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Dato’ Paduka Prof. (Dr) Ir. Hj.

Keizrul bin Abdullah


Adjunct Professor
July U i
Universiti
iti Tenaga
T Malaysia
M l i
2008
21 September 2010 1
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Q & A 2
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Q & A 3
Profession

• A Profession is
• A vocation founded upon specialised
educational training
• The application of specialised knowledge
off a subject,
bj t field,
fi ld or science
i
• Professional activity involves systematic
knowledge and proficiency
f
• Distinguished from other occupations due
July
2008
to their level of legal recognition
4
Profession

• A Profession is
• A vocation founded upon specialised
educational training
• The application of specialised knowledge
off a subject,
bj t field,
fi ld or science
i
• Professional activity involves systematic
knowledge and proficiency
f
• Distinguished from other occupations due
July
2008
to their level of legal recognition
5
Profession

• A Profession
• Professionalisation is
• Social process whereby a trade or
occupation Æ transform into a profession
of the highest integrity and competence
• Establish acceptable qualification to
differentiate qualified from unqualified Æ
occupational closure
July
2008 • Form a professional body/association
6
to oversee the conduct of the members
Profession

• A Profession
• Professionalisation is
• Social process whereby a trade or
occupation Æ transform into a profession
of the highest integrity and competence
• Establish acceptable qualification to
differentiate qualified from unqualified Æ
occupational closure
July
2008 • Form a professional body/association
7
to oversee the conduct of the members
Profession

• A Profession
• Professionalisation
• Historical background
• Craftsman Æ apprenticeship

July
2008
8
July
2008
Blacksmith 9
July
2008
Cobbler 10
Healer

July
2008
11
Learning through
July apprenticeship
2008
12
Profession

• A Profession
• Professionalisation
• Historical background
• Craftsman Æ undergo apprenticeship
• Craftsmen Æ form associations based on
their trades
• Aim Æ to control ‘secrets’, ‘mysteries’,
July ‘ t ’ off their
‘arts’ th i crafts
ft
2008
13
Guilds

July
2008
14
July
2008
15
Profession

• A Profession
• Professionalisation
• Historical background
• Craftsman Æ undergo apprenticeship
• Craftsmen Æ form associations based on
their trades
• Aim Æ to control ‘secrets’, ‘mysteries’,
July ‘ t ’ off their
‘arts’ th i crafts
ft
2008
16
• Take oath of secrecy
Profession

• A Profession
• Professionalisation
• Historical background
• W
Word ‘ f i ’ Æ from
d ‘profession’ f L ti Æ “to
Latin “t
swear (an oath)”
• Adhere to ethical standards
• To be p
proficient and competent
p
July
2008
• To uphold good name of profession 17
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Q & A 18
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 19
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


6) Practitioners licensed
7) Work autonomy
8)) Code of p
professional conduct or ethics
9) Self regulating and independent from
government
10) Element of public service and altruism
July 11) Exclusiveness,
E l i monopoly,
l occupational
ti l
2008
closure 20
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


12) Control of fees and advertising
13) High status and rewards
14)) Offer reassurance to clients
15) Inaccessible body of knowledge (to the
uninitiated)
16) Indeterminacy of knowledge some of
July
which can only be acquired through
2008 experience 21
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 22
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 23
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 24
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 25
July
2008
26
- also known as the IEM, the Institution is a
Civil Society Organisation formed in 1959
(
(registered
i t d with
ith the
th Registrar
R i t off Societies)
S i ti )

- Objective
j of the Institution is to promote
p
and advance the science and profession
of all aspects of engineering
July
2008
27
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 28
REGISTRATION OF
ENGINEERS ACT 1967

Section 10(2)(i)(b) Æ Professional


Assessment Examination
July
2008
29
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


1) Skill based on theoretical knowledge
2) Professional association
3)) Extensive pperiod of education involved -
usually to tertiary level
4) Testing of competence through
prescribed exams

July
5) Institutionalised training and continuous
2008 upgrading of skills (CPD) 30
CONTINUING
PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
FOR
PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS
(CPD)
July
2008
31
Requirements

Every Professional Engineer is required


to start accumulating 50 CPD hours per
year on average over 3 years with effect
from 1st January 2005

July
2008
32
Objectives of CPD

• Maintenance of technical knowledge,


skill & competency

• Engineers to stay abreast of new


engineering development in their field
and changes in codes and regulations

July
2008
33
Types of CPD

a) Formal Education and Training


Activities
b) Informal
I f l Learning
L i Activities
A ti iti
c) Conference and Meeting
d) Presentation of Papers
e) Services Activities
f) Industry Involvement (mainly for
July academic)
2008
34
Summary of CPD
Type Times Weighted Factor Max. Per Year
Formal Education And 2x No limit
Training activities
Informal learning 1 x - on job learning Max. 20
Activities 0.5 x- private study Max. 10

Conference and 1x No limit


Meeting
Presentation of Papers
p 10 x Max. 30

Services activities 1x Max. 30


Industry Involvement 1x Max. 30
(for Academic)
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


6) Practitioners licensed
7) Work autonomy
8)) Code of p
professional conduct or ethics
9) Self regulating and independent from
government
10) Element of public service and altruism
July 11) Exclusiveness,
E l i monopoly,
l occupational
ti l
2008
closure 36
Registration
R i t ti off
July
g
Engineers Act 1967
2008
37
Category of Registration

A. Professional Engineer
B. Graduate Engineer
C. Temporary
p y Engineer
g
D. Engineering Consultancy Practice (ECP)
i) Body Corporate
ii) Multi Disciplinary
iii) Sole Proprietorship
iv)) Partnership
p
July
E.
2008
Accredited Checker 38
Need for Registration

Section 7(1)(a)
7(1)(a), REA
No person shall, unless he is a registered
Professional Engineer, practise, carry on
business or take up employment which
requires him to carry out or perform
professional engineering services

July
2008
39
Need for Registration

Section 7(1)(aa)(i)
7(1)(aa)(i), REA
No person shall, unless he is a registered
Professional Engineer, be entitled to
describe himself or hold himself out
under any name, style or title bearing the
words “Professional Engineer” or the
equivalent thereto in any other language

July
2008
40
Need for Registration

Section 7(1)(aa)(iii)
7(1)(aa)(iii), REA
No person shall, unless he is a registered
Professional Engineer, be entitled to use
the abbreviation “Ir” before his name or
the abbreviation “P.Eng.” after his name

July
2008
41
Penalty

Section 24(h),
24(h) REA
Any person, sole proprietorship,
partnership or body corporate who
contravenes section 7 or 8, or subsection
7A(1), 24A(1) or 24B(5), shall be guilty of
an offence and shall, on conviction, be
liable to a fine not > RM 50,000, or to
imprisonment for a term not > 3 years, or
July
2008 both
42
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


6) Practitioners licensed
7) Work autonomy
8)) Code of p
professional conduct or ethics
9) Self regulating and independent from
government
10) Element of public service and altruism
July 11) Exclusiveness,
E l i monopoly,
l occupational
ti l
2008
closure 43
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


6) Practitioners licensed
7) Work autonomy
8)) Code of p
professional conduct or ethics
9) Self regulating and independent from
government
10) Element of public service and altruism
July 11) Exclusiveness,
E l i monopoly,
l occupational
ti l
2008
closure 44
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


12) Control of fees and advertising
13) High status and rewards
14)) Offer reassurance to clients
15) Inaccessible body of knowledge
16) Indeterminacy of knowledge some of
which can only be acquired through
July
experience
2008
45
Profession

• Main characteristics of a Profession :


6) Practitioners licensed
7) Work autonomy
8)) Code of p
professional conduct or ethics
9) Self regulating and independent from
government
10) Element of public service and altruism
July 11) Exclusiveness,
E l i monopoly,
l occupational
ti l
2008
closure 46
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Case Studies 47
Code of Ethics

• What is Ethics?
• Ethics Æ major branch of philosoply Æ
encompassing proper conduct
• Synonym for “morally correct” or justified
Æ sett off jjustified
tifi d morall principles
i i l off
obligation, rights and ideals
• Issue off ethics arise Æ specialist
knowledge of the professional, and how the
July use of this knowledge should be governed
2008
when providing a service to the public 48
Example

• Engineer
g Æp possess specialist
p knowledge
g
and training
• Client Æ places trust in the Engineer that the
service provided will be to the client’s best
interest
• Engineer Æ must not use the specialist
knowledge and training to exploit the Client
Æ eg.
eg by over-exaggerating the problem and
frightening client to accept conservative (and
more expensive) design
July
2008
49
Code of Ethics

• What is Ethics?
• What is a Code of Ethics?
• A set of internally enforced rules or
regulations that members of the profession
mustt follow
f ll
• The main intention is to ensure public
safety, prevent exploitation of the client,
and preserve the integrity of the profession
July
2008
• A code may or may not have the same
50
status as a law
How are ethics and law related?

Illegal & Legal &


Ethical E hi l
Ethical

Illegal & Legal &


Unethical Unethical
July
2008
51
Code of Ethics

• What is Ethics?
• What is a Code of Ethics?
• The Code of Professional Conduct
governing the engineering profession in
Malaysia Æ Registration of Engineers
Regulations 1990
• Failure to observe this Code is an
July
2008
i fi
infringement t off the
th Registration
R i t ti off
Engineers Act 1967 52
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Q & A 53
Code of Professional Conduct

Why Code of Professional Conduct?


• Ethics Æ relates to morality Æ difficult to
determine
• For purpose of enforcement Æ provide a
C d off C
Code Conduct
d t
• Code of Conduct Æ set of rules outlining
the responsibilities off or proper practices
for an individual
July
2008
• Outline the principles, values, standards,
54
rules of behaviour
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


1) Responsibility to Society
2) Responsibility to the Profession
3)) Responsibility
p y to the Client/Employer
p y
4) Responsibility to our Colleagues

July
2008
55
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


1) Responsibility to Society
¾ Purpose of Engineering Æ to improve
living conditions and quality of life of
S i t /C
Society/Community it
¾ Hence in carrying out his work, the
Engineer has a duty of care to Society
and the Environment
July
2008
¾ Must always ensure public safety and
56
health
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


1) Responsibility to Society
¾ Respect nature Æ maintain ecological
balance
¾ Seek solutions compatible with
principles of sustainable development
¾ Conservation of natural resources

July
2008
57
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


2) Responsibility to the Profession
¾ Commit to professionalism
¾ Uphold
p dignity,
g y, standingg and
reputation of profession
¾ Fulfill professional duty Æ apply
knowledge and adopt good
engineering practices
July
2008 ¾ Refrain from performing services 58
unless competent
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


2) Responsibility to the Profession
¾ Be creative Æ acquire latest
technological knowledge
¾ Improve skills and raise standards

July
2008
59
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


3) Responsibility to the Client/Employer
¾ Render service with sincerity Æ full
competency and creativity
¾ Act at all times in the legitimate
interest of the Client and achieve
project goals
¾ Perform duty impartially with integrity
July
2008
and faithfulness
60
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


3) Responsibility to the Client/Employer
¾ Inform Client of any conflict of interest
¾ Establish mutual trust
¾ Not to accept remuneration which
prejudices independent judgement

July
2008
61
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


4) Responsibility to our Colleagues
¾ Engineers tend to work in teams Æ
cooperate with Specialists in other
di i li
disciplines / fields
fi ld
¾ Emphasize coordination and
cooperation and improve efficiency of
execution
July
2008
¾ Not to injure reputation or business of
62
others
Code of Professional Conduct

Four main areas of Responsibilities


4) Responsibility to our Colleagues
¾ Not to directly or indirectly attempt to
take over others’ work
¾ Ensure continuity of professional
contributions
¾ Share technical experiences

July
¾ Guide and encourage younger
2008 professionals 63
REGISTRATION OF
ENGINEERS REGULATION

PART IV

CODE OF PROFESSIONAL
July
2008
CONDUCT 64
Conduct of Registered Engineer

23 E
23. Every Registered
R i t d Engineer
E i shall
h ll att all
ll
times uphold the dignity, high standing
and reputation of his profession

July
2008
65
Responsibility to employer,
clients or profession

24. A Registered Engineer in his


responsibility to his employer, client or
the profession shall have full regard to
the public interest

July
2008
66
Discharge of duties

25. (1) A Registered Engineer shall discharge


his duties to his employer or client as the
case may be with complete fidelity

(2) Except with the permission of his


employer, a Registered Engineer shall not
acceptt any remuneration
ti f
for services
i
rendered other than from his employer
July
2008
67
Reputation etc. of a Registered
Engineer not to be injured

26. A Registered Engineer shall not


maliciously injure or attempt to
maliciously
li i l injure
i j whether
h th di
directly
tl or
indirectly, the professional reputation,
prospects or business of another
Registered Engineer
July
2008
68
Canvassing and advertising prohibited
27. A Registered Engineer shall not -
(a) canvass or solicit professional
employment;
(b) offer to make by way of commission
or any other payment for the introduction
of his professional employment;
(c) except
e cept as permitted by
b the Board,
Board
advertise in any manner or form in
connection with his profession; or
(d) provide professional engineering
services to any person, unless the scope
July
of such services are clearly defined in a
2008 written agreement between both parties
69
A Registered Engineer in
private practice
p p not to practice
p
with any person whose
registration has been cancelled

28
28. A Registered Engineer in an
Engineering Consultancy Practice shall
not practise engineering with any
person whose registration has been
cancelled
July
2008
70
R t i ti
Restrictions on making
ki
payments or placing contracts

29. A Registered Engineer in an Engineering


Consultancy Practice shall not be a
medium of payment made on his client's
behalf unless he is so requested by his
client nor shall he, in connection with
work on which he is employed, place
contracts or orders except with the
authority of and on behalf of his client
July
2008
71
R t i ti
Restrictions on entering
t i
professional partnership

30. A Professional Engineer in private


practice shall not without the approval of
the Board enter into professional
partnership
t hi with
ith any person other
th than
th a
Professional Engineer in private practice,
a Registered Architect,
Architect a Registered
Quantity Surveyor or a Licensed Land
Surveyor
y
July
2008
72
A Registered Engineer in private
practise not to intervene or to take
over the work of another

31. A Registered Engineer shall not directly or


i di
indirectly
tl -
( ) supplant
(a) pp or attempt
p to supplant
pp
another Registered Engineer ;
(b) intervene or attempt to intervene in
or in connection with engineering work of
any kind which to his knowledge has
July
2008
already been entrusted to another a
73
Registered Engineer; or
Reg. 31

(c) take over any work of that other


Registered Engineer acting for the
same client unless he has :
(i) obtained the consent of that
other Registered Engineer; or
(ii) been formally notified by the
client that the services of that other
E i
Engineer have
h been
b terminated
i d in
i
accordance with the provisions of any
July contract entered into between that
2008
other Engineer and the client 74
Restrictions on being a director,
memberb or shareholder
h h ld off
contracting and manufacturing
company, etc.

32. (1) Except with the prior approval of the


Board,
oa d, a registered
eg ste ed Engineer
g ee in a an ECP
C
shall not be a director or executive of or
substantial shareholder in or agent for
any contracting or manufacturing
company or firm or business related to
July building or engineering
2008
75
Restrictions on being a director,
memberb or shareholder
h h ld off
contracting and manufacturing
company, etc.

32. (2) If such approval is given, such


Registered Engineer shall not undertake
any contract work wherein he is engaged
as a consulting engineer in such project
unless it is in respect of a "design
design and
build" project
July
2008
76
Disclosure of interest

33 Every
33. E registered
i t d Engineer
E i while
hil acting
ti i
in
his professional capacity shall disclose
in writing to his client of the fact if he is
a director or member of or substantial
shareholder in or agent g for any y
contracting or manufacturing company
or firm or business or has any financial
i
interest i any such
in h company or firm
fi or
business, with which he deals on behalf
July of his client
2008
77
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Q & A 78
REGISTRATION OF
ENGINEERS ACT 1967

July
2008
79
Offences and Penalties

• REA lists out a number of offences and


the penalties that can be meted out
• Two types of contravention :
1) Offender is not registered with BEM
2) Offender is a registered Engineer or
ECP
• For Type (1) Æ Court case
• For Type (2) Æ Disciplinary case
• Type
T (1) offence
ff includes
i l d possibleibl
imprisonment sentence (quasi-criminal)
Offences and Penalties

• REA lists out a number of offences and


the penalties that can be meted out
• Two types of contravention :
1) Offender is not registered with BEM
2) Offender is a registered Engineer or
ECP
• For Type (1) Æ Court case
• For Type (2) Æ Disciplinary case
• Type
T (1) offence
ff includes
i l d possibleibl
imprisonment sentence (quasi-criminal)
Type (1) Court Case

Section 7(1)(a)
7(1)(a), REA
No person shall, unless he is a registered
Professional Engineer, practise, carry on
business or take up employment which
requires him to carry out or perform
professional engineering services

July
2008
82
Type (1) Court Case

Section 7(1)(aa)
7(1)(aa), REA
No person shall, unless he is a Prof.
Engineer be entitled to use Ir. or P.Eng. …
or describe himself or hold himself out
under any name, style or title … which
may reasonably be construed to imply
that he is a Professional Engineer

July
2008
83
Type (1) Court Case

Section 7(1)(b)
7(1)(b), REA
No person shall, unless he is a Prof.
Engineer use or display any sign, board,
card or other device representing or
implying that he is a Professional
Engineer

July
2008
84
Type (1) Court Case

Section 8(1),
8(1) REA
No person or body, other than a
Professional Engineer or an ECP, shall be
entitled to submit plans, engineering
surveys, drawings, schemes, proposals,
reports, designs or studies to any person
or authority in Malaysia

July
2008
85
Type (1) Court Case

Section 24(a~h)
24(a h), REA
Obtaining registration by false pretences;
Forges, alters or counterfeits any
certificate of registration;
Impersonating a registered Engineer;
Buy or sell any certificate of registration;
Contravening Section 24A(1) or 24B(5)
(Also applicable to Registered Engineer)
July
2008
86
Penalty

July
2008
87
Penalties - Type (1)

Section 24(h),
24(h) REA
Any person, sole proprietorship,
partnership or body corporate who
contravenes section 7 or 8, or subsection
7A(1), 24A(1) or 24B(5), shall be guilty of
an offence and shall, on conviction, be
liable to a fine not > RM 50,000, or to
imprisonment for a term not > 3 years, or
July
2008 both
88
Penalties - Type (1)

Section 24(h),
24(h) REA
Any person, sole proprietorship,
partnership or body corporate who
contravenes section 7 or 8, or subsection
7A(1), 24A(1) or 24B(5), shall be guilty of
an offence and shall, on conviction, be
liable to a fine not > RM 50,000, or to
imprisonment for a term not > 3 years, or
July
2008 both
89
Penalties - Type (1)

Section 24(h),
24(h) REA
Any person, sole proprietorship,
partnership or body corporate who
contravenes section 7 or 8, or subsection
7A(1), 24A(1) or 24B(5), shall be guilty of
an offence and shall, on conviction, be
liable to a fine not > RM 50,000, or to
imprisonment for a term not > 3 years, or
July
2008 both
90
Penalties - Type (1)

Section 24(h),
24(h) REA
Any person, sole proprietorship,
partnership or body corporate who
contravenes section 7 or 8, or subsection
7A(1), 24A(1) or 24B(5), shall be guilty of
an offence and shall, on conviction, be
liable to a fine not > RM 50,000, or to
imprisonment for a term not > 3 years, or
July
2008 both
91
Offences and Penalties

• REA lists out a number of offences and


the penalties that can be meted out
• Two types of contravention :
1) Offender is not registered with BEM
2) Offender is a registered Engineer or
ECP
• For Type (1) Æ RTM case / court case
• For Type (2) Æ Disciplinary case
• Type
T (1) offence
ff includes
i l d possibleibl
imprisonment sentence (quasi-criminal)
Penalty

July
2008
93
Penalties - Type (2
(2))

Section 15(1A)
15(1A), REA - Registered Engineer
(a)Issuance of a written warning or
reprimand
(b)Imposition of a fine not exceeding
RM 50,000
(c)Suspension of registration for a period
not exceeding 2 years
(d)Cancellation of registration
July
2008 (e)Any combination of (a) to (d)
94
Outline of Talk

1. What is a Profession?
2. Main Characteristics of a Profession
3 What is a Code of Ethics?
3.
4. Code of Professional Conduct
5. Offences and Penalties
July
2008
6. Q & A 95
Case Examples

July
2008
96
Case Example 1

1) You are designing a Shopping Mall for a


Developer and have come up with the
following alternatives :
2)) Alternative A Æ Project
j cost RM 100 million,,
Annual cost RM 5 million
3) Alternative B Æ Project cost RM 150 million,
A
Annual l costt RM 3 million
illi
4) Alternative C Æ Project cost RM 140 million,
Annual cost RM 4 million
5) Which alternative will you recommend to your
Client?
July
2008
97
Case Example 2

1) You are designing a Shopping Mall for a


Developer The Client wants to have a Petrol
Developer.
Service Station in the basement of the Mall. In
your opinion, this will have fire and safety
consequences.
2) What will you do?
3) The
Th Client
Cli t is
i insistent
i i t t on his
hi proposall andd
ask you to incorporate mitigating measures to
alleviate y
your concerns on fire and safety.
y
4) What will you do?

July
2008
98
Case Example 3

1) You are the designer for a 4-lane Road Bridge


crossing the Klang River
River.
2) Your Engineer boss ask you to use a Factor
y of 4 as the bridge
of Safety g is an important
p
link and will be heavily used.
3) What will you do?
4) From your enquiries and research, you find
that a FoS of 4 is too excessive.
5) What will you do?

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2008
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Case Example 4

1) You are designing the M&E component of a


Shopping Mall for a Developer
2) Your friend who is selling Brand X Air-con ask
you to recommend his p
y product
3) Will you accept his request?
4) After considering all the various Brands in the
market, you find that Brand X gives the best
value for money.
5) Will you recommend Brand X to your Client?

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2008
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Case Example 5

1) You are buying some computers for your


Company and ask for quotations from a
number of suppliers. One of the supplier is
your family-owned company.
2) What will you do?
3) Another supplier offers you a free personal
computer
t if you will
ill b
buy ffrom hi
him.
4) What will you do?
5) You have bought the computers from the
supplier giving the best deal. The supplier is
grateful and sends you
g y a hamper
p as a thank-
July
2008 you gesture.
101
6) Will you accept his gift?
Case Example 6

1) Your Company wants to purchase a Tunnel


Boring Machine and you are asked to
evaluate several models from different
suppliers. One of the supplier offers you a
f
free trip
t i to
t Japan
J to
t inspect
i t their
th i TBM.
TBM
2) Will you accept their offer?

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2008
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Case Example 7

1) You work as an Engineer in a Factory


producing precast RC units for IBS IBS.
2) You notice a leak in one of the machines and
oil is p
pouringg into a drain that leads to a river.
3) You report to your boss but he says the main
priority is to complete a big order on time.
Y can d
You do the
th repairs
i after
ft the
th order
d isi
delivered.
4) What will you do?

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2008
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Case Example 8

1) You work for a construction company that is


building a 5-storey office block
block.
2) Your employer ask you to reduce the number
of steel bars to save costs.
3) What will you do?
4) Your employer gives you a letter certifying
that he takes all responsibility for instructing
you to reduce the number of steel bars.
5) What will you do?

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2008
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Conclusion

• A Profession is a vocation founded


upon specialised educational training
• Professionals are governed by their
Professional Code of Conduct Æ set of
g
rules and regulations
• The main intention is to ensure public
y p
safety, prevent exploitation
p of the
Client, and preserve the integrity of the
Profession
• Infringement against the Code can
invoke penalties including disbarment
Thank You

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2008
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