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Segment Snapshots 2015

PRIZM5 Segment Snapshots

PRIZM is a trademark of The Nielsen Company (U.S.) and is used with permission. Sources of
data shown include Environics Analytics, Environics Research Group, Statistics Canada,
NADbank/PMB, Numeris and AskingCanadians™ (all used with permission). Icon illustrations by
Scott Brooks.

Environics Analytics believes that the information in this handbook is accurate as of the
publication date, but no warranty or fitness is implied. The information is provided on an as is
basis. Environics Analytics will not be responsible for errors or omissions. All information in this
handbook is subject to change without notice.

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and the PRIZM5 Links from which they were derived.

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01 Cosmopolitan Elite
Very wealthy, middle-aged and older families and couples
Population 209,714 (0.58% of Canada)
Households 72,430 (0.50% of Canada)
Average Household Income $469,882
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Emotional Control

Canada’s wealthiest lifestyle has changed little over the years. Cosmopolitan Elite remains a
haven for both new-money entrepreneurs and heirs to old-money fortunes. With household
incomes more than five times the national average, this segment is concentrated in a handful of
exclusive neighbourhoods—like Toronto’s Bridle Path, Montreal’s Westmount, Calgary’s Elbow
Park and Vancouver’s Granville. Here, affluent, middle-aged families and older couples live in
million-dollar homes, drive luxury imports and send their kids to private schools. Most live within
an easy commute to their executive jobs in management, finance and the sciences, as well as to
downtown arts and entertainment venues; they’re big supporters of the opera, ballet, symphony
and theatre. As the most educated of lifestyle types—more than half the populace hold
university degrees—members of Cosmopolitan Elite broaden their horizons by travelling
internationally, especially to Asia, the United Kingdom and Europe. But they also express Time
Stress among their strongest Social Values, and many enjoy luxury cruises, spa resorts and
vacation cottages.

02 Urbane Villagers
Wealthy, middle-aged and older city sophisticates
Population 387,720 (1.08% of Canada)
Households 131,086 (0.90% of Canada)
Average Household Income $227,566
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Social Learning

The nation’s second wealthiest lifestyle, Urbane Villagers is a prosperous world of white-collar
executives and stately homes, high-end cars and globetrotting vacations. Located in and
around Canada’s largest cities, the segment’s neighbourhoods are characterized by married
couples with university degrees and university-bound children now in their pre-teens to early
twenties. Many hold well-paying jobs in business, management, social sciences and the arts. And
with the average household income above $227,000, members of Urbane Villagers enjoy the
trappings of success: golf club memberships, tickets to sporting events, gourmet cooking at
home and impressive stock portfolios. Few lifestyle types score higher for international travel—
residents go everywhere from Australia and China to Italy and France—but they’re not above
flying economy class as part of a vacation package or booking all-inclusive resort holidays to
accommodate their families. Back at home, these executive families pursue active lifestyles in
their established neighbourhoods. One rung down from Canada’s cultural elite, they tend to
frequent dinner theatres, popular music performances and rock concerts.

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03 Arts & Affluence


Wealthy, established urban families and couples
Population 291,630 (0.81% of Canada)
Households 114,695 (0.78% of Canada)
Average Household Income $168,820
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education University
Occupation White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Pursuit of Originality

Educated, wealthy and overwhelmingly urban, Arts & Affluence stands apart from the large
number of city lifestyles. Concentrated in only two cities—Toronto and Montreal—this segment
consists of a mix of larger families and older couples and singles in neighbourhoods such as
Forest Hill and Casa Loma in Toronto and Côte-Saint-Luc in Montreal. Many of these areas
contain first- and second-generation Canadian Jews—the segment is more than a third
Jewish—who live in elegant homes, semi-detached houses and condos. Exhibiting a cultured
sensibility, they have high rates for attending nearly every form of art and performance: opera,
ballet, symphony, art galleries, film festivals and museums. With lofty incomes nearing $170,000,
Arts & Affluence members have achieved success through a mix of education (more than half
hold a university degree) and professional achievement (typically in management, education, the
arts and sciences). These metro households are well travelled, frequently flying to various sunny
destinations, major cities in the northeastern U.S., and Europe’s cultural capitals. But they are
also fiscally conservative and invest in bonds, GICs and mutual funds all at high rates.

04 Suburban Success
Wealthy, middle-aged and older homeowners
Population 315,916 (0.88% of Canada)
Households 121,095 (0.83% of Canada)
Average Household Income $174,187
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Effort Toward Health

The wealthiest non-urban segment, Suburban Success is a magnet for Canada’s established
professional class: a prosperous place of dual-income couples who have university degrees and
large families, typically with teens or university-aged children. Many have parlayed jobs as
managers, scientists, artists and government workers into well-paying careers that earn an
average income of about $175,000. Concentrated in the bedroom suburbs of cities such as
Calgary, Vancouver and Ottawa, the segment’s older families and empty-nesting couples have
turned their homes into suburban castles, with gas barbecues on their backyard decks,
professionally manicured lawns and family rooms featuring the latest computers, PVR/DVR
equipment and video-on-demand-enabled TV. But these Canadians don’t simply cocoon in their
homes. They like crowds and, with their homes only a short commute to downtown
entertainment, they enjoy going to ballet and opera performances, jazz concerts and art
galleries.

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05 Asian Sophisticates
Upscale, urban Asian families
Population 518,905 (1.45% of Canada)
Households 160,532 (1.10% of Canada)
Average Household Income $133,366
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Need for Status Recognition

The most affluent of the Asian-dominated lifestyles, Asian Sophisticates is home to educated,
middle-aged and older families, a third of whom are Asian. About half the residents came to
Canada in the 1980s and 1990s, and many now live in comfortable suburban communities like
Toronto’s Bayview Village, Mississauga and Richmond Hill, as well as Vancouver’s Arbutus Ridge.
With three times the average number of multi-generational families, Asian Sophisticates is filled
with teenage and twentysomething children. And with their upscale incomes averaging more
than $130,000, Asian Sophisticates households enjoy active lifestyles. They travel abroad,
frequent plays, art galleries and film festivals, and like to go sailing and wind surfing. In addition,
these mostly university-educated consumers are determined to see their children succeed
academically: they score high for signing their kids up for private schools, extracurricular
actitives and Oxford Learning Centres.

06 Kids & Careers


Large, well-off, middle-aged suburban families
Population 1,098,648 (3.06% of Canada)
Households 350,117 (2.39% of Canada)
Average Household Income $157,517
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Medium
Sample Social Value Ecological Concern

One of the wealthiest suburban lifestyles, Kids & Careers is known for its sprawling families—
more than 40 percent have four or more people—living in the nation’s second-tier cities.
Parents are middle-aged, children are between 10 and 25 years old, and 85 percent live in single-
family homes—typically spacious affairs built after 1980. And nearly a quarter of households
contain older immigrants who have achieved success and moved to the suburbs. With average
incomes around $160,000, residents lead flourishing lifestyles, belonging to golf and fitness
clubs, shopping at upscale malls and big-box stores and attending pro sporting events. Few
segments score higher for team sports as both participants and spectators, with Kids & Careers
households exhibiting high rates for playing ice hockey, soccer, football and basketball. When
they want to catch a game on TV, they relax in family rooms outfitted with home theatre
systems, iPads and gaming devices. Still in the asset accumulation phase of their financial lives,
these families score high for investing in stocks and mutual funds, and many do their investing
and banking online.

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07 Nouveaux Riches
Well-off, suburban Quebec families and couples
Population 290,412 (0.81% of Canada)
Households 108,641 (0.74% of Canada)
Average Household Income $139,692
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Fulfilment Through Work

The most upscale of the francophone segments, Nouveaux Riches has remained relatively stable
over the last decade. Concentrated outside Quebec’s densest downtowns, its members live in
the new suburbs surrounding Montreal, Quebec City and Gatineau, in communities like St-Bruno,
Laval and Boucherville. As children of the Quiet Revolution, they are the first generation of self-
made affluent Quebecers. With their university educations, fluency in both French and English,
and professional and management jobs, these middle-aged couples and families can afford to
live in new suburban splendour. Their stately houses are tended by landscaping services, and
their family rooms are decked out with the latest video and audio equipment. Nouveaux Riches
residents generally drive inexpensive imports, buy trendy clothes and enjoy going to comedy
clubs, symphony concerts and theatre festivals. And with a majority of households containing
couples with children, they enjoy athletic activities like skiing, ice skating, hockey, hiking and
backpacking. Status-conscious, they’ve earned their way to the top and are unashamed to
spend their money on themselves and their children.

08 Boomerang City
Upscale, multi-generational urban households
Population 850,716 (2.37% of Canada)
Households 330,348 (2.26% of Canada)
Average Household Income $126,272
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Equal Relationship with Youth

Reflecting the recent demographic trend of older children still living at home, Boomerang City
consists of middle-aged families and older couples aging in place in urban neighbourhoods.
Nearly a third of the children at home are over the age of 20, and nearly all the families live in
single-detached homes on city streets. Located in a number of large cities, including Vancouver,
Calgary, Winnipeg and Toronto, these adults tend to be Baby Boomers who have parlayed good
educations—more than 40 percent have graduated or attended a university—into well-paying
jobs in science, education, government and the arts. Many maintain active social lives, going to
the theatre and ballet, attending museums and film festivals, and frequenting garden and boat
shows. And many of these multi-generational households are health conscious, joining health
clubs and signing up for aerobics and yoga classes. Because this segment includes so many
young adults who have returned to their childhood homes or simply never left, surveys reveal the
popularity of a number of youth-centred activities—from skiing and snowboarding to playing
basketball and lacrosse—though it’s possible the segment’s age-denying Boomer parents are
enjoying these sports, too.

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09 Satellite Burbs
Older, upscale exurban couples and families
Population 971,671 (2.71% of Canada)
Households 362,014 (2.48% of Canada)
Average Household Income $128,962
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Religion a la Carte

One of the wealthiest exurban lifestyles, Satellite Burbs features a mix of middle-aged families
and older couples living in satellite communities across Canada. Many residents have settled
here for the relaxed pace of outer-ring subdivisions, with their wooded tracts and spacious
homes built between 1960 and 2005. Despite their mixed educational achievement—one-
quarter have university degrees, another quarter have high school diplomas—the households
average impressive incomes of nearly $140,000 from a wide variety of jobs. Members take
advantage of their location between city centres and rural settings, enjoying both the arts and
the great outdoors. Their idea of entertainment is going to a community theatre, music concert
or movie theatre. For vacations, they’re more likely than average Canadians to go camping,
boating or touring in a recreational vehicle. But they’re not entirely into roughing it: their exurban
dream homes are outfitted with hot tubs and stylish furniture on their patios, and home theatre
in their family rooms.

10 Emptying Nests
Older, upper-middle-income suburban couples
Population 328,882 (0.92% of Canada)
Households 146,838 (1.00% of Canada)
Average Household Income $103,663
Housing Tenure Own
Education University/College
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Utilitarian Consumerism

Credit the aging population over the last decade for the prevalence of Emptying Nests. Today,
these established, upper-middle-income households consist of married couples over 55 whose
children have flown the coop. Residents here tend to live in single-detached and row houses in
developments built over the last thirty years. Even though nearly half the adults are of
retirement age, these households still report comfortable incomes—the average is about
$104,000—and enviable lifestyles. University- and college-educated, they enjoy cultural
activities, going to ballet and opera performances, community theatres and film festivals. They
like to keep up with trends by attending exhibitions, particularly craft, cottage, investment and
travel shows. Many have reached an age where they have both the time and money to travel,
allowing them to book long-haul trips to the United Kingdom, the Middle East, Australia and
China. But they’re not spending all of their nest egg; expressing an interest in leaving a Legacy,
they’re active investors who use financial planners when choosing stocks and mutual funds.

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11 Urban Digerati
Younger, well-educated city singles
Population 497,448 (1.39% of Canada)
Households 268,465 (1.84% of Canada)
Average Household Income $102,524
Housing Tenure Rent & Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Sexual Permissiveness

The most urban of all the segments, Urban Digerati is a collection of younger, tech-savvy singles
concentrated in the downtown apartment buildings of two cities: Toronto and Montreal.
Reflecting two emerging demographic trends—the increasing urbanization of Canada and the
growth of high-rise neighbourhoods—Urban Digerati offers residents a vibrant vertical world,
with bedrooms in the clouds and a lively social scene on the ground. Middle-income, highly
educated and culturally diverse, Urban Digerati neighbourhoods are typically filled with recently
built high-rise apartments and condos located near fitness clubs, clothing boutiques and all
types of bars—from wine to coffee to microbrew. Because many residents have yet to start
families, they have the time and discretionary income to pursue active social lives, going
dancing and bar-hopping and hitting film festivals and food and wine shows. And they like to
look good while on the social scene, taking aerobics and Pilates classes and purchasing the
latest fashions and electronics online. But they’re not simply acquisitive materialists; many are
globally conscious consumers who support the arts and try to lead ecologically sensitive
lifestyles.

12 Street Scenes
Younger, upper-middle-income singles and families
Population 548,288 (1.53% of Canada)
Households 238,998 (1.63% of Canada)
Average Household Income $111,505
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Need for Escape

Located on the fringes of the downtown core, Street Scenes attracts younger singles and
families to well-kept streets with their aging houses, duplexes and semi-detached houses. Many
residents are well educated—nearly 40 percent attended university—with white-collar jobs and
active leisure lives. While residents here have above-average incomes, their spending power
appears greater because so many households are childless. They open their wallets for music,
books, fashion and consumer electronics. Many engage in athletic activities such as
snowboarding, cross-country skiing, mountain biking and aerobics. And they frequent stores
offering sporting goods and athletic wear such as Mountain Equipment Co-op and Play It Again
Sports. Living close to city entertainment districts, they have high rates for going to bars,
nightclubs, art galleries and music and film festivals. They’re big fans of professional sports,
attending basketball, baseball, football and soccer games all at high rates. Progressive in their
outlook, they support the Pursuit of Originality—which they exercise by acquiring the latest in
fashion, food and wine.

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13 Asian Avenues
Successful, middle-aged and older Asian families
Population 586,331 (1.63% of Canada)
Households 188,833 (1.29% of Canada)
Average Household Income $89,298
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Multiculturalism

With nearly two-thirds of residents foreign-born—more than any other segment—Asian


Avenues is an urban lifestyle of older immigrants from China and, to a lesser degree, the
Philippines, Vietnam and South Asia. Divided between Vancouver and Toronto, it’s the most
Chinese of all the segments, with half of households consisting of first- and second-generation
Chinese. Now middle-aged and older, half are married with children, most have moderate
educations and members earn middle incomes. With more than half speaking a non-official
language at home, they inhabit a bi-cultural world, travelling often to their native country in
addition to destinations throughout Asia, Europe and the western U.S. They enjoy going to
exhibitions and have high rates for attending health and pet shows. And these family households
enjoy the full range of sports: jogging, skiing, basketball and badminton. On weekends, they can
often be seen taking their children to zoos, aquariums, bowling alleys and ski resorts.

14 Diversity Heights
Diverse, middle-aged and older suburban families
Population 585,152 (1.63% of Canada)
Households 195,447 (1.34% of Canada)
Average Household Income $112,595
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Skepticism Towards Advertising

Unlike the wave of immigrants who came to Canada in the postwar years, the members of
Diversity Heights tend to be Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers who emigrated between 1960 and
1990. Today these older, culturally-diverse families—about 40 percent are foreign-born,
typically from China, India, Italy and the Philippines—have moved beyond gateway
neighbourhoods into comfortable inner-ring suburbs. In these multi-lingual neighbourhoods,
nearly nine out of ten households own their homes, and more than two-thirds of these are
single-family dwellings; about 5 percent are multi-family households. With its high
concentration of older children—one-third are over 20—this segment scores high for outdoor
activities like soccer, baseball, tennis and football. Many also frequent nightclubs, amusement
parks, aquariums and hockey games. And in these neighbourhoods where one of the strongest
values is Traditional Family, shoppers frequent family-oriented businesses: tutoring programs,
cinemas, video arcades and ski resorts that offer snowboarding.

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15 Heritage Hubs
Middle-aged, diverse suburban families
Population 841,295 (2.34% of Canada)
Households 263,480 (1.80% of Canada)
Average Household Income $118,160
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation Mixed
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Consumptivity

The young families who moved into starter homes a decade ago are growing up. In Heritage
Hubs, these now middle-aged families have crafted comfortable lifestyles—often thanks to dual
incomes—in suburban communities slowly being absorbed by the urban sprawl. Nearly 90
percent of residents live in houses built since 1990, and while the housing stock is mixed, more
than a quarter live in row houses—more than triple the national average. Reflecting the
increasing diversity of the nation’s suburbs, almost 40 percent of households contain
immigrants, though no one cultural group dominates. Family-filled Heritage Hubs scores high for
participating in basketball, swimming and bowling. On weekends, families head to theme parks,
zoos and aquariums. Many parents express the value of Consumptivity, which they satisfy by
frequently attending exhibitions, especially those featuring gardening, pets, autos and food and
wine. With their international roots, families here are seasoned travellers, often visiting China,
Australia, Dominican Republic and Jamaica. To save money, vacations frequently involve
staying with friends, renting a cottage or booking an all-inclusive resort.

16 Pets & PCs


Younger, upscale suburban families
Population 1,306,643 (3.64% of Canada)
Households 429,189 (2.94% of Canada)
Average Household Income $132,591
Housing Tenure Own
Education University/College
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Medium
Sample Social Value Saving on Principle

The largest lifestyle in Canada, Pets & PCs has changed little over the last decade, remaining a
haven for younger families with pre-school children in the new suburbs surrounding larger cities.
More than half the children in this segment are under the age of 10, and most of the maintainers
are under 45. What has changed in Pets & PCs is an increasing presence of immigrants from
South Asia, China and the Caribbean. Few segments have more new housing, and most residents
have settled into a mix of single-detached, semi-detached and row house developments. With
upscale incomes, segment members have crafted an active, child-centred lifestyle. These
families participate in many team sports, including baseball, basketball, hockey and soccer, and
they shuttle kids and gear to games in minivans and SUVs. On weekends, they head to kid-
friendly destinations such as zoos, theme parks, aquariums and water parks. They fill their homes
with an array of computers and electronic gear, including video game systems and iPads, to
occupy their children while the moms and dads grab the occasional date night to go dancing or
enjoy dinner at a fine restaurant.

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17 Exurban Wonderland
Middle-aged, upscale exurban families
Population 555,065 (1.55% of Canada)
Households 198,022 (1.35% of Canada)
Average Household Income $129,362
Housing Tenure Own
Education College/Trade
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Propriety

An upscale exurban segment, Exurban Wonderland is home to middle-aged families who have
settled in the emerging sprawl beyond the nation’s largest cities. With incomes nearing
$130,000, residents of these new communities tend to be prosperous professionals who like
their toys: boats, RVs, snowmobiles, computers, home theatre systems and impressive
collections of sporting equipment. Many enjoy outdoor activities like baseball, football, fishing
and camping. Their idea of entertainment is going to a dinner theatre, rock concert or RV show.
With a majority still raising children at home—most kids are between 5 and 20 years old—the
segment scores high for family-friendly activities like visiting a theme park, zoo, video arcade or
national park. But in these exurban areas known for affordable housing and open country, many
adults confront the trade-off of long commutes and a harried lifestyle. One of their strongest
values is Primacy of the Family.

18 Management Material
Younger, upper-middle-income suburbanites
Population 421,221 (1.17% of Canada)
Households 168,069 (1.15% of Canada)
Average Household Income $110,254
Housing Tenure Own
Education University/College
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Medium
Sample Social Value Confidence in Big Business

While most younger adults are drawn to downtown action, members of Management Material
defy that stereotype with its twenty- and thirty-somethings who have opted for suburbia’s less
pricey and more spacious homes. The households here are a mix of couples and families who
have transformed college or university educations into good jobs in management, business,
information technology and the sciences. Found mainly on the fringe surrounding big cities,
they’ve settled into a mix of row houses and low-rise apartments built since 2000; notably, 30
percent live in row houses—nearly five times the national average. Their upper-middle incomes—
the average is about $110,000—afford them comfortable lifestyles, though they’re hardly
extravagant. Members enjoy curling, exercising at home, playing baseball and pursuing
adventure sports. For Saturday night dates, they like to go dancing or hit a nightclub. Fans of
popular culture, they keep up with trends by going to a wide range of exhibitions, including those
that feature boats, pets and even fan-focused events like ComicCon.

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19 Grey Pride
Middle-income seniors in urban apartments
Population 157,095 (0.44% of Canada)
Households 90,646 (0.62% of Canada)
Average Household Income $84,055
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Legacy

The oldest lifestyle type in Canada, Grey Pride is home to older and mature singles, couples,
widows and widowers living in large cities across the country. Some 45 percent are over 65 years
old—nearly three times the national average—and no segment has a higher proportion of
members over 75. But Grey Pride isn’t a collection of retirement communities. More than 40
percent of residents are still in the labour force, providing households with solid incomes and a
middle-income lifestyle. And nearly nine in ten Grey Pride residents live in an apartment,
typically a unit in a high-rise built between 1980 and 2000. And these seniors are smart. Unlike
many older households, over a third have a university degree or have taken some university
courses. Many are working or recently retired from positions in real estate, technical sciences
and management. Having both time and money, Grey Pride households enjoy vibrant lifestyles—
dancing, golfing, doing aerobics and going to craft shows and the symphony. For a little
adventure, they take package tours to Australia, escape winter in Florida and stay at a bed and
breakfast for a short getaway.

20 South Asian Achievers


Suburban, upper-middle-income South Asian families
Population 457,808 (1.28% of Canada)
Households 112,997 (0.77% of Canada)
Average Household Income $103,620
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation Mixed
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Advertising as Stimulus

Reflecting the increasing diversity of Canada’s visible minority population, South Asian
Achievers has emerged as a fast-growing segment of family-filled households in new suburban
neighbourhoods. The most affluent of the South Asian segments, it also has one of the highest
concentrations of family households, at more than 90 percent. Many tend to cluster together in
cultural enclaves, particularly in the greater Toronto area. These middle-aged, relatively recent
immigrants—about 60 percent are foreign-born—are characterized by mixed educations, skilled
blue-collar and service jobs, upper-middle-incomes and child-centred lifestyles. In
neighbourhoods filled with single-detached, semis and row houses, active families enjoy outdoor
sports like basketball, baseball and soccer, as well as visits to theme parks, movies and auto
shows. Still making their way in Canadian popular culture, these residents have a high rate for
going to a university with plans for bettering their lives.

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21 Beau Monde
Urban, middle-income Quebec seniors
Population 377,277 (1.05% of Canada)
Households 160,329 (1.10% of Canada)
Average Household Income $88,093
Housing Tenure Own
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Sexism

A midscale Quebec segment, Beau Monde consists of middle-income, older households living in
Quebec’s largest cities. Found in fashionable city neighbourhoods like Duvernay and Saint-
Lambert in Greater Montreal, these often bilingual singles and couples live in semis, duplexes
and low-rise apartments. With average incomes compared to the rest of Canada, the segment’s
residents can afford active lifestyles, with high rates for buying tickets to ballet performances,
pop music concerts, outdoor stages and music festivals. Their favourite leisure activities include
visiting historical sites, going to spas, skiing and travelling abroad; they have high rates for
visiting France, Italy, Cuba and Mexico. And they enjoy a night out on the town, the better to be
seen at trendy restaurants, bars and comedy clubs. Among their top-ranked values are Vitality
and Pursuit of Intensity.

22 Aging in Suburbia
Older, upper-middle-income suburban couples and families
Population 769,344 (2.14% of Canada)
Households 292,743 (2.00% of Canada)
Average Household Income $108,590
Housing Tenure Own
Education High School/College/Trade
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Ethical Consumerism

Not quite golden age material, the established households of Aging in Suburbia enjoy a
comfortable lifestyle sustained by their upper-middle-incomes. Once filled with young child-
rearing families, this segment is now a sign of the times: home to a mix of older couples aging in
place and middle-aged families still raising children and building nest eggs. Many adults earn
good incomes from long-tenured jobs in public administration, wholesale trade and construction.
And that’s allowed them to buy solid, single-detached homes typically built between 1960 and
1990—many with luxury cars and boats in the driveway. About half the households still contain
children—generally over the age of 15—who no doubt influence this segment’s preferences for
pets, amusement parks, animated movies and rock concerts. For summer vacations, they can
often be found heading to lakes and parks for camping and jet skiing, but they’ve also been
known to visit such far-flung locales as China and Australia.

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23 Asian New Wave


Younger, well-educated Asian singles and families
Population 242,376 (0.68% of Canada)
Households 111,326 (0.76% of Canada)
Average Household Income $68,477
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education University
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Traditional Family

As immigration continues to play an important role in Canada’s population growth, Asian New
Wave has emerged as a new Asian Canadian-dominated lifestyle. The least affluent of the three
Asian segments, it’s home to younger, lower-middle-income singles and families living in urban
areas in Vancouver and Toronto. Nearly two-thirds are foreign born, and most have come to
Canada during the 1990s or more recently. In fact, over half speak a non-official language at
home, typically one of the Chinese languages. Despite their modest incomes, Asian New Wave
members are well educated—nearly half have gone to a university—and they hold jobs in the
sciences, business administration, sales and services. While still establishing their careers, they
make time to enjoy their urban lifestyles, stopping for a latté at their local Starbucks where they
may also pick up an alternative weekly. But they’re not averse to leaving the city, and they have
high rates for going snowboarding, visiting zoos and aquariums, attending health and living
shows, and shopping for clothing at Danier and H&M. In their high-rise apartments they watch
soccer and W Network, flip through a news magazine and listen to podcasts.

24 Fresh Air Families


Middle-aged, middle-income exurbanites
Population 909,194 (2.53% of Canada)
Households 340,762 (2.33% of Canada)
Average Household Income $102,243
Housing Tenure Own
Education College/High School/Trade
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Obedience to Authority

Widely dispersed across Canada, Fresh Air Families is one of the largest segments—and
growing. Found in rapidly expanding exurban communities, these neighbourhoods feature a mix
of middle-aged couples and families with children of all ages. While most adults have high
school, trade school or college educations, these two-income households enjoy solid, middle-
income lifestyles thanks to positions in health care, public administration and the trades. They
own single-detached homes, typically built in the 1990s, and nearly nine out of ten commute by
car to jobs in nearby suburbs. With its mixed family types, the segment scores high for a range
of marketplace preferences, frequenting big-box retailers, large department stores and discount
grocers. Members of Fresh Air Families enjoy the great outdoors, particularly fishing, boating,
snowmobiling and camping. Indeed, some of their favourite leisure activities are evident in their
driveways, typically cluttered with boats, campers or motorcycles—and pickup trucks to haul
them to parks and campgrounds. But they also enjoy indoor pursuits like crafting and knitting.

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25 South Asian Society


Middle-aged, middle-income South Asian families
Population 501,122 (1.40% of Canada)
Households 136,345 (0.93% of Canada)
Average Household Income $94,681
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector/Blue Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Global Consciousness

Home to the largest concentration of South Asian residents, South Asian Society features a
blend of Sikh, Hindu and Muslim immigrants who have arrived in Canada since 1990. Half speak
a non-official language, the most common being Punjabi. Residing mostly in two major cities—
Vancouver and Toronto—these middle-aged families contain children of all ages living in single-
detached homes and duplexes. Working in manufacturing, the trades, sales and service, the
adults in South Asian Society earn average incomes, which they diligently invest for their
children’s education. Here, nearly one in seven households is multi-generational—seven times
the national average—and their marketplace tastes reflect the age span. Eager to explore all
that their adopted country has to offer, South Asian Society members have high rates for
jogging, camping, going to nightclubs and attending auto shows. They are active shoppers, too,
frequenting fashionable retailers like H&M and Banana Republic, as well as athletic apparel
shops such as Foot Locker and Lululemon Athletica.

26 Second City Retirees


Older and mature, middle-income homeowners
Population 695,053 (1.94% of Canada)
Households 295,561 (2.02% of Canada)
Average Household Income $90,420
Housing Tenure Own
Education College/High School
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Ecological Fatalism

Second City Retirees consists of a mix of older and mature couples and families found in the
suburban neighbourhoods of second-tier cities like Hamilton, Winnipeg and Windsor. Most
residents are over 55 years old and are divided between those now retired and those
approaching retirement from jobs in public service and manufacturing. Nearly all, however, are
homeowners, aging in place in single-detached homes that were built before 1980. These
households contain slightly more empty-nesting couples than those married with children—and
in those family households the kids are typically older teenagers. With their high school, trade
school and college educations, many of the working adults report middle-incomes that allow
them to get away from their emptying nests with a cruise vacation or a trip to Jamaica or
Florida. With more time on their hands to relax, they also enjoy staying at their cottages,
strolling a city park or just meeting friends at a donut shop for coffee and conversation. Their
idea of exercise is gardening, golfing and paddling around a lake or stream in a canoe.

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27 Diverse City
Diverse, middle-income city dwellers
Population 541,001 (1.51% of Canada)
Households 190,278 (1.30% of Canada)
Average Household Income $84,781
Housing Tenure Own
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Mixed
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Sexism

For nearly a half-century, Diverse City has been a haven for up-and-coming immigrants from
Europe, Asia and Central America. Concentrated in Toronto and nearby cities, these
neighbourhoods are mixed by more than their cultural diversity: the households include singles
and families, the ages range from 35 to over 75, and the housing stock includes row houses,
semis and duplexes. Half the populace is foreign born and a third speak a language other than
English or French at home. Lately, gentrification has started to creep into these areas with the
arrival of residents working in the arts and culture, and surveys indicate these residents of
downtown neighbourhoods have high rates for going to art galleries and film festivals. Members
of Diverse City stay fit by playing tennis and badminton and exercising at home. And typical
weekend diversions include visits to amusement parks, cottage shows, tennis matches and
soccer games. Surrounded by vibrant commercial districts, these consumers express a Joy of
Consumption and frequent stores like Roots, Zara and Fairweather.

28 Metro Multiculturals
Diverse, middle-aged and older households
Population 672,457 (1.87% of Canada)
Households 259,918 (1.78% of Canada)
Average Household Income $93,183
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Medium
Financial Concern Regarding the
Sample Social Value
Future
The name Metro Multiculturals reflects this urban segment’s high concentration of pre-1990
immigrants from a number of countries in Europe and the Middle East. Found in neighbourhoods
across cities like Toronto, Edmonton and Montreal, these households typically contain a mix of
middle-aged families and older couples enjoying a middle-income lifestyle. With over half living
in Montreal, they inhabit a multi-lingual world where one-fifth speak a non-official language at
home, and another fifth are francophones. Over half of households contain married couples, a
stark contrast to typical francophone segments where common-law relationships are more
prevalent. What unites these multicultural households are average incomes earned from a mix of
education and jobs in transportation and wholesale trade. Metro Multiculturals members tend to
own their single- or semi-detached homes—typically built between 1961 and 1980—where they
have plenty of room for their older children. These active families enjoy cross-country skiing,
golf, racquet sports, and fitness club memberships and buy clothes at Sports Experts and Golf
Town. Reflecting their diversity, they are likely to attend both garden shows and rock concerts.

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29 Silver Linings
Urban seniors in high-rise apartments
Population 214,588 (0.60% of Canada)
Households 125,670 (0.86% of Canada)
Average Household Income $68,278
Housing Tenure Rent
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Medium
Sample Social Value Personal Expression

Located in big cities across Canada, Silver Linings consists of older and mature singles, widows
and divorced individuals living in high-rise apartments—increasingly, the dwelling of choice
among city residents. More than half of residents are over 55 years old; some 55 percent are
unattached. Although nearly 40 percent of adults have attended a university, the segment’s
members have below-average incomes, in part because so many are retired. Those still working
have jobs in administrative support, professional, scientific and technical services. But what
they lack in income, Silver Linings members make up for in leisure-rich lifestyles. They have high
rates for attending classical music concerts, book shows and country music performances. For
exercise, they enjoy jogging, golf, yoga and aerobics. And they like to travel, particularly to the
United Kingdom and Las Vegas. Back at home, they give back to the community, telling
researchers they like to “volunteer my time for a good cause.”

30 La Vie est Belle


Middle-aged, middle-income Quebec families and couples
Population 353,015 (0.98% of Canada)
Households 136,715 (0.94% of Canada)
Average Household Income $95,176
Housing Tenure Own
Education Trade/College
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Brand Apathy

Centred in the exurban areas of Quebec’s biggest cities, La Vie est Belle remains a segment of
middle-income families and couples living in single and semi-detached houses. Having changed
little demographically over the past decade, this francophone segment—half the residents are
bilingual—is characterized by middle-aged, common-law couples with teenagers. However, an
influx of younger people has recently pushed down the segment’s average age slightly
compared to a decade ago. La Vie est Belle members are avid fans of outdoor sports such as
cycling, skiing, soccer, hockey and in-line skating. With family-friendly cultural tastes, they have
high rates for going to outdoor performances, pop concerts, music festivals and historical sites.
Their above-average incomes and modest mortgages afford them the discretionary cash to
enjoy auto shows, spas and tennis matches. These working couples, who typically have jobs in
business, science and health care, also enjoy winding down by meeting friends for dinner at
restaurants or in their homes. La Vie est Belle is a strong market for comedy clubs, chicken
restaurants and home delivery.

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31 New World Symphony


Diverse, lower-middle-income city dwellers
Population 576,595 (1.61% of Canada)
Households 273,738 (1.87% of Canada)
Average Household Income $82,188
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education College/University
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Racial Fusion

New World Symphony is one of the most culturally diverse of Canada’s lifestyles. In this
segment 49 different languages are spoken at home at rates that are more than twice the
national average for each language. Often the first neighbourhood for new immigrants, this
segment reflects Canada’s increasing diversity and urbanization in recent years. More than 40
percent of segment members are foreign born, drawn to city neighbourhoods that are diverse
beyond their diversity. New World Symphony consists of singles and couples, old and young,
condo owners and apartment renters; half live in high-rise buildings. No one’s particularly
wealthy, but residents manage to live decently by stretching their lower-middle incomes. They
have high rates for listening to classical and jazz music, attending professional golf and tennis
tournaments, and frequenting live theatre and art galleries. Befitting the wide range in ages, this
segment makes a strong market for snowboarding and Pilates, as well as collecting stamps,
craft shows and senior citizen’s magazines. But nearly everyone goes to the local movie
theatres, enjoying comedies, adventure movies and, especially, foreign films.

32 Mini Van & Vin Rouge


Younger and middle-aged Quebec homeowners
Population 973,459 (2.71% of Canada)
Households 376,996 (2.58% of Canada)
Average Household Income $93,411
Housing Tenure Own
Education Trade/College/University
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Parochialism

Mini Van & Vin Rouge represents a collection of younger and middle-aged families and couples
who live in new exurban communities beyond Quebec’s big cities. These households mostly
consist of married and common-law couples and, although most are French-speaking, more
than 40 percent are bilingual. Their mixed educations—trade school, college and university
level—provide good jobs in blue collar, service sector and management professions, resulting in
average incomes and leisure-intensive lifestyles. Residents here enjoy high-energy sports like
mountain biking, in-line skating and downhill skiing. After all that fresh air and exercise, they
reward themselves by picking up dinner at a chicken restaurant or kicking back with a glass of
rosé in their single- and semi-detached homes. For a night out, they’ll pay for a babysitter and
head to a comedy club or electronics show; their idea of a vacation is a package tour of Cuba or
France with the entire family.

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33 Heartland Retirees
Rural, older and mature lower-middle-income couples
Population 472,622 (1.32% of Canada)
Households 215,353 (1.47% of Canada)
Average Household Income $74,989
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Attraction to Nature

Home to Canada’s highest concentration of Baby Boomers, Heartland Retirees consists of


lower-middle-income couples and retirees living in unpretentious single-detached houses and
mobile homes. These aging householders—two-thirds of maintainers are over 55 years old—tend
to have high school and trade school diplomas, and those still working hold blue-collar, service
sector or agricultural jobs. Widely scattered across rural Canada, Heartland Retirees residents
enjoy camping and gardening as well as almost anything with a motor; their properties are often
cluttered with pickups, power boats, RVs and snowmobiles. With no kids around, these empty-
nesters have time for hobbies like woodworking, golf and knitting. They also enjoy an evening
out at a community theatre or local pub, where they might express opinions on topics like
technology—they feel it is passing them by—or capital punishment, which they support.

34 Rooms with a View


Young, diverse singles in urban high-rises
Population 258,451 (0.72% of Canada)
Households 157,796 (1.08% of Canada)
Average Household Income $61,594
Housing Tenure Rent
Education University
Occupation White Collar/Service Sector
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Concern for Appearance

Young, culturally diverse immigrants remain at the heart of Rooms with a View, a segment of
urban high-rise dwellers concentrated in Toronto and Montreal that has changed little in the last
decade. Often found near university campuses, these young singles tend to be recent graduates
and students still taking classes. More than 40 percent identify themselves as visible minorities
while nearly a quarter speak a variety of non-official languages. Despite nearly half of adults
having university degrees—typical of the higher education levels of the Millennial generation—
these newcomers mostly earn downscale salaries from entry-level white-collar and service
sector jobs. However, with few family financial obligations, many have plenty of disposable
income to lead vibrant lives. In their downtown neighbourhoods, they go to nightclubs, jazz
concerts, art galleries and film festivals. They like to keep fit by going hiking, playing soccer and
taking Pilates and yoga classes. And these unattached Canadians—nearly two-thirds are single,
divorced or separated—view their communities as singles scenes and meet markets: they have
high rates for using online dating sites.

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35 Country Acres
Middle-aged and older rural couples and families
Population 425,740 (1.19% of Canada)
Households 176,744 (1.21% of Canada)
Average Household Income $85,142
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Aversion to Complexity

One of the nation’s most affluent rural lifestyles, Country Acres is a collection of middle-aged
and older couples and families mostly found in small towns across the Ontario countryside.
Many earn average incomes from a mix of jobs in agriculture or blue-collar professions. And nine
out of ten are homeowners, typically living in modest single-family houses. But these mostly
third-generation Canadians tell researchers that they’re content with their rustic lifestyles,
noting “life in the country is more satisfying than city life.” As in other rural communities,
residents here spend their leisure time outdoors, enjoying hunting, fishing, boating and camping;
their dens often feature the results of crafts and woodworking projects. But they typically have
to leave town for their entertainment, including the exhibitions they enjoy that feature cottages,
boats, golfing and pets. Status is expressed in the size and newness of your pickup and family
sedan—mostly domestic brands. A big date is taking a trip into town for a night at the movies.

36 Exurban Homesteaders
Exurban, middle-aged and middle-income homeowners
Population 421,476 (1.17% of Canada)
Households 165,037 (1.13% of Canada)
Average Household Income $93,396
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector/Blue Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Primacy of the Family

Concentrated in small towns that comprise Toronto’s outermost ring, Exurban Homesteaders
consists of middle-aged families and couples living in tidy homes nestled in near-rural settings.
Most of the couples earn average incomes from solid, blue-collar jobs in primary industries,
manufacturing, transportation and the trades. With 85 percent owning single-family homes,
many have settled in these communities for the affordable housing and laid-back lifestyle. The
members of Exurban Homesteaders spend a lot of their leisure time outdoors: fishing, hunting,
camping, skiing and snowmobiling. In this DIY-friendly segment, residents tend to work on their
cars, patronize big-box hardware chains, tend their gardens and enjoy sewing and crafts.
Occasionally they check out the latest trends in outdoor living by attending craft, cottage and
RV shows. For excitement, they bet on a horse race or buy lottery tickets—especially sports and
hospital or charity lotteries. When they travel, their first impulse is to investigate local
campgrounds and trailer parks near their destinations.

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37 Trucks & Trades


Younger and middle-aged, upper-middle-income families
Population 803,053 (2.24% of Canada)
Households 304,492 (2.08% of Canada)
Average Household Income $115,392
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Blue Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Work Ethic

Younger and middle-aged families comprise Trucks & Trades, where skilled tradespeople and
blue-collar workers have built a comfortable lifestyle while accumulating tidy savings.
Concentrated in Alberta and the Prairies, this segment has a disproportionate number of oil and
gas workers who have sought out jobs in resource-rich lands over the past two decades. What
workers may lack in education, they make up for with practical skills in primary industries, the
trades, transportation and sales. Many families are younger and middle-aged—most children are
under 15 years old—and live in single- and semi-detached houses built between 1961 and 1990.
There’s also a significant presence of mobile dwellings hauled in to accommodate the sudden
influx of workers. When not working hard, these households play hard: fishing, hunting, playing
hockey, attending sportsmen’s shows, watching mixed martial arts matches and getting tattoos
to commemorate it all. They also have high rates for owning hot tubs, boats, camping trailers
and motorcycles. Their transportation of choice is a pickup truck—provided it’s outfitted with
satellite radio.

38 Grads & Pads


Young, single urban renters
Population 322,900 (0.90% of Canada)
Households 192,811 (1.32% of Canada)
Average Household Income $69,507
Housing Tenure Rent
Education University
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Brand Genuineness

The youngest lifestyle type in Canada, Grads & Pads is a collection of young city dwellers living
near universities. Present since 2004, segment members have become slightly younger, less
affluent and more likely to be living in low-rise apartments than in the past. But it’s still a
progressive mix of well-educated singles and couples, students and recent grads, white-collar
professionals and service workers—all living in apartments within a short commute to work by
public transit or foot. Their incomes aren’t high, but these young adults just entering the
workforce enjoy the freedom of spending their first paycheques solely on themselves. With two-
thirds of the adults unattached, Grads & Pads residents are nightowls who frequent bars,
nightclubs and art galleries. They stay active by jogging, mountain biking, playing squash and
working out at health clubs. They’re also the kind of young consumers who, to balance their
alcohol-fueled partying, are health-conscious foodies who prefer organic veggies and patronize
grocery stores that offer sustainably sourced products.

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39 Our Time
Older and mature, lower-middle-income suburbanites
Population 430,239 (1.20% of Canada)
Households 192,468 (1.32% of Canada)
Average Household Income $78,555
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Low
Primacy of Environmental
Sample Social Value
Protection
Our Time is filled with over-60 singles, couples and widowed individuals living in low-rise
apartment neighbourhoods across the country. With many now retired, residents get by on
lower-middle incomes from modest educations and service sector and white-collar careers.
Their low-key lifestyle revolves around close-to-home leisure activities and travel. Many like to
spend their days gardening, woodworking, crafting or sewing. With time on their hands, they
enjoy taking moderately priced package tours or trips by RV to the western and southern U.S.
But they’re also content with an evening at the local community playhouse or dinner theatre
with friends. These active seniors aren’t ready to slow down just yet. They keep up with the
latest trends by attending travel, home, food and wine, and health and wellness shows. And
occasionally, they’ll spring for tickets to a concert by a favourite rock or pop performer. When it
comes to clothes and shopping, they seek a more classic look at stores like Laura, Eddie Bauer
and Moores.

40 Wide Open Spaces


Middle-aged, middle-income farmers and blue-collar workers
Population 936,341 (2.61% of Canada)
Households 346,918 (2.37% of Canada)
Average Household Income $96,856
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Blue Collar/Primary
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Religiosity

Scattered across the Prairies and a handful of isolated locales, Wide Open Spaces is one of
Canada’s wealthiest rural segments. More than a quarter of its middle-aged couples and
families work in agriculture, and with most residents living on small homesteads and leading
rustic lifestyles, it is the most rural of all lifestyles. They spend much of their leisure time outside,
fishing, snowmobiling, golfing and gardening—and sometimes they participate in local curling
games. While they generally stay close to home—travelling to nearby campgrounds or the
homes of friends or relatives—they occasionally splurge on a trip to the western U.S. Like other
rural consumers, they score high for owning pickup trucks, recreational vehicles, snowmobiles
and ATVs. With traditional views in politics and religion, they’re strong supporters of family
values and oppose government and business involvement in people’s private lives.

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41 Vieille École
Middle-aged and older Quebec exurbanites
Population 620,925 (1.73% of Canada)
Households 269,639 (1.84% of Canada)
Average Household Income $85,615
Housing Tenure Own
Education Trade/College/University
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Penchant for Risk

The communities that make up Vieille École are found mostly in middle-income, exurban towns
across Quebec. In this segment, households can be middle-aged or older, married or common-
law, couples or families. They earn average incomes from jobs in science and government as well
as transportation and the trades—enough to own modest houses and older duplexes with
somewhat new Japanese subcompacts in the driveway. With over half of maintainers between
55 and 74, Vieille École lifestyles are more sedentary than athletic. Residents spend their free
time going to chicken restaurants and local hockey games. They’re big on exhibitions organized
around their interests including sportsmen’s, RV, travel and auto shows. Living close to nature,
they like outdoor sports such as cross-country skiing, ice skating, hockey and cycling. But on
Saturday night, they’re happy just to have a drink—or several—with friends at a bar or comedy
club. A big night out is a concert featuring classical or popular music.

42 Home Sweet Rows


Diverse, middle-aged, middle-income suburbanites
Population 675,210 (1.88% of Canada)
Households 239,805 (1.64% of Canada)
Average Household Income $89,966
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Fatalism

Living in row houses in the established suburbs of Canada’s largest cities, the middle-aged
members of Home Sweet Rows earn average salaries to support their large, child-filled
households. With immigrants from Asia, Latin America and the Middle East—a high proportion
having arrived since the turn of the 21st century—nearly four in ten residents belong to a visible
minority. Indifferent to high-brow entertainment, they’re happy with a night out at a pub or
casino, and dinner at Swiss Chalet or Milestones. To keep fit, they row and jog, while for fun
they’ll hit the slopes with the kids for a ski or snowboarding trip. With such busy home lives, this
group may enjoy escaping through film: they list sci-fi and drama movies as their favourite
genres when visiting the cinema. When they travel, they often visit Mexico and Latin America,
staying with friends or relatives, both to reconnect and to save on accommodations while
visiting their home country.

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43 Newcomers Rising
Younger, downscale city immigrants
Population 559,599 (1.56% of Canada)
Households 215,905 (1.48% of Canada)
Average Household Income $59,751
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Adaptability to Complexity

Concentrated in Ontario’s older city neighbourhoods, Newcomers Rising is a segment of


younger, recent immigrants—as it has been for a decade. Nearly 60 percent of the residents are
foreign-born, and they continue to arrive from an array of countries in South Asia, Latin America
and the Middle East. About 10 percent are Filipino, the highest concentration in the nation. Many
of these immigrants—a mix of singles, families and lone-parent households—arrived after 2006
and now live in high-rise apartments. Despite their above-average rates of university
education—a growing trend among new immigrants—these young workers earn only downscale
incomes from entry-level jobs. Still, they spend freely on leisure-intensive lifestyles, with high
rates for going to bars and nightclubs, the opera, classical concerts, and baseball and basketball
games. They tend to be fans of racquet sports such as tennis and badminton, and they enjoy
participating in cultural dancing sessions with friends and family. Like many recent immigrants,
Newcomers Rising residents are hardworking and ambitious, and they tell researchers they’re
willing to sacrifice time with their family to advance their career.

44 Jeunes et Actifs
Younger, urban downscale Quebec singles
Population 492,991 (1.37% of Canada)
Households 261,036 (1.79% of Canada)
Average Household Income $60,181
Housing Tenure Rent
Education University
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Ecological Concern

Younger, downscale and transient, the residents of Jeunes et Actifs are singles or couples just
starting out in life. As in the past, nearly three-quarters of residents are French speakers and
nearly 50 percent are bilingual. Despite their high education levels—more than half have a post-
secondary education—most can only afford rentals in older low-rise apartments in central
Montreal and Quebec City neighbourhoods. But they stretch their modest incomes to pursue
vibrant lifestyles rich in fitness and the arts. Jeunes et Actifs members score high for playing
tennis, going downhill skiing and cycling around the city, and they regularly attend music
festivals, comedy clubs and film festivals. Many are unattached, making this a solid market for
dating services and health and beauty products. For home-cooked meals, they’ll splurge on
organic produce and convenient, pre-seasoned fresh meat. Yet remnants of their recent student
days persist, as reflected in their affinity for snack cakes and dry soup packages, as well as
shopping for groceries at convenience stores and drug stores.

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45 Jeunes d’Esprit
Older, downscale rural couples
Population 230,731 (0.64% of Canada)
Households 107,130 (0.73% of Canada)
Average Household Income $66,193
Housing Tenure Own
Education Trade/High School
Occupation Blue Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Attraction to Nature

With its roots in rural Quebec, Jeunes d’Esprit boasts an old-fashioned, unhurried way of life.
Located in small towns like Shawinigan and Sorel-Tracy, this segment is generally home to blue-
collar francophone couples. Most of the maintainers are older, with about 45 percent between 50
and 70 years old—one of the highest concentrations of Baby Boomers in Canada. With high
school and trade school educations, many still work in jobs in manufacturing, transportation and
the trades. And they spend their leisure time outdoors, working up a sweat by cross-country
skiing, snowmobiling, ice skating and cycling. Despite their isolated communities, they still enjoy
a number of entertainment options, such as music festivals, theatres and travel and book shows.
Although they usually skip the expensive retailers, shoppers here like to dress smartly and
patronize trendy and inexpensive retailers like l’Aubainerie and Marie Claire. Many tell
researchers that it’s important to stay young looking.

46 Villes Tranquilles
Middle-aged, rural Quebec couples and families
Population 326,324 (0.91% of Canada)
Households 138,647 (0.95% of Canada)
Average Household Income $77,332
Housing Tenure Own
Education Trade/High School
Occupation Service Sector/Blue Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Concern for Appearance

A middle-aged francophone segment, Villes Tranquilles can be found in the industrial towns and
remote communities of Quebec’s heartland. The couples and families of this segment earn
lower-middle incomes from blue-collar manufacturing, construction and primary industry jobs.
More than 95 percent of residents speak French at home, and that’s the way they like it; many
prefer to be around people who look, speak and think like they do. Their traditional values lead to
traditional activities: these Quebecers take advantage of their rural settings for activities like
hunting, fishing, camping and cross-country skiing. Not surprisingly, they visit sportsmen’s,
boating and home shows at high rates. From their single-detached homes, they enjoy going out
to affordable entertainment options like community theatre or dinner at St. Hubert. When they
need a break, Villes Tranquilles residents take discount package tours to sunny destinations like
Cuba.

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47 Traditional Town Living


Middle-aged and older middle-income homeowners
Population 473,130 (1.32% of Canada)
Households 181,329 (1.24% of Canada)
Average Household Income $83,285
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Parochialism

Found mainly in smaller towns around Ontario like Woodstock and Chatham-Kent, Traditional
Town Living is made up of middle-aged and older households, where couples and families enjoy
simple pleasures and low-key leisure pursuits. These blue-collar and agricultural workers enjoy
the great outdoors, hunting, fishing, gardening and cycling in their free time. Indoors, they’re into
more sedate activities like collecting coins, woodworking and sewing. They like to keep fit by
swimming or hiking, but they also get their heart rates going as spectators in the stands at an
auto or horse race. Many plan their leisure time and major purchases by attending craft, book
and motorcycle shows. And when these homebodies need a change of scenery, they might head
for the low-key comforts of their favourite campground. Traditional in their values as much as in
their lifestyles, these Canadians place a high importance on their religious beliefs and traditional
gender roles. Many tell researchers they are more comfortable being around people like
themselves.

48 Variété Suburbaine
Lower-middle-income Quebec suburbanites
Population 489,178 (1.36% of Canada)
Households 216,877 (1.48% of Canada)
Average Household Income $76,101
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education Trade/High School
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Cultural Assimilation

A francophone segment known for its diversity, Variété Suburbaine is a mix of lower-middle-
income households of varied ages, educations and backgrounds. Concentrated in suburban hubs
like Lévis and Gatineau, these households feature both young and old, singles and families, and
solo parents and couples with children. With incomes around $75,000 earned from blue-collar
and service sector jobs, they can afford modestly priced single-family homes, duplexes and low-
rise apartment rentals. These culturally curious households have high rates for patronizing
classical concerts, jazz performances, movies and comedy clubs. Passionate about outdoor
sports, many spend their weekends engaged in high-energy activities like snowboarding, ice
skating and soccer. They’re also a strong market for auto shows, as well as soccer and hockey
games. Perhaps surprisingly, this group has a strong interest in food: not only do they score high
for going to all kinds of restaurants, they also like gourmet cooking, baking from scratch,
watching cooking shows and searching for recipes online. With half of all adults unattached,
they have the time to express their inner foodie, scoring high for the value Personal Expression.

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49 Enclaves Multiethniques
Diverse, low-income, younger city dwellers
Population 632,159 (1.76% of Canada)
Households 272,047 (1.86% of Canada)
Average Household Income $50,407
Housing Tenure Rent
Education High School/Trade
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity High
Sample Social Value Pursuit of Intensity

A new lifestyle reflecting the increasing diversity of the Canadian populace, Enclaves
Multiethniques is a haven for both immigrants and francophones. Based in Quebec, almost half
the residents speak French and more than a third speak a non-official language—mostly Arabic,
Spanish and Italian. Many of the immigrants came from French-speaking countries—like Algeria,
Morocco, Haiti and Vietnam—and were drawn to francophone neighbourhoods in Montreal and
other cities like St. Leonard and Laval. In their mix of low-rise apartments and duplexes, many
residents have only modest educations, or are still in school, and most earn below-average
incomes in service sector jobs. As they learn the ins and outs of life in Canada, they’re also
stretching their paycheques by enjoying low-cost leisure pursuits. With fewer than half of
residents married, they like to use dating services, frequent bars and pop music concerts, and
stay fit by playing soccer and football. And many residents like to travel, going to far-off
destinations in Africa, Latin America or France. Closer to home, they enjoy exploring Canada’s
cottages and bed and breakfasts.

50 Suburban Scramble
Young, lower-middle-income suburbanites
Population 627,489 (1.75% of Canada)
Households 253,758 (1.74% of Canada)
Average Household Income $81,563
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Pursuit of Originality

Found in the suburbs of small- and medium-sized cities, Suburban Scramble is home to a mix of
young families and singles, including higher-than-average rates of divorced and lone-parent
families. Despite modest educations and incomes, these folks lead active and eclectic leisure
lives focused around hobbies like woodworking, crafts and stamp collecting, and sports like
fishing and bowling. A big date means getting tickets to a jazz or country music concert, football
game or hockey game. And with many singles and divorcees on the lookout for new partners,
they visit bars and nightclubs at very high rates—provided, of course, they can get a sitter for
the kids. Many manage their lower-middle-income budgets by shopping at discount grocery
stores, eating fast food and using cheque cashing services. Members of Suburban Scramble also
regularly seek out flyers in community and daily papers, searching for discounts and clipping
coupons.

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51 Aging & Active


Older and mature, lower-middle-income town households
Population 415,663 (1.16% of Canada)
Households 178,673 (1.22% of Canada)
Average Household Income $76,823
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Utilitarian Consumerism

Found in towns across Canada, Aging & Active consists of a mix of older families and empty-
nesting couples living in modest, single-detached homes. Close to half the household
maintainers are over the age of 55 and many are now retired, though those still in the labour
force typically hold blue-collar and agricultural jobs that earn them lower-middle incomes.
Members of this segment spend much of their free time outdoors, walking, hunting and fishing.
Residents are involved in their local communities and spend evenings at local venues, taking in
concerts and community theatre productions. When the mood strikes, they’ll go out for a night
of dancing at the local watering hole after an afternoon spent cycling or at an outdoor sporting
event. Aging & Active residents especially enjoy motor sports, jumping on their ATVs for an off-
road adventure or riding their motorcycles on the open roads around their small communities.

52 Striving Startups
Younger, urban lower-middle-income singles and families
Population 371,115 (1.03% of Canada)
Households 180,736 (1.24% of Canada)
Average Household Income $69,901
Housing Tenure Rent & Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Anomie-Aimlessness

Situated in once-thriving downtown districts, the duplexes and low-rise apartments of Striving
Startups no longer anchor new and expanding neighbourhoods. Yet, these urban communities
attract a mix of predominantly young singles and single-parent families for their affordable
rentals near in-town amenities. Despite modest incomes from jobs in sales and services, these
households have active social lives, with high rates for going to bars, nightclubs and movies.
Many like to exercise outside, running marathons and ice skating; on the weekend, they’ll go for a
hike or play pickup basketball. These younger consumers like to shop—whether to pick up
brand-name apparel from The Gap or bargains at second-hand clothing stores. Describing
themselves as discriminating consumers, they follow the latest trends at auto, outdoors and
health and living shows. And many have aspirations to improve their lot, with a disproportionate
number going to career colleges, community colleges and management training courses.

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53 Outdoor Originals
Middle-aged and older, lower-middle-income exurbanites
Population 368,712 (1.03% of Canada)
Households 155,890 (1.07% of Canada)
Average Household Income $72,128
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Cultural Assimilation

Beyond the metropolitan sprawl bordering rolling farmland, you’ll find Outdoor Originals, a
collection of exurban communities filled with a mix of middle-aged and older families and
couples. Half of these areas are found in the Atlantic provinces. Nearly nine out of ten residents
are third-generation Canadians. And half the adults have a high school or less education,
leading to lower-middle incomes from blue-collar and service industry jobs. Here, mobile homes
shelter 10 percent of all households, one of the highest rates in the nation. But the modest
housing encourages residents to go outdoors for leisure activities. Members of this segment
enjoy hunting, fishing, snowmobiling and power boating. They like to travel across Canada,
looking for campgrounds and RV parks in national and provincial parks as well as beaches, zoos,
theme parks and cultural sites. And when they’re home, they have high rates for do-it-yourself
projects like woodworking and gardening. For nightlife, they head to community theatre
productions, baseball games and bowling alleys.

54 Serenity Springs
Mature, lower-middle-income town singles and couples
Population 738,867 (2.06% of Canada)
Households 315,660 (2.16% of Canada)
Average Household Income $75,412
Housing Tenure Own & Rent
Education Mixed
Occupation Blue Collar/Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Culture Sampling

Serenity Springs is mostly a retirement lifestyle, a collection of small town and sleepy city
neighbourhoods where more than half the household maintainers are over 55 years old and a
third are over 65. Unlike upscale, tidy retirement communities, however, the rustic towns in
Serenity Springs are filled with lower-middle-income seniors who are aging in place and
watching their wallets. In these traditional households, the men fish and go boating, the women
garden and bake, and everyone enjoys going to craft and home shows. Living in far-flung
communities means they have few entertainment options, and they often must travel distances
to go to a dinner theatre, attend a figure skating event or shop at stores like Mark’s Work
Wearhouse and Giant Tiger. They’re less interested in travelling any further, as reflected in their
low rates for visiting other countries. For these Canadians, a vacation means driving to a
provincial park to go boating or bird watching.

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55 La Vie Bucolique
Rural, middle-aged and older couples and families
Population 505,692 (1.41% of Canada)
Households 218,334 (1.49% of Canada)
Average Household Income $62,109
Housing Tenure Own
Education Trade/Grade 9
Occupation Blue Collar/Primary
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Fulfilment Through Work

La Vie Bucolique is about as rural as it gets. Scattered in wide tracts outside Quebec’s small
towns, it is the most francophone of all lifestyles, with more than 95 percent of households
speaking French at home. These residents—a mix of married and common-law couples and
families—live in older houses valued at less than half the national average. Most of the adults
work in blue-collar and farming jobs and enjoy outdoor activities in their leisure time. They have
high rates for going hunting, fishing, hiking and cross-country skiing, as well as criss-crossing
the countryside in their ATVs and snowmobiles. While they occasionally drive long distances to
attend exhibitions and comedy clubs, members of La Vie Bucolique have learned to make do on
their own, tending their backyard gardens and enjoying occasional bottles of wine. Many simply
enjoy the peace and quiet of their isolated communities, telling researchers, “I’d rather spend a
night at home than most anything else.”

56 Single City Jazz


Younger, downscale city singles in apartments
Population 399,834 (1.11% of Canada)
Households 199,697 (1.37% of Canada)
Average Household Income $58,539
Housing Tenure Rent
Education High School/University
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Medium
Sample Social Value Personal Optimism

Life can be stressful in Single City Jazz, a transient world of mostly younger, diverse, low-income
singles and single-parent families. In their crowded neighbourhoods found in Canada’s bigger
cities, more than a third of household maintainers are under 35 years old, and nearly 90 percent
rent apartments in low- or high-rise buildings. These are the urban denizens who frequent
Starbucks, order groceries online and take public transit at rates twice the national. They
entertain themselves by participating in outdoor sports like soccer, softball and football. But for
a date, they’ll splurge and go to a nightclub or buy tickets for a jazz concert or football match.
And many tell researchers that they enjoy looking for bargains in second-hand clothing stores,
that is, when they’re not browsing for trendy apparel from Hudson’s Bay. Lately, they’ve started
doing their shopping online, buying everything from beauty and cosmetics to sports equipment
and video games. And they like to snag deals online, frequenting sites that feature group-
buying, secondhand items and auctions.

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57 First Nations Families


Younger, lower-middle-income aboriginal families
Population 407,521 (1.14% of Canada)
Households 136,435 (0.93% of Canada)
Average Household Income $71,621
Housing Tenure Band Housing
Education Grade 9
Occupation Service Sector/Primary
Diversity Low
Financial Concern Regarding the
Sample Social Value
Future
Over 90 percent of residents in First Nations Families are of aboriginal origin, and they tend to
be younger and have lower-middle incomes. A segment that’s changed little over the last five
years, it still stands out for having few couples without children and many lone-parent
households. In their widely dispersed, remote communities, close to a quarter reside in band
housing, with many dwellings built in the 1980s and 1990s. While these demographics combine
to create a less-than-lavish rustic lifestyle, many residents are actively striving to improve their
situation. In recent years, members of First Nations Families have increased rates for completing
high school, community college and trades certification programs. They pursue outdoor
activities like fishing, camping and boating. Their social life revolves around home-based
activities but they enjoy the occasional sportsmen’s show, rock concert or wrestling match; they
also enjoy touring around on their ATV or snowmobile. Residents jealously guard their bucolic
treasures, but in these economically depressed areas, many residents struggle with the
environmental trade-offs that could improve their financial future.

58 Rustic Roads
Rural, downscale older couples
Population 529,491 (1.48% of Canada)
Households 235,242 (1.61% of Canada)
Average Household Income $62,041
Housing Tenure Own
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Blue Collar/Primary
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Rejection of Order

Rustic Roads earned its name because of its rural setting where nearly half of its working adults
hold blue-collar jobs, almost a fifth in agriculture, which is about seven times the national
average. Found in rural areas mostly in Newfoundland, Nova Scotia and British Columbia, this
segment consists of empty-nesting couples and older families—nearly 60 percent of
maintainers are over 55 years old—leading traditional rural lifestyles. These households spend
their leisure time outdoors, going fishing, bird-watching and snowmobiling, as well as playing
sports like basketball, volleyball and curling. For a night out, they have high rates for going to a
local dinner theatre or catching a quick meal at Swiss Chalet. And they don’t mind taking a long
drive to attend a wide range of exhibitions—auto, pet, RV, craft, gardening and food and drink.
But most days these downscale older couples lead simple lives, focused on their churches and
communities, and they show little desire to change.

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59 Locataires en Banlieues
Younger, downscale suburban renters
Population 272,257 (0.76% of Canada)
Households 137,497 (0.94% of Canada)
Average Household Income $59,110
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Grade 9/Trade
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Spiritual Quest

Typically, young singles and couples rent apartments in big cities. But Locataires en Banlieues
reflects the movement of younger singles and couples to older suburbs surrounding Montreal
and Quebec City. The segment features a mix of household configurations with nearly half
married or common-law couples, while about a third are single maintainers. In addition, one-
quarter of family households are lone-parent families. With their downscale incomes from low-
level jobs in retail, health care and manufacturing, many can only afford apartment rentals, and
more than two-thirds live in low-rise apartment buildings. Yet their lifestyle tends to exceed
their socioeconomic status. For entertainment, they go to comedy clubs, foreign movies, concert
venues and outdoor stages. And there’s an aspirational quality to Locataires en Banlieues, with
members splurging on tickets to an occasional hockey game and telling researchers they like to
spend money, dine at fine restaurants and frequent clothing shops to keep up with the latest
fashions. And no meal is complete without wine, made anywhere in the world.

60 Bons Vivants
Older, downscale suburban singles and couples
Population 430,820 (1.20% of Canada)
Households 212,500 (1.45% of Canada)
Average Household Income $58,315
Housing Tenure Rent & Own
Education Grade 9
Occupation Mixed
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Fulfilment Through Work

Found in aging suburbs across Quebec, Bons Vivants consists of mostly older and mature
singles, couples and parents who earn modest paycheques from sales, health care and
manufacturing jobs. Many have opted not to pursue a college or university education, but close
to a fifth have an apprentice or trades certificate. They’re about evenly divided between owners
and renters, and they typically live in low-rise apartments or duplexes. Despite incomes well
below the national average, their mostly childless status allows for a busy social life. Members of
Bons Vivants enjoy an evening at the local bowling alley, a friendly tennis match in the
afternoon, or a weekend spent snowmobiling or hunting. They also enjoy attending country
music concerts and comedy clubs, while quiet evenings at home provide time to bake their
favourite recipe from scratch. Members of Bon Vivants can also be found at craft, book or
outdoor consumer shows. And although their wallets are thin, they enjoy shopping trips to
favourite stores like Reitmans and Suzy Shier.

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61 Les Seniors
Urban, low-income Quebec seniors
Population 220,231 (0.61% of Canada)
Households 114,468 (0.78% of Canada)
Average Household Income $52,633
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Service Sector/White Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Personal Creativity

Les Seniors is a collection of older and mature francophone singles living in Quebec’s largest
cities, with one of the highest concentrations of retirees. More than a third are over the age of 65
and a quarter are widows or widowers—almost twice the national average. With just over 50
percent of adults still in the labour force, average incomes are low, and most residents live in
rental apartments—typically in low-rise buildings. Despite their modest incomes, residents have
fashioned comfortable lifestyles. They have high rates for going to comedy clubs and dinner
theatres, and frequent the opera and classical music concerts. Occasionally they enjoy
attending pro tennis, figure skating and golf events. While they enjoy aerobics, tennis and hiking,
other favourite activities are relatively sedentary: collecting coins and bird watching. But they
have a certain joie de vivre, and they tell researchers they “often do things on the spur of the
moment” and “enjoy being extravagant.” To keep informed about their areas of interest, Les
Seniors residents often attend garden, home and craft shows.

62 Terre à Terre
Downscale, middle-aged and older rural households
Population 289,011 (0.81% of Canada)
Households 130,923 (0.90% of Canada)
Average Household Income $59,672
Housing Tenure Own
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Blue Collar/Primary
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Ethical Consumerism

A collection of rural, downscale communities, Terre à Terre stands out from other francophone
segments because about a third of its households are located outside of Quebec in eastern New
Brunswick and Ontario. The majority of adults work in forestry, manufacturing, utilities and
primary industries, and incomes and education levels are below the national average—more than
a third of residents haven’t completed high school. The majority of residents own homes in older
neighbourhoods, with properties often occupied by campers, trailers and all-terrain vehicles.
Typical of many rural communities, members of Terre à Terre tend to spend their leisure time
outdoors, fishing, hunting, gardening and snowmobiling. They frequent exhibition shows that
feature pets, boats, gardening and health and living. Without bowling alleys or movie theatres
nearby, residents must travel to get their entertainment; in this segment, a big date is going to a
dinner theater or comedy club. Otherwise, a low-key trip to St. Hubert or the local ice cream
parlour will do.

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63 Lunch at Tim's
Urban, downscale singles and families
Population 1,102,999 (3.07% of Canada)
Households 488,709 (3.34% of Canada)
Average Household Income $67,248
Housing Tenure Own
Education Mixed
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Aversion to Complexity

Located in dense, industrial neighbourhoods scattered across second-tier cities, Lunch at Tim’s
consists of singles and solo-parent families living in older single-detached homes, semis and
duplexes. They’re the kind of tight-knit communities where residents enjoy socializing at local
eateries like Tim Horton’s—as well as coffee shops, burger joints, delis and fish and chip
restaurants. With an unusually mixed age profile—it’s no longer the bi-modal segment of the
past—Lunch at Tim’s has above-average rates for residents who are single, divorced, separated
or widowed; half the adults in these neighbourhoods are unattached. Despite relatively low
education levels and downscale incomes, more than two-thirds of households own their homes—
most of which were built before 1980. Residents enjoy quieter pastimes, and have high rates for
knitting, fishing and going to the movies. When the mood strikes, they might play a friendly
game of football or splurge on tickets to a country music concert, or craft or bridal show. They
like to gamble with regular excursions to casinos and the closer-to-home thrill of buying lottery
tickets.

64 Fête au Village
Rural, downscale Quebec seniors
Population 294,780 (0.82% of Canada)
Households 132,637 (0.91% of Canada)
Average Household Income $59,695
Housing Tenure Own
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Service Sector/Blue Collar
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Attraction to Nature

One of the oldest francophone segments, Fête au Village consists of small towns and rural
villages scattered across Quebec. These communities are mostly home to retirees and older
couples, some of whom still work at blue-collar and service jobs in manufacturing, transportation
and the trades. With downscale incomes, these smaller households typically own single-
detached homes, almost two-thirds of which were built before 1980. Still, money goes far in
these rural communities and these older residents are hardly sedentary, especially where the
great outdoors is involved. They have high rates for owning and using snowmobiles, ATVs and
power boats, as well as going hunting and cross-country skiing. And many don’t mind driving
some distance to attend an auto race, hockey game or outdoor show. With most of their
children out of the house, they can afford to splurge on a little nightlife, going to comedy clubs
and country music concerts. And when they venture out to town they may visit their favourite
buffet or pub.

Copyright ©2015 Environics Analytics


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65 Young & Connected


Younger, low-income, diverse urban renters
Population 424,284 (1.18% of Canada)
Households 162,005 (1.11% of Canada)
Average Household Income $54,010
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity High
Sample Social Value National Pride

With a population that’s 60 percent visible minority and almost 30 percent speaking a non-
official language at home, the tech-savvy members of Young & Connected encompass a wide
mix of cultural backgrounds. Younger immigrants from Latin America, the Middle East and Asia
have all made their way to these inner-city neighbourhoods mostly in Toronto and other big
cities. Their low incomes, modest educations and uncertain jobs create significant challenges for
the segment’s households, 35 percent of whom are lone-parent families—among the highest in
the nation. But despite tight budgets, research shows that Young & Connected members have
high rates for going out for pizza and ice cream, attending rock concerts and frequenting
basketball games. With their children, they visit amusement parks, bowling alleys and museums.
And for a night out, they take in the latest action adventure or science fiction flick on the silver
screen with their family or friends.

66 Sunset Towers
Low-income seniors in urban apartments
Population 494,654 (1.38% of Canada)
Households 279,076 (1.91% of Canada)
Average Household Income $51,145
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Importance of Price

With a third of its members over 65 years old, Sunset Towers is one of Canada’s oldest
lifestyles—as well as one of the least affluent. These low-income retirees tend to live in older,
seniors-oriented low- and high-rise apartment buildings in cities across Canada. More than half
its members are retired, typically getting by on modest pensions. Because most never made it
beyond high school and spent their working lives at low-paying service sector jobs, their
lifestyles today are unpretentious. Residents like to spend their time reading, listening to the
radio, working on arts and crafts projects and taking walks. But they also like to escape the
routine of their apartments to go to racetracks, casinos and football games. Many support the
arts, regularly patronizing museums, theatres and music festivals. But in this low-key, slow-
paced world, residents concede that they rarely go out to dinner, and then only to a buffet
restaurant.

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67 Survivre en Ville
Younger, low-income Quebec urban renters
Population 587,003 (1.64% of Canada)
Households 318,700 (2.18% of Canada)
Average Household Income $44,202
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Anomie-Aimlessness

One of the least affluent lifestyle types in Canada, Survivre en Ville consists of urban
neighbourhoods that are home to young singles, couples and single-parent families; nearly 40
percent are bilingual. Little has changed over the past decade, and these households are still
characterized by relatively high unemployment, low educational levels and modest paycheques.
Many of these residents hold sales or service jobs, commuting to work by public transit or used
cars from their older, low-rise apartments, and frequenting convenience stores and take-out
restaurants in strong numbers. Nevertheless, these Canadians have a zest for life. They score
high for going to outdoor stages, sci-fi movies, auto races and all kinds of concerts—pop, rock,
classical and country. They enjoy getting active, going in-line skating, bowling, hiking and
playing roller hockey. And these mostly young consumers like discovering the latest products at
computer, book and outdoor shows. Surveys show they’re always looking for ways to improve
their careers by frequenting job fairs.

68 Low-Rise Renters
Young, low-income city singles and families
Population 797,688 (2.22% of Canada)
Households 363,180 (2.48% of Canada)
Average Household Income $53,694
Housing Tenure Rent
Education Grade 9/High School
Occupation Service Sector
Diversity Low
Sample Social Value Social Intimacy

The most economically challenged lifestyle, Low-Rise Renters is a world of low-income, young
singles and single-parent families. In these closely packed neighbourhoods in mid-sized cities,
nearly a third of household maintainers are under 35 years old, and more than 70 percent rent
apartments—mostly in older, low-rise apartments and row houses. These households are
predominantly white with low education levels, and members work hard at service sector jobs
that earn them incomes that are about half the national average. With their tight budgets, they
fashion low-cost lifestyles, engaging in outdoor activities like skateboarding and playing
basketball, going to the movies, and enjoying the city parks and gardens near their communities.
For a little excitement, they might head to a casino, bingo hall or video terminal. But their desire
to improve their prospects is evident in their frequent visits to job fairs and their interest in
student loans. While a dinner at a fancy restaurant may be a rarity for these residents, they
shop at discount grocery stores for the cheese, meats and pizza needed to celebrate informal
gatherings.

Copyright ©2015 Environics Analytics

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