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The Nation’s Oldest Continuously Published College Weekly Friday, April 10, 2020 Volume 149, Number 21 bowdoinorient.com

Course registration Students and faculty find creative solutions


pushed to mid-June, to online classes
will feature new by Diego Lasarte
disciplines, everyone is adjusting
to the demands of remote learn-
who is now home in Kuching,
Malaysia, has had to adjust her
to a different space, streaming
her classes from a makeshift bed-

interface
Orient Staff
ing, from managing family ten- daily routine. room her parents set up so that
As students and faculty wrap sion to keeping students engaged “What’s hard is the time dif- she could quarantine away from
up their third week of online thousands of miles away. ference. I have night classes now, the family upon her return from
classes and settle into their new Students from around the which is weird because I am so the United States.
COVID-19 outbreak are that routines, many have stories to world are attending classes, used to having morning class,” Twelve time zones away,
by Tianyi Xu Maine may peak in 10 days to tell about their new virtual-class- sometimes at odd hours of the Eraou wrote in an email to the
Orient Staff
two weeks, so there’s a lot of room reality. Across academic day. Song Eraou ’23, for example, Orient. She has also had to adjust Please see ONLINE, page 4
The College announced on uncertainty on how this out-
Sunday that course registration break is going to really impact
for the fall semester will be Bowdoin,” said McCormack
postponed from April 9 until in a phone interview with the
mid-June, pending a decision Orient. “Given all that un-
about whether students will certainty, and given that we
be able to return to campus in don’t absolutely have to lock
the fall. Additionally, Senior in the curriculum now … why
Vice President of Information couldn’t we buy ourselves some
Technology (IT) Michael Cato time [to] let events unfold?”
notified students in an email McCormack also said that
last Thursday that class regis- some faculty members had re-
tration for next semester will quested a delay so they could
feature a new interface as the adapt their courses to the on-
result of an important system line setting, in the event that
maintenance. the College determines that
In a campus-wide email on students will be unable to re-
Sunday, Senior Vice President turn for the fall semester or
and Dean for Academic Af- will be able to do so with new
fairs Elizabeth McCormack restrictions.
explained that the decision to “[Faculty] could have a
postpone course registration much better sense of how their
was driven by the continued courses could be delivered if
uncertainty caused by the we had a little more time,” said
coronavirus (COVID-19) pan- McCormack. “For example, if
demic.
“The predictions about the Please see COURSES, page 5

College to host first ANN BASU, THE BOWDOIN ORIENT

responders and
SEE YOU NEXT YEAR: The Class of 2020 will not have their commencement exercises in Brunswick this spring. Instead the College plans to hold the event in May 2021.

CLASS OF 2020 COMMENCEMENT TENTATIVELY


emergency personnel SCHEDULED FOR MAY 2021

in on-campus housing
current seniors will be invit- Commencement inadvisable.” physical graduation next May.
by Kathryn McGinnis ed back to the College in May The Senior Class Council will There will be separate events
Orient Staff
2021 to walk across the steps of assist in the planning of next for the Class of 2021.
President Clayton Rose an- the Walker Art Building. month’s virtual commence- Rose’s email also notified
nounced preliminary plans to “I made the decision after ment, but a detailed schedule seniors that production delays
two weeks, so there’s a lot of reschedule commencement consulting with a number of has yet to be released. Tradi- due to COVID-19 will mean
by Aura Carlson uncertainty on how this out- exercises in the wake of the folks,” wrote Rose in an email to tions, such as the selection of that diplomas will not be de-
and Emma Sorkin break is going to really impact coronavirus (COVID-19) pan- the Orient. “We thought about commencement speakers, have livered in time for the virtual
Orient Staff
Bowdoin,” said McCormack in demic in an email to the Class the summer and fall, but the been postponed indefinitely. graduation. Though they are
The College announced on a phone interview with the Ori- of 2020 on Thursday morning. continued presence of the virus In addition, the Senior Class expected to arrive in mid-
Sunday that course registration ent. “Given all that uncertainty, Rose stated that, in addition to made the idea of the large so- Council will be instrumental June, they will still be dated
for the fall semester will be and given that we don’t abso- a virtual gathering on May 23, cial gatherings associated with in deciding the events for the May 23, 2020.
postponed from April 9 until lutely have to lock in the curric-

In memory of David Driskell H’89: From the


mid-June, pending a decision ulum now … why couldn’t we
about whether students will be buy ourselves some time [to] let
able to return to campus in the events unfold?”
fall. Additionally, Senior Vice McCormack also said that

pines of Falmouth, and beyond


President of Information Tech- some faculty members had re-
nology (IT) Michael Cato no- quested a delay so they could
tified students in an email last adapt their courses to the online
Thursday that class registration setting, in the event that the
for next semester will feature a College determines that stu- by the University of Maryland, “Two Centuries of Black Amer- religion and Black American life.
new interface as the result of an dents will be unable to return by Sabrina Lin which founded the David C. ican Art,” is considered a water- Maine became a constant ele-
Orient Staff
important system maintenance. for the fall semester or will be Driskell Center for the Study shed study in the scholarship of ment in Driskell’s oeuvre after he
In a campus-wide email on able to do so with new restric- David C. Driskell H’89, artist, Of The Visual Arts and Culture African American art. He is the attended the Skowhegan School
Sunday, Senior Vice President tions. scholar, curator and titan figure of African Americans and the recipient of 13 honorary doctor- of Sculpture and Painting in
and Dean for Academic Af- “[Faculty] could have a much in the field of African Ameri- African Diaspora in his honor al degrees in art, including one 1953. He was a visiting professor
fairs Elizabeth McCormack better sense of how their cours- can art history, died on April 1 in 2001. Driskell received the from Bowdoin in 1989. at Bowdoin in the spring of 1973
explained that the decision to es could be delivered if we had at 88 years old from complica- Presidential Humanities Medal As an artist, Driskell—the son and owned a summer home in
postpone course registration a little more time,” said McCor- tions related to the coronavirus from President Bill Clinton, and of a minister, Georgia-born and Falmouth.
was driven by the continued un- mack. “For example, if we have (COVID-19). his 1976 exhibition at the Los Appalachia-raised—produced
certainty caused by the corona- a seminar course of 20 people His death was announced Angeles County Museum of Art, rich imagery rooted in nature, Please see DRISKELL, page 8
virus (COVID-19) pandemic. … we could put that course in
“The predictions about the a larger classroom and people
COVID-19 outbreak are that This print edition of the Orient was produced on Friday, April 10, 2020, but due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it will be physically printed at a later date.
Maine may peak in 10 days to Please see HOUSING, page 5

N ZOOMER’S LICENSE F REACHING OUT A FESTIVITIES NO MORE S HEALTHY AT HOME O AN UPDATED OFFER
After “Zoombombing” incidents, BSG Bowdoin community explores virtual Eboard members revealed their plans for Bowdoin athletic trainers unveil virutal The Editorial Board updates the Offer of
contributes to expand Zoom licenses. Page 5. volunteering opportunities. Page 6. Ivies 2020, which is now canceled. Page 8. “Sunday Stretches” initiative. Page 10. the College. Page 11.
2 PAGE TWO
2 Friday, April 10, 2020

by Lily Randall
I’ve regressed.
randa Cosgrove alive? Was she ifestation of some internalised
STUDENT SPEAK:
Orient Staff
just a fever dream? Shoot me a
text if you know.) But such is
sexism/“I’m-not-like-other-
girls” headassery, but I’m over it! What’s a silver lining of remote learning?
Saturday marks one month not the case and I’m pretending I’m not going there! I’ve seen the
since President Clayton Rose I like Parks and Recreation so light, and I want to talk about the
took a shotgun to the semester my family doesn’t start renting incredible lyricism in “18” writ- Nailah Khoory ’22
(rest in power Miss Bowdoin, out my room. So, in the spirit of ten by Ed Sheeran for 1D’s plati-
1794-2020), which means it regression, I’ve decided to in- num album FOUR instead! In all “Being able to watch little siblings grow up.”
has now been one month since dulge every guilty pleasure that seriousness though, if you were
I’ve felt any sense of agency. I’d crosses my path because I know ever a Directioner, fire up your
like to think that I’ve kept some my third grade self would, and favorite album for old times’
semblance of my college self to- at least that bitch had some or- sake. I just remembered Zayn a
gether, but considering my tol-
erance is now half a White Claw
ganically-produced serotonin.
I know I’m about to lose some
few days ago and had to have a
moment of silence.
Gail Saez Hall ’23
and I can slowly feel myself go-
ing illiterate, that one might be
major audience support with this
one, but on god the best guilty
Another fun, cute and quirky
thing I’ve been doing this past “Locking eyes with Halina Bennet in class.”
a bit of a stretch. On top of all pleasure I have indulged in this month is taking pictures on
of this, I don’t leave my house quarantine is listening to One my “Quarantine Camera.” The
unaccompanied anymore, I go Direction again. I kinda became quarantine cam is a three-years
to bed at like 10 p.m., and I’ve an indie music snob in high expired disposable I found in
been on a strict diet of pasta and school, and attending Bowdoin my kitchen cabinet while look- Solomon Aborbie Jr. ’22
grilled cheese since I got home. College in Brunswick, ME has ing for scissors, and I decided to
Now, if you had told any of
this to Lily of six weeks ago, she
honestly only made it 10 times
worse (this is a public apology
document my family’s ~adven-
tures in social distancing~ with
“My grandparents have been taking care of me since I was a
probably would have respond- to anyone I ever forced to listen it. As of right now, the camera is kid, and now I’m home to help them around the house.”
ed with some shit like “omfggg to Hippocampus or Snail Mail mainly photos of my half-asleep
that’s like the f***ing dream or something in that vein… I dog or me with my ear in a bowl
bro,” but considering I’m pretty was too far up my own ass to of saltwater trying to nurse my
sure I’m just 8 years old again, I know better). But redemption infected ’cartilage piercing back Jordy Dushime ’23
can confirm that this is actually truly is a beautiful thing, and I to health. But I have high hopes
NOT the f***ing dream, bro. At am SHAMELESSLY listening to for its future! I’m especially ex- “I get to expand my culinary skills.”
this point I’m just waiting for One Direction again. cited to see what the first shot
iCarly to reboot so this thing I could probably (definitely?) on the roll is, because when I
can be a slam dunk on reliving get into a long spiel about how found it, one picture had been
my childhood. (Side note: is Mi- rejecting 1D was likely a man- taken. Updates to come luvs xx. COMPILED BY AYUB TAHLIL AND LILY RANDALL

QUARANTINE CORONAVIRUS
FLATTEN THE CURVE
WORK FROM HOME
REMOTE LEARNING
WIFI
NO IVIES

WORD SEARCH QUARANTINE


DISTANCE
ZOOM
SCREEN ADDICTION
LONELY
SAD
We know you’re bored. MASK MICROSOFT TEAMS EGGS

D H W H K I G F Q B O O K D S F N O I T C I D D A N E E R C S S
E A A C M N A E S C Z Z H J K U I O O Q S E G Z Q X C I H N P G
F E Z O A M E S D H V C X F O U H G M E E A S D F F E O K I O F
G I G R S A W E F H J K I B N C D A I T A M E I O D A N B I I R
H J H O R A E R F L A T T E N T H E C U R V E G G J O P E F U H
A G J N D D B S G H R M E R V G K I R O M A S K A K R Z G E Y K
J V E A S A C D F G H J T Y U R E C O Q S G K L O E V E I L T G
U N S V B H P A Q A U E N C T U N J S Q W E R T M E N U K O R F
I M C I V P O J I U A N Y H D R N Y O Y U I O O P C B I N N E D
O M V R U C V I O B A S R D N H A O F A S D T F G O A N V E W S
H K B U J O H U B I X R E D X R I U T H J E K L Z O R B C L A U
N O N S G G E A O U H K A I R D B D T X L C V B N J I G I Y B I
R E U O J A Q B O U Y S O N E N I Z E E M J U G E N A F N E C J
E F F I K M E M M A N X U P T B E X A D A B F R I A E D O G T H
A S F Z C M N V F O U J D A P I U R M V R I A N V E K E I B H G
R A E E E N E N U J D A E O E A N O S T V B M O O Z L P V H J F
J Z A A Q E P A H G E L L B R I X E C Y J I N B L Y I A I I I D
U E V S O A L E B Y H U K N N R E A B D B F R I L B X T E G E E
G R I H R D I S T A N C E G A D F H I N G S E D Q A N D S K I N
W O R K F R O M H O M E O K F O E H J U B C D W S A Q R C L F B
J G F G H I D S C B H Y P P R D S A F E A B H J U E W Z A E I M
Q J T H B O G I D S X V G U I E F H J U H G N E D C G F D E W J
Friday, April 10, 2020 NEWS 3

NEWS IN BRIEF Head football coach sued in Title IX lawsuit


COMPILED BY HALINA BENNETT AND ELLERY HARKNESS
Allegheny College and its team activities. sponse from the defendants’
by Ian Ward counsel and they intend to vig- “It became clear to Ms. lawyers.
Orient Staff
orously defend the case,” wrote Simonetta that the football Bowdoin’s Ashmead White
Head Football Coach B.J. Hammer. coaching staff had deliberately Director of Athletics Tim Ryan
Hammer has been named as a Simonetta became the first elected not to proceed with an declined to comment on the
defendant in a federal sexual woman on the Allegheny foot- investigation, opting instead to lawsuit, other than to say that
harrassment lawsuit filed by ball team when she joined as a ‘resolve’ the issue by forcing her the College was aware of the
a former player at Allegheny prospective kicker in the win- off the football team,” Weidus proceedings. Ryan declined
College alleging that the school ter of 2018. According to the wrote in the court documents. to specify whether Hammer
ignored reports of sexual mis- court documents, Simmonetta According to the complaint, would face disciplinary action
conduct and discrimination. immediately began experienc- Simonetta continued to experi- from the College if found liable.
The complaint was filed ing harassment from her male ence harassment even after she Bowdoin’s Freedom from
in the United States District teammates, who “inappropri- left the team in August of 2018, Discrimination, Harassment,
Court for the Western District ately leer[ed] at her buttocks” including having a teammate Sexual Misconduct & Gender
of Pennsylvania on February 5. and told her that they wanted attempt to kiss her without her Based Violence Policy states
The filing alleges that Sa- to “fuck her silly.” Teammates consent and pull her into his that “[a]ll employees are ex-
ANN BASU, THE BOWDOIN ORIENT
mantha Simonetta, a female also allegedly made unwanted dormitory room. pected to respect the rights of
ONE DAY: Due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Bowdoin OneDay, kicker on the Allegheny team, sexual advances on Simonetta Simonetta later reported the their coworkers and conduct
originally scheduled to be April 7, will be postponed indefinitely. Despite the
reported multiple instances of during off-season practices, attempted assault directly to Al- themselves in a way that sup-
event being cancelled, Scott Meiklejohn, senior vice president for development
and alumni relations, said that alumni donations are more critical than ever. sexual assault and harassment including putting their arms legheny’s Title IX office, which ports the inclusion of students
by fellow players to Ham- around her and “telling her she found that the the accused stu- and employees of all different
ONEDAY POSTPONED, mer’s staff during the 2018 was beautiful.” dent had violated the school’s backgrounds. Employees who
ADMINISTRATION SAYS NOT THE off-season. According to court
documents filed by Simonet-
In February of 2018, Simon-
netta reported the misconduct
gender discrimination and sex-
ual harrassment policies.
engage in unlawful harass-
ment, sexual misconduct or
TIME TO “FOCUS ON BOWDOIN” ta’s attorney Kristen Weidus, to one of Hammer’s assistant The 15-page lawsuit alleges gender based violence or dis-
Hammer’s staff violated Title coaches, Curtis Bailey, who that Allegheny violated Ti- crimination will be subject to
Bowdoin OneDay, the largest annual fundraising event for the IX regulations by failing to re- told her that he would report tle IX regulation and accuses disciplinary action, up to and
Alumni Fund, has been postponed indefinitely due to the corona- port the complaints to school her complaints to Hammer. Hammer, Allegheny’s director including immediate termina-
virus (COVID-19) pandemic. This year’s event had been scheduled authorities and subsequently Bailey later admitted that he of athletics, two of Hammer’s tion of employment.”
to take place on April 7. attempting to force her off the had never done so. assistant coaches and another The policy does not apply to
Scott Meiklejohn, senior vice president for development and team. The lawsuit alleges that Alleghany staff member of neg- conduct performed by an indi-
alumni relations, explained that the Alumni Fund is working to Hammer served as the head Hammer’s staff responded to ligence, tortious interference vidual before they became an
reschedule the celebration. coach at Allegheny from Janu- Simonetta’s reports by attempt- with contractual relations and employee of the College.
“OneDay has become an important celebration of the College ary 2016 until December 2019, ing to force her off the team by negligent infliction of emotion- Players from the football team
and a huge part of our Alumni Fund year, so we were sorry to post- when he was hired by Bowdoin. placing her on academic pro- al distress. and members of the Bowdoin
pone,” Meiklejohn wrote in an email to the Orient. “However, we In a one-sentence statement bation despite the fact that her The filing is requesting un- Student-Athlete Advisory Com-
decided that it wasn’t the right time to ask everyone to focus on to the Orient, Hammer indi- grades were above the specified specified compensatory and pu- mittee (BSAAC) did not respond
Bowdoin given all of the other things people are navigating right cated that he and Allegheny threshold, by failing to include nitive damages for Simonetta. to requests for comment.
now.” intend to fight the case. her in team correspondenc- A court date has yet to be Andrew Bastone contributed
Meiklejohn wrote that despite the event’s postponement, alumni “I have been working with es and by excluding her from set for the case, pending a re- to this report.
donations and the Alumni Fund are more critical now than ever,

Students spearhead mutual aid effort to


“The Alumni Fund has never been more important given all the
unexpected costs the College has absorbed over the last month or
so,” he wrote.

assist students and staff members in need


Meiklejohn added that he is hopeful the OneDay event can be
held in May, but his office has not made a final decision about a
new date.

IRB REQUESTS ANY RESEARCH funds. This paragraph is then reads a request from a staff throughout the Bowdoin
by Kate Lusignan
REQUIRING IN-PERSON Orient Staff
uploaded onto a webpage for
interested donors who can
member.
Though interpersonal con-
community through on-cam-
pus organizations’ social me-
INTERACTION STOP IMMEDIATELY On the morning the Col- choose which person they’d nection is critical to the proj- dia pages and private group
lege announced the decision like help. When envisioning ect, the group also felt it was chats.
The Bowdoin Institutional Review Board (IRB) announced last to move to remote learning, how the fund would work, the important to keep personal Although the initiative is
week that any research requiring in-person interaction with sub- Anibal Husted ’22, like many, six students concluded that information about requesters student-led, the support of
jects, previously approved or exempted, should stop immediately. didn’t know how he was going this personal element would and donors anonymous. campus organizations have
The announcement applies to faculty, staff and student research. to meet the costs of leaving be important to ensure the “[Their] identities aren’t contributed to its success.
The decision was made by the IRB in consultation with the campus. success of the fund. the core of our mission,” said Currently, the mutual aid
Senior Vice President and Dean for Academic Affairs Elizabeth “I didn’t know how my “The story and voice defi- Ben Ray ’20, another fund network is being hosted on
McCormack due to concerns about the spread of the novel coro- family was going to afford a nitely makes it feel more per- coordinator, in a video inter- the Bowdoin Labor Alliance’s
navirus (COVID-19). plane ticket. I didn’t know sonal and not like it’s a sterile view with the Orient. “The website.
If students desire to continue pursuing their research projects what to do with all my be- donation request where you core of our mission is to make Due to the general uncer-
that involve in-person interaction, they can petition the IRB to longings that I couldn’t take don’t even know what this is sure that people can afford tainty about the novel coro-
continue research, change the research interactions from in-person with me. I left one box with going towards or who it’s go- the things they need and live navirus pandemic and its eco-
to remote or delay their research until the IRB lifts the restrictions. eight different people because ing to,” said Sylvia Bosco ’21, their day-to-day life.” nomic impact, the students
Students who petition the IRB to continue their research must I couldn’t pay for a storage one of the students working Although requesters’ iden- anticipate that the fund will
prove that the benefits of the study outweigh the risk of the coro- unit,” said Husted in a video on the initiative, in a video tities are not disclosed to continue to operate for the
navirus and must modify their consent form to explain the higher call with the Orient. interview with the Orient. the public, the request form foreseeable future.
risk of contracting the virus to participants. Changing research After hearing stories about One student requested requires contact informa- “Requests keep trickling
interactions from in-person to remote only requires informing the staff members struggling to $400 to help pay for rent and tion because each requester in. And if we can expand
IRB and does not need official approval. pay bills and students losing groceries after her moth- is assigned to a point person our donor outreach to match
The IRB will continue to review and accept new applications for their on-campus jobs, Husted er—”the head of the house- within the group of six coor- that, that would be amazing
research projects. and a group of five other stu- hold”—lost her job. dinators. Each contact person because I don’t think any-
dents created a mutual aid “Life is looking pretty checks in with the recipient one envisions things getting
fund to support the Bowdoin rough the next few weeks for about how they prefer to re- that much better,” said Diego
community. The fund, which food and other things,” part of ceive the grant—by check, Grossmann ’20, another stu-
launched on April 2, allows the request reads. “Moreover, direct transfer or PayPal. The dent involved in the initiative,
In recognition of the COVID-19 pandemic, community members to re- rent next month will be hard six coordinators also reach in a video interview with the
quest up to $400 for personal to pay without making many out even after the aid has Orient.
The Orient is offering free advertising for use. sacrifices. Therefore, I’m been received. The coordinators are
Brunswick businesses. The Orient is an So far, the fund has re- requesting $400 to help pay “These are members of pleased with the overwhelm-
ceived more than $9,000 for food and rent (coming up our community that we care ingly positive response to the
effective way to reach Bowdoin students, worth of contributions from May 1st). Thank you!!” about. So we want to make fund, though they acknowl-
faculty and staff as well as parents, alumni anonymous donors. Of the Of the 39 requests submit- sure that if there are other edge that the fund’s existence
and community members. 39 requests made as of Thurs- ted, 32 of them came from needs or other questions, or also underscores how many in
day, 21 have been fulfilled. students. The other seven just things in general, they the Bowdoin community are
According to the completed came from staff. can reach out and talk to us,” unable to support their basic
We believe that this initiative can help you requests, the majority of the “I am a housekeeper and said Amanda Trent ’20, an- needs right now.
and your customers during this difficult time. funds will assist with rent,
grocery bills and utilities.
my husband is disabled. I’m
asking for 350.00 for a car
other fund coordinator, on a
call with the Orient.
“The fact that we raised this
much has been really wonder-
Requests and donations are payment. I was doing side The organizers credit the ful,” Trent said. “But, on the
Please contact orientads@gmail.com for processed online. Request- cleaning jobs after working to quick success of the fund to flip side, the mutual aid fund
ers must include a paragraph meet our bills. My husband is social media. Information is really highlighting the class
details. describing their relation to disabled and a diabetic, and about the fund and the links differences in our community
the College and details about now I can’t do the side jobs to the request form and dona- and those who have been left
the intentions of the potential because he can’t get the virus,” tion pages have been shared behind in the crisis.”
4 NEWS Friday, April 10, 2020

COURTESY OF MICHAEL NERDAHL


GETTING CREATIVE: Senior Lecturer in the Classics Department Michael Nerdahl embraces the challenges that accompany virtual learning and often lectures in front of fun green screen backgrounds.

ONLINE “I was in class in Chile for


[fewer] than two weeks and
impossible. … Everyone I’ve talk-
ed to at each of the schools I am
means in a time of global crisis
to the syllabus of his course about
have embraced the challenges
that come with virtual classes.
and illogical, so to come at a story
from the perspective of someone
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
didn’t think it would be worth it considering described the ‘vibe’ happiness throughout history en- In an email to the Orient, Senior who experienced it is a fun take.
Nicholas Bower ’22 joins Zoom or the same experience. … It is on campus as one of the best titled “The Good Life.” Lecturer in the Classics Depart- A blinded and bloodied Oedipus
classes from his backyard in the all a big bummer and I’m upset parts. Suddenly a huge portion of “[The class] is about what peo- ment Michael Nerdahl wrote that narrating and complaining about
Bahamas, complete with tropical to not [study] abroad at all, but what makes a school unique and ple have thought it means to lead for his class, Classical Mythology, his post-Thebes life seemed more
fruit trees blooming in the back- also I’m lucky to be in a position special is hidden from the deci- an excellent or meaningful life. he decided to create a series of interesting and memorable than
ground, generating much envy to opt-out of classes,” Lawlor said sion process,” Vandermark said. And so if we read these different videos for his students to watch simply summarizing it. Dressing
amongst his classmates. in an email to the Orient. Despite these concerns, stu- philosophers and thinkers about weekly. up like Daedalus and singing a
“Every time I have an individ- Since President Clayton Rose dents and faculty across different this topic, we might get ideas “In creating videos, I take ad- Velvet Underground song made
ual conversation on Zoom … it’s suggested last week that the Col- disciplines have found ways to and tools for ourselves, right?” vantage of the format to do new the loss of his son Icarus more
like ‘I’m so jealous’ or ‘It’s a cold lege may not be able to bring “ev- adapt. In an email to the Orient, Denery said in a phone inter- things—I created a green screen, poignant for me.”
rainy day here,’” Bower said in a eryone” back to campus for the Lucia Gagliardone ’20, a dance view with the Orient. “So when for example, to lecture in front Nerdahl also admittedly has
phone interview with the Orient. fall semester, students have be- major, expressed how the De- COVID-19 hit, and the school of—and I take inspiration from begun to enjoy his new creative
According to Bower, his deci- gun to consider the possibility of partment of Theater and Dance went online, it seemed like the what I love: music, classic movies, license, in the same way students
sion to do his classwork outside continued remote learning. Deva faced the challenge of online perfect opportunity to try to real- acting melodramatically, corny might.
was out of necessity. He lives with Holliman ’23 said she finds her- courses head-on. ly demonstrate to [students] that jokes, irony,” he wrote. “Sometimes, though, there’s
his parents and two siblings who self unable to imagine doing an “The theater and dance de- a humanities course on the good In many ways, Nerdahl has no lofty motive, [I’m] just doing
have also returned home due to entire semester of classes online. partment has definitely rallied life is actually a really practical, found the new format to be a things for the sake of self-enter-
the pandemic, which has made “I definitely think that if classes around all of us in this time and useful course. It seemed like the different way of looking at the tainment,” he said. And to reas-
studying indoors more difficult. are only offered online in the fall, created really innovative and obvious thing to do.” material he teaches. sure his students: “That blood on
“This [is] the first time that I will take the semester off,” she lovely ways to continue staying Like Denery, other professors “Greek Myth is violent, odd Oedipus’s face? Ketchup.”
my family and I [have been] back wrote in an email to the Orient. connected and practicing per-
together since we were kids, and “While I’ve been very impressed formance arts. In my Advanced
now we are back as fully-grown by my professors’ ability to transi- Repertory class, we have had
adults. So the only space left for tion to remote teaching—and am weekly dance classes where we
me to claim was my garden, and so grateful to be able to finish the all follow along with a series of
so I have set up a makeshift office semester at home—I’ve begun to warm-ups, and then our profes-
in my garden. It is the place I get realize that I value my college ed- sor, Gwyneth Jones, teaches us
the most privacy. I have had a ucation for [many] more reasons a phrase designed for confined
conversation in pretty much ev- than the pursuit of a degree.” spaces.”
ery class about it,” he said. These concerns have also im- Gagliardone has found the
For other students, especially pacted potential Bowdoin stu- class to be a calming presence in
those who were studying abroad dents. In an email interview with the hectic reality of a global pan-
this semester, online courses the Orient, Juliana Vandermark, demic.
seem pointless. Facing difficulties a high school senior who was “It’s been really lovely moving
with asynchronous class times recently admitted to Bowdoin with everyone, even though it is
and crowding at home, some regular decision, voiced the diffi- virtual. It helps keep the feeling
students have decided online culty she faces while considering of connection,” Gagliardone said.
classes are not worth the effort. which school she will attend in In the history department,
Aine Lawlor ’21 has opted out of the fall. Professor of History Dallas
the online classes offered by the “Our current situation as a Denery saw the pandemic as a
program that she was enrolled whole, and the prospect of the fall learning opportunity. He added REUBEN SCHAFIR, THE BOWDOIN ORIENT
in while studying abroad in Val- semester being completely online Albert Camus’ “The Plague” and IN THE ZONE: Micah Wilson ‘22 focuses on his homework. Wilson has been living in an off-campus residence since
paraiso, Chile. is making the college decision feel an essay about what happiness classes resumed online.

HAVE AN OPINION?
Submit an Op-Ed or a Letter to the Editor to
orientopinion@bowdoin.edu by 7 p.m. on the Tuesday of the
week of publication. Include your full name and phone number.
Friday, April 10, 2020 NEWS 5

SAFC reopens budget requests for the Bowdoin IT expands


remainder of the spring semester Zoom licenses to
by Diego Velasquez
ment, $15,000 remains in the
SAFC budget.
The SAFC has reopened the
process for clubs to request funds
budgets to determine funds for
the next academic year. These students, increases
security
Orient Staff
“This year will be different and the first funding decisions allocations will not come from
Student organizations can and there is a likelihood for will be made April 13. Only two the remaining funds in the
once again request funds for there to be funds remaining,” student groups have requested SAFC budget from this year.
club activities despite the Col- said Director of Student Ac- funds so far—the Bowdoin Com- The SAFC’s most pressing
lege’s move to remote learn- tivities Nate Hintze in a phone mons Podcast and the Beartones concern is the finalization of who wish to continue their activi-
ing, announced the Student interview with the Orient. acapella group. expenditures. To that end, Hall by Sophie Burchell ties in creative and adaptive ways.
Orient Staff
Activities Funding Committee In past years, the SAFC has Typically, each time a student and the SAFC are collecting Hall suggested that some groups
(SAFC) on Tuesday in an email always allocated all the funds in Student organizations can might start book clubs to help
to club leaders. its budget. But this year, Hintze once again request funds for club maintain community virtually.
Chair of the Treasury for and the SAFC will work together “I think the 136 student activities despite the College’s “I think the 136 student orga-
Bowdoin Student Government to determine how any remaining organizations that we have are a move to remote learning, an- nizations that we have are a great
(BSG), Charlotte Hall ’20,
oversees the SAFC, which is
funds will be used. Hintze is cer-
tain that the amount will not roll great resource during this time to nounced the Student Activities
Funding Committee (SAFC) on
resource during this time to cre-
ate a community for students and
responsible for allocating funds over to next year. create a community for students and Tuesday in an email to club lead- help keep them connected to the
to student groups and organiza-
tions throughout the year. Hall
For the remaining months of
this year, the left-over $15,000
help keep them connected to the ers.
Chair of the Treasury for Bow-
College,” Hintze said.
The SAFC has reopened the
said that with the transition to will be available to student College.” doin Student Government (BSG), process for clubs to request funds
remote learning, both the SAFC
and individual clubs have refo-
groups who wish to continue
their activities in creative and
–Nate Hintze, Director of Student Activities Charlotte Hall ’20, oversees the
SAFC, which is responsible for al-
and the first funding decisions
will be made April 13. Only two
cused their goals. adaptive ways. Hall suggested locating funds to student groups student groups have requested
The SAFC allocates the ma- that some groups might start organization submits a funding outstanding receipts from stu- and organizations throughout the funds so far—the Bowdoin Com-
jority of its annual $810,000 book clubs to help maintain request, it meets with the SAFC dent groups to ensure that all year. Hall said that with the tran- mons Podcast and the Beartones
sum to five groups on campus: community virtually. to explain its budget proposal. expenses paid for by individual sition to remote learning, both acapella group.
the Entertainment Board, BSG, “I think the 136 student or- Now that the College is operating students are reimbursed before the SAFC and individual clubs Typically, each time a student
the Bowdoin Outing Club, the ganizations that we have are a remotely, the SAFC has opted to allocating the rest of the budget. have refocused their goals. organization submits a funding
Joseph McKeen Center for great resource during this time send club leaders questions about She is confident that the The SAFC allocates the ma- request, it meets with the SAFC
the Common Good and Club to create a community for stu- their budget request over email SAFC will work through these jority of its annual $810,000 sum to explain its budget proposal.
Rowing, which leaves roughly dents and help keep them con- instead of meeting in person. difficult times and “hope[s] that to five groups on campus: the Now that the College is operating
45 percent for other student nected to the College,” Hintze The SAFC will also work clubs will be understanding” of Entertainment Board, BSG, the remotely, the SAFC has opted to
groups’ expenses. At the mo- said. with clubs that have operating the changes. Bowdoin Outing Club, the Joseph send club leaders questions about
McKeen Center for the Common their budget request over email
Good and Club Rowing, which instead of meeting in person.
COURSES for how to prepare for offering
courses.”
tion to pay tuition and fees for
the following semester.
adopter’ and waited until it was
rolled out and vetted by some
leaves roughly 45 percent for oth-
er student groups’ expenses. At
The SAFC will also work with
clubs that have operating budgets
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
McCormack also said that The time frame won’t be the of our peer institutions.” the moment, $15,000 remains in to determine funds for the next
we have a seminar course of a mid-June course registration only new thing about course IT ran a pilot program last the SAFC budget. academic year. These allocations
20 people … we could put that process will give all students, registration this year. Students semester to test the new system, “This year will be different will not come from the remaining
course in a larger classroom especially those students consid- will now have the option to use a and Cato said the new interface and there is a likelihood for there funds in the SAFC budget from
and people could observe so- ering studying abroad in the fall, new interface, “Registration Pre- received good reviews—two- to be funds remaining,” said Di- this year.
cial distancing if we decide more time and information to view,” which includes a Calendar thirds of the 15 students polled rector of Student Activities Nate The SAFC’s most pressing
we need to. There’s a lot of di- make a final decision about their View feature that allows students reported that the new interface Hintze in a phone interview with concern is the finalization of ex-
mensions to explore [with] the enrollment. to more easily identify potential was easier to use than the old the Orient. penditures. To that end, Hall and
prospect of having everybody According to the student scheduling conflicts. The tradi- one. In past years, the SAFC has the SAFC are collecting outstand-
back, but the details of what handbook, students who register tional interface, “Registration Despite the looming uncer- always allocated all the funds in ing receipts from student groups
they find will have implications for courses incur a legal obliga- Classic,” will still be available. tainty, McCormack assured its budget. But this year, Hintze to ensure that all expenses paid
In an email to students, Cato students that the College’s top and the SAFC will work together for by individual students are
“The upgrade has been available to acknowledged that IT was hes- priority is ensuring that stu- to determine how any remaining reimbursed before allocating the
[the College] since 2014. Bowdoin itant to roll out a new interface
while students are away from
dents will be able to earn credit
towards their degrees. “We
funds will be used. Hintze is cer-
tain that the amount will not roll
rest of the budget.
She is confident that the
intentionally avoided being ‘an early campus but said the changes want to make good decisions, over to next year. SAFC will work through these
adopter’ and waited until it was are necessary to keep the system and having more information For the remaining months of difficult times and “hope[s] that
rolled out and vetted by some of our running smoothly.
“The upgrade has been
will help us do that,” McCor-
mack said. “While it’s a little
this year, the left-over $15,000
will be available to student groups
clubs will be understanding” of
the changes.
peer institutions.” available to [the College] since disconcerting that things aren’t
2014,” wrote Cato in an email normal, in some ways, we’re
–Michael Cato, Senior Vice President of
Information Technology
to the Orient. “Bowdoin inten-
tionally avoided being ‘an early
being responsive to [that] fact
… in a thoughtful way.”
HOUSING In an email to students, Cato
acknowledged that IT was hesi-
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
tant to roll out a new interface
could observe social distancing while students are away from
if we decide we need to. There’s campus but said the changes are
a lot of dimensions to explore necessary to keep the system
[with] the prospect of having running smoothly.

YOUR AD HERE
everybody back, but the details “The upgrade has been
of what they find will have im- available to [the College] since
plications for how to prepare for 2014,” wrote Cato in an email
offering courses.” to the Orient. “Bowdoin inten-
McCormack also said that tionally avoided being ‘an early
a mid-June course registration adopter’ and waited until it was
process will give all students, rolled out and vetted by some of
especially those students con- our peer institutions.”

The Bowdoin Orient offers advertising space in


sidering studying abroad in the IT ran a pilot program last
fall, more time and information semester to test the new system,

our 24 print editions each year and continuously


to make a final decision about and Cato said the new interface
their enrollment. received good reviews—two-

online. The Orient is a tremendously successful


According to the student thirds of the 15 students polled
handbook, students who regis- reported that the new interface

advertising platform: there’s a reason our repeat


ter for courses incur a legal ob- was easier to use than the old one.
ligation to pay tuition and fees Despite the looming uncer-

advertisers keep coming back.


for the following semester. tainty, McCormack assured
The time frame won’t be the students that the College’s top
only new thing about course priority is ensuring that stu-
registration this year. Students dents will be able to earn credit

For more information, visit


will now have the option to use towards their degrees. “We want
a new interface, “Registration to make good decisions, and

bowdoinorient.com/advertise/.
Preview,” which includes a Cal- having more information will
endar View feature that allows help us do that,” McCormack
students to more easily identify said. “While it’s a little discon-
potential scheduling conflicts. certing that things aren’t nor-
The traditional interface, “Reg- mal, in some ways, we’re being
istration Classic,” will still be responsive to [that] fact … in a
available. thoughtful way.”
F FEATURES
6 Friday, April 10, 2020

Bowdoin community seeks virtual volunteer opportunities


ably as much as she looks forward to remote learning, keeping in She is not surprised by the re- bunch of medical students went “I know people are kind of
by Eliana Miller to it. I’m there to listen to her, and touch with mentees is difficult. sponse—she is inspired. to go donate that day.” wary to try to go out and do
Orient Staff
she’s there to also listen to me.” “There are privacy issues. A lot “Reaching out and helping Partnering with the McKeen anything, but this is a tangible
Every afternoon, Annie Rose The call-in program is one of parents just don’t want to release others is one of the things that Center, Browne then started the way that people can help and
’20 calls the same home-bound of the McKeen Center for the home addresses and phone num- can be most healing in times of Maine Students Blood Drive, a also a way that we can bring the
senior citizen in Brunswick. Their Common Good’s new virtual bers and such,” said Nora Greene pain,” she said. “I’m really encour- competition that encourages community together,” said Diego
conversations flow naturally from volunteering efforts. Although ’22, a leader of Harpswell Com- aged by folks, by students and young, healthy students to get Villamarin ’21, a leader of Bow-
topic to topic, just as a conversa- many individuals are eager to stay munity School (HCS) Mentoring, overall community members. out and donate by pitting differ- doin’s Pre-Health Club who is
tion with a good friend would. involved, health risks and stu- in a phone interview with the Ori- That instinct not only helps the ent Maine colleges against each spearheading the blood donation
“How’s your family these dents’ distance from campus have ent. “Some of the kids don’t have communities that are in need, but other to see who can rally the campaign with Browne.
days?” impeded the Center’s usual oper- a stable environment, and they’re it helps us all to think about how most donors. The McKeen Center is also
“What do you think of the pres- ations. All direct volunteer activi- not in the same home all the time.” we can be of service to others in a Fearing the spread of the co-sponsoring the Distance Saves
idential primaries?” ties affiliated with the College have After talking with school social time like this.” coronavirus, many blood drives Lives blood drive series with
“Have I told you my story about been cancelled, and instead the workers and parents, only three of Seames acknowledged that nation-wide have been can- MaineHealth. Every Wednesday
a seagull eating raw meat from the Center is helping students, staff the 11 members of HCS Mentor- one of the best ways to help out celled, including more than through June 3, the American Red
back of my pickup truck?” and faculty determine how best ing have been able to contact their now is through financial support 4,500 of the Red Cross’s blood Cross will hold a blood drive at the
Rose and this woman have to volunteer and help out in their mentees. Greene, whose mentee and supplies donations to local drives. The remaining blood Portland Elks Lodge.
never met in-person. They were home communities or online. will graduate from the program at businesses and nonprofits. But, donation sites are operating Seames encouraged Bowdo-
connected only a week ago “We are physically located in the end of this year, was originally for members of the Bowdoin with greater safety precautions, in community members to help
through a call-in program run by Brunswick, but now students are hoping to mail letters back and community who do not have the limiting the number of donors out in whatever way is most
People Plus, a nonprofit that helps located all over the world. And forth but has not even been able to means to contribute financially, who can come into buildings comfortable for them, whether
support and foster community so we see our role in the McKeen email her buddy. non-monetary donations can be and more frequently checking that might be donating blood,
for older adults in Brunswick. Center as two-part,” said Sarah Though she is disappointed by just as important. the temperature of donors and donating money or donating
Nearly 30 other Bowdoin stu- Seames, director of the McKeen this lost connection, she’s grateful Adeline Browne ’16, a medical staff members. time through virtual volun-
dents, faculty and staff members Center, in a Zoom interview with that at least some students can student in Tufts University’s Maine While donor blood is not teering. The McKeen Center
also signed up for the program. the Orient. “The first part is to keep in touch and hopes that more Track program, was on rotation being used to treat coronavirus recently launched a website
As a McKeen Center Communi- maintain the connections to place students are motivated to partici- in a Portland hospital when she patients, many individuals still titled “Supporting Communi-
ty Engagement Fellow, Rose has that we have here in Maine and pate in McKeen Center programs realized the extent of the nation’s need transfusions, including the ty Organizations During the
worked with People Plus before the partnerships that we’ve built next year after things settle down. current blood shortage. children Browne treated during COVID-19 Pandemic” with
and used to volunteer regularly over time [and] to support the or- “It shows how important it “I was doing a rotation in a her last day at the hospital. Be- more resources.
at various other organizations ganizations that are so important is that Bowdoin students really pediatric hematology/oncology cause blood products have a At the end of the day, though,
in town. But now that she’s back to this community. The other part reach out to the community,” floor. There’s a lot of kids on relatively short shelf-life, blood Seames said one of the best ways
home in New York, she has had is to help individual students think Greene said. “We don’t know how that floor who are very trans- donations are still considered to to help out is simple: stay home.
to find new ways to volunteer and through what they see their role as these kids are feeling, and we can’t fusion-dependent and require be an essential service. “It’s a service, it’s for the com-
stay connected to Brunswick. now, wherever they may be.” provide any sort of happiness or daily or weekly transfusions of As of Wednesday, 82 people mon good and it is incredibly
“I think it’s really wonderful to Seames said that the McKeen support for them anymore … I blood and platelets,” Browne had participated in the Maine important,” Seames said. “People
be able to start a new relationship Center’s biggest challenge is main- hope that more people will see said in a phone interview with Students Blood Drive, including want to know how they can help,
during this time of isolation,” Rose taining relationships between how many people are actually the Orient. “The last day that I 18 members of the Bowdoin and it can be hard to feel like you’re
said in a phone interview with the Bowdoin students who serve as affected by this pandemic and was working there, there was community. The group hopes not doing anything, but we also
Orient. “A lot of people are expe- mentors to kids in the Midcoast really give back to the greater a really severe shortage in the to get 1,000 participants by the want people to know that some-
riencing feelings of loneliness, and area. Nearly half of the Center’s 38 Brunswick community.” blood bank at the hospital. end of the month. Participants times by literally doing nothing
human connection is one way to student-led service organizations Seames said lots of Bowdo- And so when we were asked to donate blood at their local and just staying in your house, you
combat those feelings, so I really work with kids, and now that all in students and faculty have leave the hospital [due to the drives and then answer short are really doing something very,
enjoy it. I look forward to it prob- Maine schools have transitioned reached out asking how to help. transition to remote learning], a surveys to log the donations. very important.”

Curating life online in the time of coronavirus


cute rebranding of “role model” they die, where you find out voice to my teenage angst. In the
I Said What to “possibility model”? It was like about their secret alcoholism or mid-2010s, I learned about social
that.) From observing her routines their shitty parents. justice in ways that my school
I Said and the products she endorses, Okay, it’s not always that dra- never taught. Sadly, I deleted it
by Aisha Rickford I learned how to integrate new matic, but you do get a chance to during my junior year of college,
A few days ago, I unfollowed things into my life that would see that this person isn’t all walks in so I can’t sift through my posts and
my favorite influencer (the fact make me happier. But it soon the park, homemade sourdough or reanalyze them here with new-
that I even have a favorite influ- turned sinister. I’d compare my life perfect pictures of coffee, captured found perspective, like The Cut so
encer is the kind of admission to hers, from her relationships to just as the milk is swirling into the brilliantly did once with emails in
that makes me realize how much her sense of fashion. coffee. You get the whole picture. a podcast episode.
I am a part of Gen Z, despite my Yet, I couldn’t allow myself to I unfollowed the influencer. But The point is, my engagement
attempts to claim otherwise). unfollow her, like I would so eas- in thinking about the timeline of with the internet was a whole-
With so much free time on my ily unfollow a company that was my obsession (all eight months of some, affirming experience,
hands and the social distancing tempting me with a few too many it) I couldn’t help but think about where I sought out communities
mandates of our new coronavirus posts advertising products that I 10 years ago, when our relation- that made me feel seen and didn’t
era making it perfectly acceptable simply couldn’t afford. ships to the internet and online walk away from my socials feeling
to spend hours on my phone, Why? Because I felt like I knew community—and its expectations fatigued and worse about myself
I found that the social media her, even though I didn’t. Unfol- of us—were far different. than when I’d opened them. One
breaks I was taking between lowing her would feel like abruptly In middle school, I was deeply of the first blogs I fell in love with
doing homework or tuning into stopping an exciting new show in wedded to my online life. It was on Tumblr was a gorgeous one
my virtual classes were growing the middle of a season, or losing insular and intensely private. An called stophatingyourbody, fea-
alarmingly long. I also found that the phone number of a really good avid fan of the “Warrior Cats” turing selfies of people around the
DALIA TABACHNIK

I knew way too much about this friend. I had to keep up. book series, I would join role- world declaring self-love. What
influencer who, besides respond- Part of my interest in follow- play websites, eventually launch- happened to that?
ing to one of my DMs or liking ing her had to do with a desire ing one of my own. (Hilariously, But finally, toward the end of
maybe one of my comments, was to craft the kind of life I’d imag- one of the ones I frequented most high school, as I started to morph
a complete stranger. ined and was imagining for is still up.) I wrote fanfiction on into a real person and shed my ad-
Through inferences made from myself. Myself, but older, more fanfiction.net. olescent formlessness, I began to community and start becoming a their tune, marketing products
social media and various web ar- grounded and successful, able The internet was where I, a stop needing my online commu- social and capitalist competition, to make you feel like you need
ticles, I knew many details of her to afford the $100 dollar face oils kid who didn’t necessarily fit in nity of nerdiness and affirmation. a dangerous and terrifying mar- them even though you’re inside
life, from where she grew up, to or custom-made hair products at school, found a community I spent more time and outside and riage between the professional and all day, encouraging you to spend
how she met her partner, to her that so many influencers tout on of affirmation and validation. I’d with real people. I started college the personal? And what does that money when 6.6 million Ameri-
morning routine. During a period their profiles. But the problem receive kind reviews on my fan- and my in-person life became the mean for the scary time we are cans no longer have any spending
a few months back when I took is the life I was seeing wasn’t a fiction and watch ad-free Harry rich, vibrant community I’d so living in? money to speak of. I miss when
an Instagram break altogether, I whole one. They were highlights, Potter fan art videos on YouTube long sought after online. I’m not the first to express the internet was a safe space. But
would check in on her page just to carefully curated, and one can’t set to Avril Lavigne’s “Keep Yet here we are, driven back distaste over how everything I also recognize that it can’t just
see if she posted something new. base a life off of a selection, just Holding On.” inside by the coronavirus, and has become prepackaged and be the internet that’s changed—I
At first, it was innocent. She like you can’t fully appreciate At age 13, I made a Tumblr the internet does not seem so safe monetized in our current digi- used to admire the women I saw
reminded me of myself and made an artist by just looking at a few account. I would go on to have and nurturing a place anymore. tal age. You would think social on Tumblr and other socials, not
me feel, through her presence, of their paintings. You’ve got to this account for seven years, accu- In this case, it seems, one cannot distancing would encourage a envy them until I have to unfollow
that things were possible for me. watch the tell-all documentary mulating thousands of posts and always return home. When did return to online community, but them. Clearly, the way we use the
(Who remembers Laverne Cox’s that comes out a few years after hundreds of followers and giving social media stop being a place for companies have simply changed internet has changed, too.
Friday, April 10, 2020 FEATURES 7

Talk of the Quad


basement is empty. Eva and
A REFLECTION ON LIFE AT Lauren, our dutiful E-Hosts,
250 MAINE STREET wait upstairs for party-goers
I can’t look at the pictures who will never appear. Con-
yet. I know exactly which ones sidering the sparse crowd,
I love most: PC and Ellie resting tonight, we’re playing what we
on the grass on our first day want. And we want Robyn’s
home, a blurry Andrew point- “Dancing On My Own.” The
ing at the camera on his birth- song’s iconic synth floods
day, Allyson grinning widely the room. We few remain-
with orange-painted cheeks at ing Quinby residents begin
House Olympics. When I think the “Dancing On My Own”
about our lives in Quinby, I’m experience slowly; we dance
reminded of what we’ve lost, half-heartedly until the build-
and I’m overcome by a deep, ing energy is irresistible, and
unrelenting sadness that knocks we give in completely to the
the wind out of me. heartbroken anthem.
I’m unsure how to hold this Just as the song swells to its
pain that stems from having to phenomenal, explosive chorus,
leave Quinby House prema- Lauren and Eva burst in to join
turely. All things considered, the moment. Our E-Hosts have
I know that my Quinby-based abandoned their sworn duties,
sadness is trivial and that I have but as Eva explains, “if nobody
much to be thankful for. I have else is coming, who cares?”
my health. I have a safe home And so, alone in the base-
to return to. I have two more ment, Quinby dances. Regard-
years at Bowdoin ahead of me. less of how absurd we look to
Amid the horrific pandemic we the few remaining first-years in
currently face, I’m privileged our home, we dance, laugh and
to be able to mourn the loss of sing along with wild abandon.
a non-necessity, and I strive to I hold onto this moment now.
acknowledge that privilege. All I hold onto the door swinging
things considered, this pain is HOLLY HARRIS open and the two young women
insignificant. running to join us. I hold onto
And yet still, I hurt. I hurt in fined by solitude. I’m far from that I could exhale the mo- tive experience in our House. hope to one day remember this the lights illuminating the hun-
a way that I never expected to alone in confronting this reali- ment that I crossed the Quinby I’m in “terra incognita”; our lives year through the moments that dreds of names spray-painted
hurt over a College House. It’s ty, but it’s frighteningly easy to threshold and was reunited with in Quinby have been stashed make clear why I feel this pain on the basement walls.
a pain that leaves me breathless. feel alone in this moment; to the housemates I love. During into the recesses of ‘what once so acutely. Quinby mattered This moment serves as a re-
It’s a pain I carried as I drove feel that past, cherished experi- this time of pandemonium, I was.’ I mourn the experiences and loss stings. To preserve my minder that yes, we were here.
to Brunswick to collect a year’s ences are all I have. And as of want nothing more than to find we never shared, the memories sanity, I have to hold onto the Quinby was once ours and we
worth of memories, as I said now, I still hurt, and I will for that same relief in returning to we never created, the words we moments that stand out. knew it and we loved it and
physically-distanced goodbyes some time. that space and to those people, never said. It’s a Friday in November, we mattered to each other and
to my housemates, as I packed I leave part of myself at 250 but that space is no longer ours. I fear that I’ll describe Quin- and I’m back. The party we are Quinby mattered to us. I take a
my car and left alone. Maine Street, in its nonsensi- I feel haunted by the time by and my life there with this hosting is nothing more than breath, I shut my eyes, I hold on.
This pain sits inside of me cal layout, in its worn chapter we’ve lost. I don’t know how to abrupt ending serving as a ‘but’ an abject failure, a near total For a moment, the dust settles,
and forces me to confront the room. On days when I felt whol- let go of the fleeting hope for a to my statement. I still feel that no-show. The presence of a the world slows its turn and it’s
terrifying reality that I’ve lost a ly alone at Bowdoin and would spring together and the broken we deserved more time, and handful of first-years momen- almost like I’m home again.
life defined by joy and commu- fight tears on my walk home, I expectation that we would have it’s nearly impossible for me tarily boosts morale, but for Blaine Stevens is a member of
nity and have gained a life de- found comfort in telling myself more time to shape our collec- to feel grateful, but I can only all intents and purposes, our the Class of 2022.

structure to days that blurred and legitimate boredom (mind my yard. It was from headquar- disheartening to leave all these In retrospect, it was the
LIFE DIDN’T CARE ABOUT
together and time that seemed you, this was pre-cell phones, ters in Antananarivo. We were plans I had at the drop of a hat right move. The Peace Corps
MY PLANS: LESSONS FROM
to otherwise stand still. pre-Netflix, pre-social media). being evacuated, and I had two and at the expense of so much. could no longer ensure our
THE PEACE CORPS
Time. Such a funny con- On a good day, the lack of dis- hours to pack my things and Little kids chased our Land safety. The country had more
I had such great plans. I was struct. To go from the harried tractions helped me notice and say goodbyes. Cruiser as we drove away, wav- pressing issues to address
going to serve my country and hustle and bustle of my senior be touched by some of the most I was in shock. I was angry. ing, not understanding any of it. than me having adventures,
do something good in the world. year where there was never breathtaking sunrises, sit for I was devastated. I was worried. It was not a complete sur- teaching English and making
I was going to adventure around enough time for anything to hours in the quiet company of I packed my essentials and prise that we had to leave the friends. Madagascar had to
obscure corners of the globe. I living on my own in a village on people in my village, hearing walked around the village, giv- country. We had suspicions that stabilize itself. As disappoint-
was going to defer the enor- an island where I had more time their stories and absorbing an ing away everything I didn’t this might be The Peace Corps’ ing as it was, it was time for
mous student loans waiting for than I knew what to do with. entirely different way of under- need and wanted them to have next move but were hoping us to leave.
me after graduation. I was going Time that stretches and bends standing life. (which was most of what I that it wouldn’t come to this. This remains one of the
to put my education degree and like this makes you sit with the And then one morning owned at that point). I tried Months earlier, there were pres- most stressful experiences of
linguistic skills to work. But, it wide range and messy soup of wasn’t like all the others. While to explain why I had to leave idential elections which led to my life—so much upheaval,
turns out, the world didn’t care human emotions. eating my mofo gasy and despite spending the past year discord and social disturbance. being so far from my family,
about my plans. In fact, looking back, it was heating water for my bucket growing a life there, investing The cities grew more unsettled, the uncertainty around what
On a morning just like all the like being on a meditation re- shower, an official white Land in relationships and building violence began to erupt and was next, my heart aching for
others in my tiny village on the treat, but I didn’t yet have any Cruiser pulled up in front of a home. It was confusing and government systems started to those left behind. It was one
high plateau of Madagascar, I essential tools to thrive. Instead shut down. It had been stress- of the most impactful experi-
was sitting on my front porch I have a journal somewhere ful for months throughout the ences on me as a person and
eating my breakfast of mofo full of entries purging entire country although it was how I continue to understand
gasy (sweet rice cakes). I sat loneliness, longing slow to ripple out to our the true nature of the world.
watching young women, many for home and remote villages, where It was an experience of hu-
of them my high school stu- frustration at we would hear ru- mility, in which I realized that,
dents, carrying buckets of water so much mors of it on despite all my great plans and
on their heads (a skill I added to dysfunc- the radio. good intentions, the world
my Peace Corps bucket list but tion did not revolve around me.
failed miserably to complete). This may sound harsh, but I
Younger girls, barefoot with am grateful for the lesson. It
baby siblings wrapped to their has softened other suffering
backs, were walking to fetch for me when life did not un-
bread for the day. My neighbor fold as planned or hoped. It
with gray braids tied up on her taught me about the fragility
head was sweeping the red, dirt of the lives that we work so
floor. The men were already out hard to build. And it taught
in the fields, sternly steering the me that we will be okay.
water buffalo through rice pad- ALEX BURNS
Kate Nicholson is the assis-
dies. These morning routines tant director of student well-
and rituals gave purpose and ness programs.

WE WANT YOU TO TELL YOUR STORY


Submit a Talk of the Quad to the Orient. Email submissions to orient@bowdoin.edu.
A ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
8 Friday, April 10, 2020

Ivies 2020: eBoard saddened by event’s cancellation


eBoard announced on its Insta- ence, Brooks wrote, gave useful
byJane Godiner gram that this year’s headlining information on how to plan and
Orient Staff
act was KYLE. The rapper and execute campus-wide concerts.
On March 19, during a virtu- musician is most famous for his “I was looking forward to be-
al ‘town hall’ about the corona- collaboration with rapper Lil ing able to implement some of
virus (COVID-19) and its im- Yachty on “I Spy,” which peaked those things into our show and
pact on the College, President at number four on the Billboard the week leading up to it,” wrote
Clayton Rose confirmed the Hot 100 Chart in 2017. Brooks.
cancellation of this year’s Ivies “I really like KYLE as an artist Other senior board mem-
weekend. The news saddened because he knows how to have bers, such as Diaw, are disap-
members of the Bowdoin com- fun with music,” said eBoard pointed to miss their last Ivies.
munity, including those on the member Mamadou Diaw ’20 “I think it would have been
Entertainment Board (eBoard) in a phone interview with the a phenomenal, really fun cap-
who plan the annual spring Orient. “He presents himself in stone to four years at Bowdoin,”
concert. a very unique way that I really Diaw wrote.
“Although I was certain that appreciate.” Though the concert weekend
a move to virtual classes meant “He has great energy and is cancelled, eBoard hopes to
that Ivies was cancelled, it wasn’t great songs,” eBoard co-chair connect with the Bowdoin com-
until I watched the live [town Sabrina Hunte ’20 added in an munity through its Instagram
hall] that it actually hit me,” email to the Orient. “Thinking account, @bowdoin_eboard.
wrote eBoard Co-Chair Joshua about him not performing for The group still plans to hold
Brooks ’20 in an email to the us is making me sad.” the annual contest for an Ivies
Orient. “It was heartbreaking, While the eBoard devoted a t-shirt design and will accept
knowing that you would not be significant amount of time to applications for next year’s
able to see something that you hiring the headliner, Brooks was eBoard.
had worked very hard towards excited for the chance to create “The eBoard will continue to
come to fruition.” an enjoyable weekend beyond make progress on our normal
The eBoard was responsible KYLE’s performance. In the end-of-year processes,” Brooks
for organizing all aspects of fall semester, Brooks attended a wrote. “And [with] regards to
the Ivies concerts, including conference geared towards stu- Ivies 2021, I can finally say that
reaching out to and hiring the dents in organizations similar to I have absolutely no idea who’s
entertainment. On Tuesday, Bowdoin’s eBoard. The confer- coming!” SARA CAPLAN

DRISKELL celebration of 50 years of Afri-


cana Studies at Bowdoin.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
“David’s connection to the
“Maine was an important art world remained totally
part of the rhythm of his year. fresh and engaged,” said Anne
Maine, the state’s resilient Goodyear, co-director of the
people, trees and light were Bowdoin College Museum of
fodder and foils for his art,” Art, in a video interview with
noted Assistant Professor of the Orient. “So even late in
Art History Dana Byrd in an his career, he was continuing
email to the Orient. to travel extensively around
Among his many accolades the world, to support contem-
and accomplishments, Dris- porary artists, contemporary
kell’s role as an educator and scholars, and to continue
advocate for the arts was cen- to nurture the art historical
tral to his life’s work and still community with his wisdom,
holds profound resonance in his sense of humor and shar-
the Bowdoin community. ing his experiences with us.”
“Driskell was indefatiga- During his half-centu-
ble in his educational mis- ry-long sojourn in Maine,
sion that was both pastoral Driskell’s presence touched
and creative. For him, being the lives of many in Bowdo-
an educator equaled being in’s creative community. He
an artist, professor, curator, has remained a mentor and
historian, philanthropist and friend to numerous alumni,
family man,” wrote Julie Mc- both those just discovering
Gee ’82, associate professor of their passions or advancing
Africana studies and art his- far into their careers.
tory at the University of Del- Kinaya Hassane ’19 met
aware and a former visiting Driskell three years ago while
professor at Bowdoin, in an researching collectors of Afri-
email to the Orient. McGee can American art, a topic that
is lead curator of Driskell’s ultimately became the focus
COURTESY OF LONE SPRUCE CREATIVE
upcoming retrospective at the of her honors project.
High Museum in Atlanta, the “The afternoon that we REMEMBERING AN ICON: Renowned artist and scholar David Driskell H’89 visited campus in December to partake in Bowdoin’s AF/AM/50 celebra-
Portland Museum of Art and spent at his home discussing
tion. Driskell held roots in Maine, owning a summer home in Falmouth and joining Bowdoin’s faculty as a visiting professor in the spring of 1973.
The Phillips Collection. his prolific career as an art- ist I had ever met,” Hall said hegan—Driskell was not only larly when it comes to black Driskell’s lasting impact
“David Driskell loved Bow- ist, scholar and collector not in a phone interview with the a role model professionally, but male or black masculinity.” on the art world will be re-
doin and we shared this pas- only shaped the trajectory of Orient. “And we sat there and also a guiding force personally, While grieving this deep alized only with time’s pass-
sion,” she wrote. “He champi- my project, but it also fueled talked about artists like Alma through his wisdom, humility loss, among the many others ing, through the countless
oned my endeavors to provide my personal growth as a re- Thomas. We talked about Ja- and calm reassurance. that have been caused by the individuals he has guided in
African American and Af- searcher,” wrote Hassane in a cob Lawrence. We talked about “There are many celebrated pandemic, the Goodyears are search of their paths. From
rican diasporic art history message to the Orient. all of these artists I had never young and mid-career black reminded that it is during one creative spirit to the next,
courses there … He did what Ahead of his time in many heard of. At the time, I did not artists, male black artists … these times that art matters Driskell’s legacy will continue
few could, which was embody ways, Driskell laid the foun- know about Norman Lewis. I But to this day, it’s not that even more as a form of cul- to reverberate from the stu-
the humanistic study of art.” dation for the understanding didn’t know about Jack Whit- easy to look out in the world tural memory. dio, to the classroom, to the
Driskell’s colleagues, and appreciation of African ten, and all these other artists and find a black male men- “Bowdoin is really proud to museum walls and beyond.
friends and students alike re- American art. His endeavor who today are huge people in tor,” Leonardo said in a phone have collected David’s work,” “[His influence] wasn’t
member his deep kindness and in promoting Black art as the the art world … and that was interview with the Orient. Frank Goodyear said. “You about the width. It wasn’t about
his commitment and generos- backbone of American culture my really first introduction to “[Driskell] resembled the kind know, why do we collect? Be- the celebration. It wasn’t about
ity to share his knowledge and is not to be underestimated. the names. And it just stayed of person that I could look to, cause David’s voice is in those even marking these moments
cultivate the creative spark in Alvin Hall ’74, renowned with me.” or attempt to be, in his compo- works, his contributions to of brilliance … it was about
whomever he came into con- financial educator and art For contemporary artist sure, in his scholarliness and larger common global conver- committing every single day
tact with. Just last fall, Driskell collector, likewise credits his Shaun Leonardo ’01—who was his kindness … To have some- sations are contained in those of your life,” said Leonardo.
and McGee came to campus early encounters with Driskell introduced to Driskell’s work one like that in the art world works. And I think having a re- “What David would want from
and spoke on the importance for opening his artistic eye. his senior year at Bowdoin is unmeasurable, and people ally lovely collection of David’s me is what he did for me every
of Africana Studies and the “David was the first African by McGee and who befriend- don’t quite understand that work … keep[s] him at his own single time we were together—
Visual Arts for AF/AM 50, a American art teacher and art- ed the artist while at Skow- type of mentorship, particu- voice, close to us forever.” to move it forward.”
Friday, April 10, 2020 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 9

Otoboke Beaver challenges notions of feminist expression


They began touring interna- “Bad Luck” the band members
Unheard Voices tionally in 2016, and played blend their voices together,
shows at South by Southwest speed-talking in such precise
by Jack and Coachella. In the years unison that it’s hard to tell that
Swartzentruber
since 2009, their blistering it’s actually multiple people.
Otoboke Beaver is an all-fe- unique style has received praise What ties this album together,
male punk quartet from Kyoto, from well-known Japanese mu- amidst the impressive instru-
Japan which plays incredibly fast, sicians like Emi Morimoto of mentals and clever wordplay, is
angular rock music fueled by lib- Shonen Knife as well as interna- the sense of sheer joy and fun
erated rage. The original lineup, tional artists like Paul Thomson that the music evokes. Although
composed of singer Accorinrin, of Franz Ferdinand and Lars their songs often criticize men,
guitarist Yoyoyoshie, bassist Ni- Ulrich of Metallica. members of Otoboke Beaver
shikawachi and drummer Pop Otoboke Beaver’s 2019 album have stated, “We don’t try to sing
formed in 2009 at Ritsumeikan “Itekoma Hits” is a compilation about women’s rights or women’s
University’s music club. of older singles combined with issues in our music.” The root of
The group’s name was in- new material. It squeezes 14 the band’s energy and anger is
spired by a ‘love hotel’ in Osaka, songs into a mere 26 minutes, not in an abstract political agen-
a specialized type of accommo- averaging less than 90 seconds da, but reflects upon the direct
dation designed primarily to per song. This intense brevity is experiences of its members.
allow guests privacy for sexual a testament to the band’s point- Listening to Otoboke Beaver
activities. ed energy and fury regarding feels like listening to someone
The band’s music is com- the topics they sing about. This vent their anger and frustration
posed of incredibly calculated is shown in the hyper-specificity in ways they’ve always been told
bursts of energy and fury, with of many song titles which often not to. (While it is not part of
Accorinrin singing primarily seem to reference events from this album, I would highly rec-
about experiences from her Accorinrin’s life. ommend the music video for
own life regarding everything The first song on the album their most recent single, “Dirty
from romance and overly-enti- is “datsu.hikage no onna,” KAYLA SYNDER Old Fart is Waiting for My Re-
tled men to monotonous office which she opens by singing “I band members are never afraid “After Making Love With Me, are still precise, transitioning action.”) The album doesn’t try
jobs. Her fierce and mind-bend- hate you” in English, before re- to express exactly how they feel, You Eat Your Wife’s Meal.” from melody to chaos and back to appeal to specific groups of
ingly fast vocals are bolstered by turning to the verse in Japanese although their assertiveness It is important to note that with ease. One of the most in- people, and it doesn’t seek to
the other members of the group in which she laments being “a often grows and explodes over the explosiveness of the band’s strumentally impressive songs compromise on anything. In-
who often sing behind her in woman in the shadows.” When the course of each song. They lyrics does not overshadow the is “Introduce Me to Your Fam- stead, “Itekoma Hits” represents
perfect unison. the English line comes back lat- continue to demonstrate this explosiveness of its instrumen- ily,” in which the song changes the journey of four people
The band released a demo in er in the song, it is sung by all joyful assertiveness with names tal mastery. The musicians rare- tempo and style multiple times learning how to express their
2011 and a live album in 2012 the members, lending to a sense of later tracks such as “I’m Tired ly ever miss a beat, and even the while maintaining the same rage as something fun, joyful
that gained traction in Japan. of unification and solidarity. The of Your Repeating Story” and most cacophonic bursts of noise nimble and catchy bassline. In and absurd.

‘Honey, I’m Home’: senior theater majors adjust to off-campus life


September, explores the break The play explores issues sur- my friends anymore.” Although the shift in learn- So, they decided that Clarke
by Elizabeth Flanigan up of friendships in a theater rounding changing circum- At the moment, however, ing is hard, Clarke feels the would direct and Farber would
Orient Staff space. Weeks before the proj- stances and shifting dynamics their project is on pause. department is being exception- act. Before Thanksgiving
For Tori Clarke ’20 and ect was set to finally be per- within a close friendship. “The theater department ally present and understanding break, the duo cast Ellie Pike
Caroline Farber ’20, a lunch- formed, however, Bowdoin “I find, as I prepare to gradu- has been attempting to be very with its students. ’22 to star opposite Farber in
time conversation in the transitioned to remote learn- ate, looking at this story is kind receptive to the fact that what “This is really hard, espe- the show.
Moulton Union lightroom ing due to the coronavirus of scary to think about,” said it looks like to be a student off cially for seniors and especially “We are both still learning
became the inspiration for (COVID-19). Clarke in a Zoom interview campus is not the same as what in the case of the studio stu- as writers and artists, but this
their co-written senior proj- “Honey, I’m Home” follows with the Orient. “The transi- it looks like to be a student on dents,” she said. “People who piece is something that we
ect, “Honey, I’m Home.” two best friends, Millie and tion is going to put a strain on campus and that the expec- were working on these projects made from scratch, and it is
The play, which the two Claire, from college to life as my friendships because I’m not tations have to be different,” since September—that had important that we are able to
have been working on since roommates in New York City. going to be living next door to Clarke said. taken a lot of emotional energy see it through until the end,”
and physical time—to then be said Farber in a Zoom inter-
uprooted from that [is hard]. view with the Orient.
But it is not within the depart- Clarke and Farber are
ment’s power to fix that.” grappling with the uncertain
Clarke and Farber are both future of their production
members of the senior studio given the current situation
class for performance arts ma- with COVID-19. The theater
jors. Clarke is a performance and dance department wants
arts and Gender, Sexuality and to bring all of the senior stu-
Women’s Studies double major, dio students back to campus
while Farber is an English and at some point next year to
theater interdisciplinary major. perform their showcases in a
Clarke had a history of theater festival-style weekend. How-
involvement at Bowdoin while ever, this is contingent on the
Farber did not, but they both College’s decision to resume
decided to include theater in on-campus classes in the fall
their majors during their soph- semester.
omore year. That same year, the “Because of my relationship
pair met in Assistant Professor with the theater department at
of Theater Sally Wood’s Acting Bowdoin, I would really love
II class. to see it performed at Bowdo-
“In the class we did physi- in and have some closure to
cal combat … when we were my theater career in that way,”
physically fighting each other said Clarke.
was how we became friends,” Farber noted how these
said Clarke. emotions extend beyond than
Good friends as well as col- her project with Clarke and
laborators, the duo envisioned towards the work of her peers.
that they would write, direct “That’s why the studio stu-
and act together in their play. dents have been so nice to be
But as they got farther into the able to speak to. [We are] going
demands of the writing process, through the exact same things,”
COURTESY OF TORI CLARKE they realized that directing each she said. “We’re grieving the
SMILES ON STAGE: Ellie Pike ’22 (left) and Caroline Farber ’20 (right) shared laughs during a rehearsal for “Honey, I’m Home.” The production other would take a toll on both loss of our own project but also
is now indefinitely postponed due to the coronavirus. the piece and their friendship. theirs as well.”

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FS SPORTS
10 Friday, April 10, 2020

Keeping in touch, athletic trainers unveil


new ‘Sunday Stretches’ video program
by Andrew Chang
Orient Staff
Even in these times of dis-
array—or perhaps because of
them—new routines and pat-
terns have begun to emerge.
From President Clayton Rose’s
bi-weekly email updates to
various Zoom classes and Mi-
crosoft Teams meetings, one
thing’s for sure: these routines
mean more time looking at
screens and less time ventur-
ing outdoors. As a means to
promote health and wellness
during quarantine, the Ath-
letics Department debuted a
“Sunday Stretches” program
on YouTube last weekend.
The short and informative
videos are designed and pro-
duced by Bowdoin athletic
trainers, featuring tips and
stretches for students to stay
healthy and injury-free at
home. Episode One was put
together by athletic trainers
Ashley Stambolis, Gretchen
Henderson and Joe Shaw, and
offered tips for setting up a
comfortable, “ergonomically
correct” workstation at home. COURTESY OF BOWDOIN ATHLETICS
Five more episodes have STAYING LOOSE: Athletic trainers debut “Sunday Stretches” miniseries over Zoom in effort to promote wellness during quarantine.
been planned, and they will from Assistant Athletic Di- bolis, Henderson and Shaw in trainers wrote. “We’ve received all happen!” After a shout-out in Rose’s
cover upper and lower ex- rector for Sports Performance an email to the Orient. great feedback from staff, Over the next few weeks, email Tuesday and the ini-
tremity stretching, myofascial and Head Trainer Dan Davies. This is the first time the coaches, and student-athletes, the three will look to involve tial positive reception, will
release (a technique for easing “[Davies] presented us with athletic training department so that’s positive. We are using more members of the training the training staff expand the
pain in various “trigger points” this project as a way for us to has ever done a social media a lot of technology [and] pro- staff in the videos. “Sunday Stretches” program to
on the body), breathing tech- reach out to our student-ath- program. Despite their relative grams some of us haven’t used “Our entire staff will be in something more ambitious?
niques and tips on progressing letes and show them we are inexperience, the trainers en- before … Thank goodness front of the camera to help “[We] think that is to be
from prolonged sitting to ac- still here to support them in joyed making the first episode. for Micki Manheimer in our deliver encouragement and determined—who knows
tivity as the quarantine eases. injury prevention and care, “It was a lot of fun and Sports Information depart- support through these trying where this newfound fame
The idea for the series came even from afar,” wrote Stam- way harder than it looks!” the ment—she was able to make it times,” they wrote. will take us!”

Here’s the link to our zoom call:


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for Brunswick businesses. The Orient is an effective way to reach Bowdoin bowdoinorient.com
students, faculty and staff as well as parents, alumni and community members.
Hm wait sorry I’m not sure why that
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difficult time.
Let me try again.
Please contact orientads@gmail.com for details.
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Idk why this keeps happening. Let

Good Friday?
me try copying the zoom link again.

bowdoinorient.com
Every Friday is a good Friday when you check out
the Bowdoin Orient. bowdoinorient.com

bowdoinorient.com

Don’t Passover an opportunity to peruse Ugh, I guess we should just check


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the pages of the Bowdoin Orient. bowdoinorient.com
O OPINION
Friday, April 10, 2020 11

The Offer of the College, adapted QUESTION OF THE WEEK


The Offer of the College is a sort of mission statement for Bowdoin. And,
though its meaning holds up through the years, it has undergone several re-
visions since it was written in 1906. This week, we made some changes of our
own to reflect the new reality that we face as a College.
HAVE YOU BEEN “ZOOM-BOMBED”?
Answer at bowdoinorient.com/poll.
T O BE AT HOME in all lands and all ages;
To count your backyard a familiar acquaintance, and Netflix an in-
timate friend;
To gain a standard for the appreciation of the work of medical profession-
als and essential employees,
And the criticism of your own (but don’t be too hard on yourself);
To carry the keys of the world’s library as a JSTOR login,
Last issue’s response:
And feel its resources (still) behind you in whatever task you undertake;
To make and keep hosts of friends on Zoom… Who are to be leaders in Q: WOULD YOU ENROLL FOR A COMPLETELY
ONLINE SEMESTER IN THE FALL?
all walks of life;
To lose yourself (and your sanity) in generous enthusiasms, like baking
sourdough.

15% YES
And cooperate with others for common ends by staying home to flatten
the curve-
This is the offer of the college for the best (almost) four years of your life.

This editorial represents the majority view of the Orient’s Editorial Board, which is 85% NO Based on answers from 285 responses.
comprised of Emily Cohen, Roither Gonzales, Ellery Harkness, Julia Jennings, Alyce
McFadden, Rebecca Norden-Bright and Jaret Skonieczny.

ESTABLISHED 1871 You may be missing out on...


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edu by 7 p.m. on the Tuesday of the
week of publication. Include your full We don’t have a cool tag line like the Washington Post,
name and phone number. but we’ll get through this together!
16 Friday, April 10, 2020

APRIL
“I want to know if you can see beauty even when it’s not pretty, every day, and if you can source your own life
from its presence.
FRIDAY 10
I want to know if you can live with failure, yours and mine, and still stand on the edge of the lake and shout to Write a story that begins with one character in some sort
of water—anything from the Atlantic Ocean to a shower.
the silver of the full moon, ‘Yes!’
The story ends when the character gets out and dries off.
It doesn’t interest me to know where you live or how much money you have. I want to know if you can get up,
after the night of grief and despair, weary and bruised to the bone, and do what needs to be done to feed the
children. Write about your favorite weird thing that the C-Store
sells and why you like it.
It doesn’t interest me who you know or how you came to be here. I want to know if you will stand in the center
of the fire with me and not shrink back.
It doesn’t interest me where or what or with whom you have studied. I want to know what sustains you, from Bonus activity: Have a third-night Passover seder,
because what else are you doing with your time? Try not
the inside, when all else falls away.
to act visibly annoyed when your family refuses you a
I want to know if you can be alone with yourself and if you truly like the company you keep in the empty second glass of wine because “this isn’t college.”
moments.”
–Oriah Mountain Dreamer, “The Invitation”

SATURDAY 11 SUNDAY 12 MONDAY 13


Write a letter to your favorite graduating senior. Remind Things have felt quiet lately. Open your window and Write about the most revolting food you’ve ever tried in
them that they were appreciated on campus and that make a list of all of the sounds you hear. disgusting, excruciating detail.
Bowdoin will miss them.

Write about someone who, quite literally, sees their entire Write a story about two people eating dinner together.
Write about your least favorite song, what makes it so life flash before their eyes. Write about each milestone The first half of your story is from the perspective of one
annoying and the memories that you have attached to it. from the perspective of the character, who should act as character, who thinks it is a date; the second half is from
a spectator to the events of their own life. the perspective of the other character, who is completely
oblivious to the first character’s intentions.
Bonus activity: Get out of bed before noon. Trust me,
it’ll be so fun and interesting! Bonus activity: Re-read one of your high school essays.
Feel shame. Bonus activity: Read the Orient online! Thanks for
making it this far.

TUESDAY 14 WEDNESDAY 15 THURSDAY 16


Write about a time where you had to make a difficult Write about the last person you said “I love you” to, Write a story about the lives of your next-door neighbors,
choice, but, per Robert Frost’s advice, “took the one less whether it be a family member, a friend or a partner. Was either at home or at Bowdoin. The less you know about
traveled by.” Did it make all the difference? it out of emotion, obligation or something in between? their lives, the better the story will be.

Make a list of all of the people that you want to hug Write a recipe for a “Quarantini.” It shouldn’t be drink- Watch a music video with some sort of narrative storyline
when you can see people again. Stir the pot by writing able. and transform it into a short story (I did this for Katy
the names in order of priority and sending it to everyone Perry’s “The One That Got Away” and wound up crying,
on the list. so, trust me, this is legit).
Bonus activity: Tune in to a virtual yoga class led by Siri
Kazilionis ’23! Live on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. Eastern on
Bonus activity: Put on pants. the Bowdoin Wellness Instagram page (@bwellbowdoin). Bonus activity: Reach out to an estranged lover.
Rekindle the passion over Zoom.

17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Read The Orient Do some spring Reconnect with an Write a song Hug something or Start a new TV Cook something
cleaning old friend someone series new

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