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UNIVERSITY OF THE EAST

UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT:

Imploring the aid of Divine Providence, the University of the East dedicates itself to the service of youth, country and God, and declares
adherence to academic freedom, progressive instruction, creative scholarship, goodwill among nations and constructive educational leadership.

Inspired and sustained by a deep sense of dedication and a compelling yearning for relevance, the University of the East hereby declares as its
goal and addresses itself to the development of a just, progressive and humane society.

UNIVERSITY VISION STATEMENT:

As a private non-sectarian institution of higher learning, the University of the East commits itself to producing, through relevant and affordable
quality education, morally upright and competent leaders in various professions, imbued with a strong sense of service to their fellowmen and their
country.

INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES:

In pursuit of its mission, the University seeks


1. To create curricular programs attuned to the constantly changing needs and challenges of the youth within the context of a proud nation
and enriched culture;
2. To produce innovative research output, the true hallmark of institutional integrity and dynamism;
3. To render relevant and committed service to the community, the nation, and the world.

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UNIVERSITY OF THE EAST
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT:

The College of Arts and Sciences shall endeavor to provide the students with a diversity of learning strategies and opportunities that will promote
intellectual, personal, and social development; equip them with professional competence within their field of specialization so that they may readily be
absorbed by the labor market; and provide a dynamic curriculum, grounded on the values and traditions of our culture.

COLLEGE VISION STATEMENT:

As a private non-sectarian institution of higher learning, the University commits itself to producing, through relevant and affordable quality
education, morally upright and competent leaders in various professions, imbued with strong sense of service to their fellowmen and their country.

COLLEGE GOALS:

The College of Arts and Sciences is committed to develop students with the competitive knowledge, skills, values, and confidence to meet the
challenges of a complex and changing society.

COLLEGE OBJECTIVES:
1. To develop a truly humane person whose desire for personal growth is tempered with moral and spiritual values, ethics, self-discipline, and
integrity.
2. To equip the student with professional competence within a field of specialization in the humanities, the natural sciences or the social sciences so
that he becomes a productive member of his community and the nation as a whole.
3. To instl a sense of citizenship by making the student aware of the thrust in the development of Filipino society and his potential contribution to his
development through the practice of his profession.
4. To develop an integrated personality able to withstand pressures and able to function adequately in a world marked by rapid scientific,
technological and social changes.
5. To instil in the student a desire for precise thinking as well as correct and appropriate means of expression.

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COURSE SYLLABUS IN

LIFE AND WORKS OF RIZAL

Course Code ZGE 1109

Course Title LIFE AND WORKS OF RIZAL


Lecture 3 units
Credit Units
Laboratory / Studio
Couse Code
Pre-Requite(s)
Course Title

Course Description:

As mandated by Republic Act 1425, this course covers the life and works of the country’s national hero, José Rizal. This is an in-depth study of
the social, economic, and political conditions of the Philippines during the 19th century as reflected in the life and works of Rizal. The life and works of
Dr. Jose Rizal along with the other reformists and forerunners of liberal idealism, the importance of their contributions to the aspiration of a true and
patriotic nationalism and its implications to the contemporary events that are shaping the destiny of the Philippines as a nation.

Course Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the learner will be able to:

1. Explain the circumstances of José Rizal’s life in the context of the nineteenth century
2. Explain the context of Rizal’s various works, particularly his novels Noli me tangere and El filibusterismo, his annotations of Chapter 8 of Morga,
his essay on Sobre la indolencia de los filipinos, and other works
3. Analyze Rizal’s various works, particularly those mentioned above
4. Articulate the significance and paradoxes of Rizal’s contributions to Filipino nationalism
5. Produce a creative work that conveys the significance of Rizal for the current generation
6. Recognize the value of differing narratives and interpretations of Rizal’s life and works

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COURSE CONTENT

Teaching Learning Assessment


Week Hours Learning Outcomes Topics
Activities Tasks

Quiz

Graded recitation

Group Presentation

(1) Determine the issues and interests at Lecture/Discussion Write an


A. The Rizal Law, Literature, and Society
stake in the debate over the Rizal Bill argumentative
(2) Relate the issues to present-day • Rationale of the Rizal Course
Powerpoint essay on “what
1st 3 Presentation
Philippines • RA 1425 issues and interests
were at stake in the
debate over the
Rizal Bill? Do these
issues remain
pertinent to the
present?”

Quiz

Graded recitation

3
(1) Explain the relationship between Group Presentation
literature and society Group thought
(2) Evaluate how one learns Develop a position
B. The Rizal Law and Philippine Literature paper
2nd “patriotism” and “nationalism” from paper through
literature Lecture/Discussion answering the
question, “given the
characteristics of
literature and the
hazards of
translation, is
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COURSE CONTENT

Teaching Learning Assessment


Week Hours Learning Outcomes Topics
Activities Tasks

Republic Act 1425


realistic? Why or
why not?”

(1) Assess what characterizes a nation


(2) Define what nationalism is
(3) Express how Rizal and his works
contribute to Philippine nationalism C. Rizal and the Theory of Nationalism Lecture/Discussion Quiz
• The Nation as Imagined Community
3rd – 6 (4) Evaluate Rizal in terms of popular Graded recitation
• Rizal and Popular Nationalism Powerpoint
4th nationalism Presentation
(5) Compare and contrast official view
from the popular view of Rizal

(1) Understand Rizal in the context of


Illustrate the
his times
relations between
(2) Analyze the various social, political, Lecture/Discussion the ethnic-racial
economic, and cultural changes that D. Rizal’s Social Origins and Historical categories used
occurred in the nineteenth century Context Powerpoint
5th 3 during the Spanish
(3) Discriminate the historical conditions • Ascendance of Chinese Mestizos Presentation
colonial period
that led to the emergence of Chinese
Group Activity through a game,
mestizos as an important element of
skit, drawing, or
Philippine society
Powerpoint
(4) Consider the implications of their
presentation.
ascendance
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COURSE CONTENT

Teaching Learning Assessment


Week Hours Learning Outcomes Topics
Activities Tasks

(1) Survey the history of agrarian


relations and friar lands during the
Spanish colonial period Discussion/Lecture
(2) Critique why the indios were willing Quiz
• Agrarian Relations and the Friar Lands
to become the kasama of mestizo Powerpoint
inquilinos Presentation Graded recitation
6th 3
(3) Explain why the Hacienda de
Calamba became a site of agitation in
the late nineteenth century

PRELIM EXAMINATION

COURSE CONTENT

Teaching Learning
Week Hours Learning Outcomes Topics Assessment Tasks
Activities

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(1) Evaluate the conflicts that marred
relations between the secular and Discussion/Lecture
regular clergy • Intraclergy Conflicts and the Cavite Quiz
7th 3 Mutiny Powerpoint
(2) Relate how these conflicts impinge Presentation Graded recitation
on Philippine history in general and on
Rizal’s politics in particular

E. Rizal in Europe, the Propaganda


(1) Evaluate what the propaganda Quiz
Movement, and Noli me tangere Discussion/Lecture
movement is and what it stood for
8th Graded recitation
(2) Distinguish Rizal’s involvement in • The Propaganda Movement and La Powerpoint
3
the movement Solidaridad Presentation

Quiz

Graded recitation

Draw the family


(1) Describe the context in which Rizal trees of Ibarra and
wrote Noli me tangere Elias side-by- side.
(2) Evaluate how Noli me tangere Discussion/Lecture
In bullet points,
contributed to the formation of Filipino describe the key
national consciousness characters. Then
Powerpoint
• Noli me tángere answer these
th
9 – 10 th 6 (3) Appraise the hero of Noli me Presentation
questions: (A) What
tangere does the novel say
(4) Evaluate how Noli me tangere Class Activity
about Creoles in the
contributed to the formation of Filipino Philippines? (B)
national consciousness What does the
novel say about the
relationship
between Creoles
and Indios?

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(1) Summarize how Rizal portrayed the Based on his
precolonial past annotations, explain
F. The Morga and Rizal’s Search for
(2) Analyze the reasons for his portrayal Origins
Discussion/Lecture Rizal’s views of the
(3) Provide a survey of Rizal’s view of • Pacto de Sangre: Why Were We preconquest past.
the Preconquest Past Powerpoint
11th -12th 6 Conquered? Presentation Discuss the overall
(4) Assess Rizal’s view in light of current • Rizal’s Morga and Ilustrado Views image of the past
studies of the Preconquest Past that Rizal wanted to
convey in his notes.

MIDTERM EXAMINATION

COURSE CONTENT

Teaching Learning
Week Hours Learning Outcomes Topics Assessment Tasks
Activities

(1) Outline the structure of Philippine G. Rizal’s Changing View on Spanish


Discussion/Lecture
history as presented by Rizal in his Rule and El Filibusterismo
Quiz
essay “On the indolence of Filipinos” • Indolence and Spanish Colonial
Powerpoint
13th – 14th Rule
(2) Defend Rizal’s view on what are the Presentation Graded recitation
• Rizal’s Abandonment of
causes and solutions to indolence Assimilation
(3) Judge how this essay differs from
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Rizal’s other works
(4) Discuss the campaign for
assimilation
(5) Explain why Rizal decided to
abandon this campaign
(6) Determine the implications of Rizal’s
abandonment to the campaign

(1) Understand the context in which


Rizal wrote El filibusterismo
(2) Distinguish the literary strategies Group thought Discuss the
paper question and then
Rizal used in the writing of this novel write a paper on the
(3) Compare and contrast El topic: “Considering
filbusterismo with Noli me tangere • El Filibusterismo the analytical
(4) Appraise how El filibusterismo perspectives on El
15th 3 filibusterismo, what
contributed to national consciousness
and the revolution are the implications
for the teaching of
(5) Identify the analytical perspectives this novel?”
on El filibusterismo
(6) Examine the implication of these
perspectives on the teaching of this
novel
H. Rizal, the Nation, and World History
at the Fin-de-Siècle
Discussion/Lecture
• Rizal in Dapitan and Cultural
Minorities Powerpoint
(1) Identify how ilustrados like Rizal Presentation Quiz
conceive of the nation vis-à-vis ethnic
th
16 – 17 th • Rizal, the Philippines, and World
minorities and how Dapitan changed
History Graded recitation
Rizal’s view about the razas primitivas

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Discussion/Lecture
(1) Relate Rizal’s life to the life of the • Rizal: Biography and National
History Quiz
nation Powerpoint
th
18 (2) Assess what characterizes a hero Presentation
Graded recitation

FINAL EXAMINATION

Course References
Suggested Readings A. The Rizal Law, Literature, and Society

Republic of the Philippines. 1956. Republic Act 1425. Available online, http://www.gov.ph/ 1956/06/12/republic-act-
no-1425/.

Laurel, Jose B. Jr. 1960. The trials of the Rizal Bill. Historical Bulletin 4(2): 130–39.

Constantino, Renato. 1969. The Rizal Law and the Catholic hierarchy. In The making of a Filipino: A story of
Philippine colonial politics, 244–47. Quezon City: The Author.

Schumacher, John. 2011. The Rizal Bill of 1956: Horacio de la Costa and the bishops. Philippine Studies 59(4):
529–53.

B. The Rizal Law and Philippine Literature

Hau, Caroline S. 2000. Introduction. In Necessary fictions: Philippine literature and the nation, 1946–1980, 1–14.
Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. PS9991 H38

Mojares, Resil. 2013. Jose Rizal and the invention of a national literature. In Isabelo’s archive, 213–21.
Mandaluyong City: Anvil.

Anderson, Benedict. 2004. Hard to imagine. In Spectre of comparisons: Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the

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world, 235–47 only. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS525.7 A53 2004

C. Rizal and the Theory of Nationalism

Anderson, Benedict. 1991. Introduction. In Imagined communities: Reflections on the origins and spread of
nationalism, 1–7. Revised ed. London and New York: Verso. Pasig City: Anvil, 2003 PH edition. JC311 A656 1994;
JC311 A656 2003

Anderson, Benedict. 1991. Cultural roots. In Imagined communities: Reflections on the origins and spread of
nationalism, 9–36. Revised ed. London and New York: Verso. Pasig City: Anvil, 2003 PH edition. JC311 A656
1994; JC311 A656 2003

Anderson, Benedict. 1991. Creole pioneers. In Imagined communities: Reflections on the origins and spread of
nationalism, 47–65. Revised ed. London and New York: Verso. Pasig City: Anvil, 2003 PH edition. JC311 A656
1994; JC311 A656 2003

Ileto, Reynaldo. 1998. Bernardo Carpio: Awit and revolution. In Filipinos and their revolution: Event, discourse, and
historiography, 2–9 only. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS 678 I43

Ileto, Reynaldo. 1998. Rizal and the underside of Philippine history. In Filipinos and their revolution: Event,
discourse, and historiography, 29–78. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS 678 I43

D. Rizal’s Social Origins and Historical Context

Wickberg, Edgar. 1964. The Chinese mestizo in Philippine history. Journal of Southeast Asian History 5(1): 62–
100.

Wickberg, Edgar. 2000. The Philippine Chinese before 1850. In The Chinese in Philippine life, 1850–1898, 25–36.
Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS666 C5W5 2000

José Rizal. 1889. La verdad para todos / The truth for everybody. In La Solidaridad, vol. 1: 1889, trans. Guadalupe
Fores-Ganzon, 168–77. Pasig City: Fundación Santiago. DS651 S6 1996

Roth, Dennis M. 1982. Church lands in the agrarian history of the Tagalog region. In Philippine social history:
Global trade and local transformations, ed. Alfred W. McCoy and Ed. de Jesus, 131–53. Quezon City: Ateneo de
Manila University Press. HN713 P44

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Aguilar, Filomeno. 1998. Elusive peasant, weak state: Sharecropping and the changing meaning of debt. In Clash
of spirits: The history of power and sugar planter Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila

Aguilar, Filomeno. 2016. Sugar capitalism: The divergent paths of haciendas on Negros hegemony on a Visayan
island, 63–77 only. University Press. HD9116 P53 N42
Island and the Hacienda de Calamba. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies forthcoming.

Blanco, Roberto. 2010. Pedro Peláez, leader of the Filipino clergy. Philippine Studies 58(1– 2): 3–43. [Read pages
19–26, 31–32]

Schumacher, John. 1999. Historical introduction. In Father Jose Burgos: A documentary history with Spanish
documents and their translations, 1–32. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS675.8 B8 S37

Schumacher, John. 2011. The Cavite Mutiny: Toward a definitive history. Philippine Studies 59(1): 55–81.

Schumacher, John. 2006. The Burgos Manifiesto: The authentic text and its genuine author. Philippine Studies
54(2): 153–304. [Read pages 151–52, 268–92]

E. Rizal in Europe, the Propaganda Movement, and Noli me tangere

Schumacher, John. 1997. Early Filipino student activities in Spain, 1880–1882. In The propaganda movement:
1880–1895; The creators of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 19–39. Also read page 236.
Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS675 S385 1997

Rizal, José. 2011. Rizal’s toast to Luna and Hidalgo. Presidential Museum and Library, Republic of the Philippines.
Online, http://malacanang.gov.ph/4071-jose-rizals- homage-to-luna-and-hidalgo/.

Schumacher, John. 1997. Journalism and politics, 1883–1886. In The propaganda movement: 1880–1895; The
creators of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 40–58. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila
University Press. DS675 S385 1997

The Staff. 1889. Our aims. In La Solidaridad, vol. 1: 1889, trans. Guadalupe Fores-Ganzon, 3, 5. Pasig City:
Fundación Santiago. DS651 S6 1996

Schumacher, John. 1997. The new Filipino newspaper in Barcelona, 1888–1889. In The propaganda movement:
1880–1895; The creators of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 128–46. Quezon City: Ateneo

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de Manila University Press.

Schumacher, John. 1997. Del Pilar as delegate in Barcelona of “The Propaganda.” In The propaganda movement:
1880–1895; The creators of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 147–70. Quezon City: Ateneo
de Manila University Press.

Rizal, José. 1996. Noli me tangere, trans. Ma. Soledad Lacson-Locsin. Makati: Bookmark. PQ8897 R5 N531 1996
[Read Dedication and Chaps. 1–32]

Rizal, José. 1890. Al Excmo. Señor Don Vicente Barrantes / To His Excellency Mr. Vicente Barrantes. In La
Solidaridad, vol. 2: 1890, trans. Guadalupe Fores-Ganzon, 62–71. Pasig City: Fundación Santiago. DS651 S6
1996

Schumacher, John. 1997. The “Noli me tángere,” 1887. In The propaganda movement: 1880– 1895; The creators
of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 83–104. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.
DS675 S385 1997

Anderson, Benedict. 2008. Why counting counts: A study of forms of consciousness and problems of language in
Noli me tangere and El filibusterismo, pp. 1–37. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. PQ8897 R5
Z5253

Rizal, José. 1996. Noli me tangere, trans. Ma. Soledad Lacson-Locsin. Makati: Bookmark. PQ8897 R5 N531 1996
[Read Chaps. 23–64 and Epilogue]

Joaquin, Nick. 2005. Why was the Rizal hero a creole? In A question of heroes, 65–76. Mandaluyong City: Anvil.
PS9993 J62 A16 2005

Hau, Caroline. 2000. The fiction of a knowable community. In Necessary fictions: Philippine literature and the
nation, 1946–1980, 48–93. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. PS9991 H38

F. The Morga and Rizal’s Search for Origins

Aguilar, Filomeno. 2010. The pacto de sangre in the late nineteenth-century nationalist emplotment of Philippine
history. Philippine Studies 58(1–2): 79–109.

Aguilar, Filomeno. 1998. Cockfights and engkantos: Gambling on submission and resistance. In Clash of spirits:
The history of power and sugar planter hegemony on a Visayan island, 32–62. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila

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University Press. HD9116 P53 N42

Rizal, José. 1961 [1890]. Sucesos de las Islas Filipinas por el Doctor Antonio de Morga, obra publicada en Méjico
el año de 1609 nuevamente sacada a luz y anotada (Events of the Philippine Islands by Dr. Antonio de Morga,
published in Mexico in 1609 recently brought to light and annotated). Manila: José Rizal National Centennial
Commission. DS674 M83 1961; ENGLISH VERSION: DS674 M8313 1962 [Read “To the Filipinos” (p. vii),
Blumentritt’s Prologue, and Rizal’s annotations in Chapter 8]

Schumacher, John. 1997. The Filipino past and education for the future, 1887–1891. In The propaganda
movement: 1880–1895; The creators of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 212–35. Quezon
City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS675 S385 1997

Aguilar, Filomeno. 2005. Tracing origins: Ilustrado nationalism and the racial science of migration waves. Journal of
Asian Studies 64(3): 605–37. [Focus on pp. 605–20 only]

G. Rizal’s Changing View on Spanish Rule and El Filibusterismo

Rizal, José. 1890. Sobre la indolencia de los Filipinos (On the indolence of Filipinos). In La Solidaridad, vol. 2:
1890, trans. Guadalupe Fores-Ganzon, 322–27, 340–45, 362–69, 388–401, 416–21. Pasig City: Fundación
Santiago. DS651 S6 1996

Rizal, José. 1889. Los agricultores filipinos / The Filipino farmers. In La Solidaridad, vol. 1: 1889, trans. Guadalupe
Fores-Ganzon, 42–47. Pasig City: Fundación Santiago.

Aguilar, Filomeno. 2016. Romancing tropicality: Ilustrado views of the climate in the nineteenth century. Philippine
Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints 64 (3–4): 417–54. [Focus on pages 417–28 and 435–47]

Schumacher, John. 1997. Renewed activity in Madrid. In The propaganda movement: 1880– 1895; The creators of
a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 182– 211. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

Schumacher, John. 1997. The Filipino past and education for the future, 1887–1891. In The propaganda
movement: 1880–1895; The creators of a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 235–44. Quezon
City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

Schumacher, John. 1997. Rizal’s break with del Pilar. In The propaganda movement: 1880– 1895; The creators of
a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 245–60. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

Rizal, José.. 1996. El filibusterismo, trans. Ma. Soledad Lacson-Locsin. Makati: Bookmark. PQ8897.R5 F43l 1996
Page 14 of 17
[Read “To the Filipino People and their Government,” “To the Memory of the Priests,” and Chaps. 1–19]

Schumacher, John. 1997. Rizal’s break with del Pilar. In The propaganda movement: 1880– 1895; The creators of
a Filipino consciousness, the makers of the revolution, 260–80. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press.

Anderson, Benedict. 2008. Why counting counts: A study of forms of consciousness and problems of language in
Noli me tangere and El filibusterismo, pp. 38–87. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. PQ8897 R5
Z5253

Rizal, José. 1996. El filibusterismo, trans. Ma. Soledad Lacson-Locsin. Makati: Bookmark. PQ8897.R5 F43l 1996
[Read Chaps. 20–39]

Anderson, Benedict. 2006. In the world-shadow of Bismark and Nobel. In Under three flags: Anarchism and the
anti-colonial imagination, 108–22. Pasig City: Anvil. HX945 A53 2006

Recto, Claro M. 1968. Rizal and Bonifacio. In Rizal: Contrary essays, ed. Petronilo Bn. Daroy and Dolores Feria,
57–77. Quezon City: Guro Books.

Aguilar, Filomeno. 2011. Filibustero, Rizal, and the Manilamen of the nineteenth century. Philippine Studies 59(4):
429–69.

H. Rizal, the Nation, and World History at the Fin-de-Siècle

Rizal, José. 1961. Rizal to Blumentritt, Dapitan, 15 February 1893. The Rizal-Blumentritt Correspondence. Manila:
José Rizal National Centennial Commission. DS675.8 R5 A53 1961

Scott, William Henry. 1982. The creation of a cultural minority. In Cracks in the parchment curtain and other essays
in Philippine history, 28–41. Quezon City: New Day. DS667.2 S36

Aguilar, Filomeno. 2005. Tracing origins: Ilustrado nationalism and the racial science of migration waves. Journal of
Asian Studies 64(3): 605–37. [Focus on pp. 620–32]

Anderson, Benedict. 2006. Trials of a novelist. In Under three flags: Anarchism and the anti- colonial imagination,
147–67. Pasig City: Anvil. HX945 A53 2006

Anderson, Benedict. 2006. Montjuich. In Under three flags: Anarchism and the anti-colonial imagination, 169–71,
184–207. Pasig City: Anvil. [Pay attention to note 63, p. 193] HX945 A53 2006

Page 15 of 17
National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA). 2015. Selection and proclamation of national heroes and
laws honoring Filipino historical figures (1995). Online, http://ncca.gov.ph/about-culture-and-arts/culture-
profile/selection-and-proclamation- of-national-heroes-and-laws-honoring-filipino-historical-figures/.

Joaquin, Nick. 2005. Anatomy of the anti-hero. In A question of heroes, 50–64. Mandaluyong City: Anvil. PS9993
J62 A16 2005

Anderson, Benedict. 2004. The first Filipino. In Spectre of comparisons: Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the
world, 227–34. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press. DS525.7 A53 2004

Constantino, Renato. 1966. Our task: To make Rizal obsolete. In The Filipinos in the Philippines and other essays,
137–52.PS9993 C6 F4a

Lahiri, Smitha. 1999. Writer, hero, myth, and spirit: The changing image of José Rizal. SEAP Bulletin. Fall bulletin.
Southeast Asia Program, Cornell University. Online,
http://seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/sites/seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/files/1999f_2.pdf.
Grading System STUDENT PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT
1. University grading system: 11-point grading system, cumulative
2. Assessment criteria per term (based on university grading system policies)

Criteria Weight
Term Exam (Prelim, Midterm, Final) 30%

Average of unit tests and Quizzes 30%

Class Participation 35%


(Class discussion, seatwork,
Group work, assignment)

Personal quality development/value 5%


Integration

TOTAL 100%
Course Requirement/s
A. Research

B. Thought paper
C. Visit to Museums, Archives, and Accessible Historical Sites

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D. Educational Tour on selected Historical Sites Relevant to the Life of Rizal after the Mid-term examination

E. Major Examinations (Preliminary, Mid-terms, and Finals)

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