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Good Evening Da Nang 1193

US SUPERSONIC FIGHTER
1:48 SCALE PLASTIC KIT

intro by Brad Elward


The McDonnell F-4C Phantom II became the first of what would eventually be some 2,300-plus Phantoms operated by the United
States Air Force. The Phantom II (initially designated as the F4H-1) was originally developed by the United States Navy as its standard
carrier-based fighter interceptor and designated as the F-4B. Despite an initial reluctance to adopt a Navy-developed fighter, the USAF
embraced the Phantom following a highly-successful fly-off versus the Convair F-106 Delta Dart and subsequent Air Force evaluations
held in early 1962. USAF Phantoms were originally designated as the F-110 Spectre, but were renamed F-4 as part of the United States
Tri-Service aircraft designation system introduced by the Department of Defense in 1962, which gave unified numerical designations for
aircraft of all services. The Air Force intended to use the Phantom II as an interceptor, conventional bomber, and nuclear strike aircraft.
From an external standpoint, there was little difference between the F-4C and the Navy’s F-4B. The Air Force variant featured thicker,
lower pressured tires on its main landing gear, a new antiskid braking system, and a dorsal refueling system, rather than the retractable
probe used by the Navy’s F-4B. The thicker landing gear permitted a thicker wing root, which helped accommodate more ordnance.
Despite being land-based, it retained the F-4Bs tailhook.
The major changes between the two variants were internal. Most notably, the F-4C was fitted with two cockpits, allowing it to be flown by
two pilots. This lead to the pilot in the backseat often being derogatorily referred to as the “guy in the back” or GIB. The F-4C possessed the
improved APG-100 radar, better suited for ground-attack, and two 10,900 lb (4,944 kg) / 17,000 lb (7,711 kg) thrust J79-GE-15 turbojet
engines with a built-in cartridge starting system. The F-4C also featured a much-improved electronic warfare suite, necessitated by its
large role as an attack aircraft.
Like the Navy’s F-4B, the F-4C did not have an internal gun. Both aircraft carried up to four AIM-9B Sidewinder heat-seeking missiles on
wing stations and up to four AIM-7D Sparrow III semi-active radar homing missiles on recessed fuselage stations. Up to 16,000 lbs (7,257
kg) of ordnance could be carried, including air-to-air missiles, Mk-80 series iron bombs, napalm, cluster bombs, AGM-45 Shrike, AGM-12
Bullpup, SUU-16/A or SUU-23/A gun pods, and rocket pods, as well as external fuel tanks. The aircraft had internal fuel storage of 1,972
gallons (7,465 litres) and up to 1,340 gallons (5,073 litres) in external tanks.
The first F-4C flew on 27 May 1963. Early model F-4Cs were delivered to the Air Force in the same gull gray and white paint scheme
used by U.S. Navy F-4Bs, but color patterns changed as the involvement in Vietnam grew, and USAF Phantoms adopted green and
brown tactical camouflage.
The F-4C was first assigned to the Air Force’s 4453rd Combat Crew Training Wing (CCTW) at McDill AFB, Florida, in November 1963,
although the unit had been conducting initial flight training using borrowed Navy F-4Bs.
F-4Cs were assigned to operational tactical fighter units in January 1964, and the USAF’s 12th and 15th Tactical Fighter Wings (TFWs)
were the first two wings to receive the new F-4C. Both became fully operational in late 1964. Although F-4Cs from the 12th TFW’s 555th
Tactical Fighter Squadron (TFS), the infamous Triple-Nickel squadron, were the first to deploy to Vietnam, arriving at Udon Royal Thai Air
Force Base (RTAFB) in December 1964, it was the 45th TFS of the 15th TFW that claimed the first air-to-air victory. On 10 July 1965, two
45th TFS F-4Cs crewed by Captains K.E. Holcombe and A.C. Clark (aircraft 64-0693), and Captains T.S. Roberts and R.C. Anderson
(aircraft 64-0679), shot down two North Vietnamese MiG-17s during a mission over North Vietnam. Both kills were by AIM-9B Sidewinder
missiles. F-4C squadrons saw significant action in Vietnam and claimed 42 North Vietnamese MiGs during aerial combat between 1965
and 1968. Of these kills, 22 were by Sidewinders, 14 were by Sparrows, four were by gun pods, and two resulted from maneuvering
tactics. F-4Cs operating over South Vietnam flew largely close air support (CAS) missions while those operating “Up North” over North
Vietnam flew both interdiction and escort missions. Phantoms providing close air support often stood ready in groups of four aircraft to
respond to urgent radio calls from engaged ground troops requesting fire support.
A total of 583 F-4C Phantoms were built at McDonnell’s St. Louis, Missouri plant, the final being delivered on 3 May 1966. Five hundred
five photo-reconnaissance variants, dubbed RF-4Cs photo-Phantoms, were also built. The RF-4C first flew in May 1964. It aircraft carried
no armament at first, and was fitted with three different camera stations in its nose section, allowing high- and low-altitude photography
both day and night.
Thirty-six 36 F-4Cs were converted into EF-4Cs for Wild Weasel missions against North Vietnamese air defense systems, specifically
Soviet-built SA-2 Guideline and their associate Fan Song acquisition radar. These variants carried the anti-radiation AGM-45 Shrike
missile, which homed in on radar emissions, and beginning in 1969, enhanced radar detection gear.
The F-4C was followed in production by the improved-bombing F-4D variant and later by the gun-toting F-4E. F-4Cs remained in
service with the Air National Guard well into the 1980s and all remaining RF-4Cs were retired in 1995.
DECALS AND COLOR PROFILES DESIGNED BY

1193 - NAV1
ATTENTION UPOZORNĚNÍ ACHTUNG ATTENTION

INSTRUCTION SIGNS INSTR. SYMBOLY INSTRUKTION SINNBILDEN SYMBOLES

OPTIONAL BEND OPEN HOLE SYMETRICAL ASSEMBLY REMOVE REVERSE SIDE APPLY EDUARD MASK
VOLBA OHNOUT VYVRTAT OTVOR SYMETRICKÁ MONTÁŽ ODŘÍZNOUT OTOČIT AND PAINT
POUŽÍT EDUARD MASK
NABARVIT

PARTS DÍLY TEILE PIECES


PLASTIC PARTS
C> D> F>

G> H> J>

M> R>

N> P> 2 pcs.


K>
O>

Upper
Fuselage

RP - RESIN PARTS

PE - PHOTO ETCHED DETAIL PARTS


Q> 2 pcs.
R1 R2 R3
2 pcs. 2 pcs. 2 pcs.

R1 eduard
2 pcs.

R3 R4
2 pcs. 2 pcs.
R1 R5 R2
2 pcs. 2 pcs. 2 pcs.

COLOURS BARVY FARBEN PEINTURE


GSi Creos (GUNZE) AQUEOUS Mr.COLOR AQUEOUS Mr.COLOR
AQUEOUS Mr.COLOR H 303 C303 GREEN H 317 C317 GRAY
H3 C3 RED H 304 C304 OLIVE DRAB H 327 C327 RED
H8 C8 SILVER H 309 C309 GREEN C92 SEMI GLOSS BLACK
H 12 C33 FLAT BLACK H 310 C310 BROWN Mr.METAL COLOR
H 23 C79 SHINE RED H 311 C311 GRAY MC213 STAINLESS
H 25 C34 SKY BLUE H 315 C315 GRAY MC214 DARK IRON
H 77 C137 TIRE BLACK H 316 C316 WHITE
2
A PE29

PE36 PE55
N4
H 317
C317
PE18 GRAY
PE45 H 317
C317
GRAY
PE35 PE46 PE27
PE51
H 317
PE22 PE31 PE53 C317
GRAY

H 317
C317
PE37 PE52 K6 GRAY

PE28

PE42 N2
PE41
PE20
K5
PE26
H 317
C317 G13 N1
GRAY

PE21 PE13 PE30


2 pcs. N5

PE25
PE6
H 317
C317 PE48
GRAY

PE12 PE19

A H 317
C317
GRAY

PE54

K12
K27
H 317
H 12 C317
H 12 C33
C33 G31 FLAT BLACK
GRAY

FLAT BLACK

PE24 PE49 G31


PE48
H 317 K9
C317 H 317
GRAY
H 12 C317
C33 GRAY
H 317 FLAT BLACK
C317
GRAY
K8
BALL PEN
G30 H 12
C33
FLAT BLACK

F47

H 316
C316
WHITE

F50

F48

F51
F49

3
B
C8

C12

C16
F30

C26 C19 F44

F40 C10

C
C18
C13

C17 F30
C9

C27

H 316
C316
WHITE
C28
B C11 F45

H 316
C316
C29
WHITE

D2

C1

D1

4
MC214
RP3
D
DARK IRON

2 pcs. PE47
MC214
DARK IRON

PE44

RP1 TOP

RP2

PE44, PE47
MC214
DARK IRON
RP2

MC213

MC213
O7 STEEL
O7
STEEL

F3 F2

H 316
C316 H 316
F4
WHITE F1 C316
WHITE

G14

D H8
C8
SILVER

Q9 D

5
Upper
Fuselage H 12
C33
FLAT BLACK

Upper
Fuselage

G20 PE23

PE8 PE8
PE9

Upper
Fuselage

PE7
Upper
Fuselage
PE9

G6

G40 G35

H 316
C316
WHITE

G32
G34

G24
G21 G2

H 316
C316
WHITE

G23 G41
G22
6
film
PE50
H 12
C33
FLAT BLACK

H 12
C33 H 12
FLAT BLACK C33
FLAT BLACK
K7
M3
STEP2

O2

O1
STEP1 G8
STEP4

O9
STEP3

E G36
C4
C3

H6
H5

C2 R11
C5
G15

H4

G25
G10

G16
H3

G17
G11

7
H 77 RP1 J2
C137
TIRE BLACK H 316
C316
WHITE

H 316 H 316
C316 C316
WHITE
WHITE

F9 F46 J1
H8 H 316
C8 C316
SILVER
F28 WHITE

H 316
H 77 RP1
C137 H 316
C316 TIRE BLACK H8
WHITE
C316
WHITE C8

H 316 R8 F11
SILVER

C316
F10 WHITE R8 F42

F5
F23
O11

F52

H 316
C316
WHITE

C23 H 316
C24 H 316 C15 C14
C316
WHITE
K15 K17 C316
WHITE
RP2 H3
C3
C22 C25
RED

H8
H 77 C8
C137
TIRE BLACK
SILVER
F7 F8

H3
F26 H 316
C316
WHITE
C3
RED

F27
H 316
C316
WHITE

C7 C6
C20
H8
C8
SILVER
H 316
F22 C316
WHITE
H 316
C316
C21
WHITE

F21

F 2 pcs. G 2 pcs.
Q7

Q12
Q6
Q15
Q13
Q22
Q8
Q14 Q11

Q5
Q10

Q21

8
Pylon 1 H8 H7 Pylon 2
F13
Left
H10 H9 H 316 F39
C316
F15 F16 WHITE

MC213
STEEL

F17 F18 MC213


J5 J7 STEEL

F33 F34 H 316


C316 MC213
J3 J4 WHITE STEEL

F
J6 J8 MC213
STEEL

G
MC213
STEEL

4 pcs. 4 pcs. 12 pcs.


Q3
1 2 3
H 316
H 304
C316
WHITE
C304
P16 OLIVE DRAB

P8 Q1
P11
P14 H 316
C316
WHITE
H 304 Q3
H 316
C316
P15 P1 H 304 Q2 C304
OLIVE DRAB
WHITE C304
OLIVE DRAB

P7 P17 Q31
H 317
C317 H 317 H 316
GRAY
C317 C316
GRAY WHITE

Q28 H8
P11 C8
SILVER
Q27

2 pcs. 5
Fuel tank Q26 Q25 F35
Right H 316
C316
H 316
4 C316
WHITE
WHITE

H 316

Q23 H 316 F56 C316


WHITE
C316
WHITE
H 316
C316
WHITE

F36
H 316 H 316
C316 C316
Q24 WHITE
F57
WHITE

eduard
RP1
2 pcs.
R1
RP1
2 pcs.

R2

R3
RP2
2 pcs.

R4

9
RP1 RP1
H 304
PE40
C304
OLIVE DRAB

RP2 RP3

H 2 pcs. H 304
C304
OLIVE DRAB

PE38 H 12
C33
FLAT BLACK - 0,2 mm
wire

PE43 RP1

RP4

RP1
RP5

PE3

- 0,2 mm
wire PE4

PE3
RP5 PE33

PE14

PE4
PE39
PE33

PE15
PE16 PE17

PE1 PE5

PE1

PE34
PE2

PE2

10
J K
PE10 PE32
3 pcs.
PE11 H 12
C33
FLAT BLACK

R4
R3

L
PE32
3 pcs.
H 12
C33
FLAT BLACK

R1
G9

R2

J
MC213
STEEL

K35
open
canopy

MC213
STEEL

K36
F14 open
canopy

F43

MC213
STEEL

11
MOUNTING ARMS

Pylon 1 4
Left
3 2

Pylon 3
Left 1

5
Pylon 3 1

Right
3 2

Pylon 1 4
Right

Pylon 2
F39

Pylon 1 4
Left
Pylon 2
3 2

Pylon 3
Left 1

3
1

1
3

Pylon 3 1

Right
3 2

Pylon 1 4
Right

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A F-4C 64-0726, 557th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 12th Tactical Fighter Wing,
Cam Rahn Bay Air Base, 1968
Specializing in the Close Air Support mission, the squadrons of the 12th TFW were authorized to apply nose art to their Phantoms for a short period of time.
“Hell’s Angel” acquired its unique “Diamondback” fuselage art compliments of USMC squadron VMFA-323 while on a stop over at Da Nang Air Base. This jet
survived the war and is currently on display at the Fargo Air Museum, North Dakota.

ČESKOU VERZI TEXTU NALEZNETE NA


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H327
H310 1 3 327
310
H309 H310 H309 H303
309 310 309 303
4 7 7 2 11

92

Mc214
H327
H303 H311 327
6 5 50
303 311
H309
309
89
H310 9
310 H311
H327
327
311 NOSE
GEAR
H327 Mc213 DOOR
327
H311 H311
311 Mc214 311
H310 H309 H303
310 309 303 50

10

H309
Mc213
309

H311
311

H327
50
327 3 1 H303
303
H303
303
9

H303 Mc214 H309 H310 H309


12 50+89 303 309 310 2 7 7 309 92

H311
311
H311 H309 H327
311 309 327
H327
RED 327

H309 H303 H310 H311


GREEN GREEN BROWN GRAY BLACK STEEL Mc213 DARK IRON Mc214
309 303 310 311 92 eduard
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B F-4C 63-7500, 390th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 366th Tactical Fighter Wing,
Da Nang Air Base, 1967
“The Blue Max” was the personal mount of the 366th TFW’s Director of Operations, Colonel Frederick “Boots” Blesse. A Korean War Ace, Col. Blesse had
a large role in the successful implementation and integration of the SUU-16/A gun pod for use on 366th Phantoms. At Col. Blesse’s direction, the Wing would
adopt the name “The Gunfighters” and wear on the aircraft intakes the Gunfighters Badge featuring the “Phantom Spook” character carrying a gun pod. This
aircraft would survive the war, only to be used as a range target in 1991.

ČESKOU VERZI TEXTU NALEZNETE NA


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H310 45
310
H309 H310 H309 H303
309 310 309 303
52 56 43 50+89 48
57 58 59
54
92

H25
34 46
H303 H311 6 53
303 311 H311
311 Mc214
46
H310 H309 H311
310 309 311
H311
311

Mc213

Mc214 55 55
H311 50
H310 311
310
51
H309
309 H303
303 47

H309
309
47

H311
311

50
H303
303

H303
303

45 H310 Mc214 Mc213


310
46
49 H303 50+89 44
303 H309 H310 H309
309 310 309 92
60 61 62
54

H25
H303 47 34
303 53
H311
311
H311 H309
311 309
H25
BLUE 34

H309 H303 H310 H311


GREEN GREEN BROWN GRAY BLACK STEEL Mc213 DARK IRON Mc214
309 303 310 311 92 eduard
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C F-4C 64-0676, 45th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 2nd Air Division,
Ubon Royal Thai Air Base, 1966
One of the original Phantom participants of the Vietnam War, this jet wore the US Navy scheme of Light Gull Gray over Gloss White. This aircraft had
an impressive mission score board painted on its intake ramp including a red F-100 silhouette. This aircraft was likely tasked with destroying a crashed F-100
in order to prevent the aircraft from ending up in the hands of the enemy.

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www.eduard.com/s/1193 H316
34 36 316
H315
315

33 41 42 26 39
37
92

Mc214

H316 H316
316 316
40 30
31

H316
316

H316 Mc213
316
Mc214
H23 H315
79 315

38

28 27

H316
316

29

27

38

H316
316 H316
316
H316
316 35
Mc213

34 Mc214
H315
315 26 39
H316
316

92

H316
316 42 H316
H316 316
316 32

H315 H23 H316


BLACK GRAY RED WHITE STEEL Mc213 DARK IRON Mc214
92 315 79 316 eduard
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D F-4C 64-0752, 480th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 35th Tactical Fighter Wing,
Da Nang Air Base, 1967
64-0752 arrived in Vietnam painted in the USAF’s original Phantom paint scheme of Gull Gray (FS 36440) over Gloss White. Repainted in field with the South
East Asia scheme applied over the Gull Gray, 64-0752 retained its white undersides. Hastily applied in the field, and under the rigors of combat, the S.E.A.
paint scheme rapidly chipped away to reveal the Gull Gray underneath. While piloting 64-0752 (callsing Mink 01) on 4/26/1966 Maj. Paul Gilmore
& 1Lt. William Smith shot down a MiG-21 with an AIM-9B. This aircraft was lost to AAA fire over north Vietnam on 6/8/1967.

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H310
310
H309 H310 H309 H303
309 310 309 50+89 303
23

92

24
H303 H316
303 316 6 20 Mc214

H316
316
50

Mc213

Mc214
H310
310
H316 21 22
316
H309
309
H303
303

H309
309

H316
316

H303 50
H303 H303
303 303
303

25 Mc213

H303 H309 H310 H309


Mc214
303 50+89 309 310 20 309 92

H316
316
H316
H303 316
303

H309 H303 H310 H316


BLACK GREEN GREEN BROWN WHITE STEEL Mc213 DARK IRON Mc214
92 309 303 310 316 eduard
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E F-4C 64-0776, 389th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 366th Tactical Fighter Wing,
Da Nang Air Base, May 1967
Lt Col. Robert Titus and 1Lt Milan Zimer shot down 2 MiG-21s while flying 64-0776 (callsign Wander 01) on 5/22/1967. The MiGs were dispatched using the
SUU-16/A gun pod as well as an AIM-9B Sidewinder missile. Titus and Zimer shot down a MiG-21 just two days earlier on 5/20/1967 with an AIM-7E Sparrow
while flying 64-0777. The 3 red stars on 64-0776 represent all three kills scored by the duo. It is likely that the “Gunfighter” badge would have been applied
to this jet prior to it being transferred to the 347th TFW in March of 1968. This aircraft survived the war, and is currently on display at the Museum of Flight
Seattle, Washington.

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www.eduard.com/s/1193 310
H309 H310 H309 H303
309 310 309 50+89 303
17 19

14
92

H303 6 H311
303 311

Mc214

H309
H310 H311
309
310 311 H311
311

Mc213
H311
311 Mc214

50 18
H310
310
H309
309 H303
303

H309
309
H311
311

50
H303
303
H303
303
Mc213

15 13
Mc214

H303 50+89 H309 H310 H309


303 309 310 17 309 92

14

H311
H303 311
303 H311 H309
311 309

H309 H303 H310 H311


GREEN GREEN BROWN GRAY BLACK STEEL Mc213 DARK IRON Mc214
309 303 310 311 92 eduard
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Good Evening Da Nang STENCILING POSITIONS
63 H 316
103
C316
WHITE

68

66

H 317
C317
66 GRAY
102 104 106 103 91 101

66 105 107
64

H 304
C304
95 OLIVE DRAB

66

66

92 93 94
66

ONLY FOR MARKINGS A, D, E


70
82

63 65
67

72 65 68
74

70

68 78
69

65
79 73
80
67 70
90
87 76 75
85 88 87 77
86

69

71 83 84
63
87 87 85
86

81 69
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Good Evening Da Nang STENCILING POSITIONS
H 316
63 99 C316
WHITE
98

68

66
99 97
66 100 98 108 96

66
64

66

66

66

70
82
63
65
67

72 65 68
74

70

68 78
69

65
79 73
80
67 70
90
87 76 75
85 88 87 77
86

69

71 83 84
63
87 87 85
86

81 69
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