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The Art of Public Speaking Stephen Lucas

13th Edition – Test Bank

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Sample Test
 
 
 
 
 
 
Listening

 
 
 
 
 
T

he questions for each chapter are organized according to type:


true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay. Within
each of these categories, questions are clustered by topic,
roughly following the order of topics in the textbook.
To provide as much flexibility as possible in constructing
examinations, there is deliberate overlap among the questions,
both within and across question types. This enables you to
choose the wording and question type that best fits your
testing objectives. In deciding which questions to use, take
care to avoid items such as a multiple-choice question that
gives away the answer to a true-false or short-answer
question, or an essay question that covers essentially the
same ground as a true-false, short-answer, or multiple-choice
question.
Each type of question—true-false, multiple-choice, short-
answer, and essay—has an automatic numbering system,
which means you can copy and paste items from within a
question type, and they will automatically number themselves
consecutively, beginning with “1.” The five answer choices for
each multiple-choice question are also ordered automatically,
so you can add, change, or reorder answer choices without
rearranging the lettering.
If you would like to preserve the fonts, indents, and tabs of the
original questions, you can copy and paste questions into the
Exam Master provided at the end of the Test Bank. In the
Exam Master, spaces for your course name, exam type, and
the student’s name and section are followed by headings and
instructions for true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and
essay questions. You can add elements unique to your exams
and delete elements you don’t want to use. After you
customize the Exam Master, you can save it with your
changes. Then, each time you open it, click “Save As” to give
it the name of the exam you are currently constructing.
 
 
True-False Questions

1. T F       Hearing and listening are essentially the


same.
2. T F       People need effective listening skills in almost
all occupations.
3. T F       Research indicates that even when we listen
carefully, we understand and retain only about half of
what we hear.
4. T F       People spend more time listening than in any
other communicative activity.
5. T F       You can improve your own speeches by
listening carefully to the speeches of other people.
6. T F       One of the major obstacles to listening
effectively is that the brain can process many more words
than can be spoken in a minute.
7. T F       According to your textbook, a skilled therapist
listening to a patient is an example of appreciative
listening.
8. T F       Appreciative listening is closely tied to critical
thinking.
9. T F       Listening is a passive process, while critical
thinking is an active process.
10. T F       Listening to provide emotional support
for someone is called empathic listening.
11. T F       According to your textbook, listening to
understand a classroom lecture is an example of
appreciative listening.
12. T F       According to your textbook, listening to
understand a classroom lecture is an example of
comprehensive listening.
13. T F       When you listen to someone give a sales
presentation, and you need to decide whether you will buy
the item, you are engaged in comprehensive listening.
14. T F       Listening to evaluate a message for
purposes of accepting or rejecting it is known as critical
listening.
15. T F       Critical listening involves listening to
evaluate a message for purposes of accepting it or
rejecting it.
16. T F       Concentrating on details is an excellent
way to become a better listener.
17. T F       It is impossible to listen too hard.
18. T F       As your textbook explains, focusing on a
speaker’s delivery and personal appearance is an
excellent way to strengthen your listening skills.
19. T F       Critical listening involves engaging in a
mental argument with everything a speaker says.
20. T F       When you listen to the campaign speech
of a political candidate for the purpose of accepting or
rejecting the speaker’s message, you are engaged in
critical listening.
21. T F       When you listen to the campaign speech
of a political candidate for the purpose of accepting or
rejecting the speaker’s message, you are engaged in
empathic listening.
22. T F       One of the major barriers to effective
communication is that the brain can process words much
faster than a speaker can talk.
23. T F       The aim of active listening is to set aside
one’s own frame of reference and, as far as possible, to
listen from within the speaker’s frame of reference.
24. T F       Active listening means focusing on the
speaker’s appearance and delivery rather than on her or
his message.
25. T F       Active listeners give their undivided
attention to the speaker in a genuine effort to understand
her or his point of view.
26. T F       Usually it is easy to block out physical
and mental distractions when listening to a speaker.
27. T F       When you listen to a speech, it is usually
a good idea to try to remember everything the speaker
says.
28. T F       Jumping to conclusions can be a barrier
to effective listening even when a speaker and a listener
know each other very well.
29. T F       According to your textbook, reviewing
mentally what a speaker has said is a good way to avoid
becoming distracted in a speech.
30. T F       Suspending judgment means that you
need to accept uncriticallywhatever a speaker says.
31. T F       If you disagree with a speaker, you have
nothing to gain by listening carefully.
32. T F       According to your textbook, when
focusing your listening, you should concentrate on a
speaker’s main points, evidence, and technique.
33. T F       Note taking is usually a barrier to
effective listening.
34. T F       Taking notes on a speaker’s key points
and supporting material will help improve your listening
ability and retention.

 
Multiple-Choice Questions    (Students are to indicate
the best answer for each question by circling the correct
letter.)

1. People spend more time__________ than in any other


communication activity.
2. speaking
3. writing
4. reading
5. listening
6. discussing
7. Even when we are listening carefully, we usually grasp
only about __________ percent of what we hear.
8. 20
9. 30
10. 40
11. 50
12. 60
13. When business managers are asked to list the
communication skills most crucial to their job, they
usually rank __________ number one.
14. conversation
15. critical thinking
16. listening
17. public speaking
18. writing
19. According to your textbook, effective listening can
help you do which of the following?
20. gather information and communicate it accurately to
others
21. learn effective techniques that you can use in your
own speeches
22. get promoted in your job
23. all of the above
24. a and c only
25. According to your textbook, effective listening skills
are important for
26.
27.
28.
29. all of the above.
30. b and c only.
31. Sarah is listening to her roommate to provide
emotional support in a time of distress. According to your
textbook, Sarah is engaged in __________ listening.
32. critical
33. appreciative
34. empathic
35. personal
36. comprehensive
37. Fletcher is listening for pleasure as a friend
discusses her trip to Australia. According to your
textbook, Fletcher is engaged in __________ listening.
38. appreciative
39. receptive
40. personal
41. comprehensive
42. empathic
43. Lance is enjoying Jim Gaffigan’sstand-up comedy
routine at the Civic Center. According to your textbook,
Lance is engaged in__________ listening.
44. critical
45. appreciative
46. comprehensive
47. empathic
48. intimate
49. Max is smiling and nodding his head as he listens to
a toast at a friend’s wedding. According to your textbook,
Max is engaged in __________ listening.
50. critical
51. appreciative
52. comprehensive
53. empathic
54. personal
55. Gerald is listening to comfort a friend whose
apartment has just been burglarized. According to your
textbook, Gerald is engaged in __________ listening.
56. intimate
57. empathic
58. comprehensive
59. appreciative
60. sympathetic
61. Nadiais listening to provide emotional support to her
friend Sousan, who is talking about the health of her aging
parents. According to your textbook, Nadiais engaged in
__________ listening.
62. critical
63. appreciative
64. empathic
65. intimate
66. comprehensive
67. Julia is listening to her meteorology professor
explain how to interpret images from Doppler radar.
Because Julia’s goal is to understand the information
being presented, she is engaged in __________ listening.
68. attentive
69. comprehensive
70. appreciative
71. empathic
72. critical
73. Brad is listening to a speaker explain how some new
computer softwareworks so Brad can use it in his
business. According to your textbook, Brad is engaged in
__________ listening.
74. passive
75. appreciative
76. active
77. comprehensive
78. empathic
79. Leon is listening to his chemistry instructor review
the steps for this week’s lab assignment. Because Leon
has to understand and follow these directions carefully,
your textbook would say he is engaged in __________
listening.
80. assertive
81. empathic
82. comprehensive
83. appreciative
84. engaged
85. A new class registration system has been
established on campus. Tonight, a representative from
the Registrar’s office will speak about how to use the new
system. You will be listening to the speaker in hopes of
understanding the steps involved in registering for
classes next semester. As explained in your textbook, you
will be engaged in ___________ listening.
86. intimate
87. critical
88. empathic
89. comprehensive
90. appreciative
91. According to your textbook, when you listen to
evaluate a speaker’s message for purposes of accepting it
or rejecting it, what kind of listening is involved?
92. critical
93. reflective
94. evaluative
95. empathic
96. comprehensive
97. Natasha and Ramone are listening to a realtor who is
encouraging them to buy a house they looked at earlier in
the day. As they listen, they are trying to decide whether
or not to purchase the house. According to your textbook,
Natasha and Ramone are engaged in __________ listening.
98. critical
99. appreciative
100. comprehensive
101. empathic
102. intimate
103. Tara’s campus organization has invited several travel
agents to speak to the group about their best deals on
trips for spring break. As Tara listens, she is deciding
which travel package is the best one for her. During the
presentations, she is engaged in which form of listening?
104. critical
105. appreciative
106. comprehensive
107. empathic
108. intimate
109. Brian’s fraternity is deciding whether to become
alcohol free. On the evening of the vote, speakers present
arguments on both sides of the issue. Because Brian has
to decide whether to accept or reject the proposed policy,
he is engaged in __________ listening.
110. emphatic
111. appreciative
112. comprehensive
113. critical
114. intimate
115. Kristen is listening to a political candidate’s speech
for purposes of decidingwhether toaccept or reject the
speaker’s message. According to your textbook, Kristen
is engaged in __________ listening.
116. comprehensive
117. judgmental
118. critical
119. empathic
120. judicious
121. Devon is president of the InternationalStudent
Organization. He is listening to the Dean of Students
present her plan for a new multicultural center so he can
decide whether or not to support the plan. According to
your textbook, Devon is engaged in _________listening.
122. reflective
123. personal
124. empathic
125. critical
126. receptive
127. Giving excessive attention to the details of a speech
is an example of
128. listening too hard.
129. giving in to distractions.
130. listening for technique.
131. jumping to conclusions.
132. focusing on delivery.
133. Although most people speak at a rate of 120 to 180
words a minute, the brain can process words at a rate of
134. 100 to 200 words a minute.
135. 200 to 400 words a minute.
136. 400 to 500 words a minute.
137. 600 to 900 words a minute.
138. 1000 to 1200 words a minute.
139. Which of the following is included among the four
major causes of poor listening discussed in your
textbook?
140. trying to remember everything the speaker says
141. jumping to conclusions about the speaker’s ideas
142. taking written notes while the speech is in progress
143. all of the above
144. a and b only
145. As Jenell listened to her classmate’s speech
explaining the differences between collision insurance
and comprehensive insurance, it reminded her that she
needed to pay her insurance bill before the end of the day.
Then, rather than listening to the speaker, she started
thinking about all the other things she had to do that day.
According to your textbook, the primary cause of Jenell’s
poor listening is
146. not concentrating.
147. focusing on the speaker’s topic.
148. being distracted by external interference.
149. personalizing the topic.
150. listening too hard.
151. Today was Samantha’s birthday, and her friends
were taking her out for a surprise evening. It was hard
enough to pay attention to speeches on a hot afternoon,
but Samantha’s mind kept wandering to what her friends
might be planning—and who might be coming. According
to your textbook, the most  important cause of
Samantha’s poor listening was
152. jumping to conclusions.
153. adapting to the situation.
154. not concentrating.
155. focusing on appearances.
156. failing to listen for main points.
157. Margaret is passionately committed to animal rights.
At an evening lecture required for her biology class, she
learned that the title of the speaker’s talk was “The
Importance of Animal Experimentation to Medical
Advances.” Offended and sure that the speaker had
nothing ethical or interesting to say, Margaret ignored
everything the speaker said and spent the whole lecture
sending outraged tweets to other animal activists.
According to your textbook, the primary cause of
Margaret’s poor listening was
158. poor concentration.
159. focusing on the speaker’s topic.
160. being distracted by external interference.
161. jumping to conclusions.
162. spare “brain time.”
163. Ted is listening to the introduction of Janine’s
speech when he thinks to himself, “Man, this is really
going to be boring.”What aspect of poor listening
identified in your textbook is Ted exhibiting in this
example?
164. listening too hard
165. jumping to conclusions
166. rejecting the speaker’s frame of reference
167. giving in to distractions
168. not listening comprehensively
169. Matt’s political science professor announces that
next week there will be a guest lecture by peace activist
Rachel Phelps entitled “The History of War, the Prospects
for Peace.” Matt decides to skip class that day, saying to
himself, “What can a peace activist possibly tell me about
war?” What aspect of poor listening identified in your
textbook is Matt exhibiting in this example?
170. failing to concentrate
171. jumping to conclusions
172. rejecting the speaker’s frame of reference
173. giving in to distractions
174. suspending judgment
175. Which of the following is one of the four major
causes of poor listening discussed in your textbook?
176. focusing on a speaker’s appearance or delivery
177. taking key-word notes during a speech
178. suspending judgment about a speaker’s ideas
179. concentrating on a speaker’s evidence and reasoning
180. listening empathically rather than critically
181. Jessica watched a debate among four local
candidates for mayor. After the debate, she couldn’t
remember much of what the candidates said or stood for,
but one good-looking candidate with a polished delivery
really made an impression on her. Which of the following
was most likely to have impeded Jessica’s listening?
182. not taking careful enough notes
183. concentrating too hard on everything the candidates
said
184. failing to suspend judgment
185. being distracted by external interference
186. focusing on personal appearance and delivery
187. What does your textbook say is the first step to
improving your listening skills?
188. Resist distractions during a speech.
189. Focus on the speaker’s message.
190. Take listening seriously.
191. Suspend judgment until the end of the speech.
192. Learn to empathize with the speaker.
193. Which of the following is recommended by your
textbook as a way to improve your listening?
194. Try to remember everything the speaker says.
195. Pay close attention to feedback from other listeners.
196. Concentrate solely on the speaker’s gestures and
eye contact.
197. Suspend judgment until you hear all the speaker has
to say.
198. Do not take written notes as the speech is in
progress.
199. According to your textbook, skilled listeners do not
try to absorb a speaker’s every word. Rather, they focus
on three major aspects of a speech. Those aspects
include
200. main points.
201.
202.
203. all of the above.
204. a and b only.
205. According to your textbook, people with inefficient
note-taking skills usually suffer from which problem(s)?
206. They don’t know what to listen for.
207. They don’t know how to record what they listen for.
208. They don’t know the difference between paraphrases
and quotations.
209. all of the above
210. a and b only
211. According to your textbook, one way to focus your
listening is to
212. concentrate on what the speaker is wearing.
213. try to remember every word the speaker utters.
214. engage in mental arguments with the speaker.
215. pay attention to feedback from other listeners.
216. listen for the speaker’s main points.
217. When listening for a speaker’s evidence, you should
keep an ear out for its
218.
219.
220.
221.
222. all of the above.
223. Alena is listening to a speaker’s evidence during a
speech on genetically modified foods. According to your
textbook, Alena should be asking:
224. Is the evidence from objective sources?
225. Is the evidence consistent with the speaker’s
delivery?
226. Is the evidence relevant to the speaker’s claims?
227. all of the above.
228. a and c only.
229. Mark is listening to a speaker’s evidence during a
persuasive speech on nuclear power. According to your
textbook, Mark should be asking:
230. Is the evidence sufficient to support the speaker’s
claims?
231. Is the evidence taken from objective sources?
232. Is the evidence relevant to the speaker’s claims?
233. all of the above
234. a and c only
235. Your textbook recommends__________ as the most
effective method of note taking for listening to a speech.
236. writing down a speaker’s most interesting ideas
237. making a full-sentence outline
238. using the Harvard listening system
239. trying to write down everything a speaker says
240. creating a key-word outline
241. Andrew went to hear a speech by a community
leader he very much admired. He took a notebook and pen
and, during the speech, wrote down everything he could
from the speech. When he got home later, he reviewed his
notes and could barely make sense out of them. What
went wrong?
242. Andrew should have simply listened to the speech
rather than taking notes.
243. Andrew should have taken notes by making a full-
sentence outline of the speech.
244. Andrew should have paid more attention to the
speaker’s delivery rather than focusing on the words of
the speech.
245. Andrew should have resisted distractions and
concentrated more effectively on the speech.
246. Andrew should have made a key-word outline of the
speech instead of trying to write down everything.
247. Nadineis taking notes on a speech about Chinese
New Year. If she were to follow the recommendation of
your textbook, she would
248. create a key-word outline.
249. use the Harvard listening system.
250. write down everything the speaker says.
251. all of the above.
252. a and b only.

Short-Answer Questions

1. _______________ refers to the vibration of sound waves on


the ear drums and the sending of messages to the central
auditory system of the brain; _______________ refers to
paying close attention to and making sense of those
sounds.

Hearing; listening
2. People spend more time _______________ than in any other
communication activity.

listening

3. According to your textbook, when you listen primarily for


pleasure or enjoyment, you are engaged in_______________
listening.

appreciative

4. According to your textbook, when you listen for


enjoyment to friend’s stories about her trip to Russia, you
are engaged in_______________ listening.

appreciative

5. According to your textbook, when you listen to provide


emotional support for the speaker, you are engaged in
_______________ listening.

empathic

6. When Elizabeth listened to provide support for her friend


whose mother was seriously ill, she was engaged in
_______________ listening.

empathic

7. According to your textbook, when you listen primarily to


understand the message of a speaker—for example,
taking notes in a classroom lecture—you are engaged in
_______________ listening.

comprehensive
8. According to your textbook, when you listen to an
informative speech to understand the speaker’s ideas,
you are engaged in_______________ listening.

comprehensive

9. While the governor spoke about the need to regulate e-


cigarettes, Max listened carefully and evaluated the
governor’s evidence. Max was engaged in _______________
listening.

critical

10. According to your textbook, listening to evaluate a


message for purposes of accepting it or rejecting it is
known as_______________ listening.

critical

11. According to your textbook, when you evaluate the


evidence in a persuasive speech, you are engaged
in_______________ listening.

critical

12. List the four causes of poor listening discussed in


your textbook.
13.
14.
15.
16.

not concentrating
listening too hard
jumping to conclusions
focusing on delivery and personal appearance
13. Yourtextbookgivessevensuggestionsforbecomingabe
tterlistener.Listfiveofthem.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.

 
Possible answers include:
Take listening seriously.                      Don’t be
diverted by appearance or delivery.
Be an active listener.                           Suspend
judgment.
Resist distractions.                             Focus
your listening.
Develop note-taking skills.

14. When focusing your listening, you should listen


for_______________ ,_______________ , and_______________ .

main points
evidence
technique

15. List three of the questions a careful listener should


ask about a speaker’s evidence.
16.
17.
18.

 
Possible answers include:
Is the evidence accurate?
Is the evidence from objective sources?
Is the evidence relevant to the speaker’s claims?
Is the evidence sufficient to support the speaker’s points?
 
 
Essay Questions

1. What is the difference between hearing and listening?


2. Why are your own listening skills important to you as a
public speaker?
3. Identify and briefly explain each of the four types of
listening discussed in your textbook.
4. What is meant by “spare brain time”? Explain how it
affects the listening process.
5. Identify and explain the four causes of poor listening
discussed in your text.
6. What is meant by “listening too hard”? How does it affect
the listening process?
7. Imagine that you are listening to a persuasive speech
about prescription drug shortages. Explain how a key-
word outlinemethod of note taking might enhance your
listening and recall of the speech.
8. Identify and explain five of the methods discussed in your
textbook for becoming a better listener.

 
 
 
 
 
Selecting a Topic  and a Purpose
 
 
 
 

he questions for each chapter are organized according to type:


true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay. Within
each of these categories, questions are clustered by topic,
roughly following the order of topics in the textbook.
To provide as much flexibility as possible in constructing
examinations, there is deliberate overlap among the questions,
both within and across question types. This enables you to
choose the wording and question type that best fits your
testing objectives. In deciding which questions to use, take
care to avoid items such as a multiple-choice question that
gives away the answer to a true-false or short-answer
question, or an essay question that covers essentially the
same ground as a true-false, short-answer, or multiple-choice
question.
Each type of question—true-false, multiple-choice, short-
answer, and essay—has an automatic numbering system,
which means you can copy and paste items from within a
question type, and they will automatically number themselves
consecutively, beginning with “1.” The five answer choices for
each multiple-choice question are also ordered automatically,
so you can add, change, or reorder answer choices without
rearranging the lettering.
If you would like to preserve the fonts, indents, and tabs of the
original questions, you can copy and paste questions into the
Exam Master provided at the end of the Test Bank. In the
Exam Master, spaces for your course name, exam type, and
the student’s name and section are followed by headings and
instructions for true-false, multiple-choice, short-answer, and
essay questions. You can add elements unique to your exams
and delete elements you don’t want to use. After you
customize the Exam Master, you can save it with your
changes. Then, each time you open it, click “Save As” to give
it the name of the exam you are currently constructing.
 
 
True-False Questions

35. T F       The first step in speechmaking is


choosing a topic for your speech.
36. T F       Outside the classroom, the topic of a
speech is usually determined by the occasion, the
audience, and the speaker’s qualifications.
37. T F       It is usually a poor idea to choose a
speech topic that requires research.
38. T F       You should usually avoid drawing on your
personal knowledge or experience when choosing a
speech topic.
39. T F       You should usually avoid choosing
speech topics that you feel strongly about.
40. T F       Brainstorming is a method of generating
ideas for a speech through free association of words and
ideas.
41. T F       Brainstorming is a way of clearing your
mind so you can relax while choosing a speech topic.
42. T F       No matter how you go about choosing a
speech topic, it is important to start the process early.
43. T F       After choosing a topic, the next step in
speech preparation is determining your central idea.
44. T F       Once you choose the central idea of your
speech, the next step is to formulate your general
purpose.
45. T F       After choosing a topic, the next step in
speech preparation is determining your general purpose.
46. T F       After choosing a topic, the next step in
speech preparation is determining your specific purpose.
47. T F       Most often, your general purpose as a
speaker is to inform or to persuade.
48. T F       Most often, a speaker’s general purpose
will fall into one of two categories—to inform or to
demonstrate.
49. T F       The difference between informing and
persuading is like the difference between explaining and
entertaining.
50. T F       When your general purpose is to
persuade, you act as a teacher or lecturer.
51. T F       The difference between informing and
persuading is like the difference between teaching and
advocating.
52. T F       When your general purpose is to inform,
you act as an advocate or an opponent.
53. T F       The specific purpose statement indicates
precisely what the speaker hopes to accomplish in a
speech.
54. T F       The specific purpose reveals more about
the content of a speech than does the central idea.
55. T F       The specific purpose of a speech usually
“sums up” the main points to be developed in the body of
the speech.
56. T F       The following is an example of an
effective specific purpose statement for a speech: “The
three major elements of the architectural style of Frank
Lloyd Wright are low-pitched roofs, functional designs,
and lines that blend into the landscape.”
57. T F       The following is an example of an
effective specific purpose statement for a speech: “The
five most common types of volcanoes are the cinder cone
volcano, the shield volcano, the strato-volcano, the giant
caldera, and the fissure volcano.”
58. T F       The specific purpose statement should
focus on one aspect of a topic and be expressed in a
single infinitive phrase.
59. T F       “To inform my audience of the major
steps in responding to a medical emergency” is an
example of an effective specific purpose statement for an
informative speech.
60. T F       “To inform my audience of the major
accomplishments of the space shuttle program” is a well-
worded specific purpose statement for an informative
speech.
61. T F       “To inform my audience about the current
status of tennis as an international sport” is an example
of an effective specific purpose statement for a speech.
62. T F       “To inform my audience about the causes
and effects of bullying” is an example of an effective
specific purpose statement for a speech.
63. T F       “To persuade my audience that our
school should provide more on-campus parking for
students” is an example of a well-worded specific purpose
statement for a persuasive speech.
64. T F       “To persuade my audience that the
federal government should require seat belts on all school
buses” is an example of a well-worded specific purpose
statement for a persuasive speech.
65. T F       “To inform my audience about
cybercrime” is an example of a well-worded specific
purpose statement for an informative speech.
66. T F       “To inform my audience about
depression” is an example of an effective specific
purpose statement for a speech.
67. T F       “To inform my audience about golf” is an
example of an effective specific purpose statement for a
speech.
68. T F       “The effects of light pollution in major
cities” is an example of a well-worded specific purpose
statement.
69. T F       “The problem of electronics addiction” is
an example of an effective specific purpose statement for
a persuasive speech.
70. T F       “Conducting regular car maintenance” is
an example of an effective specific purpose statement for
a speech.
71. T F       “The case against multivitamins” is an
example of an effective specific purpose statement for a
speech.
72. T F       It is important to keep your audience in
mind as you formulate the specific purpose for your
speech.
73. T F       Whether the general purpose of your
speech is to inform or to persuade, the specific purpose
statement should contain a reference to your audience.
74. T F       “To explain how to keep your Internet
data secure” is an example of a well-worded specific
purpose statement.
75. T F       “To explain three basic hand-sewing
techniques” is an example of a well-worded specific
purpose statement.
76. T F       “To explain the causes and treatment of
compulsive hoarding” is an example of a well-worded
specific purpose statement.
77. T F       “To persuade my audience that the
investigation and prosecution of sexual assaults in the
military should be conducted by civilian authorities” is an
example of a well-worded specific purpose statement.
78. T F       A specific purpose statement should
usually be phrased as a question.
79. T F       “What should you consider when
choosing a study abroad program?” is an example of a
well-worded specific purpose statement for a speech.
80. T F       “What can we learn about ourselves from
our dreams?” is an example of a well-worded specific
purpose statement for a speech.
81. T F       It is acceptable for a specific purpose
statement to include two unrelated ideas.
82. T F       “To inform my audience about the origins
of martial arts and how to perform yoga” is an example of
an effective specific purpose statement for an informative
speech.
83. T F       “To inform my audience how to build a
birdhouse and about the migratory patterns of birds” is an
example of an effective specific purpose statement for a
speech.
84. T F       The central idea reveals more about the
content of a speech than does the specific purpose.
85. T F       The central idea of a speech often
emerges after you have done your research and have
decided on the main points of the speech.
86. T F       The central idea is usually determined
after the bulk of the research for a speech is completed.
87. T F       The central idea should encapsulate or
sum up the main points to be developed in the body of the
speech.
88. T F       The central idea of a speech should be
expressed as a full sentence.
89. T F       The following is an example of a well-
worded central idea for a speech: “A diet that encourages
eating only foods high in fat and protein has major
advantages, as well as serious risks.”
90. T F       “To persuade my audience that the
federal government should institute a national sales tax
to help pay for social programs” is an example of an
effective central idea for a speech.
91. T F       “The four steps in making cheese are
curdling, draining, pressing, and ripening” is an example
of a well-worded central idea for a speech.
92. T F       “The three most distinctive traits of
Chow Chows are their black tongues, their thick coats,
and their manes” is an example of a well-worded central
idea for a speech.
93. T F       “The three major expenses for people
traveling abroad are transportation, food, and lodging” is
an example of an effective specific purpose statement for
a speech.
94. T F       “The three major expenses for people
traveling abroad are transportation, food, and lodging” is
an example of a well-worded central idea for a speech.
95. T F       “The major responsibilities of an athletic
trainer are preventing, diagnosing, and treating injuries”
is an example of a well-worded central idea for a speech.
96. T F       “The major responsibilities of an athletic
trainer are preventing, diagnosing, and treating injuries”
is an example of a well-worded specific purpose
statement for a speech.
97. T F       The following is an effective central idea
for a speech to persuade: “You should vote for a $10
increase in student fees to pay for a newfitness center
because the current one is too small and its equipment is
out of date.”

 
Multiple-Choice Questions    (Students are to indicate
the best answer for each question by circling the correct
letter.)

43. According to your textbook, brainstorming is


especially helpful when you are having trouble
44. choosing a speech topic.
45. determining the general purpose.
46. determining the specific purpose.
47. phrasing the central idea.
48. analyzing the audience.
49. The process of generating ideas for speech topics by
free association of words and ideas is known as
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55. Which of the following does your textbook
recommend as a method of brainstorming for a speech
topic?
56. clustering
57. taking a personal inventory
58. conducting an Internet search
59. all of the above
60. a and c only
61. After choosing a topic, what is the next step of
speech preparation?
62. phrasing the central idea
63. analyzing the occasion
64. selecting the specific purpose
65. writing the introduction
66. determining the general purpose
67. Which of the following is inappropriatein a speech to
inform?
68. advocating
69. explaining
70. reporting
71. demonstrating
72. telling
73. Advocating a position is most appropriate when the
general purpose of your speech is to
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79. When the general purpose of your speech is
to__________ , you act primarily as a teacher or lecturer.
80. inform
81. convince
82. entertain
83. persuade
84. convert
85. When the general purpose of your speech is
to__________ , you act primarily as an advocate.
86. persuade
87. entertain
88. demonstrate
89. commemorate
90. inform
91. According to your textbook, what is the most
important early step in the process of developing a
successful speech?
92. creating a preliminary bibliography
93. researching for speech materials
94. formulating the specific purpose
95. brainstorming for a central idea
96. selecting the residual message
97. The __________ expresses precisely what you hope to
accomplish with your speech.
98. central idea
99. specific purpose
100. preview statement
101. thesis statement
102. goal statement
103. According to your textbook, the specific purpose for
a speech should
104. include a reference to the audience.
105. be written as a full infinitive phrase.
106. be expressed as a question.
107. all of the above.
108. a and b only.
109. According to your textbook, the specific purpose
statement for a speech should be
110. determined after the central idea.
111. written using figurative language.
112. the same as the title of the speech.
113. limited to one distinct idea.
114. expressed as a question.
115. “To inform my audience about the history of the
Super Bowl”is an example of a
116. speech topic.
117. general purpose.
118. central idea.
119. thesis statement.
120. specific purpose.
121. “To inform my audience about the three basic steps
in preventive medicine” is an example of a
122. main point.
123. specific purpose.
124. thesis statement.
125. central idea.
126. general purpose.
127. “To inform my audience about the symptoms,
causes, and treatment of Hodgkin’s disease” is an
example of a
128. specific purpose.
129. thesis statement.
130. general purpose.
131. central idea.
132. main point.
133. “To inform my audience about the four major
elements in rope climbing” is an example of a
134. speech topic.
135. general purpose.
136. central idea.
137. thesis statement.
138. specific purpose.
139. “To inform my audience about the contributions of
Navajo code talkers to the U.S. militaryduring World War
II” is an example of a
140. thesis statement.
141. central idea.
142. topic statement.
143. statement of intention.
144. specific purpose.
145. “To inform my audience about the history of the
congressional filibuster” is an example of a
146. specific purpose.
147. topic statement.
148. thesis statement.
149. central idea.
150. statement of intention.
151. “To inform my audience about how police dogs assist
lawenforcement officers in combatting crime” is an
example of a
152. mission statement.
153. specific purpose.
154. transition statement.
155. general purpose.
156. central idea.
157. “To inform my audience about the history and rules
of curling” is an example of a
158. speech topic.
159. general purpose.
160. central idea.
161. thesis statement.
162. specific purpose.
163. “To inform my audience about the development,
technology, and benefits of hydrogen fuel cells” is an
example of a
164. central idea.
165. topic sentence.
166. specific purpose.
167.
168. speech topic.
169. “Improving our sleep habits” is a poorly phrased
specific purpose for a speech because it is
170. too technical for a classroom speech.
171. written as a sentence rather than as a declarative
phrase.
172. expressed in figurative language.
173. written as a fragment rather than as a full infinitive
phrase.
174. written as a statement rather than as a question.
175. “Learninghow to deal with stress” is a poorly phrased
specific purpose for a classroom speech because it
176. is written as a fragment instead of as a full infinitive
phrase.
177. is written as a statement rather than as a question.
178. does not include a reference to the audience.
179. all of the above.
180. a and c only.
181. “To explain the three major benefits of cycling as a
form of exercise” is a poorly phrased specific purpose
statement because it
182. is too broad.
183. deals with more than one topic.
184. lacks a reference to the audience.
185. all of the above.
186. a and b only.
187. “To explain how to write an effective job résumé” is
a poorly phrased specific purpose statement because it
188. is too specific.
189. contains figurative language.
190. is written as a statement instead of as a question.
191. does not include a reference to the audience.
192. is too trivial.
193. “To inform my audience that learning digital
photography is a piece of cake” is a poorly phrased
specific purpose statement for a speech because it
194. is written as a statement rather than as a question.
195. is written as an infinitive phrase rather than as a
statement.
196. fails to encapsulate the main points of the speech.
197. is made up of more than one distinct idea.
198. is expressed using figurative language.
199. “To persuade my audience that continuing to spend
money on the space program is like throwing good money
after bad” is a poorly phrased specific purpose statement
for a speech because it is
200. expressed in figurative language.
201. written as a declarative sentence rather than as a
question.
202. too technical.
203. all of the above.
204. a and c only.
205. “Abandoning nuclear power becauseof accidents
would be like throwing the baby out with the bathwater”
is a poorly phrased specific purpose statement for a
persuasive speech because it
206. is written as a statement rather than as a question.
207. is missing a reference to the audience.
208. contains figurative language.
209. all of the above.
210. b and c only.
211. “To persuade my audience to give bloodregularly and
to become an organ donor”is a poorly phrased specific
purpose statement for a classroom speech because it
212. is not relevant to this audience.
213. contains more than one distinct idea.
214. is written as a statement instead of as a question.
215. is too technical for this audience.
216. uses figurative language.
217. “To inform my audience about the basic steps in car
maintenance and how to protect their investment with
auto insurance” is a poorly phrased specific purpose
statement for a classroom speech because it
218. is too specific.
219. contains figurative language.
220. is written as a statement instead of as a question.
221. contains more than one distinct idea.
222. is too technical.
223. “To persuade my audience to volunteer regularly in
their community and to join the Peace Corps after
college” is a poorly phrased specific purpose statement
for a classroom speech because it
224. is too personal.
225. is written as an infinitive phrase.
226. contains more than one distinct idea.
227. is too technical for a student audience.
228. uses figurative language.
229. Identify the flaw in the following specific purpose
statement for a classroom speech:“Should juvenile
prisons be eliminated?”
230. It is too political for a classroom speech.
231. It is stated as a question rather than as an infinitive
phrase.
232. It is too technical for this audience.
233. It contains figurative language.
234. It isn’t informative enough.
235. Identify the flaw in the following specific purpose
statement for a classroom speech:“Should stand-your-
ground laws be repealed?”
236. It contains figurative language.
237. It contains more than one distinct idea.
238. It is stated as a question rather than as an infinitive
phrase.
239. It treats a topic that is too political for a classroom
speech.
240. It is stated as a question rather than as a statement.
241. As a specific purpose statement, “To inform my
audience aboutcomputertechnology” is too
242.
243.
244.
245.
246.
247. Identify the flaw in the following specific purpose
statement for a classroom speech:“To inform my
audience about the solar system.”
248. It’s too general.
249. It’s too shallow.
250. It’s too informative.
251. It’s too remote.
252. It’s too impersonal.
253. Identify the flaw in the following specific purpose
statement for a classroom speech:“To inform my
audience about the stock market.”
254. It’s too figurative.
255. It’s too detailed.
256. It’s too general.
257. It’s too technical.
258. It’s too trivial.
259. As a specific purpose statement, “To inform my
audience about climate change” is too
260.
261.
262.
263.
264.
265. Identify the flaw in the following specific purpose
statement for a classroom speech: “To inform my
audience about Hinduism.”

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