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Moving Images-Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and
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Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

LOOKING UP, LOOKING DOWN, LOOKING AWRY

Author:
LOUIS D’ARCY-REED

Affiliation:
UNIVERSITY OF DERBY, UNITED KINGDOM
 

INTRODUCTION
Visual representation within our contemporary environments of technology, viewing habits and access
to different media and mediums, allows cities to become powerful backdrops in cinematic and
television storytelling. Across a spectrum of choices, where reality television, dystopian futures,
superhero destruction and the traditional ‘house of horrors’ dominate our screens, an opportunity
exists in which to articulate behavioural contexts and representation. This in part, lends itself to a
platform to discuss particular urban environmental cinematography decisions that demonstrate the city
as an obstacle to psychological emancipation. As a result, this paper situates itself within the
protagonists’ behaviours becoming distorted, facing an incommensurability between themselves, and
their environments.
In this paper, I will analyse three main contexts of media including reality television, such as ​The
Apprentice, The Hills, ​and, ​Keeping Up with the Kardashians; ​dystopian movies including ​Blade
Runner ​and its sequel, ​Blade Runner 2049, ​and ​High Rise; ​in contrast to conventional horror films
based in singular environments, such as ​The Shining ​and ​Psycho​. Analysing this media through the
gaze of architecture and psychoanalysis, proposed by ​Bruno Latour, Alberta Yaneva​, and ​Slavoj Žižek,
a discussion of parallaxical identities presents itself, where all incommensurability between
environment and self can be alleviated, reducing the sense of tension enacted by the media’s
representation.
By framing the city through psychoanalysis, this paper moves away from phenomenological concepts
of “being” and the city as an interchangeable context for the spectator to suspend disbeliefs.
Examining the realm of architectural antagonism​1 proposed by Žižek​, ​the notion of the city on screen
can act as both setting and backdrop for psychoanalytical anxieties to occur. While movies and
television are surrounded by scandals ranging from gender equality, race, manipulation and a lack of
diversity, the opportunity to analyse the city presents itself within the narrative of our media. We also
live during a time period where authenticity of place and fact is questioned, where socio-political
constructs seek to devalue media representation and documentation. Whilst this paper deals with
filmic and televisual fictions, the lessons from architectural narratives transcend beyond our screens,
affording dialogues of urban environments and their settings to exist within the “real”​.
Proposing the quality of ​parallaxical identities2​ within our cities where the implementation of
architecture can severely reprimand and also transform the identities of communities, builds upon the
dichotomy of place across political and social spectrums. By transferring this notion into filmic
representations, we can begin to interrogate how the city can become represented and characterized
horizontally and vertically, corresponding to community behaviours and their activity, as highlighted
by Latour and Yaneva’s “gull-in-a-flight.”​3 We can expand this into the urban fabric, where a city
“appears to be composed of apertures and closures, impending and even changing the speed of the
free-floating actors”​4​. In contrast, using Hitchcock’s ​Psycho ​(1968) and Kubrick’s ​The Shining
(1980), movies with a horror tone that primarily take place between two poles, we can compare
Žižek’s proposal of the resolution of actant’s trauma and anxieties through architecture “trying to
resolve through a symbolic act the ‘real’ of social antagonism by constructing a utopian solution”​5​.
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

Reality Television
An ever expanding genre, reality TV accounts for a variety of casts spanning from “amateur” to the
“celebrity” as the subject base for the show. These shows chronicle a myriad of typologies to take
place; the workplace docu-soap, long-running competitions, real life 24/7 coverage and even
scripted-situational reality dramas. Serialised and extensively syndicated across different media and
countries, the shows have mass appeal as they are relatively cheap to make and bank on the stars’
interaction, charisma and character to develop the narrative. However, reality TV is a genre of
heavy-editing processes in post-production, where characters can easily be cast as the villain or hero.
This leads to an interesting dynamic within these shows where the city acts as backdrop or setting for
the entertainment to take place.
MTV’s ​The Hills6​ 7​ series followed several young and affluent women embarking on their personal
and professional endeavours​8 in and around Los Angeles.​9 The manipulation of place by MTV and its
producers, expanded upon the casts privileged backgrounds, adding to the idea of wealth and
entitlement by making the young stars seem even more privileged.​10 Other than just possessions, the
cast were seen at fashion industry internships, shopping and eating out; casting further illusions of
wealth and grandeur. The series was dogged by accusations of scripted segments, but was revealed by
its cast members to be “scripted schedules,” consisting of a format which meant the cast is scheduled
somewhere to discuss particular topics. The show followed a simple format for its running time, with
situations spliced between camera quick-cuts to location filler shots, showing Los Angeles from the
sky, day and night. These can immediately be categorized as montage; montage elevates an everyday,
trivial object into a sublime Thing. By purely formal manipulation, it succeeds in bestowing on an
ordinary object the aura of anxiety and uneasiness,​11 which in this case, serves as the backdrop for the
drama, anxieties and relationship between observer and cast. The gaze upon the city as nothing but a
montage equates to a gull-in-a-flight, where context could be done away with.​12

Figure 1. Title sequence screencap of The Hills (2006)

​ contestants compete for either a chance to work alongside, a cash investment, or


In ​The Apprentice,13
directly within, the host’s businesses. In America, the show was hosted by billionaire Donald Trump
(until his election)​14​, whilst the UK version is currently Lord Alan Sugar.​15 The contestants are
professional business women and men, firmly in the “yuppie”​16 mould, from various sectors who have
been vetted and auditioned prior to filming.​17 As with ​The Hills, The Apprentice plays the city as
setting and arena for the activity of contestants. Utilising commercial architecture and skylines of New
York and London to backdrop the competition and backstabbing, by primarily focussing on
skyscrapers, luxury buildings and the feeling of exclusivity. These shots often pan from above,
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

highlighting key cores of their grains, known for wealth. The elitism proposed by this representation
speaks of high-power, high-risk, greed and money. Often a new series involves some kind of
placement involving the newest architecture, such as The Shard in London. The key factor here is a
disassociation between money and context. ​The Apprentice tells us that the only context worthwhile to
our cities is the wealthiest, the newest, or the phallically highest. Recall Ayn Rand’s ​The
Fountainhead ​(1943 novel and 1949 movie), a movie in which modernist skyscraper architecture and
a tough, austere masculinity mutually promoted the author’s political ideology,​18 and compare ​The
Apprentice’s hosts. Masculine, rich and “tough”. Lord Sugar, who “doesn’t take bullshit”, or the now
known idiosyncrasies of Trump’s mentality. The representation of an elitist ideology through sleek
skyscrapers and exclusivity directly correlates to an incommensurability between the public and
private spaces of our cities, where deprived areas become airbrushed out of an urban fabric in favour
of montages of helicopter tracking shots of the city’s skyline. A notion that reframes our cities and
reproduces, at the level of architecture, the usual split between subjective and objective dimensions.​19

Figure 2. Title sequence screencap of The Apprentice, UK (2012)

Things get worse, however, where the exclusive isolation of ​Keeping Up with the Kardashians20 ​
utilises a multi-camera format that follows members of the family relentlessly to document their
so-called glamorous lives. The show serves as a platform to gain an access to the Kardashian family
and the “behind-closed-doors” of celebrity culture, circumventing business endeavours and the
attending of exclusive functions. Primarily serving to further the Kardashian’s wealth,​21 the show
exists within a cultural vacuum, devoid of the real world, where one travels by private jet, regularly
visits beach resorts or elaborate marriage proposals​22 at a privately hired AT&T Park. It’s an
interesting dichotomy; they live in the real world where there’s real environments and recognisable
places, but the same montage exclusivity filler shots exist. The Kardashian’s bubble may or may not
be a work of fiction as their immediate world, Los Angeles, but the gated celebrity communes serve as
their setting and canvas. The context becomes non-existent again; there are no dramas except their
own. Some would argue that this is to be expected, but recall the representation projected by montage
filler shots; it moves at a pace and subverts normality into a realm of anxieties and struggles.
Therefore the problems faced by the ​Kardashians,​ the contestants on ​The Apprentice​, or the staged
drama of ​The Hills​, become a welcome inversion of our world, where the observer is obfuscated from
the social anxieties of place. The elitist, exclusive, and wealthy, only begin to consider place as the
gull-in-a-flight, where context is irrelevant and edited to contribute towards an incommensurability
between the haves and the have-nots. The architecture of place in Reality TV affords a parallaxical
identity to transform from incommensurability, where the panoramic horizontal looking awry factor
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

transmitted via our screens, presents a zonal environment given a fantasmic status, elevated into a
spectacle, solely by being enframed.​23

Dystopian Visions 
As we move into the future, our visions of dystopia often blur between reality and fiction, where the
prevalence of simulacra is depicted on screens but also mirrors a relationship to our own lives.
Building on Fritz Lang’s vision of the futuristic city in ​Metropolis (1927),​24 the release of ​Blade
Runner ​(1982) directed by Ridley Scott, presents the future as a dystopian setting, combining
conventional neo-noir motifs of the detective, the femme fatale, and the city’s fragmentation.

Figure 3. Cityscape of Blade Runner’s 2019 Los Angeles (1982)

In 2019 Los Angeles, the population has removed itself in the midst of the colonization off-world.​25
Replicants are enslaved as off-world explorers and colonizers, “retired”​26 if found on Earth. The
backdrop of Los Angeles is an industrial wasteland,​27 submerged in smoke and constant rain. The
Tyrell Corporation​28 dominates the city from a fortressed pyramidal structure, surveilling its
surroundings, with neighbours consisting of the police department headquarters, industrial towers and
angular high-rise buildings.​29 Upon viewing the film for only a few minutes, it is immediately
apparent that this future suffers the effects of economic fragmentation, outsourcing, decentralization
and surveillance;​30 where the remaining lower classes continue to live in cramped conditions, in
run-down apartments from a bygone age, operate street-markets and trade within a complex
fragmentation of ethnicities and language. As the film progresses, we are exposed to a postmodern
portrayal of Los Angeles; one that fragments itself over and over through the conflicting experience of
space and time on varied scales.​31 Our distinction between humans and replicants, and their inherent
life-spans, conflict with the scalar quantity of space above and below; the new and future forward
privileged domain in the sky, as opposed to the wet, crumbling and decaying lower class. Being
dominated by a controlling agency that ensures a balance of order and disorder and, in the end,
maintains the status quo of power relations.​32 This feeling is further compounded by Los Angeles
transformation into a globalized space of advertising,​33 where the hierarchy between above and below
is characterized through an induced lyrical sort of information sickness, that quintessentially modern
cocktail of ecstasy and dread.​34 Above the chaos and decay of street level, there exists a world of
zooming transporters and advertising screens selling the products of such large corporations as
Coca-Cola ​and ​Budweiser.35 ​ Replicated in its sequel ​Blade Runner 2049 ​(2017), the hierarchical
advertising remains, with the addition of gigantic projections and AR imparted down to street level.
While the reach of corporations has finally consumed the street, the city remains fragmented and
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

subject to its inherent presentation of above and below; where the streets decay and freedom or purity
is exclusively in the sky. Parallel this quality to contemporary Midtown Manhattan, where a 90-story
tower set a record for the city’s priciest deal, when a duplex penthouse traded for $100.5 million.​36
The resultant disparity between the vertical relationship determined by space and living quality, is one
that functions within neo-noir typologies, where our relation to a film noir is always divided, split
between fascination and ironic distance: ironic distance toward its diegetic reality, fascination with the
gaze.​37 In this case, the ​Blade Runner universe serves as a reminder of the resultant fragmentation of
place by disaster or technological advancement, where fragmentation is not only a social construct,
but an environmental one where cities become a contrast of decay and exclusivity. Our gaze at what is
presented on the screen is mimicked by the gaze from street to sky. We witness this quality in
Deckard ​and ​K’s traversal between planes. Not only is their isolation exacerbated by the disharmony
of place, but their gaze wanders to the above, seeking resolution.
There is an argument that this domain implies Lefebvre’s “logic of visualization,”​38 embodying its
intentions;​39 the corporations look to the sky and therefore, off-world, and reciprocate the
advertisements selling new lives off-world. Again, parallaxical identities form which can be paralleled
to other films such as, ​Batman ​(1989), ​Ghost in the Shell (1995) and ​1984 (1984). Recall
J.G.Ballard’s ​High Rise (filmed in 2015) where the wealthiest live on the highest floors, whilst the
lower classes live below, differentiated by floor number. As the building falls into disrepair and
decay, the defence of the higher realm becomes more and more of a reality that determines the
occupants’ behaviours, and ultimately, destruction. Their parallaxical identities are exteriorized
through architectural antagonisms, and the dichotomy of vertical inequalities.
 
Antagonistic Awry Spaces
Comparing the proceeding movies and television, we can see antagonisms becoming apparent, mainly
through the eradication of contexts in television, and the definitive break between above and below in
dystopias. However, our final area of interest concerns the singular environments of ​Psycho (1960)
and ​The Shining ​(1980),​40 firmly placed within the horror genre. In ​Psycho​, we witness the
well-mannered Norman Bates, at the mercy of his mother’s control, who lives in the adjacent Gothic
house on the hill, leading Norman to become a killer. Much like Hitchcock’s other films, ​Psycho
elicits “framing” of tracking shots, where instead of reproducing scenes of trauma through
conventional “zooming,” Hitchcock demonstrates an inversion of the expected tracking shot. The
subversive effect of these quickly advancing shots is created by the way in which they frustrate us
even as they indulge our desire to view the terrifying object more closely.​41 We become observer and
spectator to Norman’s world, mirroring his secret voyeurism of Marion Crane in the shower, and the
looming shadow of Mrs Bates from the house that dominates the horizontally laid-out Modernist
motel; the characters become aligned with their settings - the architecture. For example, in the zenith
of the movie, cuts between Lila’s approach and the façade of the Bates house, the latter seems almost
as sentient as the former.​42 Instead of the gaze erupting like a traumatic, disharmonious blot, we have
the illusion of "seeing ourselves seeing," of seeing the gaze itself.​43 The traumatic cuts, which lend to
the illusion of Hitchcockian montage that elevates an everyday, trivial object into a sublime Thing. By
purely formal manipulation, it succeeds in bestowing on an ordinary object​44 the aura of anxiety and
uneasiness.​45 The effect for us, is to syncopate our consciousness with Norman’s, submitting to the
boundaries imposed by the vertical house and the horizontal motel. We too face architectural
antagonism and become split between the two houses.​46
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

Figure 4. Hitchcockian montage and ‘seeing ourselves seeing’ in Psycho (1960)

Žižek suggests that postmodernism seeks to obfuscate such splits, where the deployment of a
postmodern architecture that combines the old home and new motel into a hybrid configuration would
alleviate Norman’s compulsion to kill and run between the two poles,​47 or split.​48 Therefore, one
proposes that ​Psycho demonstrates parallaxical identities on screen, through boundaries represented
vertically and horizontally, that seek to remove the immediate contextual relationship that
communities exist within. The spectacle gaze elicited only seeks to represent Žižek’s idea of an
antagonism between poles. In reality TV, we witness montage effects to isolate exclusivity and project
fantasmic status. Enframing “reality” by omitting the real, presents incommensurability between
isolated wealth, and the traumatic real world. Therefore, it is easier to look down.
In the case of dystopian visions, the idea of exclusivity and isolation re-appears, but this time, the
incommensurability spans environments and time. ​Blade Runner’s off-world colonisation and
globalised mega-structures serve to represent the gap between time left for those who stay in squalor,
and those who live comfortably with slaves and isolation. The mirroring is inherent in the protagonists
where their isolation is not just xenophobic, it is environmental incommensurability between the
streets and the sky. ​High Rise ​follows a similar track; the embodiment of utopian living descends into
chaos once the antagonisms between the richer residents and the poorer residents are exposed.
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

Figure 5. Jack’s isolation within the Outlook Hotel, The Shining (1982)

Compare these with ​The Shining​, where we witness another iteration of incommensurability. This
time Jack and his family are isolated within the secluded and empty Outlook Hotel. His murderous
rampage is a result of an incommensurability between his isolation and longing for a collective
hierarchy of place. Jack’s mundane role as housekeeper, combined with his hallucinations of the valet
or man-servant to share his thoughts and repressed desires, contribute to his disassociation of place.
He is isolated by his environment, his access to community, and the presentation of an architectural
antagonism. His fantasies, anachronistic and nostalgic​49 desire for a hierarchy, places Jack mentally
unable to synthesize “self,” with his empty, yet, occupation of the grandiose hotel. If we were to
reframe Jack’s environment, and place Jack’s consciousness into a less-expansive and horizontal
arrangement, we may reduce his need to go mad; he may finish his book. His context is repressed,
requiring a hybrid configuration to bring about mediation of his mind and repressed desire.
But then again, don’t we live in a postmodernist world, too?
 
 
 
 

REFERENCES:

1. Slavoj Žižek, ​Enjoy Your Symptom!​. London: Routledge, 2008, pp. 242
2. Current research topic as part of a PhD study with the University of Derby
3. Bruno Latour and Albena Yaneva, "Give Me A Gun And I Will Make All The Buildings Move - An Ant's View Of
Architecture". ​Explorations In Architecture - Teaching, Design, Research​, 2008. pp.87.
4. ibid.
5. Slavoj Žižek, ​Enjoy Your Symptom!​ p.242
6. Originally penned as a spin-off from ​Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County. ​Episodes available at "The Hills
| Season 6 Episodes (TV Series) | MTV", ​MTV​, 2018, http://www.mtv.com/shows/the-hills.
7. The series ran from 2006 until 2010 and spanned 102 episodes across 6 seasons
8. "The hook-ups, break-ups, screw-ups and make-ups" running as the show’s tagline. Laura, Bly. "The Real
Laguna Beach Disdains Its MTV Image".​ USA Today,​ 2006.
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/travel/destinations/2006-03-02-laguna-beach_x.htm.
9. Placing the Southern California enclave front-and-centre for the cast’s antics, which, to some local observers,
the town's portrayal as a capital of fabulousness as all too accurate. See ibid.
10. ibid.
11.Slavoj Žižek. Looking Awry Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1992, p.117
12. Latour and Yaneva, ​Give Me A Gun…​, p.87.
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

13. A worldwide syndicated reality talent contest shown in twenty-nine countries. The UK show information, which
is the same, no matter the region, can be found at: "The Apprentice - About The Apprentice - BBC One", ​BBC​,
2018, http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/grTP6yCQz3zy3n3fhBR8QT/about-the-apprentice.
14. In some circles, it was rumoured Trump’s political campaign was initially due to the show’s flagging ratings in
the US, and potential cancellation. Seeking publicity, Trump ran his campaign to secure further seasons,
however, his campaign gained traction, leading to his election.
15. For the purpose of this paper, the UK and US versions will be addressed as their formats mirror each other
and are both syndicated within the UK television schedules.
16. Yuppie - Young Upwardly Mobile Professionals - canonized in the 1980s and 1990s by ​Wall Street’s ​(1987)
Gordon Gekko, ​American Psycho’s​ (1991 novel and 2000 film) ​Patrick Bateman​ or ​Single White Female’s ​(1992)
Allison Jones. For further reading on yuppies today see Teddy Wayne, "The Tell-Tale Signs Of The Modern-Day
Yuppie". ​The New York Times​, 2015.
https://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/fashion/tell-tale-signs-of-the-modern-day-yuppie.html.
17. The show follows a routine format every episode, where the contestants are assigned a task, split into
teams, complete said task, and return to the “boardroom” to be fired, or to advance to the next week. See the
episode guide "The Apprentice - Episode Guide - BBC One", ​BBC​, 2018,
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0071b63/episodes/guide.
18. Merrill Schleier. Skyscraper Cinema. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009, p.119.
19. Bruno and Yaneva, ​Give Me A Gun...​, p.82
20. Over 14 seasons, see: "Keeping Up With The Kardashians", ​E! Now​, 2018,
http://www.eonline.com/now/keeping-up-with-the-kardashians.
21. Stemming from the father Robert Kardashian’s claim to fame as one of OJ Simpson’s lawyers, and Kim
Kardashian’s sex tape scandal in 2007, of which her mother Kris Jenner, received money from distribution rights.
22. See Sean Michaels, “Kanye West takes over stadium for rap proposal to Kim Kardashian”. ​The Guardian​,
2013. https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/oct/23/kanye-west-kim-kardashian-proposal-stadium-rap
23. Slavoj Žižek, ​Living in the end times​ London: Verso, 2011, p.259.
24. In 1927 ​Metropolis​ paved the aesthetic for cinematic future cities; complete with skyscrapers, flying cars,
avenues and androids at the service of humans.
25. With off-world being outer space (not defined in the film), all that remain on Earth is a population of lower
class workers, corporations and the manufacturers of replicants.
26. Retired is the term coined by Blade Runners who hunt down the criminalised replicants and kill them.
27. Nezar, AlSayyad. ​Cinematic Urbanism​. New York: Routledge, 2006, p. 128.
28. The replicant creators
29. Incidentally, these higher structures, are the only occupants to see natural sunlight, as seen in Tyrell’s offices
upon Deckard meeting Rachael for the first time.
30. Nezar, ​Cinematic Urbanism​, p.130.
31. Ibid., p.135.
32. ibid.
33. Peter, Sands, “Global Cannibal City Machines” in ​Global Cities​, ed. by Linda Krause, and Petro Patrice.
(New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2003), 135.
34. Michael, Webb, “Like Today, Only More So” in ​Film Architecture​, ed. by Dietrich Neumann. (Munich: Prestel,
1999), 45.
35. Nezar, ​Cinematic Urbanism​, p.136.
36. C.J. Hughes, “Midtown Manhattan: New Amenities and High-Rises Attract Residents,” ​New York Times​,
August 9 2017, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/28/us/politics/28health.html.
37. Žižek, ​Looking Awry​, 112.
38. See Henri Lefebvre, ​The Production Of Space​ (Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2016).
39. Merrill Schleier. ​Skyscraper Cinema​. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009, 59.
40. Hitchcock’s ​Psycho​ follows a secretary on the run from Phoenix and onto ​Bates Motel​, where the majority of
the film’s action takes place.
41. Žižek, ​Looking Awry, ​90.
42. David Sterritt, “Registrar of Births and Deaths”, in ​Framing Hitchcock​, ed. by Sidney Gottlieb and Christopher
Brookhouse. Framing Hitchcock. (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2002), 319.
43. Žižek, ​Looking Awry, ​114.
44. In this case, the house being the dominating anxiety, and the hotel as the setting for Norman’s freedom.
45. Žižek, ​Looking Awry​, 117.
46. Žižek, ​Living in the End Times, ​257.
47. Paraphrased from ibid.
48. Ibid. Žižek furthers his hypothesis that architecture today elicits “zero institutions”; their meaning is to have
meaning, to be islands of meaning in the flow of our meaningless daily existence.
49. Frederic Jameson. "Historicism In The Shining". ​Visual Memory​, 1981, 11.
http://www.visualmemory.co.uk/amk/doc/0098.html.
Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018

 
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Moving Images – Static Spaces: Architectures, Art, Media, Film, Digital Art and Design AMPS,

Architecture_MPS; Altinbaş University


Istanbul: 12-13 April, 2018