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

The “Identification” function is used to update a number of parameters


to match with the characteristics of the vibrator attached to the DSD and
with the type of soil.

Figure 3-25

You have to run the “Identification” function after any replacement in


the vibrator electronics, or replacement of any device such as a

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The Identification function

transducer (LVDT), and whenever the “Installation” function has just


been completed.

Prerequisites
• The vibrator should be kept pressured up, and preferably at the
operating temperature. 3
• The baseplate should be down. Better results will be achieved if the
baseplate is resting on a flat, even surface with homogeneous earth
structure a few meters deep underneath. It is advisable to use the same
type of surface for the “Identification” process of all the vibrators
used in the crew.
The left-hand pane in the Identification window allows you to choose
which kind of sweeps to take during the Identification process.
Two sweeps (#1 and #2) are prompted, for each of which you can
choose:
• A Sweep Type (8 are available):
- 6 fixed frequency sweeps (8 Hz, 15 Hz, 31 Hz, 62 Hz, 125 Hz,
250 Hz),
- 2 random sweeps (Low_Ran, High_Ran).
• A drive Level (25%, 50% or 80% of max level).
In the Identification Name field, enter the name you want to assign to
this Identification session.
Click on Start to launch the Identification process.

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The Identification function

Running the Identification function


1. After you click on Start, the following message should show up:

Figure 3-26

2. After checking for full pressure, click Continue. The following


messages should appear in the upper-right pane, reporting the
successive steps in the Identification process:

Figure 3-27

Setting excit. up to xx(80%, or half, or quarter, as requested


above for the 1st sweep).
Force tuning
Setting excit. up to xx(80%, or half, or quarter, as requested
above for the 2nd sweep).
First Identification in progress(1st result).
Second Identification in progress(2nd result).

3. The results from the Identification process are displayed in the


right-hand pane of the window. If any error message arises, see
page 117.

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The Identification function

Figure 3-28

4. If, for any reason, you wish to replace the results from the current
Identification process by the results from the one previously
saved, click on the Swap button. A warning message should
appear, asking you if you really want to replace the current values.
If you choose to do that, the formerly saved values are restored.
WARNING
You are allowed to change the Servo Gain and Oil Viscosity values but
this requires expertise and careful consideration.

5. Clicking Update uploads these parameters (as adjusted) to the


DSD:
- Servo Gain,
- Oil Viscosity.
After the Identification function is complete, the Sweep function in the
Functions menu is accessible.

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Taking a local sweep

Taking a local sweep


In this section:
• Overview (page 82)
• About the Filtered/Raw option (page 84)
• Sweep types (page 85)
• Launching a sweep (page 93)

Overview
The Sweep function is not available until the “Identification” function
is completed.
Select the Sweep function from the Functions menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

The Sweep function allows you to choose the kind of waveform to


generate when taking local sweeps.

Figure 3-29

Unless you select the “Table” sweep type option, you have to specify a
number of parameters (e. g. Start Taper, Frequency, etc.) to describe the
sweep to generate. See Sweep types (page 85).

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For the Servo Input option see About the Filtered/Raw option (page 84).
The other options are described below.

Drive Level
This determines the amplitude of the sweep signal (adjustable from 0 to
100 % of the allowable drive level). 3
QC Choice
This option button is used to choose which type (Time or Frequency
domain) of Quality Control to calculate when you take a Local sweep.
The default setting depends on which type of QC was requested for the
latest sweep taken with the DSD in Remote mode (therefore triggered
by the recorder’s GUI). Your setting is lost each time a sweep is taken
with the DSD in Remote mode.

Repeat
If you tick this option, then clicking Start launches a sweep that repeats
itself until you click Stop. Otherwise this launches a one-shot sweep.

Beep
If you choose both Repeat and Beep, then a beep is heard after each
sweep is complete.

Show QC
This button opens a secondary window displaying the QC charts
resulting from the latest sweep, regardless of whether that sweep was
taken with the DSD in Local or Remote mode.

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Taking a local sweep

Figure 3-30

About the Filtered/Raw option


Filtered: With this option, servo control is performed using the
“Estimated States” from a “Kalman Filter” as input. This
allows the system to discard non-coherent measurements
on any sensor (baseplate acceleration, mass acceleration,
valve or mass LVDTs). Remember that the VE464 QC and
the traditional way of testing the equipment with external
devices always involve the force derived from raw
acceleration measurements. Therefore, vibrator
imperfections (e.g. mass rocking, baseplate flexure) may
cause errors that have a greater impact on raw Q.C. reports
than on the actual performance of the servo loop.
Raw: With this option, servo control is mainly performed using
raw measurements of baseplate and mass accelerations as
inputs. In this case servo control and Q.C. are
homogeneous but the system cannot benefit from the
ability to discard incorrect measurements.
This option is of no effect on a random sweep.

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Sweep types
If the limits are exceeded for any of the parameters you specify, then the
allowable values are prompted so that you can make any change
required.

Table 3
The Table option allows you to choose any of the sweep types (up to
32) defined in the Basic Type Setup of the recorder’s GUI and loaded
into a table in the DSD. You only have to select a sweep from the Basic
Sweep option button and a Servo Input option, and choose the desired
Drive Level.
If any “Custom” sweep has been loaded to the DSD, it is not available
from the Table option button until it has been selected by the DPG.

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-31

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Taking a local sweep

Linear

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-32

To generate a Linear sweep the following parameters need to be


specified:
• Start Taper.
• End Taper.
• Start Frequency.
• End Frequency.
• Length.

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Taking a local sweep

Log

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-33

To generate a Log sweep or a Tn sweep the following parameters need


to be specified:
• Start Taper.
• End Taper.
• Start Frequency.
• End Frequency.
• Start Amplitude.
• End Amplitude.
• Length.

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Taking a local sweep

Tn

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-34

Log dB/oct

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-35

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Taking a local sweep

To generate a dB/oct Log sweep the following parameters need to be


specified:
• Start Taper,
• End Taper,
• Start Frequency, 3
• End Frequency,
• Slope,
• Length.

Pulse
To generate a Pulse sweep, you have to specify the Frequency. This
determines the pulse width (T=1/F).

-0.5

Time (ms)
-1
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000

Figure 3-36

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Taking a local sweep

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-37

Custom
If you have loaded a signal file of your own to the DSD, the Custom
sweep type option allows you to select it as sweep signal. See Loading
Custom sweeps to a DSD (page 112).
After you choose a Custom sweep file in the Sweep window, the system
automatically calculates the Length of the signal.

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Taking a local sweep

Select from list


of available
3
files

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-38

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Taking a local sweep

Random
For the Random Sweep Type the following parameters need to be
specified:
• Start Taper.
• End Taper.
• Start Frequency.
• End Frequency.
• Polynom number.
• Length.

See About
the Filtered/
Raw option
(page 84)

Figure 3-39

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Taking a local sweep

Launching a sweep
After selecting the desired Sweep Type and sweep parameters, click
Start. The following message should show up:

3
Figure 3-40

After you press READY on the DSD, the message Acquisition in


progress should appear while the sweep is executing, unless error
messages appear. In that case, see page 118.
The DISPLAY SCROLL key on the DSD allows you to scroll through
three pages displayed on the DSD to view the following information:
• DSD number and Warning/Overload indicator (upper row);
Phase, Force, Distortion (lower row);
• Detailed overload data and Warning indicator (upper row);
Phase, Force, Distortion (lower row);
• Detailed Warning data (upper row);
Detailed Warning data (lower row).
After the sweep is complete, the Quality Control data (Time or
Frequency QC, whichever is selected with QC Choice option button) is
displayed in the right-hand pane. Below is the result page for Time-
domain QC data.

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Taking a local sweep

For
Frequency-
domain QC
data the Drive level
Distortion plotted in green
does not
appear.

Overloads
encountered
during the
sweep:

Figure 3-41

F Force (output force as high as vibrator Hold Down


Weight);
P Pressure (hitting pressure limit);
M Mass (hitting Mass stroke limits);
V Valve (hitting Valve stroke limits);
E Excitation (hitting maximum allowable value of input
current).
Choosing the “Show QC” option opens a secondary window displaying
the QC charts from the latest sweep, regardless of whether that sweep
was taken with the DSD in Local mode or in Remote mode (therefore
triggered by the recorder’s GUI). On the Force chart, the requested
drive level is plotted too (in green).

Note You can take local sweeps without any outside control, by
simply pushing READY on the DSD. In that case, the sweep
used is Sweep No. 1 from the “Table” Sweep Type function. If
Sweep No. 1 is not defined, a default sweep is launched, with
the following characteristics:

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Taking a local sweep

• Frequency: 10 to 80 Hz.
• Length:10 s.
• Amplitude: High Drive (80% by default) or Low Drive
(50% by default).
• Start taper and End taper: 500 ms. 3

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Maintenance

Maintenance
Select the Measure function from the Functions menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

The functions available in this window are used for measuring some
internal signals (Voltmeter function) or resistance values (Ohmmeter
function) and for offset adjustment procedures.
In this section:
• Voltmeter function (page 96)
• Ohmmeter function (page 98)
• Mass Offset Adjust function (page 99)
• Valve Offset Adjust function (page 100)
• Torque Motor Offset Adjust function (page 101)
• Pressure switch test (page 102)

Voltmeter function
This function is used to measure the RMS voltage on the primary and
secondary windings of the Mass and Valve transducers (LVDTs), with
the vibrator pressured down. After you select the Voltmeter function a
message appears that asks you to pressure down the vibrator.
After pressuring down the vibrator, click Start. Then a message appears
that prompts you to wait a few seconds for measurements to settle
down.
Then the available signals are prompted. You can choose one of the
following:

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Maintenance

DSD - -
VOLTMETER

3
Figure 3-42

• P_VALVE_LVDT: Valve LVDT primary winding drive voltage.


• S_VALVE_LVDT: Valve LVDT secondary winding drive voltage.
• P_MASS_LVDT: Mass LVDT primary winding drive voltage.
• S_MASS_LVDT: Mass LVDT secondary winding drive voltage.
Click Start. The measurement result should show up.
Click Stop when you want to quit or to use another function.

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Ohmmeter function
This function is used to measure the resistance of the primary and
secondary windings of the Mass and Valve transducers (LVDTs) and
Torque Motor, with the vibrator pressured down.
After you select the Ohmmeter function a message appears that asks
you to pressure down the vibrator.
After pressuring down the vibrator, click Start. Then a message appears
that prompts you to wait a few seconds for measurements to settle
down.

DSD - -
OHMMETER

Figure 3-43

Then the available signals are prompted. You can choose one of the
following:
• P_VALVE_LVDT: Valve LVDT primary winding resistance.
• S_VALVE_LVDT: Valve LVDT secondary winding resistance.
• P_MASS_LVDT: Mass LVDT primary winding resistance.
• S_MASS_LVDT: Mass LVDT secondary winding resistance.
• TORQUE_MOTOR: Torque Motor winding resistance.
Click Start. The measurement result should show up.
Click Stop when you want to quit or to use another function.

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Maintenance

Mass Offset Adjust function


This function is not available until the Installation and Identification
functions are completed. It is used to correct the offset of the Mass
motion transducer (LVDT) by adjusting the position of that LVDT.
After you select this function a message appears that asks you to
pressure down the vibrator.
3

Pressure down the


vibrator.
Wait until the mass
is idle

Figure 3-44

After pressuring down the vibrator, click Start.


Adjust the position of the LVDT until the offset reading is very close to
zero.
IMPORTANT
After adjusting the mass LVDT offset, you need to run the Installation
and Identification functions.

Click Stop when you want to quit or to use another function.

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Maintenance

Valve Offset Adjust function


This function is used to correct the offset of the servo-valve motion
transducer (LVDT) by adjusting the position of that LVDT.
Set the vibrator pressure to 1500 psi.
After you select this function a message appears that asks you to
pressure down the vibrator.

Pressure down the


vibrator.
Wait until the mass
is idle.

Figure 3-45

After pressuring down the vibrator, click Start.


Adjust the position of the LVDT by turning the adjustment screw of the
Valve LVDT very slowly until the offset reading is very close to zero.
Alternately, you can connect a voltmeter to the REF ADJUST BNC
connector and adjust the position of the LVDT until the offset reading
is close to zero.
Click Stop when you want to quit or to use another function.

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Maintenance

Torque Motor Offset Adjust function


This function is used to correct the offset of the Torque Motor by
adjusting its position.
Set the vibrator pressure to 1500 psi.
After you select this function a message appears that asks you to
pressure down the vibrator.
3

Pressure down the


vibrator.
Wait until the mass
is idle.

Figure 3-46

After pressuring down the vibrator, click Start.


Turn the adjustment screw of the Torque Motor very slowly until the
offset reading is very close to zero.
Alternately, you can connect a voltmeter to the REF ADJUST BNC
connector and turn the offset adjustment screw until the offset reading
is close to zero.
WARNING
Adjusting the Torque Motor offset is a very exceptional operation.
Besides, having to perform this adjustment generally denotes either a
system failure or wear of the Torque Motor.

Click Stop when you want to quit or to use another function.

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Maintenance

Pressure switch test


This function is used to check the performance of the Pressure Sensor
Switch. It lets you view the state of the sensor in real time. You may use
this function to check the moment when the sensor tells you the
baseplate pressure is present or not present as you switch the lift system
Up or Down. It also allows you to view the triggering levels of the
sensor.

Figure 3-47

Note The information from the pressure switch is not only used prior
to starting a sweep (indicating whether the vibrator pad is
down) but also during the sweep. As a result, the system may
abort a sweep if the pressure sensor switch does not work
properly.

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The Network menu

The Network menu


In this section:
• Remote Connection (page 103)
• DSD Configuration (page 105)
3
• DSD Comparison (page 106)
• DSD Initialisation (page 108)

Remote Connection
Select Remote Connection from the Network menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

This opens a “Remote Connection” window.

Figure 3-48

If a WIFI network is used for DSDs to communicate with one another,


opening this window causes the computer to scan for all DSDs present
on the WIFI network. As a result, all the DSDs that respond appear in
the upper list box.

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The Network menu

Figure 3-49

Select the DSD you want to connect to, by clicking on it in the list box,
and then click on the Connect button.
After the connection is established, the status bar at the foot of the main
window should say you are connected to a distant DSD. (Do not mistake
the status of your connection for the “Local/Remote” mode status of the
distant DSD which also appears in the status bar).

VLI connection Status of


status distant DSD

Figure 3-50

After you are connected to a distant DSD, you can view all its settings.
You cannot open the “Installation” or “Identification” window because
you are not allowed to run these functions on a distant DSD. You can
open the Sweep window but you cannot launch any sweep. You are only
allowed to view QC results if any are available from the distant DSD,
by choosing Show QC.

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The Network menu

DSD Configuration
Select DSD Configuration from the Network menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

This opens a window with a list box prompting all the DSDs the
computer can connect to, and allowing you to see if a configuration file 3
is available from each of them.

Figure 3-51

You can select each DSD (by clicking on it) that has a configuration file
available and click on Save Configuration to save that file to the
computer’s disk. After configuration files are saved, you can use the
DSD Comparison (page 106) menu to compare the parameters of a DSD
to those of another one or more if this may help for maintenance.
Selecting a DSD in the list box causes the “Path” field to display the
folder where to find the configuration file for this DSD.

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The Network menu

DSD Comparison
Select DSD Comparison from the Network menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

This opens a window with a list box prompting all the configuration
files that have been saved to the computer’s disk, if any (see DSD
Configuration on page 105). The computer does not need to be connected
to any DSD.

Figure 3-52

Choose (highlight) a file in the list box and then click on the
DSD Comparison button. This allows you to to view the parameter
settings and installation or identification results of a DSD and compare
them to those of another one, or more, if this may help for maintenance
or troubleshooting.
Three types of parameters are displayed: parameters from the Setup
menu (viewed with the Configuration tab), parameters from the
Installation function, and parameters from the Identification function.
Below are a few examples of what you can compare.

Figure 3-53 Comparing configuration parameters

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The Network menu

Figure 3-54 Comparing which vibrator motion signals are saved 3

Figure 3-55 Comparing Installation parameters

Figure 3-56 Comparing Installation results

Figure 3-57 Comparing Identification results

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The Network menu

DSD Initialisation
Select DSD Initialisation from the Network menu or click on the
associated icon in the toolbar.

This opens a window that allows you to duplicate parameter settings


from a DSD to another. Typically, you duplicate settings from a
configuration file (conf DSD#v-.-) formerly saved on the computer’s
disk to the attached DSD. If a WIFI network is used, allowing DSDs to
communicate with one another, you can also duplicate settings from a
DSD visible on the network to another one also visible on the network.

From attached DSD


From the computer’s disk,
saved with DSD
Configuration (page 105)

Figure 3-58

The From option button prompts all the configuration files available for
you to select, that is the configuration file from the attached DSD (and
those visible on the WIFI network, if any) plus the files (conf DSD#v-.-)
you may have saved to the computer’s disk with the DSD Configuration
(page 105) menu.
The To option button prompts the list of DSDs that you can connect to,
if a WIFI network is used, otherwise it only prompts the attached DSD.
Clicking Start uploads the configuration file selected with the From
option button to the DSD selected with the To option button. If you tick
the Update Configuration option and a configuration file for the

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VLI user interface
The Network menu

targeted DSD is present on the computer’s disk, then that file is updated
too.

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The Update menu

The Update menu


In this section:
• Loading DSD software to the DSD (page 110)
• Loading Custom sweeps to a DSD (page 112)

Loading DSD software to the DSD


Select Update from the Functions menu and then New Version, or
click on the associated icon in the toolbar.

This function is not available until you assign a Vibrator number and
Crew number to the attached DSD (see The Setup menu on page 63).
It allows you to load a DSD software release stored on a USB stick or
in the following folder on the computer’s disk (see Installing SFU
software on page 282):
C:\nfs_server\usr\version\

First, you have to pressure down the vibrator (a warning message asks
you to do that) in order to preclude any malfunction as the DSD is
automatically turned off after the software release is uploaded.

LOADING
NEW VERSION

Select USB
or the
computer’s
disk (NFS)

Figure 3-59

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The Update menu

Do not use the “Force Update” option (used to force the updating of
software modules already updated). This option is intended for
customer support engineers.
The Host ID is read from the DSD automatically. Click Update.
WARNING
Loading may take a while and should not be interrupted. Wait for the
3
following message to appear, saying that loading succeeded and asking
you to reset the DSD.

Figure 3-60

Power off the DSD, and power back on. Click OK to exit.
Wait for the DSD to boot up (this takes about 1 minute). On the DSD,
the following messages may appear, depending on the changes
contained in the new software release:

Boot sequence completed


VE464 v--.--
NO DSD ADDRESS successfully, but some settings
were lost. See The Setup menu
(page 63).

Boot sequence completed


VE464 v--.--
DSD - - successfully. You do not
normally need to run the
Installation and Identification
functions again.

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The Update menu

Loading Custom sweeps to a DSD


The Ve464 allows you to define a large variety of different sweeps
(Linear, Logarithmic, TN, Pulse, Random, Compound). You may
however need to use special (Custom) sweeps other than those pre-
determined by the VE464. To do that, you have to store your “Custom”
sweeps into the DSD’s Flash memory, so that they can be selected by
the recorder’s GUI or via the VLI window’s Sweep function (see
Custom on page 90). Up to 10 Custom sweep files can be stored into the
DSD.
Select Update from the Functions menu and then Custom, or click on
the associated icon in the toolbar.

This opens a window displaying the list of Custom sweeps stored in the
DSD, and allowing you to update that list (you can delete some files
and/or add new ones).

Custom sweep
files already
stored in the
DSD

Select USB key


or the
computer’s disk
(NFS)

Figure 3-61

For each file found in the DSD’s Flash memory, the list box displays the
“Identifier” field, the “Comment” field and the signal length (seconds).

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The Update menu

Removing a Custom sweep file


If you want to delete any file, click on it in the list box and then click
the Del Custom(s) button. The file is not actually removed until you
click Apply to update the DSD’s memory.

Adding a Custom sweep file 3


To load a Custom sweep file, do the following:
1. Choose either USB or NFS from the Media Type option button.
- If you are loading from a USB stick (to be plugged in the DSD’s
USB port), the file to load must be located in its root folder.
- If you are using the NFS service, the file to load must be located
in the following folder on the computer’s disk:
C:\nfs_server\usr\custom\
2. Click on Scan Custom to find the available custom sweep files.
The system searches the directory displayed in the “Path” field
and reads those files that have “.custom” as extension to the file
name. The “Identifier” field and the comments from those files are
displayed in the list box that shows up.

List of custom sweep


files available for you
to load to the DSD

Figure 3-62

3. Select (click) the file to load and then click Add Custom. As a
result, the file is added in the primary list box (it is dimmed until
you click Apply to update the DSD’s memory).

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The Update menu

Updating the DSD’s memory


After adding or removing any file, make sure you really want to confirm
the current list of files contained in the list box, and then click Apply to
update the DSD’s memory.

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Warning and error messages

Warning and error messages


In this section:
• DSD power-on (page 115)
• During the Installation function (page 116)
3
• During the identification function (page 117)
• When taking a local sweep (page 118)

DSD power-on
Messages that may appear on the DSD during the three configuration
steps after power-on:

The vibrator number is not defined. Select


VE464 v--.-- Setup from the Functions menu to assign an
NO DSD ADDRESS
identification number to this DSD.

VE464 v--.-- Select Installation from the Functions menu to


NOT INSTALLED run this function on this DSD.

VE464 v--.-- Select Identification from the Functions menu


NOT IDENTIFIED to run this function on this DSD.

Unless you have to assign a vibrator number to the DSD or run the
Installation or Identification function, the power-on sequence should
end with the following message

VE464 v--.-- (DSD configured successfully, ready to take


DSD - - sweeps).

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Warning and error messages

On the computer:

VLI and DSDS are not fully compatible Appears as the VLI tries to connect to
the local DSD, or a distant DSD
DSD may have a debased functioning
(Remote Connection function), if the VLI
We advise you to use following version of VLI: software version is not fully compatible
V-.- with the DSDs. Some functions may not
work properly. The expected version is
OK prompted.

During the Installation function

This message appears if you try to run


ERROR: plate 1 or plate 2 the Installation function with a zero
should be other than zero mass for both baseplate 1 and
baseplate 2.
OK Enter a value other than zero for plate 1
or plate 2 and run the Installation
function again.

This message may appear after the


message “Computing polarities” or
Mass Overscaling Anomaly “Mass offset meas. in progress” if the
signal from the Mass LVDT exceeds the
allowable range. Make sure the Mass
LVDT works properly. Run the
Installation function again.

This message may appear after the


message “Computing polarities” or
“Mass offset meas. in progress” if the
Valve Overscaling Anomaly signal from the Valve LVDT exceeds the
allowable range.
Make sure the Valve LVDT works
properly. Run the Installation function
again.

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Warning and error messages

This message may appear after the


message “Computing polarities” if the
Install aborted. baseplate is not in the down position or
if the LIFT toggle switch is OFF.
Lift not ready
Set the LIFT toggle switch to ON and
press the DOWN key on the DSD. Run
the Installation function again.
3
This message may appear after the
message “Mass Displacement in
Excitation anomaly progress” if no current is fed to the
valve.
Check the wiring of the torque motor.
Run the Installation function again.

This message may appear after the


message “Mass Displacement in
progress” if the mass LVDT output fails
Mass anomaly
to vary although the excitation current is
correct and the valve works properly.
Run the Installation function again.

This message may appear after the


message “Mass Displacement in
Valve anomaly progress” if the valve LVDT output fails
to vary although the excitation current is
correct.
Run the Installation function again.

During the identification function

Check to see if the LIFT toggle switch is


ON and the baseplate is in the down
position. If required, set the switch to
IDENT. aborted
ON and press the DOWN key on the
LIFT not ready DSD.
Run the Identification function again.

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Warning and error messages

When taking a local sweep


Wait for The mass needs centring.
Mass centering

CAN’T SWEEP You have to run the


DSD NOT IDENTIFIED Identification function

ERROR: Start Taper + End Taper Start Taper and/or End Taper
must be less than seep length
too long.
OK

Miscellaneous

Appears as you select


Warning: Update > New Version
Pressure down the vibrator before from the Functions menu.
updating new version
You have to pressure down
Continue
the vibrator in order to
preclude any malfunction as
the DSD is automatically
turned off after the new
software release is
uploaded.

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Chapter

4 Reference information

In this chapter:

• VE464 Status codes (page 120)


• Sweep timing (page 122)
• Vibrator Ready signal management (page 131)
• Sweep Definition Message (page 133)
• Signal Local Archive (page 134)
• Standalone DSD (page 138)
• Slave DSD (page 143)
• Autonomous DSD (page 148)
• Slip-sweep (page 153)
• Vibrator signal recording (page 154)
• Ground Viscosity and Stiffness (page 155)

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VE464 Status codes

VE464 Status codes


Status generated by DPG

Status code indicative of


Meaning
successful sweep

1 OK.

19 OK, Small PPS discrepancy.

Status code indicative of


Meaning
error

20 Hiline error.

21 Wrong sweep definition.

22 Custom definition error.

23 Sweep start time expired.

25 Overrun error

27 PPS discrepancy.

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VE464 Status codes

Status generated by DSD

Status code indicative of


Meaning
successful sweep

1 OK, Raw mode.

12

19
OK, Filtered mode.

OK, small PPS discrepancy.


4

Status code indicative of


Meaning
error

2 Sweep aborted by DSD.

10 Sweep aborted by user.

11 Ethernet error between DSD and PC.

13 Discrepancy in DSD and DPG acquisition table.

14 Lift error.

21 Wrong sweep definition.

22 Custom definition error.

23 Sweep start time expired.

25 Overrun error

26 Slave recording unit failed to start (on a slave DSD only).

27 PPS discrepancy.

28 Force level too low.

29 DSD didn't have time to save the previous signal to file.

98 No T0 data received.

99 No T0 data received or no status report.

The Status file generated by the DPG can be exported to a spreadsheet


application. See 428XL User’s Manual Vol. 1 (Log window).

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4 Reference information
Sweep timing

Sweep timing
In this section:
• Using a TDMA datalink (page 122)
• Using a conventional analog radio (page 128)

Using a TDMA datalink

Ready FO TB
Recurrence FO-to-TB delta time
t1 rate t2 t3 (page 123)

Ready to TB delta time = Ready to FO delta time + FO to TB delta time

Figure 4-1 Sweep start timing with TDMA datalink

Note If you are reading this manual on-line, you can calculate the
“Ready-to-TB” time and status retrieval time by clicking here.
Note In what follows, the recording system is assumed ready. If it is
not, it may bring about additional delays.

Ready-to-FO delta time


For details on how the Ready signal is generated, see Vibrator Ready
signal management (page 131).
With a TDMA datalink for DSDs to communicate with the DPG:
Ready to FO delta time = t1 + Recurrence rate + t2 + t3
t1 = Delay time before transmitting (from DSD to TDMA).
t2 = Time delay for VHF or UHF transmission (airlink) = 1/number
of slots per second.
t3 = Delay time for DPG and recording system’s GUI to process the
Ready message.

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Sweep timing

t1+ t2 + t3 is dependent on the Baud rate of the TDMA datalink. See


Table 4-1.

Table 4-1:
Baud rate 4800 6000 7200 8000 9600 12000 14400

t1 190 ms 175 ms 135 ms 130 ms 150 ms 125 ms 90 ms

t2 143 ms 125 ms 100 ms 91 ms 84 ms 63 ms 50 ms

t3 62 ms 62 ms 62 ms 62 ms 62 ms 62 ms 62 ms 4
For details on the “Recurrence rate”, see Time-slot allocation (page 185).
If the “Number of Ready Frames” to transmit is other than 1 in the
VE464 DPG window on the 428XL GUI, one more “Recurrence rate”
time may be required for each additional “Ready Frame”.

FO-to-TB delta time


With a TDMA datalink for DSDs to communicate with the DPG, the
time delay between the Firing Order and the Time Break lies
between t1 + t2 + t3 + t4 and t1 + T + t2 + t3 + t4

FO TB

t1 t2 t3 t4
Sweep
T

Figure 4-2 FO-toTB delta time

t1 = Transmitter time delay (from DPG to TDMA).


T= Waiting for a transmission time-slot. This may take from 0 to the
“Recurrence rate” of a DPG cycle, depending on how many
DSDs are communicating with the DPG via the TDMA. See
Time-slot allocation (page 185).
t2 = Time delay for VHF or UHF transmission (airlink) = 1/number
of slots per second.
t3 = Receiver time delay (from TDMA to DSD).

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Sweep timing

t4 = Time delay for the DSD to process the message.


t1 + t2 + t3 + t4 depends on the Baud rate of the TDMA datalink, but
is invariable for a given Baud rate. See Figure 4-2.

Table 4-2: t1+ t2 + t3 + t4 depending on Baud rate (single fleet, single T0 Data)

Baud rate 4800 6000 7200 8000 9600 12000 14400

t1 (ms) 190 175 135 130 150 125 90

t2 (ms) 143 125 100 91 84 63 50

t3 (ms) 62 62 62 62 62 62 62

t4 (ms) 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

t1+ t2+ t3 + t4 415 ms 382 ms 317 ms 303 ms 316 ms 270 ms 222 ms

Table 4-3: With 2 to 4 simultaneous fleets (single T0 Data)

Baud rate 4800 6000 7200 8000 9600 12000 14400

t1 (ms) 225 230 185 185 185 180 145

t2 (ms) 286 250 200 182 166 125 100

t3 (ms) 94 94 94 94 94 94 94

t4 (ms) 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

t1+ t2+ t3 + t4 625 ms 594 ms 499 ms 481 ms 465 ms 419 ms 359 ms

You may have to add the following time delays to the standard values
given above:
• In order to give the DSDs another chance of receiving the T0Data, the
“Leader” in a “DSD network” transmits again the T0Data to the other
DSDs in the fleet. This takes an additional 50 ms.
• If any status messages are still to be retrieved at the moment the
T0Data is transmitted, this will cause an additional 20-ms delay. That
delay may appear in the exchange because the DSDs are set to
transmit their status messages in the interval between sweeps (i.e. the
“At end of sweep” option is enabled on the 428XL GUI), and the
serial line between the TDMA and the DSD is busy as status
messages are being retrieved. If any status is delayed, one more
message may need to be transmitted, fitting into a single time-slot

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Reference information
Sweep timing

(the maximum extra time required is less than or equal to the DPG
cycle recurrence). If it is crucial to the crew to preclude any such
additional delay, choose the “During the sweep” option instead.
• If you choose to transmit two or more T0Data frames to make up for
difficult radio conditions (that option is available in the VE464 DPG
window on the 428XL GUI), an extra delay appears as follows:
- For a single fleet, one more “Recurrence” time is required for
each pair of T0Data frames. If the number of T0Data frames is 4
even, one more transmission slot (t2) is required.
- With multiple fleets vibrating simultaneously, one more
“Recurrence” time is required for each T0Data frame replica.
• If more than 4 fleets are vibrating simultaneously, one more
“Recurrence” time is required for each set of additional 4 fleets, and
the resulting additional delay must be multiplied by the number of
T0Data frames.

Note In case of difficult radio conditions, choosing a lower Baud rate


for the TDMA datalink is less costly in time than repeating the
T0Data.

Table 4-4: Examples of FO-to-TB delta time calculation (no Tracking)


Num. of Slots for Baud
Recurrence rate FO-toTB delta time
fleets DGPS rate

4 3 12000 (2 + 4 +3) / 16 = 0.560 s 560 + 270 + 50 = 880 ms

1 1 9600 (2 + 1 +1) / 12 = 0.334 s 334 + 316 + 50 = 700 ms

Recurrence time

t1+ t2+ t3 + t4 from Table 4-2 (page 124)

DSD Network

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4 Reference information
Sweep timing

Status retrieval
The time required for retrieving the status messages from all the
vibrators in a fleet depends on:
• Baud rate of the TDMA datalink.
• Number of DSDs in the fleet doing the sweep.
• Recurrence rate of DSD time-slot (see Time-slot allocation on
page 185).
Retrieving the standard status message from a DSD takes about 2.5
slots.
Because time-slots cannot be fractioned, 3 rather than 2.5 slots are
required for each DSD, therefore the status from all the DSDs will be
retrieved at the end of [3×Recurrence rate] seconds, unless DSDs are
networked.
If DSDs are networked, 2.5×n slots are required for the Leader to
transmit the status from the n DSDs in the fleet. Again, time-slots
cannot be fractioned, therefore [2.5×n] must be rounded to the next
higher integer (N). Therefore the status from all the DSDs will be
retrieved at the end of [N×Recurrence rate] seconds. (N is greater than
3 but that is not a problem since, with a DSD network, the Recurrence
rate is shorter).
Note that the actual transmission time is only 2.5×n/number of slots per
second.
Example: assuming 2 fleets, each with 4 vibrators, and 3 slots for DGPS
corrections (RTK @ 1600 bits/s), TDMA @ 12000 Baud, DSD
Network, no Tracking, then
• Recurrence rate = (2 + 2 +3) / 16 = 0.438 s.
• Each fleet’s Leader will use 2.5×4 = 10 slots to transmit the status
from the 4 DSDs in the fleet. Therefore, it will take
10×0.438 = 4.38 seconds to get the statuses from all DSDs.
• The actual transmission time is only 2.5×4/16 = 0.625 s.

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Reference information
Sweep timing

Note Because the TDMA allows full-duplex communications, a new


sweep can start before all status messages from the previous
one are retrieved, even if the DSDs are set to transmit their
status messages in the interval between sweeps (i.e. if the “At
end of sweep” option is enabled on the recording system’s
GUI).
However, the time interval between the T0Data for a sweep and
the T0Data for the next sweep must be longer than the retrieval
4
time of the last status (4.38 seconds in the above example).

FO T0Data TB FO T0Data TB

TT0
Last
status

TT0 > TSTATUS TSTATUS

Figure 4-3 Status retrieval

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4 Reference information
Sweep timing

Using a conventional analog radio


Note If you are reading this manual on-line, you can calculate the
“Ready-to-TB” time and status retrieval time by clicking here.
The time delays calculated below are minimum values assuming
the system never has to wait for any DSD to respond or send its
status. Additional delays may appear, especially if the DSDs are
set to transmit their status messages in the interval between
sweeps (i.e. the “At end of sweep” option is enabled on the
recording system’s GUI).
Note In what follows, the recording system is assumed ready. If it is
not, it may bring about additional delays.

Ready-to-FO delta time

Ready FO TB
Switch On
Delay 320 ms

Figure 4-4 Ready-to-FO delta time

FO-to-TB delta time

FO TB

Switch On
120 ms NxF 60 ms
Delay

Figure 4-5 FO-to-TB delta time

F. O. = Start order from recording system.

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Sweep timing

N = number of T0 DATA frames (T0 Repeat Times parameter)


specified in the T0 Time Setup on the GUI.
F = 240 ms if a single fleet is vibrating,
320 ms if 2 fleets are vibrating simultaneously,
460 ms if 3 or 4 fleets are vibrating simultaneously.
plus 460 ms for each extra set of 4 fleets vibrating
simultaneously. 4
In addition, in order to give the DSDs another chance of receiving the
T0Data, the “Leader” in a “DSD network” transmits again the T0Data
to the other DSDs in the fleet. This takes an additional 50 ms.
The “Switch On Delay” depends on the type of radio (see Analog radio
interfacing on page 331).

Status retrieval
FO TB
DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4
status status status status

Figure 4-6 Status retrieval

T = “Gap” + “Switch On Delay” + 700 ms for a normal status.


Notes:
(1) If DSDs are networked, this goes for the “Leaders” only
(i. e. one for each vibrating fleet); for each of the other
DSDs, T = 540 ms.
(2) Add about 97 t milliseconds for Time Extended QC
information if enabled (i. e. about 1 second for a 10-second
sweep).
(3) Add about 27  f
----- + t  ms for Frequency Extended QC

5
information if enabled (i. e. about 0.7 s for an 80-Hz
bandwidth 10-s sweep).

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4 Reference information
Sweep timing

where t is the sweep length (seconds).


f is the spectrum width
(e. g. for a 20 to 80 Hz signal f =80-20 = 60 Hz).
Also, each fleet that is not vibrating, or the DPG, may give rise to an
extra delay time. The maximum extra delay time (maxD) can be
calculated as follows:
• If DSDs are networked
maxD = (SwOn +160)×[(numFleets - simFleets) +1] ms
• Otherwise
maxD = (SwOn +160)×[((numFleets - simFleets)×numDSD) +1] ms
where
SwOn = “Switch On Delay”.
numFleets = total number of fleets.
simFleets = number of fleets vibrating simultaneously.
numDSD = number of DSDs in each fleet.

Note Typical Test conditions:


- MOTOROLA GM360 radio units.
- MODEM transmission rate: 1200 bits/s.
- Switch On Delay: 300 ms.
- Gap: 100 ms.

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Reference information
Vibrator Ready signal management

Vibrator Ready signal management


Unless a “Pressure Sensor” is used, the signal to indicate that the
vibrator is ready to shake is generated by the operator pushing the
“Ready” button on the DSD.
If a pressure sensor is used on the vibrator, the operator does not need
to push the “Ready” button. Instead, after he pushes the “Down”
button, the Ready signal is generated automatically when the pressure 4
sensor actually sees the pad is down.

Without a WIFI DSD Network


• Only the “Leader” vibrator is allowed to use the “Ready” button and
send a Ready message to the DPG. The Ready message also contains
the GPS position of the leader.
• If a pressure sensor is used on the leader, the Ready message is sent
to the recording system as soon as the sensor says the pad is down.
• The Ready message can be transmitted in anticipation on the datalink
if an Early Ready time is specified on the recording system’s GUI
(in the VE464 window’s Radio function). See 428XL User’s Manual
Vol. 1.

With a WIFI DSD Network


• When the “Leader” vibrator is ready (whether because the “Ready”
button was pressed or the pressure sensor says the pad is down), it
queries each of the other DSDs in the fleet to see if it is ready, using
the wireless network datalink. See DSD Network management
(page 217). Each DSD replies, indicating whether or not it is ready. If
it is, then it sends its GPS position to the leader.
• As soon as all vibrators in the fleet are ready, the leader computes the
Centre Of Gravity of the fleet and incorporates that position into the
Ready message.
• Only the leader is allowed to send the Ready message to the DPG.

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Vibrator Ready signal management

• The Ready message can be transmitted in anticipation on the datalink


if an Early Ready time is specified on the recording system’s GUI
(in the VE464 window’s Radio function). See 428XL User’s Manual
Vol. 1.

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Sweep Definition Message

Sweep Definition Message


The following message is available (unless the Guidance option is
enabled) from the RS_GUID port (see Figure 9-14 on page 260) on the
NAV connector of the DSD:
*VE464/SL#xxxxx,xx/SN#xxxxx,xx/SI#x/TB#yymmdd hh :mm :ss :mmm<CR><LF>

where
4
SL = Source Line
SN = Source Number
S I = Source Index
TB = Time Break time

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Signal Local Archive

Signal Local Archive


In this section:
• Overview (page 134)
• Prerequisites (page 134)
• Enabling the Signal Local Archive (page 135)
• Disabling the Signal Local Archive (page 136)
• Error handling (page 136)

Overview
Using the Signal Local Archive function, up to four signals generated
by the vibrator, for each sweep, can be saved to the hard disk of a PC
attached to the DSD, via NFS, or to a USB stick. See Signal Local archive
files (page 305).

Prerequisites
For archiving via USB, insert a USB stick into the USB port of the DSD.
For archiving via NFS:
1. Install the NFS SFU server software on the computer (see
Installing SFU software on page 282).
2. The TCP/IP address of the computer must be something like
172.27.200.X (you can choose whatever value you like between 0
and 255 for X, except 123). See Configuring the Tablet PC
(page 280).
3. Connect the PC to the DSD (see Figure 4-7).

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Signal Local Archive

+12 V

Fuse

DC
adapter

4
Figure 4-7 Tablet PC attached to DSD

Note Guidance of two simultaneous source does not allow the use of
the Force Local Archive function.

Enabling the Signal Local Archive


1. Power up the DSD.
2. In the VLI interface window select Setup from the Functions
menu and then click on the Options tab. Choose the desired
Saved signals options and Media Type. See Options (page 65) for
details.

Figure 4-8

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Signal Local Archive

3. Open the c:\nfs_server\usr\data folder to see if the


“ReadyToTransferForce” file appears in it. This means that
transfer of data to the PC is enabled for the Remote or Local mode
(take a local sweep for a check). If that file fails to appear, check
all preceding steps, including the installation of SFU.

Disabling the Signal Local Archive


To disable the Signal Local Archive, open the VLI interface window,
select Setup from the Functions menu and then click on the Options
tab. Untick all the Saved signals options.

Error handling
Status 11 Normal, Ethernet error between DSD and PC (can't
save signal to disk).
In the event of a save error, this error status (11) is reported to the
recording system, in Remote mode, telling the Observer that the data
failed to be saved to the disk. However, the sweep may have been
completed successfully (whether in Filtered or Raw mode). The PC may
fail to save the signal because it has not finished saving the data from
the preceding sweep. To preclude any conflicts, the acquisition cycle
length should be longer than the sweep length by at least 20%.
WARNING
The vibrator status message is transmitted to the recording system
immediately after the sweep is complete, that is before the signal data is
saved to the local disk. As a result, if an error arises when saving the
signals, it will not be reflected in the status code associated with the
sweep (it may be delayed by one or two sweeps).

After the problem is fixed, the operator does not need to power off the
DSD to recover the PC/DSD connection. To get reconnected, simply go
to the Local mode on the DSD, then back to Remote.

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Signal Local Archive

With the archive function enabled and a save error left unfixed, the error
status is reported on each sweep but this does not affect the performance
of the DSD.

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Standalone DSD

Standalone DSD
A DSD can be used in “Standalone” mode, meaning that a single DSD
is used and it does not require a DPG. The Standalone DSD not only
controls a vibrator just like a regular DSD would do but also does the
same work as a DPG for synchronizing with the acquisition system. The
Standalone mode is typically used for downhole acquisition.

VLI

Remote Standalone cable


Standalone DSD
(P/N 1730084578)
See page 266

FO
TB

LCI-428

Figure 4-9 Standalone DSD configuration

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Standalone DSD

The Sandalone DSD is a standard unit. You simply have to use the VLI
interface to choose the “Sandalone” option in the Setup menu.

4
Choose
“STANDALONE”

Figure 4-10 Standalone mode option

Figure 4-11 shows the timing of the TB signal generated across pins 12
and 6 on the “Remote CMD” connector of the Standalone DSD

VLI Start Sweep command


(Standalone DSD goes to “Wait for FO” state) Acquisition starting

VLI
FO
Waiting
for TB
Recorder

TB

Waiting 15 V
Standalone DSD for FO Sweep length
TB signal

Figure 4-11 Sweep start timing diagram

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Standalone DSD

The Standalone DSD may go to the “Wait FO” state (waiting for the
Firing Order) in three different ways:
• Clicking on the Start button in the Sweep function window, on the
VLI interface, causes the DSD to wait for the Firing Order endlessly,
until the FO is generated or you click on the Stop button.

Figure 4-12 Starting a sweep with the VLI interface

• If the Start button is used with the “Repeat” option enabled, then the
DSD automatically goes back to the “Wait FO” state after each sweep
completed. This allows launching continuous acquisitions on the
428XL GUI.
• Rather than using the VLI interface, simply pressing the Ready
button on the DSD control panel causes the DSD to go to the “Wait
FO” state for 10 seconds, with the DSD display reading “WAIT FO”.
In that case, the DSD does the first sweep encountered in the sweep
table.

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Standalone DSD

In Standalone mode, you can save a sweep to the basic sweep table as
follows:
1. Use the Sweep menu window on the VLI interface to set the
parameters for the sweep you want to create, and then use the
Save Number drop-down list button to assign an identification
number to the sweep type to save. Click OK.

Figure 4-13 Selecting basic Sweep number to save

2. Click Save to save the basic sweep type.

Figure 4-14 Saving a basic Sweep type

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Standalone DSD

The message “Sweep ... Saved” should appear, meaning that the sweep
table was successfully updated.

Figure 4-15 Sweep type saved

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Slave DSD

Slave DSD
You may want to use two recording trucks in parallel, for example
because of geographical considerations. One recording truck is used as
“Master” and the other as “Slave”.
Each recording truck is equipped complete with an acquisition system,
plus:
• a DPG attached to the “Master” recorder,
4
• a slave DSD attached to the “Slave” recorder.

Master/Slave configuration example


An example of Master/Slave configuration is shown in the diagram that
follows, involving two recording trucks complete with a basic 428XL
configuration.
The DPG synchronization method used in this standard configuration
can be extended to any acquisition system in use in the oil exploration
industry.
The Slave DSD receives a DSD-like address (Crew #, Slave #) from the
Master DPG.
Once addressed by the Master DPG, the Slave DSD behaves like a DPG.
It receives the T0 parameter from the master DPG. On the first T0
successfully received, the Slave DSD generates a signal (EXT_GO)
that can be used in the recording truck to initiate the 'Waiting for Time
Break' sequence.
The time denoted T on the timing diagram below may vary from one
recording system to another.
After the sweep is complete, the Slave DSD sends a status message to
the Master DPG which relays it to the recorder’s GUI. That status is like
those usually returned by DSDs, with an extra specific code (26) if the
Slave acquisition system fails to start. That type of error can be detected
by monitoring the RDYIN signal, low during acquisition, high
otherwise (pins P and R of the “Blaster” connector on the LCI-428).

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Slave DSD

Part of line managed by Master 428XL Part of line managed by Slave 428XL

LAUX LAUX

Radio Radio

Ready-Slave
see Note (1)
RADIO RADIO
RECORDER

BLASTER
VIB CTRL
Master
TB Master Slave Ext Slave
BLASTER

GO
DPG DSD LCI-428
Ethernet

LCI-428 RDY Time Break

CLK LINE

Aux line

Ethernet
Firing Order and digital pilots
AIB FDU

Slave DSD sends the folowing message via the


RS232 line :
*VE464/SL#xxxx,x/SN#xxxx,x/SI#x
(Source Line, Source Number, Source Index)

GPS
Firing Order start time
Select “Vib Other”
T0 T0 TB vibrator electronics
200 ms par. par.
Master DPG type option in GUI
configuration Setup

T0 T0 To Master Acquisition
200 ms par. par.
Slave DSD system

TB
To Slave Acquisition
Radio delay 5V
EXT GO system
0V
FO
Slave DSD
T
Waiting for TB Acquisition
Slave
recording RDY IN
system

NOTES:
(1) READY-SLAVE used to know whether the Slave acquisition is started or not (status is computed by Slave
DSD and sent to Master DPG for operator information).

Figure 4-16 Master/Slave configuration

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Slave DSD

A Sweep Definition Message (page 133) is transmitted via the the Slave
RS serial port if the slave acquisition system starts properly, that is if
Ready IN is detected. See pin assignment of the Slave recorder cable (P/
N 1730084585) on page 274. In the case of a 428XL acquisition system,
the message is recorded in the External Header of the resulting SEGD
file. With an acquisition system other than from Sercel, pin P on the
Blaster plug must be wired to pin R (Ready IN) in order to allow that
message to be transmitted on each acquisition.
4
Master acquisition system
The DPG in the Master recording truck does not only perform the
standard function (controlling all DSDs and generating a reference
signal), but it also controls the Slave DSD. The “Master” DPG is
configured as usual.
See the 428XL User’s Manual Vol. 1, and use the VE464 window on the
428XL GUI as follows:
• In the “Vibrator Crew” setup, select “Slave” as DSD Type for the
DSD attached to the slave acquisition system. If you are using a DSD
network, select “Vibrator” instead (the system will ignore this
setting).
• With the “Vib Fleet” function, build a distinct fleet including only the
slave DSD. On each acquisition, that “slave” fleet will automatically
be included in the cluster currently selected as source.
• In the “Acquisition Type” setup, note that selecting which Basic
signal type to use for the “slave” fleet also determines which signal
to use for correlation on the slave side. You can use “Numeric” pilots
(in the “Correl With” and “Add Pilot” fields).
• In the “Sweep Management” setup, select a large enough T0 count so
that the slave acquisition system can have enough time to build the
Lines on the first sweep.
• The Status code in the VE464 window should read 1. Status 26 is
indicative of a problem on the slave side.

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Slave DSD

Note that for post-processing, the easiest way of finding the matching
records from either side is to have the acquisition time recorded in the
SEGD files. Therefore it is highly recommended to attach a GPS
receiver (Trimble Accutime Gold) to the LCI-428 and use the “Time
Management from GPS” option (in 428XL Config window’s Crew
setup). Also, a time server is strongly recommended in each recording
truck.

Slave acquisition system


The Slave DSD is a standard DSD that generates a reference pilot signal
synchronous with the Time Break. Connect the Blaster/DSD control
cable supplied by Sercel (Part No. 1730084585) between one of the
Blaster connectors of the LCI-428 and the Vib Control connector of the
DSD.
You simply have to use the VLI interface to choose the “Slave” option
in the Setup menu.

Slave number,
from 1 to 32

Figure 4-17

See the 428XL User’s Manual Vol. 1, and use the VE464 window on the
428XL GUI as follows:
• In the Install window, set the Vibrator Type option to “Other”.
• In the Operation window:
- In the “Seismic setup” Operating options, select “Continuous”.

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Slave DSD

- In the “Source Type” setup, select “Sequential” from the


“Moving” option button for the source.
- In the “Delay” setup, set the “At end of VP” delay to the
maximum value (99 s).
Because it does not receive any information about the current shot point
from the Master system, the Slave system works as follows:
• Shots are done as scheduled in the operation table (the source
selection option is set at “Sequential”).
4
• A fixed spread is is acquired.
• Part of the data in the general header of the Slave SEGD file is totally
useless.
• For correlation on the Slave side, no “Numeric” pilot can be used.
Instead, record an analog pilot by connecting the DSD Reference
from the Similarities connector to the auxiliary line. Set parameters
accordingly on 428XL GUI (Auxiliary channels in the Line
window’s Layout setup, and “Process Type” setup in the Operation
window).
In the Slave recording truck, the operator simply has to check the lines
in the Line window, call the Master system’s operator when all is clear,
and wait for the Firing Order.
On the first Firing Order from the Master system, the Slave DSD
generates an External Go after receiving the first T0 (see the timing
diagram in Figure 4-16 on page 144), and the system remains in
“External Go” mode (in the Operation button the Go button is dimmed,
the Stop button is available). In the Config window, the counter under
the ACQ indicator keeps counting down endlessly (the 99 s “At end of
VP” delay setting stands for infinite delay).

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Autonomous DSD

Autonomous DSD
In this section:
• Introduction (page 148)
• Requirements (page 148)
• How to use the Autonomous mode (page 149)

Introduction
The “Autonomous” mode allows simultaneous-source shooting with
sweeps being launched independently. As soon as a vibrator or fleet
leader is ready at a planned source position, a sweep is started by the
operator pressing the Ready button on the DSD, without caring about
synchronization with the recording truck. The planned Vibrator Points
can be done in any order.
The interest of using the Autonomous mode is to eliminate the need for
radio communications for starting the sweeps, which makes it
especially suited to difficult radio environments. A radio link is still
required, however, but only for the status messages from the vibrators
to the GUI, which can be transmitted during intervals of good radio
conditions.
The recording unit is set to perform a continuous acquisition consisting
of consecutive shots with zero dead-time. No sample is lost between the
last sample from a shot and the first sample from the next one (like in
Micro-seismic mode).

Requirements
This mode of operation requires special seismic data processing
techniques.
The LCI-428 must be attached to a GPS receiver so that the seismic
samples can be accurately time-stamped, and each DSD must be set to
save the Force signal locally. Also, each vibrator must use a GPS
receiver.

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Autonomous DSD

Unless a fleet consists of a single vibrator, it must use a WIFI network.


The Autonomous mode neither requires nor allows the use of the
Vibrator Guidance function.

How to use the Autonomous mode


1. On a PC computer, use the VE464 VLI interface to set each DSD
to the Autonomous mode (DSD Setup menu), and enable the
Force local archive option (Options Setup menu).
4

Figure 4-18 VLI setup

2. Use the 428XL GUI to enable the Autonomous mode. To do that,


you have to select that option in the Operating Mode and Options
setup in the Operation window, then notify the DPG by going to
Auto in the VE464 DPG window (if the DPG is already in Auto
mode, go to Manual then Auto).
3. Create a Vibroseismic Stack Process Type with a single
acquisition (this allows recording uncorrelated, unstacked data).
4. Load SPS files, using the Log window, to populate the Source
Point Setup (in the Operation window) and the Positioning
window.
5. Switch all DSDs to the “Remote” mode (press “Remote” on the
DSD keypad).
6. For this step, the radio link must be available so that the following
functions can be done, in the VE464 window:

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Autonomous DSD

- Set Vib Fleet to assign DSDs to fleets. Note that unless a fleet
consists of a single vibrator, it must use a WIFI network. Set the
“DSD network” option accordingly in the Vibrator Crew setup.
- Set DSD to upload sweep-type parameters to the DSDs, and also
the description of the source pattern.
- Set Servo to set the servo control loop parameters in the DSDs;
- and any other function that may be necessary (Get DSD, etc.).
7. Once the DSDs are assigned to fleets and ready to sweep, switch
all DSDs to the “Local” mode.
8. Select a VP in the Operation table, with the Process Type created
in step 3, and click Go to start the continuous acquisition. After
each shot is completed, the Shot Number is automatically
incremented and an operator report is generated. The Point Index
is not incremented.
9. Start a sweep by pressing the Ready pushbutton on DSDs
whenever vibrators are ready to shake at planned positions.
- With no WIFI network (a single vibrator in each fleet), pressing
the Ready pushbutton launches a local sweep.
- With a WIFI network, pressing the Ready pushbutton on the
Leader DSD launches a sweep on all the vibrators in the fleet. As
all the DSDs in the fleet are synchronized with the Leader, they
start sweeping at the same time. This is the recommended way
of using the Autonomous mode. Note that prior to launching the
sweep, the Leader must make sure all the vibrators are ready
(with a future software release, the system will take care of that
itself).
10. After completing a sweep the DSD tries to send a status message
to the recording truck, via the radio link with the DPG, until it is
notified of the status being actually received by the DPG. If, for
any reason, the radio path is obstructed for some time, the status
message and the next ones are stored in the DSD and, when the

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Autonomous DSD

radio link is available again, they are sent to the DPG in the order
of their occurrence.
11. The VE464 and Positioning windows are updated with the sweep
status messages received, which makes it easy for the operator to
see which shots are done and see if any sweep failed.
The system uses the $GPGGA GPS information from the status
message to find the nearest source point and calculate the COG to
display it in the Positioning window. See Figure 4-19 (page 151) and 4
Figure 4-20 (page 152) below.

Figure 4-19 VE464 window

The “Vp” and “Acq#” columns in the VE464 window’s numeric view
are irrelevant, and therefore dimmed. As usual, double-clicking in any

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Autonomous DSD

cell opens a secondary window showing the detailed QC values


contained in the status report from the corresponding DSD. This also
causes a sprite to appear in the Positioning window, indicating the
geographical position of the DSD during the sweep.
Selecting “Get Properties” from the right-click menu on the sprite
causes a Properties window to pop up, containing the Vibrator number,
the status code and the actual position of the vibrator during the sweep.
See Figure 4-20 (page 152).

Figure 4-20 Positioning window

Note that you can look for more information in the APS and APS
Verbose file available from the LOG. window.

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Slip-sweep

Slip-sweep
Slip-sweep requires a single DPG, regardless of how many vibrator
fleets are involved.
The system will run in slip-sweep mode when the Slip-sweep option is
enabled in the OPERATION window, with the Continuous mode
selected.
The sweeps then start automatically as soon as the vibrators are ready
4
and a minimum delay has expired after the start of the previous sweep.
This minimum time is “Slip time + DPG Delay” (DPG Delay depends
on the time-slot allocation by the TDMA). See Time-slot allocation
(page 185).
If vibrators fail to send a Ready message, the sweep will not start
automatically.

T
Fleet 1 sweep Fleet 1 sweep
Slip Time T Slip Time T
Fleet 2 sweep Fleet 2 sweep
Slip Time T Slip Time T
Fleet 3 sweep
Slip Time

Fleet 2 Fleet 3 Fleet 1 Fleet 2 Fleet 3


Ready Ready Ready Ready Ready

T = time from FO to TB

Figure 4-21

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Vibrator signal recording

Vibrator signal recording


Processing techniques making use of motion signals picked up on the
vibrators, and recorded, may require that you program the VE464
specifically, not to have all the vibrators doing the same sweep within a
vibrator fleet. This is easily done with the VE464 and the 428XL, by
creating a distinct fleet for each vibrator and having all fleets shaking
simultaneously.
You may want to shift the initial phase of sweeps in the vibrators, for
the Vibrator Signal Recording (VSR) function. The VSR function on
the recorder allows vibrator motion signals to be radioed to the central
control unit in real-time (as soon as the sweep is complete), using
standard radio telemetry units (LAUR-428), so that they can be
recorded as auxiliary channels in the SEGD file.
For example, you may want to take four acquisitions on each Source
Point, with four vibrators, and the initial phase of each vibrator for each
acquisition to be as in the table below:

Acq. Vibrator
1 2 3 4
1 0 90 90 180
2 90 0 180 90
3 90 180 0 90
4 180 90 90 0

See VE464 Vibrator Signal Recording in 428XL User’s Manual Vol. 1.

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Ground Viscosity and Stiffness

Ground Viscosity and Stiffness


Conversion To Normalized Units

4000  M P
G S = --------------------------  GS464
S base
4
15.625  M P
G V = -------------------------------  GV464
S base

GV Ground Viscosity (Ns/m3).


GS Ground Stiffness (N/m3).
GS464, GV464 Values from VE464 DSD Quality Control.
MP Baseplate Mass (kg).
Sbase Baseplate Surface (m2).

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Ground Viscosity and Stiffness

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Chapter

5 TDMA radio datalink

In this chapter:

• Overview (page 158)


• Installation (page 162)
• TracsTDMA settings (page 174)
• Using a TDMA radio datalink (page 179)
• Time-slot allocation (page 185)
• Interpreting the LED indicators (page 192)
• Specific serial port wiring for VE464 (page 195)

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Overview

Overview

Figure 5-1 TDMA box

Time Division Multiple Access


The Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) channel access method
allows several users to share the same frequency channel by dividing
the signal into different time-slots. In this manual, each radio unit within
the TDMA system is itself called a “TDMA” for short, rather than
“TDMA radio unit”.

Data stream divided into frames

Frames divided into time-slots.


1 2 3 4
Each user (DPG or DSD) is allocated a time-slot

1010111010001011 Time-slots contain data with a


guard period for synchronisation

Guard periods for synchronisation

Figure 5-2 TDMA frame structure

The DPG and the DSDs transmit in rapid succession, one after the other,
each using its own time-slot. This allows the DSDs to share the same
radio frequency channel while using only the part of its bandwidth they
require. As a result, unlike with a conventional radio which may delay

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TDMA radio datalink
Overview

messages by a few seconds, with a TDMA the messages between the


DPG and all the DSDs are virtually simultaneous.
The DPG assigns a time-slot to each DSD. With a 25-kHz channel and
a 12000 baud rate, 16 time-slots per seconds are available. If more time-
slots are required, the recurrence of each DSD’s time-slot is slower,
unless a second TDMA box is attached to the DPG, with a different
radio frequency. Each DSD in a fleet communicates with either the first
or the second TDMA on the DPG, depending on which frequency
channel is selected in the DSDs. See Time-slot allocation (page 185).
The TDMA’s maximum transmitted power output is 10 W. A 50 W 5
booster can be used.

Part Number
3530280 (UHF)
3530279 (VHF)

Figure 5-3 Booster

Built-in GPS receiver


The TracsTDMA radio unit has a built-in GPS receiver supplying a
highly accurate clock signal that allows it to generate the required time-
slots with high precision. That clock also allows the start time of each
sweep to be determined accurately. It is required not only in the DPG
but also in each DSD.

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Overview

The GPS receiver also supplies the vibrator’s position, used for
Navigation-driven shooting and for the vibrator Guidance function.
Because in the event of interruption of GPS satellite reception (e. g. if
the GPS antenna is shielded by trees) the TDMA cannot continue to
function for more than 20 seconds, the DSD too supplies its own clock
to the TDMA. The DSD’s clock allows the TDMA to continue to
function with no GPS satellite reception.

Differential GPS
The Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) technique uses a
fixed ground-based reference station to broadcast the difference
between the position indicated by the satellite system and the known
fixed position. The Base station broadcasts the difference between the
measured satellite pseudoranges and actual (internally computed)
pseudoranges, so that receiver stations can correct their pseudoranges
by the same amount.
The reference station uses a TracsTDMA unit with special equipment
(this must be specified when ordering). The reference TDMA must be
located at an accurately determined point. The TDMA attached to the
DPG can be used as DGPS reference station.
The Real Time Kinematic (RTK) option on a TDMA allows centimetric
accuracy to be achieved.
See Broadcasting Differential GPS corrections (page 168).

Comparison to “standard” TracsTDMA


The Sercel variant of the TacsTDMA has been very specifically tuned
to meet Sercel requirements. In order to remove possible confusion for
users, especially those who have used TracsTDMA in a previous
experience, the following list is provided outlining the basic functional
differences.

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TDMA radio datalink
Overview

Mode and functions removed from Sercel TDMA


• Dynamic Base and Mobile mode.
• Base backup mode.
• Auto repeat function.
• Engineering and monitor output messages.
• Hayes AT messaging functions.

Modes and functions added to Sercel TDMA


• Repeater mode - separate code variant.
5
• DPG -DSD mode – separate code variant.
• Extra long OPEN slot allocations.

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Installation

Installation
WARNING
Only TracsTDMA units supplied by SERCEL are compatible with the
VE464. The TracsTDMA model supplied by SERCEL comes with
specific software and hardware changes for the VE464. See Specific
serial port wiring for VE464 (page 195).

The TracsTDMA radio unit is supplied along with:


• A power cord (the required power supply is 9 to 36 VDC, 1.7 A
max.).
• A GPS antenna and a VHF or UHF antenna (to be connected prior to
powering on the TDMA box).

WARNING
Both antenna downleads are equipped with N-type connectors. It is
advisable to place a tag on each connector to be sure the downleads are
not swapped on the rear panel of the TDMA.

The TDMA connects to the DPG or DSD via two cables supplied
together with the DPG or DSD.
When supplied along with a DPG, the TracsTDMA box is configured
for use as a “Base” station so that it can be used as reference station for
DGPS corrections (see Table 5-1 below). When supplied along with a
DSD, the TDMA is configured for use as a “Mobile” station. DGPS
corrections can be used, with no need for any additional equipment. The
VHF antenna of a Base-type TDMA is different from that of a Mobile-
type.
The TracsTDMA operates in the VHF band from 136 MHz to 174 MHz
(or UHF from 440 MHz to 512 MHz).

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WARNING
The VHF antenna supplied for a Base station (with a DPG) is a Jaybeam
antenna limited to 145-165 MHz. If you want to use a different
frequency range, you need a different antenna. For a TDMA on UHF
frequencies, use a Jaybeam 7533 antenna (3 dB, 430-471 MHZ).
The antenna supplied for a Mobile (with a DSD) is a whip antenna to be
cut to the appropriate length, depending on the frequency to use
(between 136 MHz and 174 MHz for a VHF antenna). A 145-165 MHz
Jaybeam antenna is also supplied.
Longer radio range is achieved if the TDMA antenna is installed on a
5
mast, e. g. 8 m high for a Base (DPG) and 2 m for a Mobile (DSD).
The TDMA antenna should be installed at the front of the truck for the
distance to the TDMA box to be minimum. The voice radio antenna
should be installed at the rear of the truck for maximum separation from
the TDMA antenna, therefore minimum interference.
The frequency for the voice radio should be chosen to be as far as
possible (at least 1 or 2 MHz) from that of the TDMA to prevent
interference with the data transmission and DGPS corrections. Still
better, if you are using a VHF TDMA then use UHF radios for voice
communications, and the other way round if you are using a UHF
TDMA.

Table 5-1

TDMA attached TDMA attached


GPS Cables
to DPG to DSD

Base or Mobile
No DGPS corrections
See Figure 5-6
Mobile
DGPS with reference station Base
See Figure 5-5 provided
location close to DPG See Figure 5-6
(page 165)
DGPS using a separate reference Base or Mobile
station (a base TDMA is required) See Figure 5-6

Base with external Mobile with


Using a GPS receiver of your own GPS external GPS See Figure 5-
attached to DPG or DSD See Figure 5-13 See Figure 5-12 12 (page 171)
(page 172) (page 171)

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WARNING
Connect the VHF or UHF antenna prior to powering on the TDMA box.

WARNING
Unless the metal case of each piece of equipment is connected to ground
the TDMA or the PPS detection circuit inside the DPG or DSD may get
damaged. Be sure the TDMA case is properly grounded.

To be tied
to DPG or
DSD case
ground
Ground lead
tied to bottom
plate of TDMA
box

Figure 5-4 TDMA case ground connection

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TDMA attached to a DSD

9-36 VDC
VHF GPS
(UHF)
Ground

Figure 5-5 TDMA attached to DSD

Important: Connect the case of the TDMA and that of the DSD to the
same ground point on the chassis of the vibrator truck.

TDMA attached to a DPG

VHF GPS
(UHF) 9-36 VDC

Ground

Figure 5-6 TDMA attached to DPG

Important: Connect the case of the TDMA and DPG and the recording
truck’s chassis to the same earth ground stake.

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Two TDMAs attached to a DPG

The VHF or UHF antennas


VHF GPS must be a few metres
(UHF) apart in order to preclude
any interference.

9-36 VDC

Ground

9-36 VDC
VHF GPS
(UHF)

Figure 5-7 Two TDMAs attached to DPG

WARNING
The VHF or UHF antennas should never touch each other (damage to
the HF circuitry may result).

If you want to use a single GPS antenna for both TDMAs, use an
adapter wired as shown in Figure 5-8 (page 167).

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DB25 (pin)
GGA
22
18 GND
To TDMA 1
14
(Base)
7
RTCM
8

To TDMA 2
DB25 (pin)
20
GGA 5
18 GND
with no
GPS antenna 14
See Note (*) 7
RTCM
below 9
DB25
(socket)

20
GND
18 To DPG
PPS Nav
14
GND connector
7
GGA
22

Figure 5-8 Adapter for two TDMAs using a single GPS antenna

(*) Note: for the TDMA with no GPS antenna to receive the DGPS
corrections, it must be configured for “external GPS” (using the
TDMAexternal.sts file. See page 320).

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Broadcasting Differential GPS corrections


A reference station is required for each radio frequency channel used.
Typically a separate TracsTDMA (equipped with specific options) is
used to broadcast the DGPS corrections (differential, single frequency
RTK, dual frequency RTK etc.), but if the reference point is located
close to the recorder truck station, the TDMA unit or units (1 or 2)
attached to the DPG can be used for the DGPS broadcast. Below are the
three possible ways of broadcasting DGPS corrections.

Standard configuration
Figure 5-9 shows the standard using the GPS receiver inside the TDMA
box, and using the TDMA to transmit the DGPS corrections.

- Use “Base” TDMA configuration - Use “Mobile” TDMA configuration;


- Activate “Diff” in JVe464 GUI window - Standard cabling.
- Standard cabling
Figure 5-9

External GPS, DGPS through TDMA


Figure 5-10 shows a configuration using an external GPS receiver, but
using the TDMA to transmit the DGPS corrections.

- Use “External” TDMA configuration; - Use “External” TDMA configuration;


- Activate “Diff” in JVe464 GUI window; - Special cabling (Figure 5-12 on
- Special cabling (Figure 5-13 on page 172). page 171).

Figure 5-10

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External GPS, DGPS through external radio


Figure 5-11 shows a configuration using an external GPS receiver, and
using an external radio to transmit the DGPS corrections (Figure 5-11).

- Use “External” TDMA configuration; - Use “External” TDMA configuration;


- Do not activate “Diff” in JVe464 GUI window; - Special cabling (Figure 5-12 on
- Special cabling (Figure 5-13 on page 172). page 171).

Figure 5-11

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External GPS receiver


You can use an external GPS receiver in place of the TDMA’s built-in
receiver. This requires the TDMA to be configured for an “External”
GPS receiver.
The GPS receiver output port must be configured as follows: 9600,
none, 8, 1 (9600 bits/s, no parity, 8 bits, 1 stop bit). It must at least
supply the messages absolutely necessary for the DPG or DSD to work
properly: $GPGGA (vibrator position) and $GPZDA (time setting).
If you want to use the Vehicle Tracking (page 183) function, the external
GPS receiver must supply $GPVTG messages, ortherwise vibrator
positions will fail to be updated.
The uncompressed RTCM data is transmitted from the TDMA used as
Base (attached to the DPG) to the “Mobile” TDMAs through TRAN-
type time-slots. The bit stream may convey any type of message (RTK
for instance), depending on the bit rate selected in the VE464 window
on the 428XL GUI. The selected bit rate allows determining the number
of TRAN time-slots required to convey the data from the external GPS
receiver’s serial port.
You have to pick up the required conductors on the DB25 connector or
insert an adapter wired as shown below. See:
• External GPS receiver attached to “Mobile” TDMA (page 171) for a
DSD.
• External GPS receiver attached to “Base” TDMA (page 172) for a DPG.
• Adapter for two TDMAs and an external GPS receiver attached to DPG
(page 173).

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VHF 9-36 VDC


(UHF)

Ground

External
Adapter cord
(see detail below)
NAV GPS cable
5
GPS
receiver
(Part No. 605084575)

DB25 (pin)
GGA
20
18 GND
To TDMA
14
7
8

RTCM

GND 20
GND
18
PPS (TTL) PPS DB25
External 14 (socket)
PPS GND GND
7
GGA
GND 22
External
GGA RS232 Tx

Figure 5-12 External GPS receiver attached to “Mobile” TDMA

If Differential GPS corrections are received (from a “Base” TDMA,


which itself may or may not use an external GPS receiver) they can be
picked up on pin 8 on the “Mobile” TDMA and fed to the external GPS
receiver.

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VHF
(UHF)

9-36 VDC

NAV GPS cable


(Part No. 605084575)
Adapter cord
External (see detail below)
GPS
receiver

DB25 (pin)
GGA
20
18 GND
To TDMA
14
7
9

RTCM

GND 20
GND
18
PPS (TTL) PPS DB25
External 14 (socket)
PPS GND GND
7
GGA
GND 22
External
GGA RS232 Tx

Figure 5-13 External GPS receiver attached to “Base” TDMA

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DB25 (pin)
GGA
20
18 GND
To TDMA 1
14
(Base)
7
RTCM
9

DB25 (pin)
20
GGA
5
18 GND
To TDMA 2
(Base) 14
7
RTCM
9
DB25
(socket)
RTCM

GND 20
GND
18 To DPG
PPS (TTL) PPS Nav
External 14
PPS GND GND connector
7
GGA
GND 22
External
GGA RS232 Tx

Figure 5-14 Adapter for two TDMAs and an external GPS receiver attached to DPG

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TracsTDMA settings

TracsTDMA settings
Configuration supplied by SERCEL
The TracsTDMA is configured for use with the VE464 on shipment
from SERCEL, except for the information at the user’s choice, that is
the TDMA’s identification number and radio frequencies, which you
have to set up using the SercelTDMAconfig software tool supplied by
SERCEL (available from the 428XL server’s disk).
On a TDMA used to broadcast DGPS corrections, that is a “Base”
station, you also have to enter the reference position.
Some parameters (like time-slot allocation, transmission channel and
power, Baud rate, generation of DGPS corrections, indicator LEDs) are
controlled in real time by the DPG or DSD.

Using SercelTDMAconfig to configure a TDMA


To set up the remaining configuration parameters, use the
SercelTDMAconfig software tool (available from the 428XL server’s
disk).
1. Copy the SercelTDMAconfig software from the 428XL server
disk directory /export/home/ve464/tdma/repeater (all files in
this directory) to a PC computer. Run the msi file to install
SercelTDMAconfig on the computer with the traditional
Windows “Installation Wizard”.
2. Connect a serial port of the computer to the TDMA via the DB9
cord supplied, as shown in Figure 5-15.

GPS 9-36 VDC COM1


VHF
(UHF)

Ground

Figure 5-15 Connecting the TDMA to a computer

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3. Power on the TDMA and the PC. Be sure the Java Runtime
Environment is installed on the PC.
4. Open the SercelTDMAconfig main window (double-click on its
icon on the desktop).

If TDMA is used as separate


base, enter
- Cycle length (1).
- 1st Freq (the channel used).
- Tx Power (Transmission power.
- RF Baud/BW (Baud rate used)
(otherwise these parameters are
automatically updated by DPG or
DSD)

Figure 5-16 SercelTDMAconfig main window

5. Set the Mode to Normal.


6. Each TDMA belonging in a crew must have a distinct
identification number (from 001 to 254). Choose the Unit ID
number so as to be sure the ID number of each TDMA within the
crew is unique.
7. You can create up to 9 radio channels. This will allow you to
choose between 9 working frequencies.

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TracsTDMA settings

If two TDMAs are attached to the DPG, then you must create at
least the two channels to be used, and you must do that on the
DSDs too (even though on a DSD a single frequency is used).
Otherwise, a single frequency is required. Creating more channels
makes it possible to switch to another frequency in the event of
trouble with the one currently selected (much like with a
traditional analog radio).
The list of frequencies available runs from 136 MHz to 174 MHz
for a VHF TDMA (440 MHz to 512 MHz for UHF).
8. Click on the “setup TDMA with BSIC & FREQ” button.

Figure 5-17

9. Close the window.

DGPS reference station configuration


For a “Base” TDMA attached to the DPG, use the VE464 window’s
Radio Management setup on the 428XL GUI. See the 428XL
documentation.
1. Click on the GPS Base Position button.
2. Enter the position of each TDMA’s GPS antenna.
- Latitude: minus sign if South, degrees (2 digits), minutes (2
digits), seconds (2 digits), fractional part of second.
- Longitude: minus sign if West, degrees (3 digits), minutes (2
digits), seconds (2 digits), fractional part of second.
- Elevation: altitude + geoidal separation (metres).

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Figure 5-18

3. Click Go. Different messages may appear.


Make sure the cable from the NAV
Check your NAV cable is connected to the connector of the DPG is connected to
TDMA the DB25 connector on the TDMA
(TDMA1 if two are used). Click OK.
OK Cancel

If a second TDMA is attached to the DPG, the following message


shows up:
Disconnect your NAV cable from the first Connect the cable from the NAV
TDMA and conect it to the second TDMA connector of the DPG to the DB25
connector on the second TDMA
Retry Cancel (TDMA 2). Click Retry.

Unless an error message appears, this completes the configuration


of the “Base” TDMA. The following error messages may appear:
TDMA 2 is not a base The position cannot be loaded because
Do you want to retry? the TDMA is not configured for use as a
Retry Cancel DGPS reference station.

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TracsTDMA settings

Position not accepted by GPS on TDMA1 The position you are trying to load is
Do you want to retry? rejected because it is inconsistent (too
Retry Cancel far away from the actual position).

TDMA1 GPS antenna 25 metres away The position you are trying to load is
from base position. Do you want to retry? accepted, but it is more than 20 metres
Retry Cancel away from the actual position.

For a TDMA that is not attached to the DPG, see Setting up the GPS
receiver as “Base” (page 326).

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Using a TDMA radio datalink

Using a TDMA radio datalink


Choosing a radio channel
For TDMA radio units to communicate with each other, they must use
the same radio frequency, hence the same radio channel.

Using the VE464 window on 428XL GUI


To choose a radio channel on a TDMA attached to the DPG, use the
428XL GUI (see VE464 > “The Radio Management setup” in 428XL
User’s Manual Vol. 1, or see the GUI’s on-line Help menu). If two
5
TDMAs are attached to the DPG, then you must choose a different radio
channel on each of them. If you want to use DGPS corrections, you have
to set up a reference (Base) TDMA for each radio channel.
When you assign a DSD to a fleet with the “Vib Fleet” function the
system automatically chooses the same radio channel for all the
vibrators within the fleet.

Using the VLI interface


You choose the radio channel for each DSD when you choose the
TDMA option in the Setup menu with the VLI interface (see page 67).

Using the DSD keypad


You can also use the keypad on a DSD to select its TDMA radio
channel:
1. Press the Local button to go to the “Local” mode.
2. Press the Display Scroll button until the radio channel is
displayed.

DSD Channel 1

Figure 5-19

3. Press the High (or Low) button to select the appropriate channel.
4. Press the Remote button to enable the new setting.
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Using a TDMA radio datalink

Choosing a radio Baud rate


The Baud rate options for the TDMA datalink range from 4800 to
14400. The default setting is 12000. You can change this setting but it
is important to consider the impact of your changes and remember the
Baud rate must be the same on all TDMA boxes.

What is the impact of a higher or lower baud rate?


• Higher Baud rates allow the TDMA to transmit more time-slots per
second. The time-slot for each DSD is refreshed more often, as a
result of its faster recurrence, which improves the response time. See
Time-slot allocation (page 185).
• Increasing the Baud rate achieves greater data throughput at the cost
of a shorter maximum operating range. As the sensitivity of the radio
receiver circuitry diminishes, transmission errors are more likely.
Note that the maximum attainable range for a safe datalink is also
affected by various other criteria: antenna height, feeder cable losses,
type of terrain, local noise environment, etc.
• Some Baud rates are associated with a 12.5-kHz channel width and
others with a 25-kHz channel. Therefore you must request a
frequency allocation for your TDMA from the local regulation
agency and choose a suitable Baud rate from the table below,
depending on which channel width you are allowed to use.

Table 5-2 Baud rate and channel width


Baud rate Number of slots/second Channel width
4800 7
6000 8
12.5 kHz
7200 10
8000 11
9600 12
12000 16 25 kHz
14400 20

Note Note: only 9600 or 12000 Baud for a UHF Tracs TDMA box.

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How to change the Baud rate


WARNING
Remember the Baud rate setting requires careful consideration and
must be the same on all the TDMA boxes used (the ones attached to the
DPG and those attached to DSDs). Because the system is unable to
work until the Baud rate is the same on all TDMA boxes, it is advisable
to do all the changes in the shortest possible time.

TDMA attached to the DPG


To change the Baud rate on a TDMA attached to the DPG, use the 5
recording system’s GUI (see VE464 > “The Radio Management setup”
in 428XL User’s Manual Vol. 1, or see the GUI’s on-line Help menu).

TDMA attached to a DSD


Because if any change is required it has to be done on all the TDMA
boxes and in the shortest possible time, quick access to the TDMA Baud
rate setting is provided via the DSD’s keypad (you do not need to
connect a PC and use the VLI interface, but you can if you want to).
On the DSD in each vibrator cab:
1. Press the Local button to go to the “Local” mode.
2. Press the Display Scroll button until the Baud rate is displayed.
3. Press the High (or Low) button to increase (or decrease) the Baud
rate.
4. Press the Remote button to enable the new Baud rate setting.

Radio messages
The TDMA units need an “Open-type” time-slot for their data
communications functions (see the documentation from CYBIT for
details). This resource is controlled by the DPG, which starts by
assigning a time-slot to its own TDMA. Then the DPG uses that time-
slot to broadcast a message to the DSDs that operate on the same radio
channel. Each DSD interprets the message, supplies the Open-type slot

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number to its own TDMA, and then generates the reply for its TDMA
to send back to the DPG.
Until those initial communications controlled by the recorder’s “Vib
Fleet” function are successfully established, the system cannot transmit
anything else, since the DSDs are unable to reply.
Since all DSDs have a TDMA, they all receive the radio messages. If a
wireless WIFI network (DSD Network option) is used for DSDs to
communicate with each other, only the fleet’s Leader DSD has an Open-
type slot, and therefore is allowed to respond to the DPG. The other
DSDs within the fleet send their messages to the Leader DSD via the
WIFI network, and the Leader relays them to the DPG.
If many units are allowed to transmit data, the recurrence rate of the
time-slot allocated to each is slower, which impairs the responsiveness
of the system (this is the reason why only the Leader DSD is allocated
a data-transmission slot). Attaching a second TDMA (with a different
radio channel) to the DPG improves the response time. With four fleets
on the same radio channel, the recurrence rate of data communications
is 0.38 second @ 12000 Baud.

Differential GPS
The TDMA of each DSD, configured as a “mobile”, is able to receive
Differential GPS corrections from a reference station (“Base” TDMA).
The DGPS corrections (RTCM data) are conveyed in a transparent
(TRAN-type) time-slot. The DPG allocates that time-slot to the “Base”
TDMA and associates the Base station’s Identification number with it.
The TRAN-type slot allocated to DGPS corrections slightly decreases
the bandwidth available for data communications, and therefore slightly
affects the system’s response time (0.44 s @ 12000 Baud with 4 fleets
on the same channel, 200 bits/s DGPS corrections).

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Using a TDMA radio datalink

Real Time Kinematic


The Real Time Kinematic (RTK) technique is a differential correction
process that allows a centimetre level of accuracy to be achieved, if the
TDMA units (both the Base and Mobiles) are equipped with that option.
The data conveyed in the TRAN-type time-slot requires a wider
bandwidth, which slightly affects the system’s response time (0.56 s @
12000 Baud with 4 fleets on the same channel, 1600 bits/s DGPS
corrections).

Vehicle Tracking
5
In addition to the automatic display of DSD positions, updated every
10 seconds, in the Positioning window on the recording system’s GUI,
you may want to use the TDMA’s tracking function that allows tracking
DSDs on an external device (a PC), since the TracsTDMA from CYBIT
is a radio datalink primarily intended for vehicle tracking applications.
The vehicle Tracking function must be enabled in the VE464 window’s
Radio Management setup on the 428XL GUI.
It is important to note, however, that if you do not use the TDMA’s
tracking function, the positions of DSDs are still displayed in the
Positioning window.
The TDMA’s tracking function uses time-slots that convey position
messages from the built-in GPS receiver (POS-type time-slots). The
DPG only allocates POS-type slots to those DSDs that have Open-type
slots for data communications. Using POS slots decreases the available
bandwidth and affects the response time.
For example, with 4 fleets on the same radio channel (@ 12000 Baud):
• Tracking with no Differential GPS: the data message recurrence rate
is 0.44 s, with 1 position for each Leader DSD every 1.75 s.
• Tracking with 200 bits/s DGPS corrections: the data message
recurrence rate is 0.50 s, with 1 position for each Leader DSD every
2 s.

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• Tracking with 1600 bits/s DGPS corrections (RTK): the data message
recurrence rate is 0.63 s, with 1 position for each Leader DSD every
2.5 s.
The position can be picked up on the DATA port of any TDMA that is
tuned to the radio channel used within the network. The DATA port is
the standard serial port available on the DB25 connector of the TDMA,
which is not used by the DPG or DSD.
To feed the position message to a computer (PC), on a separate TDMA
(for example a Base station) you only need to use a DB25-DB9 adapter
on the TDMA’s DB25 connector. On a TDMA attached to the DPG (or
a DSD), use an adapter wired as shown below (Figure 5-20 on
page 184), or open the DB25 connector and pick up the signal across
pins 3 (Tx) and 1 or 7 (GND).

To DSD
To TDMA
NAV
connector RS232 Rx
2 3
RS232 Tx PC
3 3 2
PPS out computer
14 14 5 serial port
GND GND
7 7 DB9
20 GGA in
20 (socket)
GGA out
22 22
GND
18 18
DB25 DB25
(socket) (pin)

Figure 5-20 Serial port for Tracking

If an external GPS receiver is used, it must supply $GPVTG messages.


See External GPS receiver (page 170).

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Time-slot allocation

Time-slot allocation
The recurrence of the time-slot for each DSD (or each fleet, in the case
of networked DSDs), referred to as “Recurrence rate” in this manual, is
not only dependent on how many DSDs or fleets are used, but also on
whether or not some time-slots are required for broadcasting
Differential GPS corrections and/or for vehicle tracking. (Note that
attaching two TDMAs to the DPG allows a faster recurrence to be
achieved).
The Recurrence rate (seconds) depends on various parameters: 5
• Baud rate of TDMA datalink;
• Number of DSDs (or number of fleets if networked DSDs) controlled
by the TDMA;
• With or without Differential GPS corrections;
• Data rate (bits/second) of Differential GPS corrections;
• With or without vibrator position Tracking.
In Table 5-4 (page 186) are simple examples showing how to calculate
the “Recurrence rate” after determining the number of time-slots
required for DGPS corrections. The calculation formula on the next
page can be used so long as the number of slots required for DGPS does
not exceed 4 and the number of DSDs does not exceed 11. With more
DGPS slots to transmit or more DSDs, the transmission cycle is split
(only a fraction of DSD slots are transmitted on each DPG recurrence
cycle). In that case, use the calculator tool provided on the VE464 CD-
ROM.

Note If you are reading this manual on-line, you can calculate the
“Recurrence rate” by clicking here.
Figure 5-21 to Figure 5-23 (page 189) show how each DSD’s message is
refreshed, with a single TDMA and up to 8 DSDs or fleets.
Table 5-6 (page 190) gives the different recurrence rates for up to 32
DSDs or fleets @ 12000 Baud (with no Tracking).

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Time-slot allocation

Refresh length (slots)


Recurrence rate (seconds) = ------------------------------------------------------------
Number of slots / second

Refresh length (number of slots) = 2 + D + n


slots for DPG
D = number of fleets (or number of DSDs if no
WIFI network) controlled by the TDMA
n = number of slots for DGPS correction data
(depends on DGPS bit rate)

Table 5-3 Number of slots per second vs Baud rate


Baud rate 4800 6000 7200 8000 9600 12000 14400
s = Slots / second 7 8 10 11 12 16 20

The number (n) of slots assigned to DGPS corrections can be


determined as follows:
8   32 + 54   n – 1  
-------------------------------------------------------  c
2+D+n

where c is the DGPS correction bit rate. As a result:

c   2 + D  + 176  s
n  ---------------------------------------------------
432  s – c

Table 5-4 Examples of calculating the number of slots for DGPS


c D s
Baud rate n
(bits/second) (fleets or DSDs) (slots/second)
200 4 14400 20 1
1600 8 14400 20 3

Table 5-5 Examples of calculating the Recurrence rate (no Tracking)


D s Recurrence
n Baud rate
(fleets with network) (slots/second) (seconds)
4 3 12000 16 (2 + 4 +3) / 16 = 0.56
1 1 9600 12 (2 + 1 +1) / 12 = 0.33

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TDMA radio datalink
Time-slot allocation

DPG and 1 DSD (or 1 fleet with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.19 second

DPG DSD1 DPG DSD1 DPG DSD1 DPG DSD1 DPG DSD1 DPG DSD1 DPG

DPG and 2 DSDs (or 2 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.25 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DPG DSD1 DSD2

DPG and 3 DSDs (or 3 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.31 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3

5
DPG and 4 DSDs (or 4 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.38 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DPG

DPG and 5 DSDs (or 5 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.44 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4

DPG and 6 DSDs (or 6 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.50 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DPG DSD1 DSD2

DPG and 7 DSDs (or 7 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.56 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 DPG

DPG and 8 DSDs (or 8 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.63 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 DSD8 DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 DSD8

DPG and 12 DSDs Recurrence: 1 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DPG DSD7 DSD8 DSD9 DSD10 DSD11 DSD12 DPG DSD1 DSD2

Figure 5-21 Time-slot allocation @ 12000 Baud, with no DGPS (no Tracking)

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Time-slot allocation

If DGPS is used, extra time-slots are required for broadcasting the


RTCM data. For example, correction data @ 200 bits/s requires one
extra slot (RTCM in Figure 5-22).

DPG and 1 DSD (or 1 fleet with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.25 second

DPG DSD1 RTCM DPG DSD1 RTCM DPG DSD1 RTCM DPG DSD1 RTCM DPG DSD1 RTCM

DPG and 2 DSDs (or 2 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.31 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTCM

DPG and 3 DSDs (or 3 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.38 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 RTCM DPG

DPG and 4 DSDs (or 4 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.44 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4

DPG and 5 DSDs (or 5 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.50 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2

DPG and 6 DSDs (or 6 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.56 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 RTCM DPG

DPG and 7 DSDs (or 7 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.63 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 RTCM

DPG and 8 DSDs (or 8 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.69 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 DSD8 RTCM DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7

DPG and 12 DSDs Recurrence: 1.13 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 RTCM DPG DSD7 DSD8 DSD9 DSD10 DSD11 DSD12 RTCM DPG

Figure 5-22 Time-slot allocation @ 12000 Baud, with Differential GPS (no Tracking)

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TDMA radio datalink
Time-slot allocation

For broadcasting Real-Time Kinematic data with a minimum rate of


1600 bits per second, several extra time-slots are required (RTK in
Figure 5-23).

DPG and 1 DSD (or 1 fleet with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.31 second

DPG DSD1 RTK DPG DSD1 RTK DPG DSD1 RTK DPG DSD1 RTK

DPG and 2 DSDs (or 2 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.38 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 RTK DPG

DPG and 3 DSDs (or 3 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.50 second 5
DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2

DPG and 4 DSDs (or 4 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.56 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 RTK DPG

DPG and 5 DSDs (or 5 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.63 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 RTK

DPG and 6 DSDs (or 6 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.69 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 RTK

DPG and 7 DSDs (or 7 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.81 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5

DPG and 8 DSDs (or 8 fleets with DSD Network) Recurrence: 0.88 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DSD6 DSD7 DSD8 RTK DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4

DPG and 10 DSDs Recurrence: 1.25 second

DPG DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 RTK DPG DSD6 DSD7 DSD8 DSD9 DSD10 RTK

Figure 5-23 Time-slot allocation @ 12000 Baud, with RTK @ 1600 bits/s (no Tracking)

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Time-slot allocation

Table 5-6 Recurrence @ 12000 Baud (no Tracking)


Recurrence of message from each DSD or fleet (seconds)
Number of
DSDs or fleets DGPS RTK
Straight GPS
(200 bits/second) (1600 bits/second)
1 0.19 0.25 0.31
2 0.25 0.31 0.38
3 0.31 0.38 0.50
4 0.38 0.44 0.56
5 0.44 0.50 0.63
6 0.50 0.56 0.69
7 0.56 0.63 0.81
8 0.63 0.69 0.88
9 0.69 0.75 0.94
10 0.75 0.81 1.25
11 0.81 0.88
1.38
12 1 1.13
13
1.13 1.25 1.63
14
15
1.25 1.38 1.75
16
17
1.38 1.5 1.88
18
19
1.5 1.63
20 2.44
21
1.63 1.75
22
23 2.63
1.88 2.06
24
25
26 2.06 2.25 2.81
27
28 3.25
29 2.25 2.44
30
3.5
31
2.44 2.63
32

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TDMA radio datalink
Time-slot allocation

Table 5-7 Recurrence @ 14400 Baud (no Tracking)


Recurrence of message from each DSD or fleet (seconds)
Number of
DSDs or fleets DGPS RTK
Straight GPS
(200 bits/second) (1600 bits/second)
1 0.15 0.20 0.25
2 0.20 0.25 0.30
3 0.25 0.30 0.35
4 0.30 0.35 0.40
5 0.35 0.40 0.50
6
7
0.40
0.45
0.45
0.50
0.55
0.60
5
8 0.50 0.55 0.65
9 0.55 0.60 0.70
10 0.60 0.65 0.80
11 0.65 0.70 0.85
12 0.8 0.9 1.1
13
0.9 1 1.2
14
15
1 1.1 1.3
16
17
1.1 1.2 1.4
18
19
1.2 1.3 1.6
20
21
1.3 1.4 1.7
22
23
1.5 1.65 1.95
24
25
26 1.65 1.8 2.1
27
28
29 1.8 1.95 2.4
30
31
1.95 2.1 2.55
32

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Interpreting the LED indicators

Interpreting the LED indicators


On the TDMA box are six indicators that allow you to check for any
malfunction.

GPS indicators

Time-slot allocation
indicators

Tx/Rx Status

Figure 5-24 Indicators

The Tx/Rx and Status indicators are controlled by the TDMA unit
itself.
• The Status LED is green and flashing if the system is OK; red and
green sequence flashing indicates a system fault.
• The Tx/Rx LED is green when receiving, red when transmitting.

When you power on the TDMA, the four upper indicators (GPS and
time-slot allocation) provide information on the current configuration
of the TDMA.
If the four upper indicators are flashing after you power on the DPG or
DSD, this means that this type of TDMA cannot be connected to a DPG
or DSD (this may be a TDMA other than from SERCEL, or a Repeater,
etc.).

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TDMA radio datalink
Interpreting the LED indicators

GPS indicators
The GPS indicators provide information on the inside connections with
the GPS receiver as explained in the table below.

Type of GPS connection

- Base attached to the DPG;


5
ON OFF - The GPS antenna must be continually free of
obstructions.

- Mobile attached to the DPG;


ON ON - The GPS antenna must be continually free of
obstructions.

- Mobile attached to a DSD;


OFF OFF - In obstructed areas, time-keeping relies on the DSD’s
clock.

- The TDMA is configured for using an external GPS


receiver. See External GPS receiver (page 170).
OFF ON
- In obstructed areas, time-keeping relies on the clock of
the DPG or DSD.

- Base attached to a DSD (not allowed!);


Flashing OFF - Base attached to the DPG, GPS not detected (waiting
for GPS to be available).

- Mobile attached to the DPG or a DSD;


Flashing ON - GPS not detected;
- Waiting for GPS to be available.

- External GPS expected, but not detected.


OFF Flashing
- Waiting for GPS to be available.

ON Flashing Mobile, cannot change inside connections.

Flashing Flashing Other configuration of inside connections (not allowed!)

If one at least of these two LEDs is flashing, the TDMA is unable to


work properly.

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Interpreting the LED indicators

Time-slot allocation indicators

Time-slot allocation

This LED is on when the TDMA is able to transmit messages (an


OPEN-type slot is allocated to it).
ON
With a wireless WIFI network for DSDs to communicate with
each other, only on the Leader DSD’s TDMA should this
indicator be ON.

Another TDMA box uses the same Identification Number.


Flashing
Transmission is interrupted (change the ID No.).

Time-slot allocation

Mobile TDMA (attached to a DSD): This LED is on when the


ON mobile is transmitting its position (a POS-type slot is allocated to
tracking).

Base station (separate TDMA or attached to a DPG): This LED


ON is on when transmiting Differential GPS corrections (a TRAN-
type slot is allocated to DGPS).

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TDMA radio datalink
Specific serial port wiring for VE464

Specific serial port wiring for VE464


On the TracsTDMA model supplied by SERCEL, the PPS and serial
port signals on the “Command” and “Auxiliary” connectors are not
wired as indicated in the manual from the manufacturer. Below is the
specific wiring for the VE464.

Command port
5
5 1
9 6
Pins viewed
from outside

Figure 5-25 9 way D-type socket DCE

TracsTDMA PC (DTE)
Pin Function Level
(DCE) name name

1 1PPS IN < CD External 1pps input to TDMA TTL

2 TxData > RxD Command & Data transmitted to PC RS 232

3 RxData < TxD Command & Data transmitted from PC RS 232

4 N/C DTR

5 GND --- GND Ground connection 0v

6 N/C > DSR

7 N/C < RTS

8 N/C > CTS

9 N/C RI

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5 TDMA radio datalink
Specific serial port wiring for VE464

Auxiliary port

13 1 Pins viewed
25 14 from outside

Figure 5-26 25 way D-type socket

Pin Name Function Level


1 GND Ground connection 0v
2 RX (data) DATA Data received from external unit RS 232
3 TX (data) DATA Data transmitted to external unit RS 232
4 N/C
5 N/C
6 TTL0_OUT Software controlled output TTL
7 GND Ground connection 0v
8 Tx (port2) Internal GPS setup Output RS 232
9 Rx (port2) Internal GPS setup Input RS 232
10 TTL_1_OUT TTL output bit 1 (Nominally PTT out) TTL
11 Analogue I/p Analogue input monitor 0 to 4.5 volts
12 OPTO_OUT+ Opto Isolator +ve output 0 to 12v
13 OPTO_OUT- Opto Isolator -ve output 0 to 12v
14 1PPS OUT 1pps signal from internal GPS receiver TTL
15 EMG_IN Emergency input bit (pull low) TTL
16 TTL_1_IN TTL input bit 1 (Nominally Fix input bit) TTL
17 TTL_0_IN TTL input bit 0 TTL
18 GND Ground connection 0v
19 LED_EMG1 Emergency LED driver 1 TTL
20 Rx (port1) External GPS NMEA messages input RS 232
21 LED_EMG2 Emergency LED driver 2 TTL
Internal GPS NMEA messages output /
22 Tx (port1) RS 232
RTCM-RTK output
23 OPTO_IN+ Opto Isolator +ve input 0 to 12v
24 OPTO_IN- Opto Isolator -ve input 0 to 12v
25 GND Ground connection 0v

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Chapter

6 TracsTDMA repeater

In this chapter:

• Overview (page 198)


• Single-Frequency repeater (page 202)
• Dual-Frequency repeater, No-Scan mode (page 204)
• Dual-Frequency repeater, Scan mode (page 207)
• Installation (page 209)
• Channel information displayed on DSD (page 215)

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February 16, 2010
6 TracsTDMA repeater
Overview

Overview
You may want to use a TDMA repeater to extend the coverage of the
system, or bypass an obstacle between the DPG and one or more DSDs,
especially if a booster or a lower Baud rate does not reveal itself
sufficient. The repeater is a standalone device, with no DSD or DPG
hardware, only requiring a power supply voltage (a car battery), so it
can be used at strategic places to achieve the best possible radio path
and coverage. The repeater comes as a set of two TracsTDMA boxes.

Figure 6-1 Dual-frequency TDMA repeater

Two types of repeater hardware are available:


• Single-frequency: uses only one of the two TracsTDMA boxes,
which is configured specifically to replicate the prime datalink’s
time-slot cycle on the same frequency. Therefore the complete cycle
for the transmission of all DSD messages is twice as long as the prime
cycle.

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February 16, 2010
TracsTDMA repeater
Overview

• Dual-frequency: the two TracsTDMA boxes are wired back to back.


One of them uses a secondary frequency channel for replicating the
DSD messages and so takes up only two extra time-slots.
The Dual-Frequency type can be used in either of two modes: “Scan” or
“No scan”. Therefore you can choose between three ways of
implementing a repeater:
• Single-Frequency: (a single radio antenna and a single GPS antenna)
not requiring any additional frequency allocation, but requiring twice
as many time-slots, at the expense of the message update rate.
• Dual-Frequency, No-Scan mode: this mode allows the TracsTDMA
attached to the DPG to control multiple dual-frequency repeaters
used in parallel. It does not affect much the message update rate as it
6
only requires two extra time-slots. Different transmission power
levels can be used if required, with or without a booster,
• Dual-Frequency, Scan mode: allows the TracsTDMA associated
with the DPG to control only one dual-frequency repeater, but in that
case a DSD scans for the strongest radio signal as the vibrator moves
to the next source point, so it can choose to use either the prime
frequency channel or the secondary one, whichever provides the
strongest signal. This requires that all TDMA boxes have the same
transmission power level. Like the “No-Scan” mode, the Scan mode
only requires two extra time-slots.
To allow the use of dual-frequency repeaters the TDMA attached to the
DPG must have firmware version 8v13 or higher. If the “Scan mode” is
used, the TDMA associated with the DSD too must have firmware
version 8v13 or higher. The firmware version appears in the main
window of the SercelTDMAconfig software tool. See TracsTDMA
settings (page 174).
If two TDMA boxes are attached to the DPG, you can use a different
repeater configuration on each of them (no repeater, or Single-
Frequency, or Dual-Frequency and Scan, or Dual-Frequency with no
scan).

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February 16, 2010
6 TracsTDMA repeater
Overview

In all cases, the secondary datalink cannot be repeated, meaning that


repeaters cannot be cascaded. The frequency and Baud rate settings on
the repeater must be consistent with those of the DPG and DSDs, and
cannot be changed remotely. The identification number (0 to 254) of a
repeater is unique. It cannot be be reused for any other TracsTDMA in
the same survey.
TracsTDMA boxes used as repeaters, whether Single- or Dual-
frequency, are loaded with special firmware, and may operate in the
VHF or UHF band. The built-in GPS receiver is not the same as in a
TDMA tied to a DPG or DSD, so the repeater cannot be used as a DGPS
reference station. It does not calculate any differential corrections but
can replicate those conveyed in the prime datalink. TDMA boxes wired
back to back for use as repeaters have special modifications to allow
high-speed serial communications between each other, and as a
consequence they cannot be swapped with standard Sercel TDMA
radios.
To help you select the repeater configuration that best suits your needs,
a summary is provided in Table 6-1.

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February 16, 2010
TracsTDMA repeater
Overview

Table 6-1 Summary of repeater configurations

Dual-Frequency,
Single-Frequency Dual-Frequency, Scan
No-Scan

- No extra frequency - Only requires two extra - Only requires two extra
required. time-slots. time-slots.
- No need to change DSD - Multiple repeaters can be - Automatic selection of
Advantages
frequency channel when used in parallel on different highest radio signal.
moving to next source frequencies.
points.

- Lower message update - Requires frequency - Requires frequency


rate (divided by 2). channels to be far apart. channels to be far apart.
- Does not allow multiple - Requires firmware - Frequency channels must
repeaters to be used in upgrade on early- be assigned in pairs.
parallel. production TDMA boxes
(only if attached to DPG).
- Does not allow multiple
repeaters to be used in
6
Disadvantages parallel.
- Requires the same Tx
power level on all TDMA
boxes.
- Requires firmware
upgrade on early-
production TDMA boxes.

Single-Frequency repeater Dual-Frequency repeater, Dual-Frequency repeater,


For details, see
(page 202) No-Scan mode (page 204) Scan mode (page 207)

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February 16, 2010
6 TracsTDMA repeater
Single-Frequency repeater

Single-Frequency repeater
A single-frequency repeater uses a TracsTDMA box configured
specifically to replicate the prime datalink’s time-slots on the same
frequency, with no DSD or DPG hardware. Some DSDs may talk
directly to the DPG’s TDMA whereas some talk through the repeater.

GPS Freq 1 GPS TDMA 1


DSD GPS
DSD
TDMA Obstacle TDMA
DPG

Freq 1 Freq 1

GPS
Rep. (Repeater)

Figure 6-2 Single-Frequency repeater

With no repeater, time-slots are allocated as shown in Figure 6-3.


Slot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Allocated DPG RTCM DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DPG
DPG
DSD1 1
DSD2 2
DSD3 3
DSD4 4
DSD5 5

Figure 6-3 Time-slot cycle with no repeater (DGPS, 5 DSDs)

The coloured cells show when units transmit and the empty cells show
when units can receive. With a single-frequency repeater, time slots are
allocated as shown in Figure 6-4.
Slot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Allocated DPG Rep. RTCM Rep. DSD1 Rep. DSD2 Rep. DSD3 Rep. DSD4 Rep. DSD5 Rep.
DPG
Repeater 1 2 3 4 5
DSD1 1
DSD2 2
DSD3 3
DSD4 4
DSD5 5

Figure 6-4 Time-slot cycle with single-frequency repeater (DGPS, 5 DSDs)

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TracsTDMA repeater
Single-Frequency repeater

The single-frequency repeater stores the individual messages and


retransmits them on the same frequency in the time-slots following the
end of the received message. The time-slot map is organised to ensure
that sufficient gaps are provided to allow the repeater to transmit the
copied messages. As a result, twice as many time-slots are required,
therefore the complete transmission cycle is twice as long.
Note that if a second TDMA is attached to the DPG, you can use another
single-frequency repeater operating on a different frequency, or choose
a different operating mode for the second TDMA (no repeater, or
another type of repeater).

GPS TDMA 1 Freq 1


GPS Freq 1 GPS
DSD
6
DPG Rep. TDMA

GPS TDMA 2
Freq 2
GPS Freq 2

Rep.
GPS
DSD
Freq 2 TDMA

GPS
DSD
TDMA

Figure 6-5 Two Single-Frequency repeaters

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February 16, 2010
6 TracsTDMA repeater
Dual-Frequency repeater, No-Scan mode

Dual-Frequency repeater, No-Scan mode


A dual-frequency repeater consists of two TracsTDMA radios wired
back to back, with no DSD or DPG hardware, each on a different
frequency. Only one radio has a GPS receiver and provides both NMEA
and 1PPS to the second repeater TDMA radio. These radios are
specifically configured so that one operates on the same frequency as
the DPG’s TDMA, known as the prime radio channel (Freq 1), and the
other operates on a second frequency known as the secondary radio
channel (Freq 2).

GPS
DSD GPS
Freq 1 GPS DSD
TDMA
Freq 1 Freq 2 TDMA
Rep.1
GPS TDMA 1
Rep. 2

DPG

Figure 6-6 Dual-Frequency repeater

The time-slot map is arranged so that a gap of 2 slots is added in the


cycle. The first gap slot allows for the single slot repeat latency. The
second gap slot allows for the DSD transmission starting one slot early
when it is on the secondary channel.
Slot 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Allocated Freq 1 DPG RTCM DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5 DPG
Allocated Freq 2 DSD1 DSD2 DSD3 DSD4 DSD5
Freq 1
Freq 2
DPG (Freq 1)
Repeater (Freq 1) 1 2 3 4
Repeater (Freq 2)
DSD1 (freq 2) 1
DSD2 (Freq 2) 2
DSD3 (Freq 2) 3
DSD4 (Freq 2) 4
DSD5 (Freq 1) 5

Figure 6-7 Example of dual-frequency repeater time-slot cycle (DGPS, 5 DSDs)

The coloured cells in Figure 6-7 show when units transmit and the empty
cells show when units can receive. The Freq 1 and Freq 2 rows show
when radio activity occurs in slots on those frequencies.
204 VE464 User’s Manual
February 16, 2010
TracsTDMA repeater
Dual-Frequency repeater, No-Scan mode

Some DSDs may talk directly to the DPG’s TDMA whereas some talk
through the repeater.
You can use two or more dual-frequency repeaters in parallel, each on
a different frequency as shown in Figure 6-8. The secondary datalink,
however, cannot be repeated (meaning that repeaters cannot be
cascaded).

IMPORTANT
Be sure to choose frequencies far enough (at least 4 MHz) apart in order
to preclude any interference.
6

Freq 1 GPS GPS


GPS Freq 2 DSD
DSD Freq 1 Rep.1
TDMA TDMA
GPS TDMA 1
Rep. 2

DPG
Freq 1
GPS
GPS DSD
Freq 3 TDMA
Rep.1

Rep. 2

Figure 6-8 Multiple Dual-Frequency repeaters

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February 16, 2010
6 TracsTDMA repeater
Dual-Frequency repeater, No-Scan mode

If a second TDMA is attached to the DPG, you can use another dual-
frequency repeater operating on a different frequency, or choose a
different operating mode for the second TDMA (no repeater, or another
type of repeater).

GPS TDMA 1 Freq 1 GPS


Freq 2 GPS
Rep.1 DSD
DPG TDMA
Rep. 2
GPS TDMA 2
Freq 1
Freq 4
GPS
Rep.1 GPS
Freq 3 GPS
Rep. 2 Rep.1 DSD
TDMA
Rep. 2
Freq 5
GPS
DSD
TDMA

Figure 6-9 Multiple Dual-Frequency repeaters, DPG with two TDMAs

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February 16, 2010
TracsTDMA repeater
Dual-Frequency repeater, Scan mode

Dual-Frequency repeater, Scan mode


With a dual-frequency repeater used in “Scan” mode, the DSDs scan
both frequencies and select the best one to use. As the DSDs rove
between the areas covered by the two frequencies the DSD TDMA
radio automatically and transparently selects the frequency to use on a
cycle-by-cycle basis. This agile behaviour provides high performance
and little or no loss of throughput in adverse operating conditions.

Freq 1 GPS
GPS TDMA 1
Rep.1
Freq 2
GPS
TDMA
DSD
6
DPG Rep. 2

GPS
Automatically selects Freq1 DSD Automatically selects Freq2
TDMA

Figure 6-10 Dual-Frequency repeater, Scan mode

Like with a dual-frequency repeater in “No-scan” mode, the DPG , the


RTCM broadcaster and one of the repeater radios operate on the same
frequency, known as the prime radio channel. The second repeater radio
operates on a second frequency known as the secondary radio channel.

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Dual-Frequency repeater, Scan mode

If a second TDMA is attached to the DPG, a second repeater can be used


as shown below.

GPS TDMA 1 Freq 1 GPS


GPS
Rep.1 Freq 2 DSD
DPG TDMA
Rep. 2
GPS TDMA 2
Freq 3
GPS
Rep.1 GPS
DSD
TDMA
Rep. 2
Automatically selects
Freq1 or Freq2
Freq 4 GPS
DSD
TDMA
Automatically selects
Freq3 or Freq4
GPS
DSD
TDMA

Figure 6-11

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Installation

Installation
IMPORTANT
The TDMA software configuration tool (SercelTDMAconfig) allows
you to create up to 9 radio channels, each operating on a different
frequency. The frequency/channel mapping should be the same on all
the TDMA units in the prospect (used for a DPG, DSDs, repeaters,
spare, etc.).

Single-Frequency Repeater 6
VHF
(UHF)
GPS

9-36 VDC

Ground

Figure 6-12 Single-frequency repeater

To configure the TracsTDMA box as a single-frequency repeater:


- Enter the Unit identification number.
- Select the “Rep 1 Freq” mode, Cycle Length (1), Radio
Channel used and frequency, Transmission Power, Baud rate
(only 9600 or 12000 if UHF type).
See Figure 6-13 (page 210).

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Installation

Figure 6-13

7. Click on the “setup TDMA with BSIC & FREQ” button. Wait
until downloading is complete.

Figure 6-14

8. Click on Setup TDMA from File to update the other parameters.


Select the REP2int.cfg file in the dialogue box that shows up.
Click Open, and wait until updating is complete.

Figure 6-15

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TracsTDMA repeater
Installation

In the VE464 window’s Radio Management setup on the 428XL GUI,


you must select the Single Freq Repeater option
On each DSD, you only have to select the same Baud rate and radio
channel as on the repeater and the DPG’s TDMA. The “Repeater Scan”
option should not be enabled.

Dual-Frequency Repeater
To configure the TracsTDMA boxes as a dual-frequency repeater:
- Enter the Unit identification number.
- Select the “Rep 2 Freq” mode, Cycle Length (1), Radio
Channel used and frequency, Transmission Power, Baud rate 6
(only 9600 or 12000 if UHF type). See Figure 6-16 (page 211).

Figure 6-16

9. Click on the “setup TDMA with BSIC & FREQ” button. Wait
until downloading is complete.

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Installation

Figure 6-17

10. Click on Setup TDMA from File to update the other parameters.
- Select the REP2int.cfg file in the dialogue box that shows up, to
configure the TDMA box including a GPS receiver. Click Open,
and wait until downloading is complete.

Figure 6-18

- Select the REP2ext.cfg, file to configure the TDMA with no


GPS receiver. Click Open, and wait until updating is complete

No-Scan mode
In the VE464 window’s Radio Management setup on the 428XL GUI,
you must select the Dual Freq No Scan Repeater option.
On each DSD, you must choose the radio channel to use: you can either
choose the channel number of the DPG’s TDMA, or that of the repeater.
The “Repeater Scan” option must be disabled (unticked). Naturally, for
direct communications with the DPG, you must choose the DPG’s
channel. It is important to make sure you do not have any two channels
on the same frequency. Also, you have to select the same Baud rate as
on the repeater and the DPG’s TDMA.

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TracsTDMA repeater
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Figure 6-19 Radio setup (VLI)

6
GPS VHF VHF
(UHF) (UHF)

9-36 VDC

Ground
9-36 VDC

Figure 6-20 Dual-Frequency repeater

You can use the keypad on a DSD to change its TDMA radio channel
(see Choosing a radio channel on page 179). You may want to do that to
start or stop using a repeater, or use another repeater, as the DSD roves
between the areas covered by two radio channels. If two TDMAs are
attached to the DPG and you change the channel number on a DSD in
order to use the other TDMA, then you must select the appropriate
TDMA in the Vibrator Crew setup and run the Vib Fleet function (in
the VE464 window on the 428XL GUI).

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Installation

Scan mode
In the VE464 window’s Radio Management setup on the 428XL GUI,
you must select the Dual Freq Scan Repeater option. The TDMA
attached to the DPG must be set to use an odd channel number (from 1
to 7).
WARNING
All TracsTDMA radios must be set to the same transmit power (2 or
10 W). If boosters are used, they must be the same type and used on all
TracsTDMA radios. (The DSDs select their frequency of operation
based on the signal strength of the broadcast messages they can hear).
On each DSD, you must choose a pair of consecutive channel numbers:
1-2, 3-4, 5-6 or 7-8. The odd channel number must match that of the
DPG TDMA. The even channel number is the repeater’s secondary
radio channel. The “Repeater Scan” option must be enabled (ticked).
Also, you have to select the same Baud rate as on the repeater and the
DPG’s TDMA.
You do not need to do a Vib Fleet (in the VE464 window on the 428XL
GUI) if the DSD channel changes.
If the Dual Freq No Scan Repeater option is selected in the VE464
window’s Radio Management setup on the 428XL GUI, then the Vib
Fleet function automatically disables the “Scan” option on DSDs. The
radio channel latest selected by the TracsTDMA remains selected. If
TracsTDMA radios do not have the same transmit power, DSDs may
fail to select the appropriate frequency.

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TracsTDMA repeater
Channel information displayed on DSD

Channel information displayed on DSD


Whenever required, you can go to Local on the DSD and use the keypad
to change the DSD radio channel —and also the “Repeater scan” option
if the TDMA has later-version firmware— provided your choice is
consistent with the repeater option setting on the DPG (from the 428XL
GUI). See Using the DSD keypad (page 179). When a Vib Fleet is done
on the 428XL GUI, the DSD’s Repeater option setting is compared to
the Repeater option received from the DPG, and is either updated or
unchanged as explained in Table 6-2 presenting the different cases that
may arise.

Table 6-2 Channel number display


6
DSD display Comments

(1) Standard display:


- with no repeater,
- or with a single-frequency repeater,
(1) DSD Channel 1 - or with a dual-frequency repeater prior to receiving parameters from
the Vib Fleet function (the VLI “Repeater scan” option is disabled).
You can go to Local and use the Low/High key on the DSD keypad
to:
- Change the radio channel to be used by the DSD’s TDMA.
- (2) Enable the VLI “Repeater scan” option. To be used only if a dual-
frequency repeater is used (this option is only displayed if the DSD
(2) TDMA firmware version is 8.13a or higher).This takes you to (6) or
ENABLE SCAN (7).
The new setting takes effect when going to Remote.

(3) Standard display if a dual-frequency repeater is used and the VLI


“Repeater scan” option is disabled (after receiving parameters from
DPG Channel 1
(3) the Vib Fleet function).
DSD Channel 2
The radio channel used by the DPG indicates whether or not the
repeater is used by the DSD (the repeater is used if the DSD’s
channel is different from the DPG’s channel).
You can go to Local and use the Low/High key on the DSD keypad
to:
- Change the radio channel to be used by the DSD’s TDMA.
DPG Channel 1 - (4) Enable the VLI “Repeater scan” option (this option is only
(4) ENABLE SCAN displayed if the DSD TDMA firmware version is 8.13 or higher).This
takes you to (6) or (7).
The new setting takes effect when going to Remote.

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6 TracsTDMA repeater
Channel information displayed on DSD

Table 6-2 (Continued) Channel number display

DSD display Comments

(5) The message “TDMA can’t scan” appears if channel scanning is


TDMA CAN’T SCAN allowed by the DPG but scanning fails because the TDMA does not
(5) DSD Channel 1 have the required firmware version.
You can go to Local and use the Low/High key on the DSD keypad
to change the radio channel to be used by the DSD’s TDMA.
The new setting takes effect when going to Remote.

(6) Standard display if a dual-frequency repeater is used and the VLI


(6) SCAN Channel 1-2 “Repeater scan” option is enabled.
Trying Channel 2 The DSD’s TDMA can choose to use the DPG’s channel (odd) or the
repeater’s channel (even).
On the second line.
- “Trying Channel x” appears if the TDMA is alternately trying to use
one channel or the other (no signal is received on either channel).
(7) SCAN Channel 1-2 - (7) “Active Channel x” appears if a signal is detected on that
Active Channel 2 channel. The TDMA will keep on using that channel until a stronger
signal appears on the other channel.
You can go to Local and use the Low/High key on the DSD keypad
to:
- Change the pair of channels to be used by the DSD’s TDMA.
(8) DISABLE SCAN - (8) Disable the VLI “Repeater scan” option and keep on using the
Active Channel 2 channel displayed on the second line. This takes you to (3).
The new setting takes effect when going to Remote.

The message “No repeater” (9) “Scan not allowed” (10) appears if
NO REPEATER the VLI “Repeater scan” option is enabled but, after receiving
(9) DSD Channel 2 parameters from the Vib Fleet function, the DPG does not allow
scanning (because the dual-frequency repeater is not used or the
SCAN NOT ALLOWED “scan” option is not enabled by Vib Fleet).
(10) DSD Channel 2 You cannot change the DSD’s TDMA channel at this stage.
Going to Local and using the Low/High key allows you to choose
between the following two options:
(11) SCAN NOT ALLOWED - (11) “Disable Scan”: this disables the VLI “Repeater scan” option.
DISABLE SCAN and takes you to (3).
- (12) “Force Scan”: this option is helpful if the Vib Fleet information
(12) SCAN NOT ALLOWED from the DPG is obsolete and you want to keep the VLI “Repeater
FORCE SCAN scan” option enabled. This takes you to (6) or (7). The information
from the former Vib Fleet function is discarded.
The new setting takes effect when going to Remote.

a. Contact SERCEL Customer Support centre if TDMA firmware requires upgrading.

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Chapter

7 DSD Network
management

In this chapter:

• Overview (page 218)


• Installing the radio unit (page 219)
• DSD networking (page 220)
• Radio settings (page 221)

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7 DSD Network management
Overview

Overview
A high data rate licence-free WIFI Ethernet bridge is available from
SERCEL for deploying an Ethernet network allowing DSDs to
communicate with each other within a fleet. That network is referred to
as “DSD Network” in this manual.
The DSD Network allows each DSD to supply its position to the Leader
vibrator. When all vibrators in the fleet are ready (pad down), the
Leader sends a READY message to the DPG, including the centre of
gravity of the fleet location. The location is relayed to the recorder’s
GUI and displayed in the Positioning window. This allows the system
to identify that location and automatically shoot the matching source
point if the Navigation-driven shooting mode is enabled in the
recorder’s Operation window.
For setting up a DSD network, the following equipment is available
from SERCEL:
- a radio transmitter (AckSys WIFI Ethernet bridge), operating in
the 2.4 GHz frequency band with no need for any licence.
- a 12 V power cord for the radio transmitter (a DC-DC converter
and its power cord are also supplied),
- a data cable, used to connect the radio transmitter to the DSD,
- an antenna and its downlead.

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DSD Network management
Installing the radio unit

Installing the radio unit


A radio modem needs to be installed in each vibrator cab, connected to
the DSD via the RJ45 cable supplied.
The radio is supplied along with an antenna to be mounted on the
vibrator's roof using the accompanying cable.
You can use either Netgear or AckSys radio units. Some fleets may be
equipped with the Netgear type while others have the AckSys type. You
can use both Netgear and AckSys types within the same fleet.
• Connect the downlead from the antenna to the radio transmitter.
(Note that the AckSys WIFI Ethernet bridge has two antenna sockets:
connect the antenna to the right-hand one).
• Connect the power cord from the radio transmitter to a 12 V power 7
supply. Connect the red cord to input 2 (+VDC) and the black cord to
input 1 (GND).
• Connect the Ethernet cord between the DSD’s Ethernet port and the
radio transmitter.

External
antenna

AckSys Ethernet cord


Antenna Radio
downlead Transmitter

12 VDC 10-30 to 12VDC


converter

Figure 7-1 AckSys WIFI Ethernet bridge

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7 DSD Network management
DSD networking

DSD networking
The DSD Network cannot be used unless and until it is enabled in the
recorder’s DPG main window. See the on-line Help menu or 428XL
User’s manual Vol. 1.
With fleets including several DSDs, and only the Leader DSD having
two-way communications with the DPG, the DSD Network allows the
Leader DSD to relay the necessary messages from all the DSDs to the
DPG. See Figure 1-2 (page 25) to Figure 1-4 (page 27).
See also Vibrator Ready signal management (page 131).

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DSD Network management
Radio settings

Radio settings
Each AckSys Ethernet bridge supplied by SERCEL comes with
appropriate default settings for SERCEL DSD networks.
If, for any reason (e. g. after a hardware reset), you need to reconfigure
an AckSys Ethernet bridge, use a PC with an RJ45 port and a CD-ROM
drive. The IP address of that PC should be something like 172.30._._,
otherwise you will not be able to access the configuration menu. To
reconfigure the AckSys unit, do the following:
1. Connect the AckSys unit to the PC, using a twisted pair cord.
2. Insert the CD-ROM. Click on “Products, manuals, drivers”, then
“Wifi bridges and access points”, and finally “Locator application
(finds WL-ACCESS or WL-BRIDGE on LAN)”. Then click on 7
the “Open” button1.
3. If nothing appears, click on “Scan”.
4. Select the bridge to reconfigure. A rectangle should appear below
the Name label and over the text area for that bridge. If you have
no rectangle, click inside that area.
5. Click on “Configure” and choose OK when an error message
appears.
6. The “Use the following IP address” field should be ticked. Type
in the following IP address and subnet mask:
- IP address: 172.30.200.251
- Subnet mask: 255.255.0.0
7. Click “Apply”.
8. Click “Scan” again to display the new IP address.

1. Alternatively, you can run the "Locator.exe" file direct from the CD-ROM (in the
"wl" folder and "soft" subfolder), or copy it to the desktop and launch it from the
desktop.

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Radio settings

9. Click on the “Web” button. This launches a browser. If nothing


appears, then the IP address of the PC needs to be changed to
172.30._._.
10. Enter the access code:
- User Name: root
- Password: root
- Click OK.
11. Click on “Wireless” and enter the following:
- Wireless mode: Bridge ad-hoc mode.
- SSID: serceldsd (no upper-case letter).
- Channel: 10.
12. Click “Save”, “Reboot” then “OK”.
This completes the configuration of the “Acksys WL-ACCESS”
device. Clicking on “Scan” should let you view every wireless bridge
already configured and powered up.

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Chapter

8 Vibrator guidance

In this chapter:

• Overview (page 224)


• Equipment supplied (page 226)
• Installing the Guidance option (page 227)
• Getting started (page 230)
• Using the Guidance GUI (page 231)
• File menu (page 238)
• Setup menu (page 240)
• Standard GIS functions (page 243)
• Obstacles layer (page 245)

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8 Vibrator guidance
Overview

Overview
The VE464 Guidance optional tool allows each vibrator in a fleet to be
steered to the next location where it is expected to shake, assisting the
driver with a graphical homing display.
Shake locations do not need to be marked with any stakes in the field.
The recorder’s GUI transmits the shake locations to the DPG which
relays them to each DSD in the fleet. A graphic interface helps the
driver steer the vibrator truck to the next shake location.
With the 428XL system, the VE464 Guidance tool works as follows :
1. In the Positioning window, the operator uses the Geodetic setup
menu to select the appropriate Datum and Projection (a click on
Apply is required). This creates a “geodeticWkt.e428.xxxx” file
in the “snSol/workSpace/param/positioningServer” directory.
(You can copy this file to a USB stick if you want to load it
manually to the Guidance Tablet PC at a later date).
2. In the VE464 window on the 428XL GUI:
- The operator enters vibrator Pattern descriptions. A Pattern
description specifies the position of each vibrator with respect to
the Centre Of Gravity of a Source Point.
- Using the VE464 Vib Fleet secondary window, the operator
assigns a DSD, hence a vibrator, to each point in the pattern.
- Finally, the Set Guidance function must be used, to transmit
patterns, Datum and projection parameters to the DSDs.
3. In the Operation window:
- A vibrator Pattern is associated with each source point (in the
Source Point setup).
- The operator uses the Go To Waypoint menu to send the
coordinates of the first source point to do to a vibrator fleet.
Subsequently the command to do a source point, radioed to each
DSD, also includes the coordinates of the next source point to

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Vibrator guidance
Overview

do. For the detailed procedure, see the 428XL documentation


(Operation and VE464 windows, in User’s Manual Vol. 1).
4. In the vibrator truck, the driver uses the guidance GUI to steer the
vibrator truck to the next location where it is expected to shake.
See Using the Guidance GUI (page 231)

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Equipment supplied

Equipment supplied
The Guidance option includes:
• A Tablet PC.
• A cord for communications between the
DSD and the PC.
• Sercel Guidance software package.
• A DC adapter and a fuse for the PC.
• Two banana plugs.
• Vehicle dock assembly parts for the PC. Figure 8-1 Tablet PC

PC dock plate

Mount plate

Protective plate

Figure 8-2 PC dock parts

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Vibrator guidance
Installing the Guidance option

Installing the Guidance option

+12 V

Fuse
Ethernet
port
DC
adapter

8
Figure 8-3

4 hex socket head


screws (M6x25 )

Figure 8-4

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Installing the Guidance option

To install the Vehicle Dock assembly, see Figure 8-5 and Figure 8-4.

4 hex socket head


screws (M4x6)

4 wing screws
(M4x20)

Mount plate

Figure 8-5 Vehicle dock assembly

4 holes,
dia. 6.5

100 80

130

110

Figure 8-6 Mount plate

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Vibrator guidance
Installing the Guidance option

Installing the in-line fuse


Before connecting the Vehicle Dock to the fuse block you must install
the black in-line fuse supplied in the Vehicle Dock kit.
CAUTION
Protect wires from sharp edges and from being pinched or crushed.

To install the in-line fuse:


1. Determine the location for the in-line fuse.
Note: This location should be as close to the power source as
possible.
2. Feed the Positive (red) wire of the Wiretap
connector
vehicle adapter through one hole of
the Insulation Displacement
Connection (IDC) wiretap connector. Fuse
8
holder
3. Feed one end of the in-line fuse into
the other hole of the IDC wiretap Banana
plugs
connector.
4. Using pliers, crimp the IDC wiretap connector to terminate the
connection.
5. Snap the protective cover in the IDC wiretap connector to finish
the crimp.
6. Install the fuse and close the fuse holder.
7. Strip the other end of the wire from the fuse holder 1/4 inch at the
fuse block end to expose the conductor.
8. Crimp a banana plug to the fuse holder wire to connect it to the
power source.

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8 Vibrator guidance
Getting started

Getting started
Installing Guidance software
The guidance software is installed on the PC and configured prior to
shipment from SERCEL.
If for any reason, you need to reinstall the software, see the readme.pdf
file contained in the CD-ROM supplied by SERCEL along with the PC.
Note that for VE464 V2.0, the Guidance package is not supplied on the
VE464 V2.0 CD-ROM but in Patch04 (double-click on the
guidance_windows.exe file).

Launching the Guidance tool


To launch the application, click on the Guidance icon on the desktop or
select it from the Windows Start Menu.

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Vibrator guidance
Using the Guidance GUI

Using the Guidance GUI


1. Connect the PC and the GPS receiver to the DSD (see Installing the
Guidance option on page 227).
2. The GPS receiver should be configured to transmit 1 to 2
messages per second.
3. Launch the Guidance application (double-click on the Guidance
icon).

Guidance view

Compass
view

Waypoint
view

Figure 8-7

The Views menu allows you to show or hide the “Compass” view and
the “Waypoint” view. You can resize each view panel by dragging the
vertical and/or horizontal borders. To move a display panel, just click
on its tab and drag it to the area where you want it to appear. Double-
clicking on a view’s tab maximizes the view panel (the other views are
hidden), and double-clicking again turns it back to its former size and
place.

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Using the Guidance GUI

The Toolbars menu allows you to show or hide the main toolbar and the
GIS toolbar. The main toolbar provides shortcuts for commands
available from the File menu (page 238) and the Setup menu (page 240).
For details on the GIS toolbar, see Standard GIS functions (page 243).
You can undock each toolbar by dragging it out of the main window (the
toolbar will be docked again when you close it).

File menu shorcuts Setup menu shorcuts

Figure 8-8 Main toolbar

The status bar at the foot of the main window allows you to see if
messages are received from the GPS receiver and if the position data is
reliable.

Green if GPS position is reliable, otherwise red

Connection
OK if green

Vibrator GPS Satellites Age of GPS Blinking when GPS


position quality in view corrections messages are received

Figure 8-9 Status bar

Until the DSD supplies the first waypoint, the message “No DSD
activity” is displayed. When a waypoint is received, the distance and
bearing to that point are displayed in the Waypoint view. Note that if the
map is rotated, the bearing angle is not relative to North.

Waypoint name

Distance to go

Bearing angle

Figure 8-10 Waypoint view

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In the “Compass” view (Figure 8-11) the arrow pointing to the left or
right of the intended direction of travel indicates which side the vibrator
truck needs to be steered to. The distance to go is displayed too, as well
as the vibrator speed. The angle to steer is the angle between the
intended direction of travel and the direction the vibrator is heading to,
negative if the vibrator needs to be steered to the left, positive if it needs
to be steered to the right.

Angle to steer

Left/Right arrow
indicating which side
to steer to.

Vibrator speed

Homing bargraph

Distance from target


8
Figure 8-11 Compass view

At the foot of the “Compass” view is a homing bargraph indicating the


progress of the vibrator truck. Right after a waypoint is received, the
entire bargraph is red. It is gradually filled with green as the vibrator
draws nearer to the target position. As the vibrator enters the tolerance
circle specified in the Quality setup (page 241), around the target
position, the bargraphs turns entirely green, telling you the target
position has been reached and you must stop your vibrator truck. If
Sound is on (see Figure 8-12) an audible warning is heard when the
vibrator enters the tolerance circle.

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Using the Guidance GUI

Map rotation Background Auto/ Indicates where


(manual colour manual waypoints come
selection) zoom from

Manual Sound Auto/


waypoint on/off manual
rotation

Figure 8-12 Status bar

The zoom icon in the status bar allows you to turn on/off the automatic
zooming function. As the vibrator moves, if automatic zoom is enabled
the map magnification factor is self-adjusted for optimal display of both
your vibrator and the target point, depending on the Zoom Distance
specified in the Zoom setup (page 242). You may want to turn it off to
zoom out and get a wider view of the map. You can also use the zoom
button in the GIS toolbar (page 243).
The Auto/Manual rotation icon in the status bar allows you to turn on/
off the automatic rotation function. If you turn it on (Figure 8-13) the
map is rotated automatically for the direction of travel to be oriented
vertically, with the vibrator truck appearing at the foot of the display and
the target waypoint at the centre. The rotation angle is displayed in the
Heading field.

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Vibrator guidance
Using the Guidance GUI

Source Point
Target status flag
tolerance (green if done
circle and OK)

Direction of Target point


next
waypoint Speed vector

Your vibrator
(blue)

Other Map rotation


vibrators relative to North
in pattern

Vibrator track

8
Automatic rotation

Figure 8-13 Guidance view

If you turn off the automatic rotation function, the target point is
displayed at the centre of the Guidance view. You can choose the
rotation angle using the Heading buttons. You can type the value into
the Heading field but, with no keyboard, it is easier to use the up and
down arrow buttons.

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Using the Guidance GUI

Your vibrator

Target point at
centre

Manual rotation

Figure 8-14 Manual rotation mode

The manual waypoint icon in the status bar allows you to place a
waypoint on the map, for example if you want to go back to a source
point that needs to be done again. You create a manual waypoint in two
clicks:
1. Click on the Manual Waypoint icon. This changes the mouse
pointer shape to a flag.

Manual Stylus pointer


waypoint (manual waypoint
after clicking) Manual
waypoint
button

Figure 8-15

2. Click on the location where to place the waypoint on the map.


This displays the waypoint in the Waypoint view and in the
Guidance view. Note that if a waypoint is received from the
recording system, it overrides the manual waypoint you have

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Vibrator guidance
Using the Guidance GUI

created. (To disable the manual waypoint mode, click again on the
manual waypoint button).
With the mouse or stylus pointer resting on an object in the Guidance
view, a tip box shows up that displays the object’s label or value,
whichever is relevant.

Figure 8-16

To load a background map and/or DXF file, see File menu (page 238).
For example, obstacles and bypass routes may be indicated using a DXF
drawing overprinted on the background map.
The Layer view allows you to choose what to display in the Guidance
view.
8

Expand or Show or
collapse hide all
layer tree layers

Tick to show,
untick to hide

Figure 8-17 Layer view

See also the Obstacles layer (page 245).

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February 16, 2010
8 Vibrator guidance
File menu

File menu

Figure 8-18

Loading a background map or DXF file


Selecting Load Background from the File menu allows you to load a
a vectorial map (DXF or ESRI Shape file) or an image into the
Guidance view panel, showing the seismic survey region.
In the case of an image file format other than GEOTIFF (for example
BMP, JPEG, etc.), you are requested to enter the image reference
information.
Also, you can overprint the loaded map with drawings generated using
the DXF format.
You can load as many DXF file as needed but this must be done after
the background map (.TIF file) if any is loaded. Those DXF files can be
used to enrich the map with private information, such as bypass routes
in the event of obstacles along the direct way, etc.

Loading SPS files


Selecting Load SPS File from the File menu allows you to load files
containing the planned source positions if you want them to appear in
the Guidance view panel. Then you can use the Layer tab to show or
hide the source positions as you like.

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February 16, 2010
Vibrator guidance
File menu

WKT file
The WKT data is normally supplied by the recording system, but you
can use this menu if, for any reason, you need to load a WKT file to the
Guidance application. To do that, go to the “snSol/workSpace/param/
positioningServer” directory on the 428XL server and copy the
“geodeticWkt.e428.xxxx” file to a USB stick, then use this menu to
load the file from the USB stick.

Clear SPS
Removes the SPS data layer from the display.

Clear Waypoint
Removes the Waypoint information from the display.

Clear All
Removes all legacy information (former position of window, etc.).
8

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February 16, 2010
8 Vibrator guidance
Setup menu

Setup menu

Figure 8-19

Preferences setup

Figure 8-20

• Navigation Mode: choosing “Waypoint” displays the target


waypoint at the centre of the Guidance view; choosing “Vib” instead
displays your vibrator at the centre. See Figure 8-13 on page 235.
• Day/Night allows you to choose between a black or white
background.
• Sound On/Off: turns on/off the audible warning indicating that the
vibrator is entering the tolerance circle around the target.
• Bar Threshold sets the distance from the target that will cause the
homing bargraph to appear in the Guidance view. For example, with
the Bar Threshold set at 30, the homing bargraph will appear in the

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February 16, 2010
Vibrator guidance
Setup menu

Guidance view when the vibrator is less than 30 metres from the
target point.
• Distance Unit sets the unit for distances on the map: metres or feet.
• Coordinates Unit is used to choose the type of coordinates: Lat-Lon
(Latitude and Longitude) or East-North (Easting,Northing).

Quality setup

Figure 8-21 8
• Target Radius (metres) determines the tolerance circle around the
waypoint, used to warn the driver that the vibrator truck is close to the
planned position.
• Vib Position Accuracy Threshold (metres) specifies the allowable
maximum deviation of position updates supplied by the GPS receiver
when stationary at the planned position. This prevents the guidance
tool from requesting the vibrator to move so long as the position
deviation lies within the accuracy specification of the GPS receiver.

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February 16, 2010
8 Vibrator guidance
Setup menu

Zoom setup

Figure 8-22

• Zoom-in Limit (metres) is the minimum distance to go for which the


automatic zoom function will stop zooming in. So long as your
vibrator’s distance to go to the target point exceeds this setting the
automatic zoom function keeps adjusting the map magnification
factor for optimal display of both the vibrator and the target point.
• Zoom Out Distance (metres) is the distance that you want your
vibrator to appear off the centre of the Guidance view when the
vibrator is stationary and the “Delay Before Zoom Out” has expired.
The purpose of the automatic zoom out function when the vibrator is
stationary is to let you have a wider view of the surroundings so that,
for example, you can see the other vibrators involved in the source
point.
• Delay Before Zoom Out (seconds) is the time that your vibrator may
be stationary without the display automatically zooming out.
• SPS visibility Distance (metres) is the zoom width for which you
want SPS information to be removed from the display. You may have
to adjust this setting to unclutter the Guidance view when a low
magnification factor causes a vast amount of SPS data to be
displayed.

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February 16, 2010
Vibrator guidance
Standard GIS functions

Standard GIS functions

Add/remove
buttons

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Figure 8-23 GIS toolbar

1. Zoom To Fit: fits the Guidance view to the entire survey area.
2. Zoom To Selected Area: lets you draw a box by moving the
stylus tip (or holding down the left mouse button) to select the
area to zoom into.
3. Undo Zoom: cancels the previous zoom operation. This function
is of no effect after a Zoom to fit.
4. Pan View: with the stylus tip or the mouse hovering over the 8
Guidance view, clicking changes the stylus or mouse pointer
shape to a four direction cross and moves the display around,
allowing you to display any area you want to see outside the
current view. Panning can also be achieved using the horizontal or
vertical slider (by dragging the slider or clicking).
5. Rotate View (with mouse).
6. Zoom in on two objects: after you select two objects on the map,
this button adjusts the zoom factor for the Guidance view to
encompass the two objects.
7. Zoom Lock: adjusts the overall perimeter for the Guidance view
to the current display. Once Zoom Lock is activated, you cannot
zoom out of the new overall perimeter. The padlock icon indicates
that Zoom Lock is activated.
8. Distance: changes the stylus or mouse pointer shape to a ruler. By
clicking (left-clicking with a mouse) on a first point inside the
view and moving the stylus or mouse pointer, a line is drawn
between the initial point and the pointer. The distance in metres or
feet and bearing is displayed.
VE464 User’s Manual 243
February 16, 2010
8 Vibrator guidance
Standard GIS functions

Figure 8-24

9. Rectangular or Circular Selection and Query: changes the


stylus or mouse pointer shape to a rectangle or a circle and lets
you perform a spatial query on all the objects located in the area
you select inside the view by moving the stylus or mouse pointer
(while holding down the left mouse button, in the case of a
mouse).

Figure 8-25

10. Feature Locator: opens a dialogue box where you can type an
object’s name (for example V4 for Vibrator #4) so the Guidance
view gets centred automatically on that object.

Figure 8-26

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February 16, 2010
Vibrator guidance
Obstacles layer

Obstacles layer
You can import or draw graphical shapes and have them show in the
Guidance view. Drawing a shape cannot normally be done onboard the
vibrator truck as this requires the use of a mouse.
To import obstacles from a file, right-click on the Obstacles layer and
use the menu that pops up, or use the File menu (page 238).

Figure 8-27
8
To draw a shape, open the “No go area” folder in the Layer view, then
right-click on the “User” layer and use the menu that pops up.

Figure 8-28

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February 16, 2010
8 Vibrator guidance
Obstacles layer

• Choosing “Create Point” opens a dialogue box that lets you enter the
attributes of the point you want to create:
- Name and description.
- Symbol: graphic symbol to display.
- Exclusion option: tick this option if the point to create is an
obstacle.
- Geodetic system.
- Coordinates format (Longitude/Latitude or Easting/Northing).
- Coordinates.
• Choosing “Draw Shape” opens a dialogue box that lets you enter a
name, description and type of shape (“Exclusion” option) for the
shape to create. Then you can draw the desired shape by clicking in
the Guidance view, moving the mouse to a new point and clicking
again to add more points. Close the shape by right-clicking on the end
point. Then click Add to save the shape.

Figure 8-29

Tick/untick the “User” option to show/hide the shapes created.


You can use the “Show/Hide Exclusion Zones” command from the
right-click popup menu to show/hide an exclusion perimeter around
obstacles.

246 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Vibrator guidance
Obstacles layer

Exclusion
zone

Figure 8-30

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February 16, 2010
8 Vibrator guidance
Obstacles layer

248 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Chapter

9 Wiring specifications

In this chapter:

• DPG wiring (page 250)


• DSD wiring (page 257)

VE464 User’s Manual 249


February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

DPG wiring
ANALOG PILOTS

Pin Signal
C PILOT1+ —————————— (red)
B PILOT1- —————————— (black)
D AGND
Not used
Not used
Not used
E AGND
Not used
F PILOT2+ —————————— (red)
A PILOT2- —————————— (black)

Figure 9-1 Analog Pilots connector wiring

PILOT 1 ± 1 V, differential output.


PILOT 2 ± 1 V, differential output.

Pilot 1

Pilot 2

A
F B
4m 1m
E C
D

Viewed from solder side

Figure 9-2 Analog Pilot cable (part No. 1731084587)

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

NAV

Pin Signal
1 _GPS_CTS
2 PPS_GND
3 RS_GUID_GND
4 _GPS_RTS
5 PPS_IN
6 GPS_LGND
7 RS_GUID_RX
8 RS_GUID_TX
9 GPS_RX
10 GPS_TX

Figure 9-3 DPG NAV connector

5m
TDMA
DPG
(NAV) or

S1031A010.130, FISCHER

Red
External
GPS receiver 9
mark
3 10
1 13 1
4 9 25 14
2 (Viewed from
5 8 solder side) (Viewed from solder side)
6 5

Plug, 10 pin DB25, male


1 _GPS_CTS TDMA_RTS 5 (not used)
2 PPS_GND TDMA_PPS_GND 7
3 RS_GUID_GND
4 _GPS_RTS TDMA_CTS 4 (not used)
5 PPS_IN TDMA_PPS_OUT 14
6 GPS_LGND TDMA_GPS_GND 18
7 RS_GUID_RX
8 RS_GUID_TX
9 GPS_RX TDMA_TX 22
10 GPS_TX TDMA_RX 20

Figure 9-4 NAV GPS cable (Part No. 605084575)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

RECORDER

RECORDER Signal Name


A CLKIN1 In
B CLKIN2 In
C FO_PULSE+ In
D FO_PULSE- In
E GND1
F RDY_OUT1 Out
G RDY_OUT2 Out
H EXT_GO1 Out
J EXT_GO2 Out
K TB1 Out
L TB2 Out
M FO1 In
N FO2 In
P RDY_IN1 In
R RDY_IN2 In
S RES_IN1 In
T RES_IN2 In
U not connected
V not connected

Figure 9-5 RECORDER connector

FO_PULSE+ Input level:


(C) 470  1.5 to 20 V
Minimum pulse length:
500 µs

470 
FO_PULSE
(D)

Figure 9-6 FO PULSE input

+15 V
TB 500 µs approx.
0V

Figure 9-7 TB signal

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

VE464 DPG Recording


(RECORDER) system

3m

14-19S plug 14-19S plug


solder side solder side
5010952 5010952

Figure 9-8 RECORDER cable (part No. 1C14078465)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

RADIO

TDMA system

4m 1m

TDMA1
DPG

S1031A012-130, FISCHER TDMA2

Red
mark

5 4 12 5 1
6 1 3 11 9 6
(Viewed from 2
solder side) 7 10 (Viewed from
8 9 solder side)

Pin Signal
DB9 DB9
1 RADIO_PTT (TDMA1) (TDMA2)
2 RADIO_XMT
3 RS-TDMA2-RX 2 TX
4 RS-TDMA1-RX 2 TX
5 RS-TDMA1-TX 3 RX
6 GND2 5 Gnd
7 GND1 5 Gnd
8 RADIO_RCV 1 PPS_IN
9 RADIO_COM
10 RS-TDMA2-TX 3 RX
11 GND3 1 PPS_IN
12 PPS_OUT

Figure 9-9 TDMA radio cable (part No. 605084579)

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

Analog radio

S4AF1C-P12MFG0-45AP, ODU
Red
mark

5 4 12

(Viewed from 6 1 3 11
2
solder side) 7 10
8 9

Pin Signal
1 RADIO_PTT ———————————————— PTT
2 RADIO_XMT ———————————————— XMT
3 RS-TDMA2-RX
4 RS-TDMA1-RX
5 RS-TDMA1-TX
6
7
GND2
GND1 9
8 RADIO_RCV ———————————————— RCV
9 RADIO_COM ———————————————— COM
10 RS-TDMA2-TX
11 GND3 Shield
12 PPS_OUT

Figure 9-10 Analog radio cable (part No. 1730084564)

The output
DSD/DPG TP8 TP9
should be TP5 TP6
terminated into C169 RADIO IN AGC OUT
C291
600 . Add a 2.2 F
RADIO XMT
resistor in series AGC
or parallel RADIO RCV 560 

connection on RADIO PTT


Digital potentiometer
the radio output RADIO COM
(RADIO XMT
line) if required. Figure 9-11 VE464 Analog Radio interface

VE464 User’s Manual 255


February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DPG wiring

Pilot 1 BNC
± 1 V (single end).

Pilot 2 BNC
± 1 V (single end).

TB BNC
(for test only).

+3.3 V

500 µs
0V

256 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

DSD wiring
POWER connector

POWER Signal Name


A + 9 to 32 V
B + 9 to 32 V
C GND
D GND

LIFT connector

LIFT Signal Name


A DOWN
B not used
C
D
FULL UP
HALF UP 9
E LIFT Pressure -
F GND BAT
G GND BAT
H LIFT Pressure +

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

VIBRATOR CONTROL

VIBRATOR CONTROL Signal Name


A MACC1+
B MACC1-
C MACC2+ Mass
D MACC2- accelerometer
E MACCOK+
F MACCOK-
N PLACC11+
P PLACC11-
R PLACC12+ Baseplate 1
S PLACC12- accelerometer
T PLACC1OK+
U PLACC1OK-
V PLACC21+
W PLACC21-
X PLACC22+ Baseplate 2
Y PLACC22- accelerometer
Z PLACC2OK+
a PLACC2OK-
_t TMC+AMPLI Torque
_u TMC-AMPLI Motor
_v VLS+
_w VLS- Valve
_x VLP+ LVDT
_y VLP-
_z MLS+
AA MLS- Mass
BB MLP+ LVDT
CC MLP-
DD +15VANA
EE AGND
FF AGND
GG -15VANA

Figure 9-12 VIBRATOR CONTROL connector wiring

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

U A
T V B
S n W C
m p X
k AA q Y
R z BB r D
j GG CC Z
P y HH s E
i FF DD a
N x EE t F
h w u b
g v c
M f d G
L e H
K J

Figure 9-13 Vibrator Control connector (front face)

Accelerometer specifications
Differential outputs: 54.5 m.s-2/V = 2145.7 inch.s-2/V.
Positive output for upward acceleration. 9

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

NAV

Pin Signal
1 _GPS_CTS
2 PPS_GND
3 RS_GUID_GND
4 _GPS_RTS
5 PPS_IN
6 GPS_LGND
7 RS_GUID_RX
8 RS_GUID_TX
9 GPS_RX
10 GPS_TX

Figure 9-14 DSD NAV connector

5m
TDMA
DSD or
(NAV) External
S1031A010.130, FISCHER GPS receiver
Red
mark
3 10
1 13 1
4 9
(Viewed from 25 14
2
5 8 solder side)
(Viewed from solder side)
6 7

Plug, 10 pin DB25, male


1 _GPS_CTS TDMA_RTS 5 (not used)
2 PPS_GND TDMA_PPS_GND 7
3 RS_GUID_GND
4 _GPS_RTS TDMA_CTS 4 (not used)
5 PPS_IN TDMA_PPS_OUT 14
6 GPS_LGND TDMA_GPS_GND 18
7 RS_GUID_RX
8 RS_GUID_TX
9 GPS_RX TDMA_TX 22
10 GPS_TX TDMA_RX 20

Figure 9-15 NAV GPS cable (Part No. 605084575)

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

RADIO

TDMA system

5m

DSD
TDMA
(RADIO)
S1031A012-130, FISCHER

Red
mark

5 4 12 5 1
9 6
(Viewed from 6 1 3 11
2
solder side) 7 10 (Viewed from
8 9 solder side)

Pin Signal
1
2
RADIO_PTT
RADIO_XMT
DB9
(TDMA1)
9
3 RS-TDMA2-RX
4 RS-TDMA1-RX 2 TX
5 RS-TDMA1-TX 3 RX
6 GND2
7 GND1 5 Gnd
8 RADIO_RCV 1 PPS_IN
9 RADIO_COM
10 RS-TDMA2-TX
11 GND3
12 PPS_OUT

Figure 9-16 TDMA radio cable (part No. 605084574)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

Analog radio

DSD
(RADIO)
S4AF1C-P12MFG0-45AP, ODU
Red
mark

5 4 12
6 1 3 11
(Viewed from 2
solder side) 7 10
8 9

Pin Signal
1 RADIO_PTT ———————————————— PTT
2 RADIO_XMT ———————————————— XMT
3 RS-TDMA2-RX
4 RS-TDMA1-RX
5 RS-TDMA1-TX
6 GND2
7 GND1
8 RADIO_RCV ———————————————— RCV
9 RADIO_COM ———————————————— COM
10 RS-TDMA2-TX
11 GND3 Shield
12 PPS_OUT

Figure 9-17 Analog radio cable (part No. 1730084564)

The output
DSD/DPG TP8 TP9
should be TP5 TP6
terminated into C169 RADIO IN AGC OUT
C291
600 . Add a 2.2 F
RADIO XMT
resistor in series AGC
or parallel RADIO RCV 560 

connection on RADIO PTT


Digital potentiometer
the radio output RADIO COM
(RADIO XMT
line) if required. Figure 9-18 VE464 Analog Radio interface

262 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

USB port

15 cm

DSD

S103A054-130, FISCHER

Red
mark

1
(Viewed from 2 5
solder side) 3 4

Pin Signal Connecteur USB femelle USB-A, female


1 USB1_HOST_5V USB_5V 1
2 USB1_HOST_GND USB_GND 4
3 + case
4
USB1_SHIELD
USB1_HOST_Data+
USB_Case
USB_Data+
Case
3
9
5 USB1_HOST_Data- USB_Data- 2

Figure 9-19 USB cord (P/N 605084449)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

Ethernet port

3m
DSD

S103A053-130, FISCHER

Red
mark

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
(Viewed from 2 5
solder side) 3 4

(Viewed from front face)

Pin Signal Connecteur USB femelle RJ45


1 ETHB_TX+ ETHB_TX+ 1
2 ETHB_TX- ETHB_TX- 2
3 ETHB_RX+ ETHB_RX+ 3
4 ETHB_RX- ETHB_RX- 6
CASE ETHB_SHIELD ETHB_SHIELD Case

Figure 9-20 Ethernet cord (P/N 605084573)

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

REMOTE CMD

Pin Signal
1 FO2
2 Nu1
3 CAN-H
4 CAN-L
5 FO_PULSE-
6 TB2
7 Not used
8 Not used
9 Not used
10 FO1
11 FO_PULSE+
12 TB1
13 GNDBAT2
14 DOWN See Figure 9-23 on
15
16
READY
Nu2
page 267
9
Figure 9-21 Remote CMD connector

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

2m
Recording
DSD
system
Remote CMD
(BLASTER)

Red
mark

7
2 16 M A B
8 15
3 6 L N P C
9 1 14 K U V R D
4 5
10 J T S E
11 12 13 H F
G

(Viewed from solder side) (Viewed from solder side)

Pin Signal RJ45 19-pin plug


10 FO1 FO1 M
1 FO2 FO2 N
12 TB1 TB1 K
6 TB2 TB2 L
9 (not used) GND1 R
11 FO_PULSE+ (NC)
5 FO_PULSE- (NC)
2 Nu1
3 CAN-H
4 CAN-L
7 (not used)
8 (not used)
13 GNDBAT2
14 DOWN
15 READY
16 Nu2

Figure 9-22 Remote Standalone cable (P/N 1730084578)

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

(2 m long)

Red mark

7
2 16 (Viewed from front face)
8 15
3 6
9 1 14
4 5
10
11 12 13 S42F1C.P16MFG045CP, ODU

Pin Signal
1 FO2
2 Nu1
3
4
CAN-H
CAN-L 9
5 FO_PULSE-
6 TB2
7 (not used)
8 (not used)
9 (not used)
10 FO1
11 FO_PULSE+
12 TB1
Down
13 GNDBAT2
14 DOWN
15 READY
16 Nu2 Ready

Figure 9-23 Ready Down cable (P/N 1730084584)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

SIMILARITIES

Pin Signal
A REF+
B REF-
C FORCE+
D FORCE-
E MASS ACC+
F MASS ACC-
H PLATE ACC+
J PLATE ACC-
M AGND
N AGND
P not used
R not used

Figure 9-24 SIMILARITIES connector

REF: 31833 daN/V = 71564 lbf/V (differential outputs).


FORCE: 31833 daN/V = 71564 lbf/V (differential outputs).
Mass acceleration (differential outputs):
318330 –2 27629823 –2
------------------------------------- m.s /V = --------------------------------------inch.s /V
Mass mass (kg) Mass mass (lbs)

Baseplate acceleration (differential outputs):

318330 –2 27629823 –2
-------------------------------------m.s /V = --------------------------------------- inch.s /V
Base mass (kg) Base mass (lbs)

WARNING
Positive output for downward acceleration.

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

PC

1m
DSD

PC

P/N 5010438

H A B
G K J C
F E D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

(Viewed from (Viewed from front face)


solder side)

RJ45
Pin
A
Signal
(not used)
ETHERNET RJ45
9
B ETHA_SHIELD Case
C ETHA_RX- 6
D ETHA_RX+ 3
E ETHA_TX+ 1
J ETHA_TX- 2
G (not used)
H (not used)
F (not used)
K (not used)

Figure 9-25 DSD / PC cable (P/N 1730084451)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

Ref Adjust BNC


• 63666 daN/V = 143128 lbf/V (single end).
• Polarity: SEG standard.

Force BNC
• 63666 daN/V = 143128 lbf/V (single end).
• Polarity: SEG standard.

TB BNC

+3.3 V

Sweep length
0V

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

SERVO cable

9
12-10S plug 14S-2 plug
(solder side) (solder side)
Part No. 50102462 Part No. 5011223

Figure 9-26 Servo cable (Part No. 1716075226A)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

Accelerometer Cable

Pin Signal
A ACC 2+
B ACC 2-
C +15V
D -15V
E ACC 1-
F ACC 1+
G GND
H OK+
K OK-

7 metres

12-10S plug 12-10S plug


(solder side) (solder side)
Part No. 50102462 Part No. 50102462

Figure 9-27 AS1 Accelerometer cable (Part No. 1716075225)

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February 16, 2010
Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

Guidance

5m
Tablet
PC
DSD
(NAV)

S1031A010.130, FISCHER TDMA


5m or
External
GPS receiver
Red
mark
3 10
1
4 9
2
5 8
13 1 5 1
6 7 25 14 9 6
(Viewed from (Viewed from (Viewed from
solder side) solder side) solder side)

Plug, 10 pin DB25, male DB9, female


9
1 _GPS_CTS TDMA_RTS 5
2 PPS_GND TDMA_PPS_GND 7
3 RS_GUID_GND Gnd 5
4 _GPS_RTS TDMA_CTS
5 PPS_IN TDMA_PPS_OUT 14
6 GPS_LGND TDMA_GPS_GND 18
7 RS_GUID_RX Tx 3
8 RS_GUID_TX Rx 2
9 GPS_RX TDMA_TX 22
10 GPS_TX TDMA_RX 20

Figure 9-28 NAV / Guidance cable (Part No. 605084576)

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February 16, 2010
9 Wiring specifications
DSD wiring

Slave recording system

3m
DSD Recording
VIBRATOR system
CONTROL (BLASTER)
22-55S 14-19S

U A
T V B M A B
S n W C
p
L N P C
m X
k AA q K U V R D
Y
R z BB r D
GG
J T S E
j CC Z H F
P y HH s E G
i FF DD a
N x EE t F (Viewed from solder side)
h w u b
g v c
M f d G
L e H
K J

(Viewed from solder side)

Pin Signal RJ45 19-pin plug


L FO1 FO1-B1 M
M FO2 FO2-B1 N
Z RDY_SLV1 CR0-B1 P
_a RDY_SLV2 GND-B1 R
_d RS_Slave_RX TX-B1 D
_e TB2 TBIN2-B1 L
_f RS_Slave_TX RX-B1 C
_g FO_PULSE+ FO-B1 T
_h RS_Slave_GND GND-B1 R
_i FO_PULSE- GND-B1 R
_j EXTGO2 EXTGO2-B1 J
_m EXTGO1 EXTGO1-B1 H
_r TB1 TBIN1-B1 K

Figure 9-29 Slave recorder cable (P/N 1730084585)

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Appendix

A Software installation

This chapter includes the following sections:

• Tablet PC first-time Power-on (page 276)


• Installing VLI software (page 278)
• Configuring the Tablet PC (page 280)
• Installing SFU software (page 282)
• DPG software (page 290)
• DSD software (page 294)
• DVCx lockup recovery procedure (page 295)

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Tablet PC first-time Power-on

Tablet PC first-time Power-on


Creating a SERCEL account
The first time you power on the Tablet PC, the system asks you to
choose a language, enter a computer name, etc. Choose the following:
• Language: English
• Computer Name: TABLET
• Workgroup: WORKGROUP
Create a local SERCEL account (with Administrator privileges and no
password).

Changing the TCP/IP Network Configuration


The TCP/IP address of the computer (typically a Tablet PC) hosting
VE464 VLI software must be something like:
172.27.200.X
You can choose whatever value you like between 0 and 255 for X,
except 123 (the address 172.27.200.123 is reserved for the interface
port dedicated to communications with the VLI application on DSDs).
The computer’s IP address is not dependent on which DSD you want to
connect to. You do not need to change that address when you want to
connect the computer to another DSD.
To set the computer’s TCP/IP address, do the following:
1. Click on “Start” and then select “Control Panel”.
2. Click on the “Network Connections” icon, then “Local Area
Connection”.
3. Double-click on “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)”.

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Tablet PC first-time Power-on

A
Figure A-1

WARNING
Note down the current IP configuration prior to making any changes, so
that you can revert to it if required.

4. Change the IP address to 172.27.200.x (x to be other than 123).


5. Change the subnet mask to 255.255.255.0

Figure A-2

6. Click OK.
7. Restart the computer.

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February 16, 2010
A Software installation
Installing VLI software

Installing VLI software


VE464 VLI software (used for communications with a DSD) is
supplied on the SERCEL Tools CD-ROM (Part No. ____).
To install VLI software on a Tablet PC, do the following:
1. Copy the “vliV-.-” directory to a USB stick and then inset the
USB into a USB port on the Tablet PC.
2. Click on “setup.exe”.

Figure A-3

3. Click Next.

Figure A-4

4. Choose “I accept the Licence Agreement”. Click Next.

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Installing VLI software

Figure A-5
A
5. Click Next.

Figure A-6

6. Wait few seconds until installation is complete.

Figure A-7

7. Click “Finish”.
The installation wizard creates shortcuts to the VLI_VE464.exe file and
to the VLI_VE464 folder on the computer’s desktop, so that yo can
launch the VLI application by simply clicking on its shortcut icon.

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February 16, 2010
A Software installation
Configuring the Tablet PC

Configuring the Tablet PC


The ITRONIX Duo-Touch Tablet PC allows you to choose between
two operating modes, Digitizer or TouchScreen (rather than using a
mouse and keyboard, attached to a USB port, which may be
inconvenient in a vibrator cab).
The TouchScreen mode is recommended, as it achieves higher
precision. It allows you to use a stylus in place of a mouse and keyboard.
1. In the menu bar in the lower right corner of the screen, click on the
“Buttons/ Device / Brightness properties” icon.

Figure A-8

2. In the Properties window, choose the “Device On/Off” tab.


3. Use the “Digitizer/Touch Screen” button to set the “Current
device” option to “TouchScreen”.

Set to
“TouchScreen”

Figure A-9

4. Click OK.
5. The function of the“Rotate” button (No. 1 in Figure A-10) is
customizable. You can choose to use that button to automatically
launch the VLI application. To do that:

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Configuring the Tablet PC

Figure A-10 “Rotate” button

- Click on the “Tablet Button” tab.

Figure A-11

- Choose the “Custom” option. Click “Open” and then select this
file path:
C:\Program File\VLI_VE464\bin\VLI_VE464
- Click “Apply” and then “OK”.

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A Software installation
Installing SFU software

Installing SFU software


Prerequisites
• Be sure a 300 MB free disk space is available on the PC and the user
account to use has local administrator privileges.
• Drive (C:) must be configured for NTFS file.
• Microsoft Office® must be correctly installed.
• For a Tablet PC: first you have to copy the SFU installation kit from
the Sercel SFU CD-ROM to a USB stick, and then insert the USB
stick into a USB port on the Tablet PC.
Note If you do not have any Sercel SFU CD-ROM, you can
download “SFU35SEL_EN.exe” from:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads (Search for SFU).

Uncompressing SFU client


1. Double-click on the SFU35SEL_EN.exe file.
2. Type the path for saving uncompressed files (12313 files):
c:\temp\SFU
3. Click Unzip.

Automatic installation of SFU client


1. Insert the Sercel e-428 CD-ROM and double-click on the
installSfuForVe464.cmd file located in the SFU folder. ( If you
are using a USB stick, copy the whole SFU folder from the Sercel
e-428 CD-ROM).
2. If this window appears, type F twice (standing for “file”).

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Installing SFU software

Figure A-12
A

Figure A-13

3. After this window disappears, go to the configuration of “Services


For UNIX Administration”.

Configuring Services For UNIX Administration


1. From the Start > Programs > Windows Services for UNIX
menu, select “Services For UNIX Administration”.
2. In the Services for UNIX window, click on the Settings tab. Type
“localhost” in the “Computer name” field, unless this is already
done.

Figure A-14

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Installing SFU software

3. Click Apply to enable the Computer name.


4. Click on User Name Mapping. The Configuration tab should be
selected by default.
5. Choose “use Password and Group files”.

Figure A-15

6. Click Browse, then type c:\SFU\config\passwd.txt in the


“Password file path and name” field and c:\SFU\config\group.txt
in the “Group file path and name” field.
- The content of passwd.txt is the following:
user408::408:388:operateur 408:/users:/bin/ksh
- The content of group.txt is the following:
sn388::388:user408
7. Click Apply. If a Windows message appears, saying that the
Firewall blocks the program, choose to unblock it.

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Installing SFU software

8. Click Synchronize Now.


9. Click on the Maps tab.
10. Click on the Show User maps link.
11. Click on List Windows Users.
12. Select the SERCEL local user if it is defined, otherwise select A
Administrator (or the equivalent name, depending on the
Operating System language). The local user must have
Administrator rights.
13. Click on List Unix Users.
14. Select user408.
15. Click on Add. This adds the new user in the “Mapped users”
window.
16. Click on Apply to enable the new user.

Figure A-16

17. Close the “Services For UNIX Administration” window.

Note The resulting mapping lets you create a “user408” user (present
in the DSD configuration) inheriting the administrator rights of
the local machine for the whole NFS sharing level NFS. See
Creating a data exchange directory (page 286).

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Installing SFU software

Creating a data exchange directory


1. Create the following directories:
C:\nfs_server\usr\data
C:\nfs_server\usr\version
C:\nfs_server\usr\custom
C:\nfs_server\usr\conf
2. In the explorer window, right-click on c:\nfs_server\usr\ and
select Properties. Click on the NFS Sharing tab and share the
usr folder as shown below.

Figure A-17

3. Click on Permissions and change the Type of access to Read-


Write.

Figure A-18

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Installing SFU software

Click OK.
4. For Windows XP SP2 users only:
- In the explorer window, right-click on C:\nfs_server\usr\ and
select Sharing and Security.
- Click on the Sharing tab and share the usr folder as shown A
below.

Figure A-19

NOTE: If the window below appears, select Folder Options


from the Tools menu.

Figure A-20

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Installing SFU software

- Select the View tab and check this option: “Use simple file
sharing”.

Figure A-21

- Click on “Apply to All Folders”.


- Click OK.
5. Open the Control Panel > Windows Firewall window.
- Under the General tab, choose “Off”.

Figure A-22

- Click OK.
6. Open the Control Panel > Administative Tools > Local Security
Policy window.

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Installing SFU software

- In the left-hand pane, select this folder: Local Policies \ Security


Options.
- In the right-hand pane, select “Network Access: Let Everyone
permissions apply to anonymous users” and choose the
“Enabled” option.
A

Figure A-23

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A Software installation
DPG software

DPG software
DPG window in the recorder’s GUI
VE464 software is supplied on the 428XL CD-ROM or DVD-ROM.
When you install 428XL software on the 428XL server, the installation
wizard asks you if you want to install VE464 software.

Uploading a new software release to a standard DPG


1. First, you must install the new release or patch on the 428XL
server with the “patcher.sh” command (see “Server software
patches” in the 428XL Installation Manual). As a result, the files
required for updating a VE464 DPG are available from this
directory on the server computer:
/export/home/ve464/delivery
2. To install the new software release on the DPG, launch the
“Update Version” function available from the menu bar in the
VE464 main window on the recorder’s GUI.

Figure A-24

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Software installation
DPG software

3. In the “Update Version” window, select the Update.conf file


from the “/export/home/ve464/delivery” directory, and then click
Go. Wait until updating is complete and then select Reconnect
(turn the VE464 and LCI-428 off then back on).

Migrating from/to Standalone DPG A


To
From Sandalone DPG V10 or
DPG V1.0 DPG V2.0
above

See Manual procedure for


Standalone DPG See Automatic procedure
loading standard DPG
V10 or above (page 291)
V1.0 software (page 292)

DPG V2.0
See Automatic procedure
Patch 08 or
(page 291)
above

See Manual procedure for


DPG V2.0 up to
loading Standalone DPG
patch 07
software (page 292)

Automatic procedure
Connect the Ethernet port of the DPG to the server computer and then
use the VE464 main window’s “Update Version” function on the GUI.

Figure A-25

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DPG software

Manual procedure for loading standard DPG V1.0 software


To load DPG V1.0 software to a DPG preloaded with Standalone DPG
software:
1. Connect the Ethernet port of the DPG to the 428XL server
network.
2. Remotely log on to the DPG by typing the following command in
a Terminal window:
rlogin 172.30.200.150
3. Once you are logged to the DPG:
- If a message saying you must wait appears repeatedly, type
ts tDpgApp
- Type the following commands:
kdpInitHciSvr428NetworkI
cd "/users/ve464/delivery"
esyUpdateFlashModuleI "VXWORKS_VE464","vxWorksDpg.st.bin"
esyFlashShow
This should first display the information on the vxWorks module.
Check the "AppliVersion", which should read "1".
sysReset
4. Use the VE464 main window’s “Update Version” function on
the 428XL GUI.

Manual procedure for loading Standalone DPG software


To load Standalone DPG software to a DPG preloaded with standard
DPG software earlier than V2.0 patch 08:
1. Connect the Ethernet port of the DPG to the Standalone DPG
server computer network.
2. Remotely log on to the DPG by typing the following command in
a Terminal window:

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Software installation
DPG software

rlogin 172.30.200.150
3. Once you are logged to the DPG:
- If a message saying you must wait appears repeatedly, type
ts tDpgApp
- Type the following commands: A
nfsAuthUnixSet ("svr464",408,388,0,0)
hostAdd ("svr464","172.30.128.30")
nfsMount ("svr464","/users/","/users/")
nfsMount ("svr464","/export/home/","/export/home/")
cd "/users/ve464/delivery"
esyUpdateFlashModuleI "VXWORKS_VE464","vxWorksDpg.st.bin"
esyFlashShow
This should first display the information on the vxWorks module.
Check the "AppliVersion", which should read "10".
sysReset
4. Use the VE464 main window’s “Update Version” function on
the Standalone DPG GUI.

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A Software installation
DSD software

DSD software
1. First, you must install the new release or patch on the 428XL
server with the “patcher.sh” command (see “Server software
patches” in the 428XL Installation Manual). As a result, the files
required for updating a VE464 DSD are available from this
directory on the server computer:
/export/home/ve464/delivery
2. Copy the VE464 delivery files from the server computer’s disk to
this directory on the Tablet PC:
C:\nfs_server\usr\version\
3. To upload a new software release to a DSD, use The Update menu
(page 110) in the VLI interface window.
Note that both standard DPG and Standalone DPG software
distributions are supported with no need to change DSD software.

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Software installation
DVCx lockup recovery procedure

DVCx lockup recovery procedure


The recovery procedure described below is only intended for a DVCx
board in a DSD or DPG loaded with V2.0 software with Patch03 or
above.
With software patch 03 or above, a recovery boot installed on the DVCx A
board can be used to recover a board permanently locked up as a result
of unexpected events (for example a DSD being turned off while
uploading new firmware, etc.).

On a DPG
1. Remove the DPG cover to have access to the DVCx board.
2. Place a jumper on connector J37.

Figure A-26

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DVCx lockup recovery procedure

3. Connect the Ethernet port of the DPG to the 428XL server


computer hosting VE464 software (/users/ve464/delivery
directory).

Figure A-27

4. Connect the serial port of the DPG to a serial port of the 428XL
server computer, using the DB9/DB9 RS cable (Part No.
3170340) provided in the DPG accessory kit.

Figure A-28

5. Power on the DPG.


6. Open a Terminal window on the computer's serial port, by typing
minicom (Return) in a Terminal window:
- Check for the following messages appearing on the screen:
PinstrapValue 8
Safety boot
(otherwise, make sure the jumper is properly installed on the
DVCx board, and reboot the DPG).
- Check for VXWORKS starting after the vxWorks jump.
- Check for the message "THIS IS A DPG" on the monitoring
screen.
- Wait until the message "Safety Boot appli" appears, followed by
"Safety Boot ok".

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DVCx lockup recovery procedure

- Type the esyFlashShow command to make sure the latest


VxWorks version is present (check the AppliVersion,
AppliRevisionPAC and AppliPatchPAC fields):
Header of module : VXWORKS_VE464
StartP : ....
RamAddrPV
BssStartAddrPV
:
: ...
0x10000 A
BssEndAddrPV : ...
OffsetPV : 0x0
EntryPV : 0x10000
VersionUL : ...
RevisionUL : ...
Date : ...
Copyright : Copyright 2006 Sercel
Name : VXWORKS_VE464
AppliVersion : .
AppliRevisionPAC : .
AppliPatchPAC : .
Not Used : ...

7. Remove the jumper from connector J37.


8. Reboot the DPG (the DPG should boot up properly and be able to
connect to the GUI).

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A Software installation
DVCx lockup recovery procedure

On a DSD
1. Open the DSD to have access to the DVCx board.
2. Place a jumper on connector J37.

Figure A-29

3. Connect the Ethernet port of the DSD (on rear panel) to the
428XL server hosting VE464 software (/users/ve464/delivery
directory).
298 VE464 User’s Manual
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Software installation
DVCx lockup recovery procedure

Figure A-30

4. Connect the serial port of the DSD to a serial port of the 428XL
server computer, using the Field Remote Shell cable (Part No.
605086474B) provided in the DSD accessory kit.

Figure A-31

5. Power on the DSD.


6. Open a Terminal window on the computer's serial port, by typing
minicom (Return) in a Terminal window:
- Check for the following messages appearing on the screen:
PinstrapValue 8
Safety boot

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DVCx lockup recovery procedure

(otherwise, make sure the jumper is properly installed on the


DVCx board, and reboot the DSD).
- Check for VXWORKS starting after the vxWorks jump.
- Check for the message "THIS IS A DSD".
- Wait until the message "Safety Boot appli" appears, followed by
"Safety Boot ok".
- Type the esyFlashShow command to make sure the latest
VxWorks version is present (check the AppliVersion,
AppliRevisionPAC and AppliPatchPAC fields):
Header of module : VXWORKS_VE464
StartP : ....
RamAddrPV : 0x10000
BssStartAddrPV : ...
BssEndAddrPV : ...
OffsetPV : 0x0
EntryPV : 0x10000
VersionUL : ...
RevisionUL : ...
Date : ...
Copyright : Copyright 2006 Sercel
Name : VXWORKS_VE464
AppliVersion : .
AppliRevisionPAC : .
AppliPatchPAC : .
Not Used : ...

7. Remove the jumper from connector J37.


8. Reboot the DSD (the DSD should boot up properly and the
display should read the latest version).

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February 16, 2010
Appendix

B VE464 file formats

This chapter includes the following sections:

• Extended QC file (page 302)


• Signal Local archive files (page 305)
• Custom sweep file (page 308)

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February 16, 2010
B VE464 file formats
Extended QC file

Extended QC file
File name format: dsd<dsd No.>_<yymmdd>.txt
(Example: dsd06_080124.txt)

Extended QC status header

Item Label Definition Format

1 % SL : Source Line nnnnn.nn


2 % SN : Source Number nnnnn.nn
3 % SI : Source Index n
4 % StackNb : Stack Number n
5 % FleetNb : Fleet Number n
6 % DsdNb : Dsd Number n
7 % SweepCounter : Sweep Counter nnnnn
8 % Sweep Type : aaa
9 % Sweep Status : See page 121 n
10 % Drive : Drive Level nn
11 % Gps_Status : Vibrator position
(GPGGA sentence)
12 User-defined GPS strings See Note about GPS
(up to five) : Strings (page 302).
13 % TB : Time Break time yy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss:mmm
14 % Time Inhibit : n

Note about GPS Strings


The user can defined five GPS strings (outputs from the GPS receiver)
that will be recorded in the extended QC file header.
The five strings should be initialized using the gps.txt file created in this
folder: C:\nfs_server\usr\conf.
Below is an example of gps.txt file:
$GPGSA
$GPZDA
$GPVTG
#$GPGGM (use # for comment)

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VE464 file formats
Extended QC file

Extended QC status content

Field Cols format Min.to Max. Default Units

Time
Phase
1-7
8-9
Second B
Force 12-13
Distortion 14-15
Ground Viscosity (Gv) 20-21
Ground Stiffness (Gs) 24-25
Mass acceleration warning 27
Mass warning 29
Mass warning 31
Piston warning 33
Piston warning 35
Piston warning 37
Plate1 warning 39
Plate1 warning 41
Plate1 warning 43
Plate2 warning 45
Plate2 warning 47
Plate2 warning 49
Force overload 51
Pressure overload 53
Mass overload 55
Valve overload 57
Excitation overload 59

Example
% SL : 00286.20
% SN : 52637.82
% SI : 1
% StackNb : 1
% FleetNb : 1
% DsdNb : 7
% SweepCounter : 00056
% Sweep Type : b1=[LINEAR 8S 10-200Hz]
% Sweep Status : 1
% Drive : 80

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B VE464 file formats
Extended QC file

% Gps Status :
$GPGGA,144355.00,4716.07414,N,00129.47150,W,1,10,0.9,37.75,M,49.49,M,,*4
% GPGSA :
$GPGSA,A,3,21,29,13,10,,30,23,31,05,16,,06,,,01.6,00.9,01.4*06
% GPZDA : $GPZDA,144355.00,17,09,2009,+00,00*4B
% GPVTG : $GPVTG,000.00,T,001.80,M,000.01,N,000.02,K,A*29
% TB : 09/09/17 14:42:51:688
% Time Inhibit : 2
% EXTENDED TIME STATUS :
% phase warnings overloads
% force Gv Gs masse pist. plaque
%Time dist 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 F P M V E
0.5 0 0 0 68 94 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1.0 -2 75 7 89 88 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1.5 1 78 9 91 73 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2.0 2 80 8 88 66 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2.5 2 78 4 88 62 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3.0 3 77 1 91 46 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3.5 1 82 1 100 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4.0 -1 81 1 118 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4.5 -3 80 1 150 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5.0 -4 81 1 214 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5.5 -4 82 2 255 79 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6.0 -4 83 2 255 95 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
6.5 -2 84 2 255 74 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7.0 -1 80 3 255 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7.5 0 72 3 255 37 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
8.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

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VE464 file formats
Signal Local archive files

Signal Local archive files


The “Set Config” function on the 428XL GUI (VE464 window) allows
saving up to four signals to a regular SEGD file, selected from the
following: Mass acceleration, Plate acceleration, Force, Reference and
B
Filtered Force.
Each waveform is sampled at 2 kHz, with a 300-Hz high-cut filter or,
if the “Use Line Filter ...” option is selected in the “Set Config”
function on the 428XL GUI, the waveform is saved using the same
Linear-Phase or Minimum-Phase filter and sample rate settings as for a
seismic waveform.
The signal sample value is expressed in:
• Newtons for Reference, Force and Filtered Force waveforms;
• metres per second squared for Mass and Plate acceleration
waveforms.
A log file is also generated, containing the list of all Signal Local
Archive files from the DSD, to be used for easier management of
archives.

Signal archive file format

File name
For a “Local” acquisition
local_<yymmdd>__<hhmmssmmm>_dsd<DSD No.>.segd
Example : local_080125_141526580_dsd07.segd

For a “Normal” acquisition


<yymmdd>__<hhmmssmmm>_dsd<DSD No.>.segd
Example : 080125_141526580_dsd07.segd

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B VE464 file formats
Signal Local archive files

External Header

Item Label Definition Format

1 #Local Acq or
#Normal Acq
2 # SL : Source Line nnnnn.nn
3 # SN : Source Number nnnnn.nn
4 # SI : Source Index n
5 # StackNb : Stack Number n
6 # FleetNb : Fleet Number n
7 # DsdNb : Dsd Number n
8 # SweepCounter: Sweep Counter nnnnn
9 # Sweep Type : aaa
10 % Sweep Status : See page 121 n
11 # Drive : Drive Level nn
12 # Gps_Status : Vibrator position
(GPGGA sentence)
13 # User-defined See Extended QC file
GPS strings (up (page 302).
to five) :
14 # TB : Time Break time yy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss:mmm
15 # Filter Type : Signal filter "8N LIN" or "8N MIN" or "DSD 300Hz"
16 # Sample Rate : Signal sample rate "4 ms" or "2 ms" or "1 ms" or "0.5 ms"
17 # Signal Name : Signals saved, and order -MACC-PACC-FORCE-REF-
FORCE_FILTERED

Notes:
1. If the Guidance option is enabled and two fleets are selected, the
Lat and Long fields are added after the SN and SL fields:
# Lat xxxxxxxx
# Long xxxxxxxxx

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Signal Local archive files

2. The Point Number field of the SEGD trace also allows identifying
the name of the signal recorded on the trace.

Trace Point Number


2
Signal Name
Reference
B
3 Force
4 Mass Acc
5 Plate Acc
6 Filtered Force

3. The GPS time field in the SEGD file is initialized with the Time
Break time.

Example for Normal acquisition

# Normal Acq
# SL : 00286.20
# SN : 52637.82
# SI : 1
# StackNb : 1
# FleetNb : 1
# DsdNb : 3
# SweepCounter : 00205
# Sweep Type : b1=[LINEAR 8S 10-80Hz]
# Sweep Status : 1
# Drive : 80
# Gps Status :
$GPGGA,144355.00,4716.07414,N,00129.47150,W,1,10,0.9,37.75,M,49.49,M,,*4
# GPGSA :
$GPGSA,A,3,21,29,13,10,,30,23,31,05,16,,06,,,01.6,00.9,01.4*06
# GPZDA : $GPZDA,144355.00,17,09,2009,+00,00*4B
# GPVTG : $GPVTG,000.00,T,001.80,M,000.01,N,000.02,K,A*29
# TB : 09/09/17 14:42:51:688
# Filter Type : 8N LIN
# Sample Rate : 2 ms
# Signal Name : - FORCE-REF-

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B VE464 file formats
Custom sweep file

Custom sweep file


To define the shape of the “Custom” sweep, you have to use a tool of
your own to create an ASCII text file containing all the samples
required to depict the signal.

File name
For the VLI to be able to interpret a custom sweep file, the file name
extension must be “.custom”.

Comments
Comments are allowed, beginning with # or #COMMENT as a tag, to
be continued with text not exceeding 40 characters.
• A comment tagged with #COMMENT is displayed in the VLI and
recording system’s GUI windows. Only one such comment is
allowed.
• Comments simply tagged with # are not displayed. You can enter as
many such comments as you like.
(See the example below).

Identifier
An identifier is required, beginning with #IDENTIFIER as a tag, to be
continued with text not exceeding 20 characters. The name you specify
after the #IDENTIFIER tag will appear in the window prompting the
list of available files).

Samples
The sweep should be defined with 2000 samples per second, one sample
per line.
The amplitude of each sample should be a floating value in ASCII
format, lying between -1.000 (standing for - 100% amplitude) and
+1.000 (standing for + 100%).

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VE464 file formats
Custom sweep file

• In the first column are the sample values for the reference signal.
• A second column may be supplied, containing a TRUE/FALSE flag
used to inhibit the calculation of QC information. If the second
column is empty, then “FALSE” is assumed, meaning that the B
calculation of QC information is enabled.

Example
#IDENTIFIER filename
#COMMENT linear 10s 15-50Hz (optional comment)
#11.03.2007 (optional comment)
# this and that (optional comment)
0.0000001 TRUE # start taper, QC inhibited
0.0000002 TRUE
- 0.0000001 TRUE
- 0.0000004 TRUE
...
0.99567 FALSE
...
0.0000001 TRUE # end taper, QC inhibited

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B VE464 file formats
Custom sweep file

310 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Appendix

C TracsTDMA
troubleshooting

This chapter includes the following sections:

• TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure (page 312)


• DGPS transmission check procedure (page 317)
• Configuring the radio circuitry (page 319)
• Setting up the built-in GPS receiver (page 322)

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure

TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure


This troubleshooting procedure is for a VE464 system that uses TDMA
radios.
1. Antennas: make sure the GPS antenna and the VHF or UHF
antenna are properly connected. The antenna downlead
connectors are the same type (N) and so may mistakenly be
swapped.
2. Connections: make sure the TDMA is properly connected to the
DPG or DSD:
- “RADIO” connector to the TDMA’s DB9 connector.
- “NAV” connector to the TDMA’s DB25 connector.
3. Power supply: check the power supply to the TDMA (9 to
36 VDC). Be sure the metal case of the TDMA is tied to the
truck’s ground.
4. Power on the TDMA (with the DPG or DSD powered off). Check
the status of the LEDs.

GPS indicators

GPS 1 GPS 2

Slot 1 Slot 2

Time-slot allocation
indicators

Tx/Rx Status

Figure C-1 TDMA indicator LEDs

- At power-up the “Status” LED colour is flashing red. It should


change to flashing green after some time, meaning that the

312 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
TracsTDMA troubleshooting
TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure

TDMA is in good working order. A red and green flashing


sequence means that it is in need of repair.
- The status of the GPS and Slot LEDs reflects the previous
configuration of the TDMA. It is of no significance until the
TDMA is controlled by the DPG or DSD. C
5. Power on the DPG or DSD. (Note that on a DPG, communication
with the TDMA is not established until the “Vib Fleet” function is
first run after the Flash memory is cleared. In that case the LED
status is of no significance until the “Vib Fleet” function is run).
After the boot, the GPS and Slot LEDs are updated. Check for the
following:
• If all four LEDs are flashing, this means that this type of TDMA
cannot be connected to a DPG or DSD (this may be a TDMA other
than from SERCEL, or a Repeater, etc.).
• The two GPS LEDs indicate the type of GPS connection:
- Both Off: this is a “Mobile” TDMA, controlled by a DSD. The
GPS signals (GGA and PPS) are relayed by the DSD. The
TDMA does not operate in standalone mode. The DSD is able to
cope with temporary interruptions of GPS signals.
- Both On: this is a “Mobile” TDMA controlled by a DPG. The
TDMA operates in standalone mode. Its antenna must be
continually free of any obstructions.
- GPS 1 is On, GPS 2 is Off: this is a “Base” TDMA controlled
by a DPG. The TDMA operates in standalone mode. Its antenna
must be continually free of any obstructions.
- GPS 1 is Off, GPS 2 is On: this is a TDMA (whether “Base” or
“Mobile”) using an external GPS receiver.
• If the type of TDMA is inappropriate (e. g. a “Base” TDMA
connected to a DSD) or if the DPG or DSD fails to receive the GPS
signal, one of the GPS LEDs is flashing (see GPS indicators on
page 193).

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure

- In the case of a “Base” TDMA mistakenly connected to a DSD,


either replace it with a “Mobile” or change its configuration to
“Mobile”.
- Otherwise, the problem is attributable to GPS signals: check the
cable from the NAV connector on the DPG or DSD, make sure
the GPS antenna is properly connected and at least four satellites
are received.
• So long as either of the GPS LEDs is flashing, the DPG or DSD
cannot use the TDMA.
• If both GPS LEDs are flashing, this means the TDMA is not properly
configured. It must be reconfigured for a “Base” or “Mobile” or
“External” GPS receiver.
• On a DSD, you can see if the PPS signal is available, by pressing on
“Display Scroll” until the GPS status appears on the DSD display:
“NO MORE PPS” being displayed (on the second text line) means
that the DSD does not receive the PPS signal from the GPS receiver.
This may also mean the GGA signal is not available, as GGA not
being available also prevents PPS from being available. The DPG
does not have any equivalent test feature.
• The Slot LEDs should be as follows:
- Slot 1 should be Off (no OPEN slot assigned).
- On a “Mobile” TDMA (attached to a DPG or DSD), Slot 2
should be Off (no POS slot assigned).
- On a “Base” TDMA, Slot 2 may be on if the TDMA transmits
Differential GPS corrections (TRAN time-slots).
• If the status of GPS and Slot LEDs is steadily other than described
above, this means the TDMA is not controlled by the DPG or DSD.
Make sure the “TDMA” radio option is selected in Radio settings on
the VLI GUI or in the VE464 window on the 428XL GUI.
6. Run the Vib Fleet function on the 428XL GUI. The following is
required for communications between the DPG and DSDs:

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure

- Same software version on the DPG and all DSDs. Refer to


Software Updates for the compatibility of software patches.
- Same Crew Number for the DPG and all DSDs.
- Distinct identification number for each TDMA (from 1 to 254).
- The frequency assignment to the channels to use must be the C
same on all TDMAs. Assigning the same frequency to two
different channels to be used is prohibited.
- The same Channel number must be selected on the DPG and all
DSDs. If two TDMAs are attached to the DPG, the Channel
number selected on each DSD in a fleet should match the one
selected for the TDMA associated with the fleet through the Vib
Fleet function. If a dual-frequency repeater is used, the DSDs
can be set to use the prime Channel number (i. e. the one selected
for the DPG) or the secondary channel (used for replicating the
TDMA time-slots).
- The same Baud Rate must be selected for the DPG, all DSDs and
repeaters if any. If two TDMAs are attached to the DPG and use
different Baud rates, the Baud rate selected on each DSD in a
fleet should match the one selected for the TDMA associated
with the fleet through the Vib Fleet function (and for the
repeater if any).
- The TDMA should receive correct GGA and PPS signals from
the GPS receiver or the DSD.
- The frequencies used by two TDMAs attached to the DPG or a
repeater should selected to be far enough apart.
- The VHF or UHF antennae should be properly connected and
installed at adequate locations.
- Boosters, if any, should be properly connected.
- Adequate radio coverage should be provided.
• On a TDMA attached to the DPG, the Slot 1 LED should be On. This
means an OPEN time-slot is available for the DPG to transmit its
messages to the DSDs. If that is not the case, check the type of radio
VE464 User’s Manual 315
February 16, 2010
C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
TracsTDMA troubleshooting procedure

in Radio settings (which must be “TDMA”) on the 428XL GUI, or


check the connection between the DPG’s Radio connector and the
TDMA.
• On a TDMA attached to a DSD (“Leader” if networked DSDs) the
Slot 1 LED being “on” means that the DSD received a message from
the DPG (i. e. an OPEN time-slot is assigned to that DSD), so the Vib
Fleet function should be successful. There may be a software
compatibility issue (check the software version displayed as you
power on the DSD). If a dual-frequency repeater is used, a
malfunction may arise from the frequency assignment to channels not
being the same on all TDMAs.
• If the Slot 1 LED is flashing, this means the DSD (or DPG) received
a message from a TDMA with the same identification number as its
own TDMA. This disables its OPEN time-slot, meaning that it cannot
transmit any more. Make sure all TDMA identification numbers are
different.

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
DGPS transmission check procedure

DGPS transmission check procedure


In the VE464 window on the 428XL GUI:
1. Select the Differential GPS option (in the Radio Management
setup); C
2. Enter the Id number of the TDMA attached to the DPG into the
“Base Id” field. Make sure the position of the “Base” is correct so
that Differential GPS corrections can be generated.
3. Run the Vib Fleet function (even if DSDs fail to respond). The
Slot 1 and Slot 2 LEDs should light up.
Note that the above procedure requires that the TDMA attached to the
DPG be actually configured for use as a “Base”. If that is not the case,
you can select the “Dual-frequency repeater” mode, even if no dual-
frequency repeater is used. This will cause the TDMA to transmit empty
OPEN time-slots. The Slot 2 LED will not light up, but Slot 1 should.
(TDMA firmware 8v13 or higher is required).
The Tx/Rx LED on the TDMA attached to the DPG should be flashing
red, meaning that it transmits radio messages (differential GPS
corrections in that case). On a TDMA attached to a DSD, the TX/Rx
LED flashing green means the TDMA receives messages. This also
means the Frequency and Baud rate settings are the same as on the
DPG. A malfunction may be attributable to an inconsistent Crew
Number or software version. The DSD display showing the GPS status
should read “DIFF ON”, and the age of Differential GPS corrections is
indicative of the quality of the received signal.
If the Tx/Rx LED stops flashing about 20 seconds after powering off
and powering on the DSD, this means the TDMA fails to receive the
GPS signals (GGA and PPS) from the DSD (because at power-on, the
TDMA uses the signals from its own GPS receiver, then it chooses to
use those from the DSD). Check for correct wiring of the PPS In signal
on the cable from the DSD’s “Radio” connector, and the GGA In signal
on the cable from the “Nav” connector.

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
DGPS transmission check procedure

In case of poor quality of the received signal, try a lower (4800) Baud
rate setting to see if the problem persists. Remember the Baud rate must
be changed accordingly on the TDMA attached to the DPG, all the
DSDs and the repeater if any.

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Configuring the radio circuitry

Configuring the radio circuitry


Use this procedure to configure the radio circuitry in the TracsTDMA
box used as “Mobile” or “Base”. (For a TracsTDMA repeater, see
Installation on page 209).
1. Connect a serial port (COM1 or COM2) of the computer to the
C
TDMA via the DB9 cord supplied.

9-36 VDC
VHF GPS
COM1
(UHF)

Figure C-2 Connecting the TDMA to a computer

2. Power on the TDMA and the PC.


3. Launch the SercelTDMAConfig application.
- Enter the Unit identification number.
- Select the “Normal” mode,
- The other parameters are automatically updated by the DPG or
DSD (Cycle Length, Radio Channel used and frequency,
Transmission Power, Baud rate). You do not need to change
anything.

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Configuring the radio circuitry

Figure C-3

4. Click on the “setup TDMA with BSIC & FREQ” button. Wait
until downloading is complete.

Figure C-4

5. Click on Setup TDMA from File to update the other parameters.


In the dialogue box that shows up, select
- TDMAbase.sts to set the TDMA for use as Base with its built-
in GPS receiver (TDMA attached to the DPG).
- or TDMAmobile.sts to set the TDMA for use as Mobile with
its built-in GPS receiver (TDMA attached to a DSD).
- or TDMAexternal.sts to set the TDMA for use with an external
GPS receiver.

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Configuring the radio circuitry

Figure C-5
C
- Click Open.
6. Wait until updating is complete, and then close the window.
Unplug the DB9 cable from the TDMA. The upper LEDs on the
TDMA, indicate the type of GPS configuration.

Mobile Base External GPS

Figure C-6

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

Setting up the built-in GPS receiver


Each TDMA unit has a built-in Differential GPS receiver (Septentrio
AsteRx or Magellan DG14) that can be used as a “Mobile” or “Base”
station. Its serial ports are available on the DB25 connector of the
TDMA.
To set up the GPS receiver, use the Y-cord supplied. One end (equipped
with a DB25 connector) connects to the TDMA. The other end has two
DB9 connectors, only one of which must be connected to the computer
(depending on whether you want to set up the GPS receiver as “Mobile”
or “Base” station).

AsteRx GPS receiver


For an AsteRx GPS receiver, copy the RxConf-setup.exe file from the
428XL server’s disk (/export/home/ve464/tdma/septentrio directory)
to a PC computer and install it on the PC. In the Installation wizard, you
must choose C:\RXCONF as installation folder. Click Install.

Figure C-7

If you want to use a serial port other than COM1, edit the
“RxConf-Serial.txt” file located in C:\RXCONF. Replace “COM1” by
the serial port to use.

Figure C-8

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

DG14 GPS receiver


For a DG14 GPS receiver, use the Thales SetTracs software package
The TDMA is supplied along with a SetTracs software package. You
must use the SetTracks package available from the 428XL server’s disk
rather than that supplied by Thales. C
If for any reason you need to reconfigure a TDMA unit, do the
following:
1. Copy the SetTracs software from the 428XL server disk directory
/export/home/ve464/tdma (all the files in that directory) to a PC
computer. Run the setup.exe file to install SetTracs on the
computer with the traditional Windows “Installation Wizard”.
2. Remove the DG14bas.ini and DG14gps.ini files from this folder:
C:\Program Files\SetTracs. Replace them by those from
/export/home/ve464/tdma
3. Open the SetTracs main window (double-click on its icon on the
desktop).

Figure C-9 SetTracs main window

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

Setting up the GPS receiver as “Mobile”


Connect the “RTCM OUT” end of the Y-cord to the serial port of the
computer. (The other DB9 connector is not used).

9-36 VDC
VHF GPS
(UHF) RTCM OUT
COM1

NMEA OUT
(used to set up as “Base”)

Figure C-10 Cabling for setup as “Mobile”

AsteRx Mobile
1. Run the RxConf.exe file. Choose the ROVER option and the type
of corrections (Diffential or RT Kinematic).

Figure C-11

2. Click OK.

Figure C-12

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

3. After all messages have been transmitted to the GPS receiver,


click on Configuration Done. GPS messages should appear
(unless no GPS signal is received).

Figure C-13

4. Click on Exit.

DG14 Mobile
1. Click on the Setup GPS Rx button in the SetTracs main window.

Figure C-14

2. From the Setup Base or Remote option button, choose “Remote”


(unless already done).

Figure C-15

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

3. Click on the Setup GPS Receiver button. A warning dialogue


box should pop up, asking you if you want to continue the search,
as the system is searching for a file that was normally renamed
(see page 323).

Figure C-16

4. Click Yes and select the “DG14MobileDgps.ini” file in the


dialogue box. This loads the configuration commands contained
in that file to the GPS receiver (the button is dimmed until the
configuration process is complete).
5. Click Close.

Setting up the GPS receiver as “Base”


1. Connect the “NMEA OUT” end to the serial port of the computer.
(The other end is not used).

9-36 VDC
VHF GPS
(UHF) NMEA OUT
COM1

RTCM OUT
(used to set up as “Mobile”)

Figure C-17 Cabling for setup as “Base”

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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

AsteRx Base
1. Run the RxConf.exe file.
2. Choose the BASE option and the type of corrections (Diffential
or RT Kinematic). Click OK.
C

Figure C-18

3. Enter the exact coordinates of the GPS antenna of the reference


station.

Figure C-19

4. Click on Valid.

Figure C-20

5. After all messages have been transmitted to the GPS receiver,


click on Configuration Done. GPS messages should appear
(unless the position is incorrect or no GPS signal is received).

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

Figure C-21

6. Click on Exit.

DG14 Base
1. Click on the Setup GPS Rx button in the SetTracs main window.

Figure C-22

2. This opens the “GPX Rx setup program” window. From the Setup
Base or Remote option button, choose “Base”.

Figure C-23

3. Set the bit rate to 300 bits per second.


4. In the Reference Position fields, enter the exact position of the
GPS antenna of the reference station (height = altitude + geoidal
separation).

328 VE464 User’s Manual


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TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

5. Click on the Setup GPS Receiver button. A warning dialogue


box should pop up, asking you if you want to continue the search,
as the system is searching for a file that was normally renamed
(see page 323).

Figure C-24

6. Click Yes and select the “DG14BaseDgps.ini” file in the dialogue


box. This loads the configuration commands contained in that file
to the GPS receiver (the button is dimmed until the configuration
process is complete).
7. Click Close.

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C TracsTDMA troubleshooting
Setting up the built-in GPS receiver

330 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Appendix

D Analog radio interfacing

This chapter describes how to connect the VE464 DPG or


DSD to some radio models tested by SERCEL. In this
chapter:

• Introduction (page 332)


• MOTOROLA GM 360 (page 333)
• MOTOROLA GM300 (page 334)

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February 16, 2010
D Analog radio interfacing
Introduction

Introduction
Conventional analog radios can be used in place of TDMA units, with
the following restrictions:
• The “Navigation-driven shooting mode is not allowed on the
recording system.
• Slip-Sweep is not allowed.
If analog radios are used, a GPS receiver must be connected to the DPG
and each DSD.
For shots with simultaneous sources, the TDMA technology is
recommended if the sources are located far apart.

IMPORTANT
Be sure the ground of the DPG or DSD is wired to the ground of the
radio unit.

332 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Analog radio interfacing
MOTOROLA GM 360

MOTOROLA GM 360
Radio Interface

VE464 GM360
1.8 k
XMT
2 5 Flat_TX_Audio

9
COM
820  820 
7 GND
D
8 RCV 11 Flat Output RX
PTT
1 3 External PTT

12-pin connector 16-pin connector

“Radio” connector pinout

Pin1

VE464 “Radio Management” parameters


In the recording system’s VE464 main window, click on the Radio
Management button and choose the “Analog” type of radio.
• Set the “Radio Level” parameter to 30 %.
• Default “Switch on” delay: 300 ms.
• Default “Gap” delay: 100 ms.

VE464 User’s Manual 333


February 16, 2010
D Analog radio interfacing
MOTOROLA GM300

MOTOROLA GM300
Radio Interface

J3
XMT 2 2
RCV 8 11
VE464 1 3
GM300
PTT
COM 9 7 GND
9
15
16
12-pin connector 16-pin connector

Pin15 Pin1

Pin16 Pin2
J3

Check for the following settings inside the radio unit:


• Jumper JU551 should be set to "B";
• Jumpers JU601, JU701, JU808, JU809 should be set to "A".

VE464 “Radio Functions” parameters


In the recording system’s VE464 main window, click on the Radio
Management button and choose the “Analog” type of radio.
• Set the “Radio Level” parameter to 30 %.
• Default “Switch on” delay: 300 ms.
• Default “Gap” delay: 100 ms.

334 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Appendix

E Glossary of abbreviations
and acronyms

A
AC Alternating Current.

Acq. An abbreviation for Acquisition.

ADC Analog-to-Digital Converter.

AIB Auxiliary Interface Box. Used to connect analog pilot signals from
a DPG to FDUs used as auxiliary channels.

API American Petroleum Institute.

AS Acceleration Sensor.

Aux. An abbreviation for Auxiliary.

Avg. An abbreviation for Average.

AWG American Wire Gauge.

VE464 User’s Manual 335


February 16, 2010
E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

B
Bacc. An abbreviation for Base plate Acceleration (vibrator).

BCD Binary-Coded Decimal.

BOB Break Out Box.

Bvel. An abbreviation for Base plate Velocity (vibrator).

C
CD Compact Disk.

Chan. An abbreviation for Channel.

COG Centre Of Gravity.

Config. An abbreviation for Configuration.

Coord. An abbreviation for Coordinates.

CR Carriage Return.

CRC Cyclic Redundancy Code. An error correction code used to catch


errors in the data.

CTB Confirmed Time Break.

Ctrl. Abbreviation for Control.

D
DAC Digital-to-Analog Converter.

dB Decibel.

DC Direct Current.

DFT Discrete Fourier Transform.

336 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

DGPS Differential GPS. The DGPS technique uses a fixed ground-based


reference station to broadcast the difference between the position
indicated by the satellite system and the known fixed position. The
base station broadcasts the difference between the measured
satellite pseudoranges and actual (internally computed)
pseudoranges, so that receiver stations can correct their
pseudoranges by the same amount.

DHCP Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (protocol for automating the


configuration of computers that use TCP/IP)

DIP Dual Inline Package. E


DPG Digital Pilot Generator (VE464). A control unit for the vibrator
electronics (DSD). Connects to the LCI-428.

DPR Dual Port RAM.

DSD Digital Servo Drive (VE432/VE464). Performs real-time control of


the energy imparted into the earth by a vibrator. Communicates
with a DPG via a radio link.

DSP Digital Signal Processor.

DTS Data Transfer Sequence.

DVD Digital Versatile Disc.

E
EEPROM Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory.

EOF End Of File.

ESD Electrostatic Discharge.

F
FDU Field Digitizing Unit. An analog-to-digital converter for a seismic
or auxiliary channel. Includes a digitally controlled test signal
generator.

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February 16, 2010
E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

Flt. An abbreviation for Fleet.

FO Firing Order sent to a source controller.

Freq An abbreviation for Frequency.

FTP File Transfer Protocol.

G
GIS Geographical Information System.

GMT Greenwich Mean Time.

Gnd. An abbreviation for Ground.

GPS Global Positioning System. A satellite-based global navigation


system that consists of a constellation of 24 satellites orbiting the
Earth, several in-orbit spares, and a ground-based control segment.
The GPS is owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Defense
but is available for general use around the world. The satellites
transmit signals that are used for extremely accurate three-
dimensional (latitude, longitude, and elevation) global navigation
(position determination), and for the dissemination of precise time.
GPS-derived position determination is based on the arrival times, at
an appropriate receiver, of precisely timed signals from the
satellites that are above the user's radio horizon. The location
accuracy is anywhere from 100 to 10 metres for most equipment.
Accuracy can be pinpointed to within one meter with special
military-approved equipment.

GUI Graphical User Interface.

H
HC High Cut (RF filtering).

HDOP Horizontal Dilution Of Precision (GPS).

Hex. An abbreviation for Hexadecimal.

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Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

HFVS High Fidelity Vibratory Seismic. A method for improving the


fidelity of data acquired with a vibratory source. Involves the
measurement and recording of suitable motions from each vibrator
so that these actual motions can be used to separate simultaneous
sources and process the data.

I
ID (1) Identification, identity. (2) Inner Diametre.

Ident. An abbreviation for Indentity. E


Incr. An abbreviation for Increment

Info. An abbreviation for Information

Init. An abbreviation for (1) Initialize (2) Initialization.

IP Internet Protocol.

ITB Internal Time Break.

K
kN 1000 Newton.

L
LAN Local Area Network. A data communications system that (a) lies
within a limited spatial area, (b) has a specific user group, (c) has a
specific topology, and (d) is not a public switched
telecommunications network, but may be connected to one.

Lat. An abbreviation for Latitude.

LC Low Cut (RF filtering).

LCD Liquid Crystal Display.

LED Light Emitting Diode.

LF Line Feed.

VE464 User’s Manual 339


February 16, 2010
E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

Long. An abbreviation for Longitude.

LVDT Linear Variable Displacement Transducer.

M
Macc. An abbreviation for Mass Acceleration (vibrator).

Max. Abbreviation for Maximum.

MB Megabyte.

Mbps Megabits Per Second.

Min. An abbreviation for (1) Minimum (2) Minute.

Misc. An abbreviation for Miscellaneous.

Mvel. An abbreviation for Mass Velocity (vibrator).

N
NA Not Available.

NAN Not A Number.

Nav. An abbreviation for Navigation.

NB An abbreviation for “Number”.

NC Not Connected.

NFS Network File System.

NMEA National Marine Electronics Association.

Num. An abbreviation for (1) Number (2) Numerical.

O
Obs. An abbreviation for Observer.

OD Outer diametre.

340 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

OS Operating System. Software designed to control the hardware of a


specific data-processing system in order to allow users and
application programs to make use of it.

P
PC Personal Computer

PCB Printed Circuit Board.

PDF Portable Document Format


E
PN Part Number.

Pos. An abbreviation for (1) Position (2) Positioning.

PPM Parts Per Million.

PPS Pulses Per Second

Proc. An abbreviation for (1) Processing (2) Process (3) Processor.

psi Pounds per Square Inch.

PWB Printed Wiring Board.

O
Oct. An abbreviation for Octave. The interval between any two
frequencies that have a ratio of 2 to 1.

Q
QC Quality Control.

R
RAM Random-Access Memory.

Ran. An abbreviation for Random.

VE464 User’s Manual 341


February 16, 2010
E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

Rcv. An abbreviation for Receiver.

Rdy. An abbreviation for Ready.

Rec. An abbreviation for (1) Record (2) Recorder.

Ref. An abbreviation for Reference.

RF Radio Frequency.

RJ45 Registered Jack - 45 (8 wire connector used in networking).

RMS Root-Mean-Square. The square root of the average of the squares of


a series of related values (for a sine wave, 0.707 times the peak
value).

RTCM Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services.

RTK Real-Time Kinematic (GPS). The RTK technique allows


centimetric accuracy to be achieved.

Rx. An abbreviation for Receive.

S
SD or SDev. Standard Deviation.

SE Single-End.

SEG Society of Exploration Geophysicists. The SEG promotes the


science of geophysics and the education of exploration
geophysicists.

SEG-D One of the formats developed by the SEG for recording seismic
data, used in processing and interpretation software to determine
how the tape should be read.

Seq. An abbreviation for Sequence.

SFU Services for Unix.

342 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

SGA Signal Graphic Analyzer. Software used to analyse radio or


wireline-similarity signals acquired on Sercel systems. Allows the
user to monitor the phase, distortion or force of the vibrator source
signal (on auxiliary traces) in real time.

Simult. An abbreviation for Simultaneous.

SN Serial Number.

SNR Signal-to-Noise Ratio.

SP Shot Point. E
SPS SHELL Processing Support format. A standard for the transfer of
positioning and geophysical support data from land field crews to
seismic processing centres.

SR Sample Rate. The sampling interval in a seismic acquisition.

Stat. An abbreviation for Statistics.

T
TB Time Break. A time mark indicating the shot instant or the time at
which the seismic wave was generated.

TCP Transmission Control Protocol (with Internet Protocol, the main


protocol of the Internet).

TCXO Temperature-Controlled Crystal Oscillator.

TDM Time-Division Multiplex.

TDMA Time Division Multiple Access.

TE Transmit Error.

Topo. An abbreviation for Topographical.

Tx. An abbreviation for Transmit.

VE464 User’s Manual 343


February 16, 2010
E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

U
UHF Ultra High Frequency (300 - 3000 MHz; 1 - 0.1 m).

UPS Uninterruptible Power Supply.

URL Uniform Resource Locator (world wide web address).

USB Universal Serial Bus.

UTC Universal Time Coordinated. Greenwich Mean Time updated with


leap seconds each year to compensate for changes in the rotation of
the earth.

Util. An abbreviation for Utility.

V
Var. An abbreviation for Variable.

VE464 Vibrator Electronics, consisting of a control unit (DPG) connecting


to the 428XL control module (LCI-428), and a vibrator control unit
(DSD) installed in each vibrator truck.

VHF Very High Frequency (30 - 300 MHz; 10 - 1 m).

Vib. An abbreviation for Vibrator.

VLI Vibrator Local Interface.

VP Vibrated Point. The Shot Point when a vibratory source is used.

VQC88 A standalone field system used for vibrator maintenance or trouble-


shooting, capable of acquiring 7 analog channels (including two
independent accelerometer sensors).

VSPB Vibrator Sensor Probe Box.

VSR Vibrator Signal Recording. A function used to record actual


vibrator motions from each vibrator.

VSWR Voltage Standing Wave Ratio. The ratio of the electronic field or
voltage at a voltage minimum to that at the adjacent maximum in a
stationary-wave system, as in a coaxial cable.

344 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

W
WGS84 World Geodetic System 1984.

WIFI Wireless Fidelity (networking).

X
Xmit. An abbreviation for Transmit or Transmitter.

VE464 User’s Manual 345


February 16, 2010
E Glossary of abbreviations and acronyms

346 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

Index
· TDMA, setting up 326
Baseplate
· mass 73
Baud rate
· TDMA 180
Beep 83
BNC
· Force 270
· Pilot 256
· Ref Adjust 270
A · TB, DPG 256
Abbreviations 335 · TB, DSD 270
Acceleration Break-Out Box 46
· sensor 50
Accelerometer C
· cable 272
· specifications 259 Cables
· Sum Box 52 · Accelerometer, DSD 272
Accessories · DPG 250
· DSD 257
· DPG 32
· radio, analog 255, 262
· DSD 33
· Servo, DSD 271
AckSys
Channel
· Ethernet bridge 219
· selecting, DSD keypad 179
Adjust
· TDMA 67, 179
· Ref, BNC 270
Check
Analog
· AS 74
· Pilots, cable 250
Choice
· radio cable 255, 262
· QC 83
· radio interfacing 331
Archive Comparison
· DSD 106
· signal, file format 305
· signal, local 134 Compass
AS · view 233
· check 74 Compression
AS1 50 · oil 81
ASB 52 Configuration
· Base, TDMA 326
Auto
· DSD 105
· Level, vib drive 69
· Mobile, TDMA 324
Autonomous · Tablet PC 280
· DSD 148 · TDMA 174
· TDMA GPS receiver 322
B · TDMA radio 319
Background 237, 238 Connecting
Base · DPG 40

VE464 User’s Manual 347


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

· DSD 43 · address number 63


· Tablet PC 43 · Autonomous 148
· TDMA 162 · connecting 43
Connectors · connectors 43, 257
· DPG 250 · keypad 44
· DSD 257 · keypad, radio channel 179
Control · mounting dimensions 42
· vibrator 20 · Network 23, 217
Crew · Power-on 58
· number 63 · serial ports 64
Custom · Setup menu 63
· sweep type 90 · slave 143
· sweep, file format 308 · software, installing 294
· sweep, loading 112 · software, loading 110
· standalone 138
DVC
D · recovery procedure 295
Datum 224 DXF 238
Day 240
Delay
· lift up 69
E
DGPS 160 Error
· reference station, setting up 326 · messages 115
· time slot 182 ESRI 238
Differential Estimated
· GPS 160 · state 84
· GPS, setting up 326 Ethernet
· GPS, time slot 182 · bridge 219
Display Excitation
· Setup menu 68 · Ponderation, Setup menu 66
Distance Extended QC
· measurement 243 · file format 302
Dither
· Setup menu 66 F
DPG 19
Filtered
· connecting 40
· servo control 84
· connectors 250
· mounting dimensions 39
Fleet
· navigation 23
· software, installing 290
· number 63
· Standalone 30
Drive FO
· pulse 252
· level 83
high 69 Force
low 69 · BNC 270
DSD 19 · hydraulic 73
Format

348 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

· custom sweep file 308 Initialisation


· Extended QC file 302 · DSD 108
· signal local archive 305 Input
Frequency · servo control loop 69
· TDMA 175 Installation
From · from DSD 73
· DSD, installation parameters 73 · from Terminal 73
· Terminal, installation parameters 73 · routine 72
Installing
G ·
·
acceleration sensor 50
ASB 52
Gain · Break-Out Box 46
· Servo 81 · DPG hardware 39
· Spool 81 · DPG software 290
GM 360 333 · DSD 42
GM300 334 · DSD hardware 42
GPS · DSD software 294
· Differential 160 · guidance equipment 227
· Differential, time slot 182 · Lift box 48
· receiver, external 170 · SFU software 282
· receiver, TDMA 159 · software 275
· TDMA, setting up 322 · VLI software 278
Ground · VSPB 54
· Stiffness 155
· Viscosity 155
Guidance
K
· software 231 Kalman
· vibrator 223 · filter 84
· view 235 Keypad
· DSD 44
· DSD, radio channel 179
H Kinematic
Heading 235 · GPS, time slot 183
High
· drive level 69
Hold Down Weight 73
L
Hydraulic Layer
· force 73 · view 237
Leakage
· oil 81
I Level
Identification · auto, vib drive 69
· parameters 78 · drive 83
· swap 81 · VHF 68
Indicator Lift
· LED, TDMA 192 · Box 48

VE464 User’s Manual 349


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

· connector 257 · connector, DPG 251


· up delay 69 · connector, DSD 260
Linear Navigation
· sweep type 86 · fleet 23
Loading Network
· custom sweep 112 · DSD 23, 217
Local Night 240
· mode, DSD 60
· signal archive, file format 305
· sweep 82
O
Log Offset
· sweep type 87 · Mass 76
Loop · Torque motor 76
· servo control 69 · Valve 76
Low Ohmmeter
· drive level 69 · function, DSD 98
LVDT Oil
· position · Compression 81
mass 99 · Leakage 81
valve 100 · Viscosity 81
· resistance 98 Options
· voltage 97 · DSD setup 65
· setup menu 65
Overloads 94
M
Maintenance
· menu, DSD 96
P
Mass Pilot
· Back gain 77 · BNC 256
· baseplate 73 Polarity
· LVDT position 99 · Mass 76
· LVDT resistance 98 · Torque motor 76
· LVDT voltage 97 · Valve 76
· mass 73 Ponderation
· Offset 76 · Setup menu 66
· Offset Adjust 99 Power
· Polarity 76 · connector, DSD 257
· Stroke 73 · supply, DPG and DSD 24
Message Power on
· sweep definition 133 · DSD 58
Mobile · Tablet PC 276
· TDMA, setting up 324 Pressure
· sensor, enabling 65
· switch, testing 102
N Projection 224
NAV

350 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

Pulse
· sweep type 89
S
Saving
· signals 65
Q saving 65
QC 21, 84 Sensor
· choice 83 · acceleration 50
· displaying 83 Serial
· Extended, file format 302 · port, DSD 64
· statistics 22 Servo
Quality 241 · cable, DSD 271
Quality Control 21 · Gain 81
Query · input 69
· data 244 · Setup menu 66
Setup
· options 65
R SFU
Radio · installing 282
· analog, Setup menu 68 Show
· cable, TDMA 254, 261 · QC 83
· Setup menu 67 Signal 65
· TDMA, setting up 319 · (in/out) specifications. See Connectors
· TDMA, Setup menu 67 · local archive 134
Random · local archive, file format 305
· Lift up delay 69 · sweep 20
· sweep type 92 Similarities
Raw · connector 268
· servo control 84 Size
Recorder · DPG and DSD 24
· cable 253 Slave
· connector 252 · DSD 143
Ref Slip-Sweep 22, 153
· Adjust, BNC 270 Software
Remote · DPG, installing 290
· connection, DSD 103 · DSD, installing 294
· mode, DSD 60 · SFU, installing 282
Remote CMD · VLI, installing 278
· connector 265 Specifications
Repeat · Accelerometers 259
· sweep 83 · DPG and DSD 24
Repeater 197 · Signals (in/out) See Connectors
RS Spool
· Setup menu 64 · Gain 81
RTK SPS
· time slot 183 · loading 238

VE464 User’s Manual 351


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

Standalone · channel 67, 179


· DPG 30 · configuring 174
· DSD 138 · connecting 162
State · datalink 157
· estimated 84 · GPS receiver 159
Statistics · indicator LEDs 192
· QC 22 · reconfiguring 323
Status · repeater 197
· bar, VLI 62 · time-slot allocation 185
· code, DPG 120 Temperature
· code, DSD 121 · operating and storage 24
Stiffness, ground 155 Time
Stroke · slot, allocating 185
· mass 73 Timing
· usable 73 · sweep 122
Swap Tn
· identification 81 · sweep type 88
Sweep Toolbar 234
· Custom 90 Torque motor
· custom, file format 308 · Offset 76
· definition message 133 · Offset Adjust 101
· Linear 86 · Polarity 76
· local 82 Tracking
· Log 87 · time slot 183
· Pulse 89 Troubleshooting
· Random 92 · TracsTDMA 311
· signal 20 Type
· Table 85 · DSD 64
· timing 122
· Tn 88
· type, Identification 79
U
Units
· Setup menu 65
T Update
Table · menu, VLI 110
· sweep type 85 Usable
Tablet PC 226 · Stroke 73
· configuring 280 USB
· power-on 276 · DSD 263
TB
· BNC, DPG 256
· BNC, DSD 270 V
· signal 252 Valve
TDMA · Back gain 77
· Baud rate 180 · LVDT position 100
· cable 254, 261 · LVDT resistance 98

352 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

· LVDT voltage 97
· Offset 76
· Offset Adjust 100
· Polarity 76
VHF
· level 68
Vibrator
· control 20
· Control, connector 258
· guidance 223
· Guidance software tool 231
· number 63
· Sensor Probe Box 54
· signal recording 154
· type 64
Viscosity
· ground 155
· oil 81
VLI
· software, installing 278
· user guide 57
Voltmeter
· function, DSD 96
VSPB 54
VSR 154

W
Waypoint
· view 232
Weight
· hold down 73
Wiring
· DPG 250
· DSD 257
WKT 239

Z
Zoom
· setup 242

VE464 User’s Manual 353


February 16, 2010
Index

A B C D E F GH I J K L M N OP QR S T U V W X Y Z

354 VE464 User’s Manual


February 16, 2010
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-01/2.0


Subsystem : DPG & DSD
Date : February 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
The purpose of this software update is to inform you of the release of VE464 software version
V2.0, together with VLI software V2.0.
WARNING: see the special installation instructions on page 2/3.

New features
- V1.0 software patches up to patch05 are included in V2.0.
- JVe464 setups more user-friendly.
- TDMA radio transmission quality indicator in DPG activity bar.
- Faster status recovery in case of adverse radio conditions.
- The "DSD Signal Local Archive" function records vibrator waveforms to an SEGD file. The
vibrator waveforms can be filtered with the same type of filter as used on seismic Lines.
- READY cannot be generated when the vibrator pad is UP.
- GET DSD returns more information.
- Differential GPS station position updated from the Jve464 window.
- GPS quality information displayed on DSD (diff, RTK, float, etc.).

Compatibility
VE464 V2.0 is compatible with 428XL V4.0 and VLI V2.0.
The following issues have been fixed in VLI software V2.0:
- VLI starting Install on Pressure down OK.
- "Excitation Ponderation" less than 1.0 not allowed.
- "Update version" function lockup.
VLI V2.0 also includes the following new features:
- Allows entering Repeater parameters.
- Allows selecting the Line filter to use for the Signal Local Archive function.
- New VLI interface allows Standalone operating mode.
- Set Servo local setup, equivalent to Set Servo remote function from 428XL GUI.

VE464-01/2.0
1/3
Installation instructions
After installing 428XL V4.0 on the 428XL server, use the procedure below to upgrade the
DPG to V2.0:
1. Install the VE464 V2.0 software release on the server. Also install the VE464 patches
available.
2. Remotely log on to the DPG, by typing the following in a Terminal window:
rlogin 172.30.200.150
3. Check the NFS mount points:
nfsDevShow
This command should return the following information:
device name file system
/users/ svr428:/users
/export/home/ svr428:/export/home
4. If that is not the case, type the following command:
kdpInitHciNetwork
5. Load vxWorksDpg to the DPG:
cd "/users/ve464/delivery"
esyUpdateFlashModuleI "VXWORKS_VE464","vxWorksDpg.st.bin"
(Warning: the quote characters in the above commands are absolutely necessary.
Also, be sure to invoke vxWorksDpg rather than vxWorksDsd. ).
6. Wait until loading is complete (this may take a few minutes).
Warning! Be sure not to interrrupt the updating process (this would lock up the DPG
and require that you return it to the Sercel for repair). The messages that may appear
are unimportant.
7. To check the program name, type:
esyFlashShow
This should first display the information on the vxWorks module. Check the
"AppliVersion", which should read "2".
Header of module : VXWORKS_VE464
StartP : ....
RamAddrPV : 0x10000
BssStartAddrPV : ...
BssEndAddrPV : ...
OffsetPV : 0x0
EntryPV : 0x10000
VersionUL : ...
RevisionUL : ...
Date : ...
Copyright : Copyright 2006 Sercel
Name : VXWORKS_VE464
AppliVersion : 2
AppliRevisionPAC : 0

VE464-01/2.0
2/3
AppliPatchPAC : 0 (or 2 if patch 2 is installed)
Not Used : ...

8. Restart the DPG.


sysReset
9. Finish the V2.0 updating:
- Start the 428XL application.
- Open the JVe464 window and launch the "Update Version" function.
- Select the update file: /users/ve464/delivery/Update.conf
- Click GO.

VE464-01/2.0
3/3
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-02/2.0


Subsystem : DPG, DSD
Date : June 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
Software Patch02 implements the following new features:
- DSD Slave mode available.
- DSD Stand-Alone mode available.
- New Set Servo panel in VLI for standalone operations.

Patch installation instructions


See the .txt file in Patch02.
WARNING: Patch02 requires e-428 patch02 to be installed.

VE464-02/2.0
1/1
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-03/2.0


Subsystem : DPG, DSD, VLI
Date : June 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
Software Patch03 implements the following new features:
- A "Repeater" mode is available.
- Delays between FO and TB much more stable in Slip-Sweep.
- Integration of AsterX GPS receiver into TracsTDMA.
- Displaying the release of all Ve464 modules in 428XL IdCard.
- Safety boot to restore corrupted application.
It fixes the following problems:
- Problems fixed in V1.0 patches 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11.
- VLI too slow when more than one GGA per second is received by DSD.
- Position in Ready message may not be accurate enough in RTK mode.
- Errors in displaying Ident results.
- Incorrect TDMA baud rate display on DSD.
- Vibrator discarded from a fleet may still appear in the Positioning environment.
VLI software is upgraded to V2.1 with the following new features:
- New setup, used to define QC limits (phase, force, distortion).
- Red warning appearing on VLI if QC result of a given sweep (local or remote) is out of
limits.
- Status 11 displayed in red.
Patch03 corrects the following VLI problem:
- Sweep table not updated after saving.

Patch installation instructions


See the .txt file in Patch03.
WARNING: Patch03 requires e-428 patch03 to be installed.

VE464-03/2.0
1/1
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-04/2.0


Subsystem : DSD & DPG
Date : June 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
Software Patch04 contains Guidance software release V1.0.

Patch installation instructions


See the .txt file in Patch04.

VE464-04/2.0
1/1
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-05/2.0


Subsystem : DSD & DPG
Date : August 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
The patch add the new features
- DSD lock up after Vib Fleet.

Patch installation instructions


See the .txt file in Patch05.

VE464-05/2.0
1/1
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-06/2.0


Subsystem : DSD & DPG
Date : September 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
Software Patch 06 implements the following change:
- Status 11 is returned within the current status message (formerly, it was delayed).
Patch 06 also corrects the following problems:
- SEGD file archive not readable with Testify and Promax.
- Force underflow when using a pulse.
- Save Signal not inhibited on slave DSD.

Patch installation instructions


WARNING: You MUST install this patch both on DPG and DSD.
See the .txt file in Patch06.

VE464-06/2.0
1/1
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-07/2.0


Subsystem : DSD & DPG
Date : October 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
DVCx lockup recovery procedure
The recovery procedure described below is only intended for a DVCx board in a DSD or DPG
loaded with V2.0 software with Patch03 or above.
With software patch 03 or above, a recovery boot installed on the DVCx board can be used to
recover a board permanently locked up as a result of unexpected events (for example a DSD
being turned off while uploading new firmware, etc.).

On a DPG
1 - Remove the DPG cover to have access to the DVCx board.
2 - Place a jumper on connector J37.

VE464-07/2.0
1/4
3 - Connect the Ethernet port of the DPG to the 428XL server computer hosting VE464
software (/users/ve464/delivery directory).

Ethernet port

4 - Connect the serial port of the DPG to a serial port of the 428XL server computer, using
the DB9/DB9 RS cable (Part No. 3170340) provided in the DPG accessory kit.

Serial port

5 - Power on the DPG.


6 - Open a Terminal window on the computer’s serial port, by typing minicom (Return) in a
Terminal window:
- Check for the following messages appearing on the screen:
PinstrapValue 8
Safety boot
(otherwise, make sure the jumper is properly installed on the DVCx board, and
reboot the DPG).
- Check for VXWORKS starting after the vxWorks jump.
- Check for the message «THIS IS A DPG» on the monitoring screen.
- Wait until the message «Safety Boot appli» appears, followed by «Safety Boot ok».
- Type the esyFlashShow command to make sure the latest VxWorks version is
present (check the AppliVersion, AppliRevisionPAC and AppliPatchPAC fields):
Header of module : VXWORKS_VE464
StartP : ....
RamAddrPV : 0x10000
BssStartAddrPV : ...
BssEndAddrPV : ...
OffsetPV : 0x0
EntryPV : 0x10000
VersionUL : ...
RevisionUL : ...
Date : ...
Copyright : Copyright 2006 Sercel
Name : VXWORKS_VE464
AppliVersion : .
AppliRevisionPAC : .
AppliPatchPAC : .
Not Used : ...
7- Remove the jumper from connector J37.
8 - Reboot the DPG (the DPG should boot up properly and be able to connect to the GUI).

VE464-07/2.0
2/4
On a DSD
1 - Open the DSD to have access to the DVCx board.
2 - Place a jumper on connector J37.

3 - Connect the Ethernet port of the DSD (on rear panel) to the 428XL server hosting VE464
software (/users/ve464/delivery directory).

Ethernet port

VE464-07/2.0
3/4
4 - Connect the serial port of the DSD to a serial port of the 428XL server computer, using
the Field Remote Shell cable (Part No. 605086474B) provided in the DSD accessory kit.

Serial port

5 - Power on the DSD.


6 - Open a Terminal window on the computer’s serial port, by typing minicom (Return) in a
Terminal window:
- Check for the following messages appearing on the screen:
PinstrapValue 8
Safety boot
(otherwise, make sure the jumper is properly installed on the DVCx board, and
reboot the DSD).
- Check for VXWORKS starting after the vxWorks jump.
- Check for the message «THIS IS A DSD».
- Wait until the message «Safety Boot appli» appears, followed by «Safety Boot ok».
- Type the esyFlashShow command to make sure the latest VxWorks version is
present (check the AppliVersion, AppliRevisionPAC and AppliPatchPAC fields):
Header of module : VXWORKS_VE464
StartP : ....
RamAddrPV : 0x10000
BssStartAddrPV : ...
BssEndAddrPV : ...
OffsetPV : 0x0
EntryPV : 0x10000
VersionUL : ...
RevisionUL : ...
Date : ...
Copyright : Copyright 2006 Sercel
Name : VXWORKS_VE464
AppliVersion : .
AppliRevisionPAC : .
AppliPatchPAC : .
Not Used : ...
7- Remove the jumper from connector J37.
8 - Reboot the DSD (the DSD should boot up properly and the display should read the latest
version).

VE464-07/2.0
4/4
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-08/2.0


Subsystem : DSD & DPG
Date : December 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
In Patch08:
New features:
- Up to five NMEA strings from the GPS receiver can be defined to be stored in the header
of archived SEGD files.
- Faster recurrence of TDMA time-slot assigned to DPG.
- Standard DPG can be connected to a standalone server, allowing migration from "standard
DPG" to "standalone DPG".
- Vib Fleet function gives rise to an alarm if no GPS is connected to the DPG.
- DPG allowing Vib Fleet update in Auto mode (this requires e428 software patch 07).
- Internal errors from DSDs are reported in the JVE464 main window.

Fixed issues:
- DPG lockup if pilot1 and pilot2 different in length.
- More TDMA time-slots being required for adequate Differential GPS bit rate if using
many DSDs.
- In Guidance mode, incorrect Lat. and Long. information in archived files.
- DSD lockup at power off.
- FO/TB time not stable in slip-sweep mode if using two TDMA boxes.
- JVE464 not detecting a sweep table modified by VLI if Standalone mode.
- Acksys lockup if too many messages exchanged between DSDs for the Ready
information.
- DPG lockup if using an undefined sweep in a Dedicated sweep.
- Unable to use a Compound sweep in a Dedicated sweep.
- DSD lockup causing its TDMA to disturb the other TDMA.

VLI V2.2 software with the following new features:


- Minimum Ground Viscosity can be adjusted through VLI.
- Filtered force can be saved to archive files.

VE464-08/2.0
1/2
Fixed VLI issues:
- Not preventing starting an undefined sweep using the sweep table.
- Drive level not taken into account when taking a local sweep via VLI.
- Sweep errors not displayed when reaching QC limits.
- Unable to select ANALOG radio type.
- Sweep not correctly saved if Standalone mode.

Patch installation instructions


WARNING: You MUST install this patch both on DPG and DSD.
See the .txt file in Patch08.

VE464-08/2.0
2/2
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-09/2.0


Subsystem : DSD/DPG
Date : December 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
Fixed issues in Patch09:
- Some types of soils causing the mass to go out of control.
- Inopportune reloading of Safety Boot module.

Patch installation instructions


See the .txt file in Patch09.

VE464-09/2.0
1/1
Approved by
VE464
D. Boucard
SOFTWARE UPDATE

Software Update Number : VE464-10/2.0


Subsystem : DSD/DPG
Date : December 2009

Mandatory Specific Information CDROM

Purpose
Patch10 is intended for the Ve464 Guidance application. It contains patch 01 for the Guidance
software (Guidance V1.1 software release), correcting the following problem:
- Inconsistent use of metres and feet in parameters (some distances being displayed in feet but
computed in metres).

Patch installation instructions


See the .txt file in Patch10.

VE464-10/2.0
1/1