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Sales Academy

www.dalecarnegie.com
Copyright © 2011
Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc.
290 Motor Parkway
Hauppauge, NY 11788

All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this
publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, or
stored in a database or retrieval system, without prior written permission of the publisher.

Released to Walchand PeopleFirst Ltd., for local production by Dale Carnegie & Associates.

Authorization for reproduction given to Walchand PeopleFirst Ltd., from May, 2011 to May, 2012.

ISO-404-PT-PM-0745-11825
Program Objectives

At the completion of this program, participants will be able to:

• Demonstrate Self Confidence to overcome the challenges of selling

• Develop a consistent, blended approach to prospecting and develop a


more systematic and effective approach to pre-call planning

• Communicate value and sell from a buyer’s point of view

• Strengthen relationships by building credibility and client loyalty

• Master a consultative selling process to accelerate the sales cycle


Module Topics

Module One Foundations for Success: Prospecting and Pre-Call Planning

Module Two Build Rapport

Module Three Generate Interest

Module Four Provide Solutions

Module Five Pipeline Management

Module Six Resolve Objections

Module Seven Appeal to Motives & Gain Commitment

Module Eight Uncover Opportunities

Module Nine Plan for Success

Module Ten Master the Selling Process

Program Glossary
Resources Section Recommended Reading
Foundations for Success:
Prospecting and Pre-Call Planning 1
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Analyze your prospecting and pre-call planning approach


• Determining the right blend of prospecting techniques
• Review and develop a comprehensive list of sources for pre-call planning
• Acquiring networking tips
• Develop system for asking for referrals
• Transform cold calls into warm calls
• Product an action plan to maintain an organized disciplined approach to
Prospecting
• Prepare a pre-approach plan for a specific customer and receive
feedback

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.1


Prospecting Skills Inventory

Skill Type Present Absent

Maintains an up-to-date customer prospect list.

Identifies opportunities to expand relationships with


existing customers.

Conducts research on prospect’s industry, company,


and business climate.

Conducts ___ sales calls each month to maintain


contact with customers.

Conducts ___ sales calls each month to prospects.

Evaluates and prioritizes potential of customers and


prospects.

Creates and nurtures centers of influence.

Identifies opportunities to re-establish relationships


with previous customers.

Asks customers for referrals.

Asks associates and contacts for referrals.

Develops contacts through participation and speaking


at local service clubs, professional organizations, and
community activities.

Identifies opportunities to offer public preview


workshops.

Has an “elevator speech.”

Uses a “blended approach” to prospecting (e-mail,


phone, face-to-face).

1.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Commandments of Prospecting

Use a varied approach


The best performers recognize that even if there is a lot in the pipeline, a defined
percentage of time must be dedicated to prospecting. To further increase their odds
of success, exemplary performers have incorporated a varied prospecting approach
as an integral part of building and sustaining their business. An appropriate blend of
phone calls, face-to-face calls, e-mail use, and workshop samples are all employed on
an ongoing basis. It is critical to determine the blend of prospecting activities that is
right for you, based on your strengths, marketplace opportunities and time
management considerations.

Determine the best blend


The first step to determine the best blend is to analyze what you are not doing. To
figure out the gaps in your approach, complete the following self-assessment.

Listed below are the 15 Commandments of Prospecting. For each of the 15, rate
yourself as always, sometimes, or never practicing them. Completing the self-
assessment will help you see how much emphasis you place on certain elements
and not others. You can then assess the appropriateness of what you are now doing
and determine the best blend for expanding your business.

Regarding the Commandments of


Never Sometimes Always
Prospecting …
I am persistent in my prospecting activities.

I realize that account penetration is often


my highest priority opportunity.

I have a balanced mix of prospecting


activities—Reading Clubs, Book Launches,
cold calling referrals.

My prospecting phone calls are effective—


concise, clear, and include “what’s in it for
the prospect.”

I use my prospecting time wisely—calling at


the best times and trying to schedule
appointments at the best times.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.3


Regarding the Commandments of
Never Sometimes Always
Prospecting …
I maintain a high level of prospecting activity,
block time for prospecting calls, and have a
prepared list of prospects and referrals to call.

I derive my prospecting goals from my sales


goals based on a calculation of how many
calls I need to make to get an appointment,
and how many appointments I need to
make a sale.

I prioritize my calls using qualifying criteria


for prospects and use these to guide how
and where I spend my time.

I have a planned effort to develop “centers-


of-influence” and generate referrals.

I keep records of how many calls, how many


appointments and the results of each of
these contacts.

I am sensitive to the communication style of


a prospect and adjust my conversation
based on a “reading” of their style.

I have a contact management system to


make sure all prospects and referral sources
are contacted on a regular basis.

I use e-mail as a method to keep in front of


clients and prospects

I have an “elevator speech” and use it at all


appropriate opportunities.

I analyze how I got business and realize


what works “best for me.”

Totals

Calculate your score by giving zero points for each “Never” answer, one point for
each “Sometimes” answer, and two points for each “Always” answer. Then total all
three categories. 0–15 is a low rating, 16–23 is medium, and 24–30 is high. Now
review the elements in the survey that you marked as “Sometimes” or “Never.”
Consider strategies for raising these elements, including talking to the franchise
owner or other top performers.

1.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Integrated Prospecting
• Using e-mail to keep in front of the customer/prospect

• Focusing on relevant clubs, organizations, or associations

• Engaging elevator speech

• Creating and nurturing centers of influence

Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.5


Targeting Accounts

Ten Lessons Learned from Account Pyramids


1. The top 20% of your customers deliver 80% of _______

2. The top 20% of your customers deliver more than ___% of profits

3. Existing customers deliver up to ___% of revenues

4. The bulk of marketing budgets is often spent on _______

5. Between ___% and ___% of all customers have the potential for upgrading in
the pyramid

6. _______ is critical for migration up the pyramid

7. Reasonably-satisfied customers often _______

8. _______ and _______ are responsible for influencing customer behavior

9. _______ and _______ influence customer behavior—for better or worse

10. A ___% upward migration in the customer pyramid can mean ___% more
revenues and ___% more profit

Source: The Customer Marketing method by Jay Curry and Adam Curry

1.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Tactical Customer
• View products as a commodity
• Know what they are buying
• Know how they want to use it
• Want a favorable price
• Want ease of acquisition
• Value intrinsic to product

Strategic Customer
• Value not inherent in product
• Value lies in how product is used
• Want to enlarge their understanding of their needs and options
• Some look for strategic value
• They look to leverage our expertise and assets
• Generally relationship is at higher levels

Matching Strategy to Tactical Customer


• Sales force does not add much
• Requires transactional sales techniques (risk free, hassle free, efficient)
• Close sale and move on

Matching Strategy to Strategic Customer


• Premium on advice and help
• Get closer to customer—deeper understanding of business needs
• Listening and empathy very important
• Sales person creates value by:
Helping customer understand problems to opportunities in a different way
Providing better solutions than customer would have discovered themselves
Acting as an advocate inside its own company to leverage resources

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.7


Ideal Dream Account

1.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Accounts T or S A,B, or C How to turn T into S, or move up re ABC

May, 2011–May, 2012


Pearson Sales Academy 1.9
Weekly Contact Planning Sheet

Methods of Contact

Accounts

1.10 Pearson Sales Academy


May, 2011–May, 2012
Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.11


Creating Business-Relevant E-Mails

1.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Practice and Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.13


Cold Calling

Who (Titles)?

Traits?

Results they seek?

1.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Tangible vs. Intangible Results

These are examples for Dale Carnegie Training . Please write


®

similar tangibles / intangibles for Pearson Education

Tangible: specific, measurable, easy to see


• Increased revenue

• Increased market share

• Increased customer satisfaction/retention

• Reduced cycle time

• Reduced turnover

• Reduced costs

Intangible: difficult to measure


• Increased employee satisfaction

• Improved teamwork and collaboration

• Reduced conflicts

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.15


Cold Calling Formula
• Prospect’s name

• Pleasantry

• Attention grabber

Tangible results preferred

Intangible results

• Your name and company

• Ask for appointment

1.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Prospect’s Name:

Pleasantry:

Bridge:

Attention grabber:

Bridge:

Your name and company:

Ask for appointment:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.17


Telephone Script When Getting through

1.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Asking for Referrals
• Earn trust and credibility

• Make it a point to ask

• Use all resources:


• Customers
• Prospects
• Strategic alliances
• Vendors

• Improve quality of referrals


• Get additional information
• Don’t settle for name and phone number

• Say “Who else should I be talking to?”

Contacting Referrals
• Prepare your approach
• Quickly mention name of reference source
• Let referral know that reference source is a happy customer
• Give referral your prospect’s name

• Keep referral source informed and say “Thank you”

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.19


Additional Methods of Making Cold Calls Warm

• Envelope Drop/Call:

• Make-Up Schedule/Call:

1.20 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Action Plan

The two most useful ideas I gained in this session are:


1.

2.

How this applies to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.21


Pre-Call Planning Skills Inventory

Skill Type Present Absent

Scripts out phone and face-to-face calls.

Prepares an agenda for the call.

Identifies possible customer/business needs and products


that can meet those needs.

Plans key questions to ask and areas to cover to achieve


call goals.

Develops examples to use to illustrate feasibility of


satisfying customer needs.

Prepares third party examples to provide objectivity and


credibility.

Plans “decision questions” to be asked to gain


favorable action.

Anticipates questions concerning strengths and


weaknesses of competitors.

Plans for resistance.

Plans the recommended action he/she seeks.

Prepares and brings to call appropriate product collateral


material.

Appropriately uses other resources such as senior


management to achieve goals.

1.22 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Pre-Call Planning

Research
Pre-call planning early in the sales process should focus on learning background
information about a company. This includes determining the nature of the business,
organizational structure, key contacts, performance, competitive relationships and
potential goals or objectives.

Set Goals
A structured pre-call plan form helps to ensure direction and consistency of
approach for each call. Having a maximum and minimum goal for each call is a good
starting place. It helps you discipline yourself to come away from the call with
achievements every time.

A maximum goal could be defined as, “if everything on the call went as good as
realistically possible, what could I hope to accomplish.” Example: Gain a
commitment to provide a sample of our work internally.

A minimum goal is the least acceptable form of action you should be willing to
accomplish. Example: Gain agreement to meet with other relevant decision-makers.

Mentally Rehearse
Exemplary salespeople regularly go through a mental imaging process prior to sales
calls. They rehearse in their minds the verbal selling skills they will use on the call
and expected responses from the prospect/client. This attempt to prepare for a
smooth and productive conversation and to anticipate surprises is the hallmark for
success.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.23


What Else Should I Plan?
Although emphasis may vary from call to call, the successful performers plan how
they will:

• Establish rapport

• Transition into business

• Define needs

• Present solutions

• Recommend action

• Handle resistance

• Add value on every call

Finding Additional Information


Remember, during your pre-call planning you should research a variety of reputable
sources. Here is a list of suggested resources for your pre-call planning.

• Networking sources

• Organization’s Website

• Trade and professional associations

• Internet Search

• Google search on company/contact

• Organization’s annual report

• Salespeople who sell other products to your prospect

• Press releases and articles

• Internal advocates

• Our organization’s website

• Dun and Bradstreet

1.24 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Pre-Approach Planning

Source
• Lead

• Referral

• Network event

• Cold call

Where are you in sales process


• Initial appointment

• Information gathering

• Solution

• Commitment

Level of Data

What do I know about this account and this person

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.25


Pre-Call Planning

Person

What do I know about this person?


• Title

• Education

• Hobbies/interests

• Communication style

• How he/she makes decisions

• Perception inside company

Where can I acquire more information?


• Champion

• Customers

• Vendors

• Assistants

Company
• Tuition policy

• Formal organizational structure

• Informal organizational structure

1.26 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Pre-Call Sales Plan

Key Facts:
Date:
Company name:
Contact person, title:
Industry:

1. What are my goals for this call?


Minimum:
Maximum:

2. Initial possible topics for building rapport?

3. How will I transition into business?

4. What are the need identification questions I need to ask?


As is:
Should be:
Barriers:
Payout:

5. What examples can I use to show feasibility of needs I have satisfied for clients?
Client name:
Need identified:
Solutions/results:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.27


6. What solutions will I explain?

7. What action will I recommend?

8. What resistance may I encounter? How can I resolve it?

9. What “value adds” will I offer?

10. What materials will I take on the call with me?

1.28 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.29


Notes

1.30 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Pearson Sales Academy

Breakthrough Plan

Name:

Address:

Organization:

Title:

Work phone: Home phone:

E-mail address:

Program no.: Trainer:

Copyright © 2011 Released to Walchand PeopleFirst Ltd.


Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc. for local production by
290 Motor Parkway Dale Carnegie & Associates, Global Services.
Hauppauge, New York 11788 ISO-404-PD-BP-0720-V4.1

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.31


Initial Assessment
Please rate yourself on each item. How effectively do you display the behavior when it
is relevant and feasible? Do not ponder any one response too long. Be as honest as
possible. The purpose of this form is to identify opportunities for improvement.
1–Very low; 2–Below average; 3–Average; 4–Above average; 5–Outstanding

Very low Outstanding


Self-Confidence
Sets clear goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Willingly takes appropriate risks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Sells to high level decision-makers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Demonstrates poise and confidence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Shows healthy self-esteem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5

Communication Skills
Listens for understanding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Delivers effective presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Expresses self clearly and concisely . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Asks questions to clarify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Accurately summarizes decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5

Selling Process
Understands the buying/selling process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Determines the customer’s wants and needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Builds rapport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Asks buyers the right questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Gains the customer’s commitment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Is seen as credible by customers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Creates win-win relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Effectively resolves objections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Helps customers achieve their goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Exceeds customer’s expectations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Presents unique solutions to buyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Defines benefits and competitive edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Develops referral network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Follows up to maintain customer loyalty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5

Build Relationships
Maintains good relationships with colleagues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Practices good interpersonal skills with buyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Builds customer trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Demonstrates empathy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Builds an on-going professional relationship with customers . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5

Positive Attitude
Is self-motivated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Demonstrates a positive attitude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Shows enthusiasm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Handles rejection appropriately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Willingly accepts new challenges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5
Keeps criticism in proper perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5

1.32 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Final Assessment Questions

1. Please evaluate yourself in the following areas (On a scale of 1–10, with 10 being the
highest):

Before Training After Training

1. Self-Confidence

2. Communication

3. Sales Process

4. Build Relationships

5. Positive Attitude

2. Major benefit of this training for you:

3. Major benefit to your organization: (Specific sales increase)

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.33


Pearson Sales Academy Name:
Participant Record Program Number: Location:

Attendance
Session Date Awards Signature Comments
Yes or No

1
2

1.34 Pearson Sales Academy


3
4
5
6
7
8
Verification
I hereby verify that this participant has met the requirements of the Pearson Sales Academy program. This participant has attended the required sessions with

May, 2011–May, 2012


visible improvement in the program related skills and abilities as indicated by oral reports. Therefore, this participant is entitled to ______ Continuing Education
Units (10 program hours equals one CEU).

Authorized Signature ___________________________ Date ________________


Initial Assessment—Breakthroughs

Name:

Listed below are the Drivers for Success. Concentrating on growth in these areas
can lead to breakthroughs in your selling! Consider the breakthroughs you envision
as you experience significant growth in each of the Five Drivers.

Drivers for Professional Business


Success Breakthroughs Results

Self-Confidence

Communication Skills

Sales Process

Build Relationships

Positive Attitude

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 1.35


Mid-Point Feedback

Name:

1. Are you making progress toward your breakthroughs? Why or why not?

2. What specific results have you seen? (Sales increase, number of new clients, etc.)

3. What will you do throughout the rest of the training to continue to work
toward your breakthroughs?

4. What more can the Dale Carnegie® team do to help you?

5. Additional comments:

1.36 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Build Rapport 2
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Apply a proven seven-step selling process to create partnerships


with buyers
• Employ three strategies to make buyers eager to talk
• Establish immediate credibility to build alignment with buyers

Overview
Selling without a process is like fishing with a rod and reel instead of a net.
You’ll catch some, but it takes more work and time. A proven process delivers
consistent results. Our sales philosophy focuses on increasing our business by
building relationships and helping our buyers be more successful. The sales
process starts by building rapport, then continues by establishing credibility and
solving problems from a buyer’s point of view. At each step of the process, we
must communicate our ability to bring value to buyers.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part II, Chapter 6

“A sale isn’t a thing, it’s a process. It isn’t standing still, it’s moving.
It isn’t one long job, it’s a series of smaller jobs.”

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.1


Cycle of Self-Development

Achieve new levels Need To


of performance Want To
Can Do
Motivation Gap
Will Do

Skill Attitude Show Me How

Practice Knowledge
Fundamentals
Right Practice Concepts
With Strong Coaching Principles

Notes

2.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Build Rapport with Prospects and Clients
The foundation of customer loyalty and repeat business lies in building long-term
relationships. Dale Carnegie’s famous book, How to Win Friends and Influence People,
contains 30 proven human relations principles on how to deal with people. The first
nine principles focus on becoming a friendlier person. Using these principles with
sincerity helps us break the ice with new prospects and strengthen relationships with
current clients.

Strengthen Relationships
Enhance Relationships and Build Trust

Don’t criticize, condemn, or complain.

Give honest, sincere appreciation..


Remembering
Arouse in the other person an eager want.. Names
• Look and listen
Become genuinely interested in other people.. • Impression
• Repetition
Smile.. • Association
Remember that a person’s name is to that person the
sweetest and most important sound in any language..

Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about


themselves.

Talk in terms of the other person’s interests.

Make the other person feel important—


and do it sincerely.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.3


Sales Model

Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Buyer Attitudes Sales Step What We Sell

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Working with a repeatable, proven process helps take


the mystery out of selling. Knowing where the buyer is
in the selling process helps us advance and accelerate the
sale. See page 5 in The Sales Advantage book for
additional insights.

2.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Build Rapport
Overcome Preoccupation
Rapport Rule: Build rapport by talking to people briefly
about something in which they are interested.

Interest

Rapport Solution ROI


Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through
Results
esul
Commitment Motive

Applications
ica

Satisfaction
sfac
Client Value
the othe
h i ngs from r pe
e t rso
se n’s
to p
tly

oi

Pleasantries
nt
es
on

of
h

vie
Try

w.

Attention-Getters Credibility Statement Agenda Statement


1. Compliment 1. General benefits 1. Benefit of Meeting
2. Ask a question 2. Specific results 2. Agenda review
3. Referral 3. Suggestion 3. Transition
4. Educate 4. Transition
5. Startle

Rapport

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.5


Attention-Getters
After exchanging pleasantries, one way to start the sale is the Attention-Getter.
Attention-Getters are tools to get the buyer’s mind off of what he or she was
doing and onto us. There are multiple Attention-Getters available. Variety and
creativity in getting favorable attention helps buyers see us as unique.

Compliment
Give them a compliment they would not hear from someone else.

Ask a question
Ask a unique question that requires some thought to answer.

Referral
Use the name of someone they respect, especially a direct referral.

Educate
Provide information, advice, or service.

Startle
Say something startling or intriguing.

2.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Buyer’s Point of View

What I Sell What People Buy

Buyers want to know what we can do for them, either by


solving their problems or by helping them capitalize on new
opportunities. In The Sales Advantage on page 59 you’ll find
an example of how someone did both for Mr. Carnegie.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.7


Client Interview
Interviewing our current clients helps us: provide customers with more value,
strengthen their loyalty, gather evidence, get testimonials, ask for referrals, and get
more business from them. Before interviewing clients, identify specific call
objectives. Some questions might include:

Current client:

Why did you decide to do business with us?

What kind of impact have our solutions had for you?


1. Satisfaction:

2. Applications:

3. Results:

4. Return on Investment:

In what areas can we improve our service for you?

What is our next step?

Voice Mail: We can often view voice mail as a barrier and


an aggravation. Turn it into a bridge instead! Use the
evidence from client interviews to leave a powerful voice
mail when prospecting. See page 68 in The Sales Advantage
for some additional suggestions.

2.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Credibility Statement
We establish credibility by talking about issues relevant to the buyer. These issues
should reflect what similar buyers have enjoyed by using our solutions. This tool
helps us establish ourselves as problem-solvers and shows we create value and
return on investment for our clients.

1. Cite general benefits your company provides that relate to the buyer’s
needs, wants, and issues.
2. Give results of how specific clients have benefitted.
3. Suggest that similar benefits are possible.
4. Transition to the next step.

Guidelines for Credibility Statements


• Caution: There are legal restrictions on sending unsolicited faxes
and/or e-mails.
• Use for prospecting letters, getting appointments, or starting the sale.
• Don’t sell. Focus on buyer issues.
• Include relevant pre-approach research information.
• Talk about specific results, especially return on investment.
• Use powerful language.
• Use bullet points.
• Be brief, usually less than one minute.

Credibility
Statement

Marketing, Opening the


Advertising, Interview
Correspondence
Prospecting

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.9


Credibility Statement: Example

Januar y 12
Ms. Helen Lopez
s Director
Information System

Dear Ms. Lopez: st 18


n) Yo ur co m pa ny ’s growth over the pa revenue
rmat io 7 million in
(Pre-approach info es siv e. Yo ur goal to reach $2 rs.
en im pr isting buye
months has be d cross-selling your ex
ire re ta in in g an
will requ ease
yo ur in du st ry ha ve been able to incr the
panies in One of
(Step 1) Other com es and reduce operating expenses.
nu of their
their company’s reve le to do this is by web-enabling some
ab
ways they’ve been tices.
pr ac
general business ve
m ed ia , an d C le ar Communications ha sell
e, Multi- ence and
(Step 2) ABC Onlin ab le to st re ng then their web pres these
en s
told us they have be unts. Here are some specific benefit
co
more to existing ac riencing:
e ex pe
organizations ar
venue
• 27% increase in re sales
in
• $450,000 increase
g ex penses by 7%
• Reduce operatin
ntion by 22%
• Increase buyer rete
bstantial
co m pa ny co ul d realize the same su t.
ur ou
(Step 3) Perhaps yo minutes to sit down together to find
d 20
benefits. Let’s fin

Sincerely,
Chris Jones
Tech Computers
y mor ning to schedule a
PS : I’ll ca ll yo ur of fice at 9:00 Tuesda
(Step 4)
time for us to talk.

Caution: There are legal restrictions on sending


unsolicited faxes or e-mails.

2.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Credibility Statement

Prospect Name:

Pre-approach Information:

1. Broad overview of benefits you provide:

2. Specific results of value you added for your clients:

3. Suggestion that similar benefits are possible:

4. Transition:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.11


Agenda Statements
The purpose of the Agenda Statement is to establish the intent of the appointment
or interview. An Agenda Statement assures that everyone has the same objective in
mind for the meeting. The Agenda Statement incorporates three vital components:

1. A specific buyer benefit related directly to the meeting. This establishes


why the buyer should invest time talking with you.
2. An overview (agenda) of the meeting itself. This can be done verbally or
may involve a written agenda that is presented to the buyer.
3. Transition to the first point on the agenda.

Example:
1. We’re here today to share some ideas that can improve your business by increasing
profitability and bringing more clients to you. We will explore ways to utilize your
advertising budget more effectively, increase sales, and improve your bottom line.
2. Let’s discuss an agenda that includes:
• Exploring the results you are currently experiencing
• Discussing your current plans for growth
• Identifying possible changes to expand your customer base
• Looking at creative solutions to your issues
• Exploring how we might help you meet your objectives
• Finally, determine our next step
3. How does that sound? Are there any additions or changes you suggest to this agenda?
May I ask you some questions to get a better feel for your current situation?

Agenda Statements help us establish a professional tone


and project a confident image of a business consultant.
The Sales Advantage (page 93) uses the term “Why Talk
Statements” because the purpose of this tool is to convince
buyers that meeting with us is a valuable use of their time.

2.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Agenda Statement

Buyer:

1. Buyer benefit related to meeting:

2. Overview/agenda of meeting:

3. Question to proceed to first agenda item:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.13


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

2.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Chapters 1–4

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Part I, Chapters 1–3

2. Prepare to relate a sales success based on an idea from the training.

3. Use unique, creative Pleasantries in every sales presentation.

4. Incorporate an Attention-Getter and a Credibility Statement or Agenda


Statement in each sales interview you conduct.

5. Interview five clients.

6. Apply the Strengthen Relationship principles.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.15


Sales Report
Describe a recent sales call in which you applied an idea from the training.

What was the outcome?

What advice do you have for us?

How will we benefit from your advice?

2.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 2.17


Notes

2.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Generate Interest 3
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Practice methods to uncover and appeal to different buyer interests


• Create power questions to get the information needed from buyers
• Widen the buyer expectation gap to create interest

Overview
Information gathering forms the heart of the solutions we present. What we
learn in this stage determines what solutions we present, how we present
them, and ultimately how we create value for buyers. The Dale Carnegie® Sales
Process teaches that we must gather information before we talk about our
solutions. A common mistake is selling before thoroughly exploring buyers’
wants, needs, and motives.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part II, Chapter 4

“Well, we have been together for five minutes and I can


already tell that you know nothing about me, my company,
my products, my issues, or my market. What was it
you were trying to sell me again?”
—Anonymous Buyer

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.1


Generate Interest
Overcome Indifference
Interest Rule: Generate interest by finding out what your
solutions will do to benefit or service your prospects.

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

from the other


th ings per
e e s on
tos Capability ’s
p
y
tl

oi

Statement
es

nt
on

of
h

Financial Executive
view
Try

Primary
.

Interest
User Technical

Buying Other
Criteria Considerations
Payout
s
n

Barriers
io
at
ic
pl

Should Be
Im

Buying
As-is Motive

Interest

3.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Interest Areas
Our goal in this area is to gather pertinent information from the buyer. We ask
questions and listen carefully to discover primary interest, buying criteria, and other
considerations. Most important is the buying motive, or the emotional, personal
payout the buyer receives when we can help solve his or her problem.

Primary
Interest

Buying Other
Criteria Considerations

Buying
Motive

Primary Interest—What they want


Buying Criteria—What they must have (Absolutes)
Other Considerations—What they would like to have (Desirables)
Dominant Buying Motive—Why they want it

Listening Levels
The way to uncover and clarify the interests of the buyer is to ask questions and
listen proactively. Selective listening usually leads us to sell before we understand
the buyer.

Proactive

Attentive
g
in
en
st

Selective
Li

Pretend

Ignore

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.3


Primary Interest
The Primary Interest is rarely what we sell. It is the result of what we sell; what
the buyer wants. A common mistake is to assume that buyers want what we sell.
In fact, buyers want solutions for their problems or new opportunities. People buy
products and services not because of what they are, but because of what they do.

Effective Employees
Increase Revenues Expand Business
Primary
Improve Efficiency Interest Flexibility

Safety Increase Market Share

Comfort Reduce Costs

Reduce Cycle Time Return on Investment

Ask questions with the intent to help the buyer rather than
just make a sale. We often have to really probe to get to the
primary interest. Sometimes the best way to get a loyal client
is to give up the sale and offer valuable advice instead.
See the example on page 126 in The Sales Advantage.

3.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Buying Criteria
The Buying Criteria are the requirements of the sale. If Buying Criteria are not
met, then the sale cannot advance. We will often find that our competitors can
provide the same buying criteria we do. We need to meet these criteria just to be
considered.

Features
Budget Approvals

Specifications Warranty
Buying
Criteria
Delivery Service

Support Location

Quality Value

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.5


Other Considerations
Other Considerations are points of interest or concern that influence the buying
decision. They are not typically requirements of the sale, but they influence the
decision. We will have a competitive edge when we discover these factors and
provide buyers with unique solutions.

Special Features
Price Added Value

Consulting Payment Terms


Other
Delivery Options Considerations Service

Relationships Special Packaging

Value Justifications Creative Solutions

3.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Dominant Buying Motive
The Dominant Buying Motive is the compelling emotional reason for the buyer, team,
or organization to make the buying decision. Although there are thousands of
motives, most decisions have one compelling motive for going ahead. The Dominant
Buying Motive is that compelling factor. Motives fall into these general areas:

Self-Fulfillment

Recognition Self-Preservation

Buying
Motive
Relationships Acquisition

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.7


Notes

We ask questions for two reasons. One is to help us


understand the wants and needs of our buyers. The more
important reason is so the buyer clearly understands their
current reality, and how far they are from where they could
be. Their interest areas (The Sales Advantage, page 98) outline
the kind of information we need to widen this buyer’s gap.

3.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Questioning Model
An effective model for asking questions allows us to discover the interest areas of
buyers. A process of gathering information should be conversational and capture
the information we need in order to present compelling solutions. The research we
do and the questions we ask will help us identify the buyer’s interest areas. This will
help us make our solution unique for each buyer. A good questioning process
points us to the interest areas. Implication questions create a sense of urgency by
establishing a gap in the mind of the buyer.

Payout

s
n
Barriers

io
at
ic
pl
Should Be
Im

As-is

Buyer’s Gap
A buyer’s gap is the difference between the benefits they are currently receiving and
the benefits they should receive. We need to widen the perception of the gap. We
create a sense of urgency for change when we help them clearly see a wide gap
here. Effective questions make the gap clearer for both us and our buyers.

My Solution

Gap
As Is Should Be
Barriers

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.9


As Is Questions:
Current Situation

As Is questions help us determine the buyer’s current situation. These questions


give us a picture of key issues such as product specifications, influential decision-
makers, and challenges that we may be able to address in our solution.
• How has (information from pre-approach) impacted your operation?
• What do your people do to deal with the new (pre-approach)?
• Why did you start to (pre-approach)?
• Where are you seeing some success with this new process?
• Who are your current providers? How did you select them?
• What do you like about their solutions?
• What would you change about your current providers?
• What are your specifications for this kind of investment?
• How much did you plan to invest?
• In addition to you, who is involved in this buying process?
• How will your buying team decide on a provider?

Need to Know Questions


(Person and Business)
In addition to you, who else is involved in this kind of
Authority
decision?

Budget How much are you currently spending on this?

What kinds of pressure are you getting to make


Need
some changes?

3.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Should Be Questions:
Goals, Objectives, Initiatives

Should Be questions help us discover the buyer’s vision of his or her operation at
optimum performance. These questions focus on how the situation can be different
if we can help the buyer solve his or her problems.
• In addition to (pre-approach), what are your objectives for the near future?
• Which strategic initiatives need to be addressed?
• How will those impact you?
• Can you describe what your operation would look like at peak performance?
• Where would you like to be six months from now? A year?
• What would you like your people thinking, saying, and doing differently?
• What would you like to hear your buyers saying?
• What changes would you like to see?
• What would that allow to happen?
• What other factors are important to your business development?
• Why is that? Could you tell me more? How do you mean?

Need to Know Questions


(Person and Business)

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.11


Barrier Questions:
Issues Blocking the Should Be

Barrier questions identify factors that prevent the buyer from achieving the should
be. While barriers are not objections, they can lead to objections. For example, a
specified budget is a barrier that can lead to objections about price.

• In addition to (Pre-approach), what obstacles are you facing?

• How is the (information from Should Be) holding you back?

• What is preventing you from moving forward with your initiatives?

• What time constraints are you under right now?

• Which key actions need to take place before you make your quota?

• How urgent is this specific initiative to you? To your company?

• When will this have to take place?

• What happens if it doesn’t?

• Who needs to support this, in addition to you?

• What else would be important for us to consider?

Need to Know Questions


(Person and Business)

3.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Payout Questions:
Impact on the Buyer

Payout questions are used to clarify how the buyer and/or the organization benefits
from the solution. Responses to these questions allow us to understand and appeal
to the motivational reasons for buying.

• If you are able to (Should Be), what impact will that have on your company?

• Your department or team? You?

• Why is that important?

• What could happen when you are able to (Should Be)?

• What would be the outcome?

• How will your team perform differently?

• What would you do with the additional time/revenue/resources saved?

• What would you like to hear management say? Your family or friends?

• What would achieving the outcome allow you to do?

Need to Know Questions


(Person and Business)

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.13


Buying Perspectives
People buy from different perspectives. These perspectives depend on personalities
and vary by function. We need to make sure that we sell to people based on their
needs and their points of view.

Financial Buyers Executive Buyers

User Buyers Technical Buyers

User buyers can often give us leverage and insights that we


cannot get from executive and financial buyers. See page
121 in The Sales Advantage for an example.

3.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Questioning Planning Sheet

Buyer’s Name:

As Is Questions:

Should Be Questions:

Barrier Questions:

Payout Questions:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.15


Capability Statement
Based on our research and questioning, we can make an assertive, specific statement
about our ability to create value for the buyer. This is called the Capability
Statement. The Capability Statement advances the sale from Interest to Solution.
After gathering information from the buyer, we can confidently state that we are
capable of providing competitive solutions.

Examples
Based on what you have told me, I’m confident the Tech 2500 will provide the speed,
quality, and reduced operational costs you have said are critical to your office operation.
The money and time you will save will help you and your team move toward the top
position in your territory.

Based on what you shared with me, outsourcing the hosting of your website is the ideal
way for your department to find the time you need to meet your deadlines. Outsourcing
will help reduce the stress you face at the end of each month.

Specific Buyer:

Solution:

Primary Interest:

Buying Motive:

3.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Planning Sheet:
Rapport

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Buyer:

Primary Interest (2.4):

Dominant Buying Motive (2.7):

Pleasantries:

Attention-Getter (1.6):

Credibility Statement (1.11) or Agenda Statement (1.13):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.17


Planning Sheet:
Interest

As Is Questions (2.10):

Should Be Questions (2.11):

Barrier Questions (2.12):

Payout Questions (2.13):

3.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Planning Sheet:
Capability Statement (2.16)

Solution:

Primary Interest:

Buying Motive:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.19


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

3.20 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Chapters 5–7

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Part II, Chapters 1–6

2. Prepare to relate a sales success based on an idea from the training.

3. Complete a questioning planning worksheet for five buyers.

4. Practice the Questioning Model with a colleague taking the role of a buyer.

5. Use Capability Statements with buyers.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.21


Sales Report
Describe a recent sales call in which you applied an idea from the training.

What was the outcome?

What advice do you have for us?

How will we benefit from your advice?

3.22 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 3.23


Notes

3.24 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Provide Solutions 4
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Develop solutions that are unique to each buyer


• Formulate solutions that appeal to buyer’s logic and emotions
• Present solutions that are persuasive and convincing

Overview
At this point in the sales process, we know the key information about our
buyers’ needs, interests, and, most importantly, buying motives. Now we have
the opportunity to tailor our presentation to fit what the buyer wants and
increase the perceived value of our solution.

In order to differentiate ourselves in a crowded, competitive marketplace, we


need to be unique, with exciting approaches to solving buyers’ problems. We
also need to present in a way that builds credibility and makes people want to
buy. One of the most effective ways to combat the price objection is to build
value in the solution of the sale. What we present and how we present it is
critical to the buying/selling process.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part II, Chapter 5

“The longer I live, the more certain I am that enthusiasm


is the little recognized key to success.”
—Frederick Williamson

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.1


Provide Solutions
Overcome Doubt
Solution Rule: Give buyers enough information, and no more,
about your solution and how it will benefit them,
to convince them that they are justified in buying.

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

y to see thi
h onestl ngs
Try fro
m
th
e
ot
he
rp
erso

Communication
Dramatize
n’s point of view.

Solutions
Trial Close

Application Evidence

Fact Bridge Benefit


Capability Statement
Solution

4.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


What Buyers Want to Know

What is it?

How does it work?

Why is it important?

Who says so besides you?

Can you prove it?

Buyers expect us to be experts in our products, our market,


and our industry. Be a lifelong learner so you can add value
to your clients on every call. See page 133 in The Sales
Advantage for seven ways to increase your product
knowledge.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.3


Facts:
What It Is

A fact is a statement that is specific, true, and can be proven. Some facts will be
accepted without hesitation because of the buyer’s familiarity with the information.
Others may require additional proof.

Examples:
1. We have comparable operations in over eighty countries, and all locations can tailor our
solutions to meet your local needs.

2. We have 12 tech-certified technicians on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

3. We offer 22 mutual funds, the broadest spectrum in the market, according to this
Miller and Camp study.

Facts about my solution:

Fact 1:

Fact 2:

Fact 3:

Fact 4:

Fact 5:

Fact 6:

Bridge: A bridge is a brief phrase that links the fact and the benefit.

Examples:
1. Therefore …

2. Which means …

3. You’ll find this helpful, because …

4.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Benefits:
What It Will Do for a Typical Buyer

A benefit is a verbal description of how any buyer could use or enjoy the solution.
A benefit should briefly, but clearly, show how the fact relates to the buyer’s
interests and needs. The benefit is specifically related to the sales fact.

Examples:
1. You will get consistent global delivery capability with cultural flexibility.

2. You will have quick response to any problems.

3. This gives you greater flexibility in your financial planning.

Benefits a buyer can get from my solution:

Benefit 1:

Benefit 2:

Benefit 3:

Benefit 4:

Benefit 5:

Benefit 6:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.5


Applications:
What It Will Do for This Buyer

The application is an explanation that clarifies specifically how the buyer will apply
each aspect of the solution. The application statement involves the buyer and
further clarifies how he or she will experience value from our solution.

Examples:
1. We can service your branches in Munich, Paris, and Tokyo. We have German, French,
and Japanese representatives there so you won’t have the translation and cultural
problems you said you had in the past.

2. You can have peace of mind knowing that once you call for service, you’ll get a
response within two hours. This is a vast improvement over the down-time you said
you’ve been experiencing.

3. You can change your portfolio any time, for example, when you are ready to buy that
boat this spring for your family.

Specific Buyer:

Application 1:

Application 2:

Application 3:

Application 4:

Application 5:

Application 6:

4.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Evidence DEFEATS Doubt

D Demonstrations

E Examples

F Facts

E Exhibits

A Analogies

T Testimonials

S Statistics

Evidence Examples:

1. Demonstration—An illustration using a physical demonstration with a prop


or possibly the solution itself.
The ports in this laptop allow the interchange of various pieces of hardware. Watch
how easy this is: When I press this button, the disk drive is ejected. Now please insert
a CD-ROM drive into the same port. And now let’s eject the CD-ROM and insert the
Zip drive, which provides a quick means of backing up or storing large volumes of data.

2. Example—A story about a satisfied buyer.


Are you familiar with the law firm of Travis and Davis? Do you respect the way they do
business? Then you will appreciate what I am about to say even more. One of their
attorneys was involved in a large case. The Travis and Davis staff were working Friday
afternoon completing their files when their computer system crashed. A call was made
to our service department. The computer was functioning again in time for everything
to be finished, and everyone was able to go home when they had planned.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.7


Evidence Examples: (Continued)

3. Facts—Statements of truth that support the point you are making.


• 22 different industries in the fund
• 42% of companies are international
• All 12 major market sectors are represented
• An even 50/50 balance of growth stocks and value stocks

4. Exhibit—Something physical that supports your solution—something the


person can see, touch, hear, smell, or taste.
These visuals will help you see the results of making this change. Here on this bar
graph you can see the anticipated additional revenue. This pie chart illustrates the
percentage of business for each of your clothing lines. Here are some photographs of
the different colors and styles. These fabric samples will help you see the colors and
feel the texture.

5. Analogy—A comparison of your solution to something with which the person


is already familiar.
Packing up your computer and shipping it to a service center you don’t know is like
taking prescription medicine without talking to your doctor. You can do more harm
than good.

6. Testimonial—An acknowledgement of your solution’s capabilities, in spoken or


other form, from someone who has used that solution.
Here on my laptop I have a video testimonial from a global company like yours. J & S
had been using local vendors for several years. As needs demanded, they would buy
from a variety of sources. Over time, they found vast inconsistencies in quality. Let’s
hear what they said after working with us.

7. Statistics—Accurate and relevant numbers that support your solutions.


An independent survey conducted in the second quarter of this year found that fewer
than one-half of one percent of Tech buyers have replaced or upgraded their equipment
purchased in the last three years.

4.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Trial Close:
Customer Evaluation

A trial close is a question that asks for an opinion, not a buying decision. We are
using a non-threatening question to test the buyer’s reaction to a specific aspect of
the solution. The reaction to the trial close question helps clarify the buyer’s
position regarding acceptance or rejection of the aspect of the solution just
presented.

Examples:
1. How does that look to you?

2. Does this sound like what you’re looking for?

3. What are your thoughts about this now?

Trial Close #1:

Trial Close #2:

Trial Close #3:

Trial Close #4:

Trial Close #5:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.9


Solution Units
Buyer:

Need Fact Benefit Application

Evidence
D

Trial Close

4.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Solution Units
Buyer:

Need Fact Benefit Application

Evidence
D

Trial Close

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.11


Solution Units
Buyer:

Need Fact Benefit Application

Evidence
D

Trial Close

4.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Be a Powerful Communicator

How
We Look

What We Say

How We Say It

What We Do

How We Appear How We Act


• Dress and grooming • Excited
• Voice • Earned the right
• Facial expression • Eager to share
• Gestures • Enthusiastic
• Accessories

There are a variety of forums we use to present our


solutions, including stand up presentations, telephone,
written proposals, and team presentations. For some tips
about each of these options, see page 155 in
The Sales Advantage.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.13


Dramatize Your Solutions
Dramatizing our ideas with analogies, demonstrations, props, etc., creates a lasting,
positive impression on our buyers. This makes the sales process more memorable
for the buyer and sets us apart from our competition.

Guidelines
• Be relevant to the sale

• Use good taste

• We must feel comfortable with it

• Buyer must react positively

• Must be memorable

Notes

Dramatizing our solutions is not about using magic tricks.


It’s about presenting some aspect of our solution in a
compelling and interesting way. Go to page 157 in The
Sales Advantage for some suggestions and practical
applications.

4.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Anticipating Questions
Being prepared helps build our confidence and credibility. Identify questions you
know you’ll be asked before you’ve finished your interview, and plan your responses.

Question Planned Response

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.15


Notes

4.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Planning Sheet:
Rapport

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Buyer:

Primary Interest (2.4):

Dominant Buying Motive (2.7):

Pleasantries:

Attention-Getter (1.6):

Credibility Statement (1.11) or Agenda Statement (1.13):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.17


Planning Sheet:
Interest

As Is Questions (2.10):

Should Be Questions (2.11):

Barrier Questions (2.12):

Payout Questions (2.13):

4.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Planning Sheet:
Solution

Capability Statement (2.16):

Need Fact (3.4) Benefit (3.5) Application (3.6)

Evidence (3.8):

Trial Close (3.9):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.19


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

4.20 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Chapters 9 and 12

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Part III, Chapters 1–12

2. Prepare to relate a sales success based on an idea from the training.

3. Develop presentations that are unique to each buyer.

4. Use the Solution Units in building each presentation.

5. Support each solution you suggest with convincing evidence.

6. Use Capability Statements that appeal to primary interests and buying motives.

7. Practice delivering presentations that are powerful, persuasive, and credible.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.21


Sales Report
Describe a recent sales call in which you applied an idea from the training.

What was the outcome?

What advice do you have for us?

How will we benefit from your advice?

4.22 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 4.23


Notes

4.24 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Pipeline Management 5
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Know the six major steps to effective pipeline management


• Implement the six major steps to effective pipeline management with
your key accounts

Rationale
The best salespeople regularly practice pipeline management. By doing things
like monitoring their own sales activities, analyzing and interpreting the
corresponding sales results and then adjusting their activities appropriately,
exemplary performers achieve desired sales levels. In this section, you will
learn some of the pipeline management techniques that the best salespeople
regularly use.

The Sales Funnel


Exemplary performers often refer to the idea of a “sales funnel” when
mentioning their approach to generating sales. The top of the funnel represents
the opportunities that are generated by overall prospect and client potential.
The middle of the funnel represents the criteria that are used to determine
which opportunities offer the greatest potential. The lower cylinder portion of
the funnel represents the appropriate activities, (quantity and quality) that are
performed to drive sales.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 5.1


Pipeline Management Skills Inventory

Skill Type Present Absent

Uses monthly reports to identify high-value customers to


contact on a regular basis.

At least annually, reviews existing targeted relationships


to identify and expand the opportunity.

Creates strategies for achieving relationship


expansion goals.

Knows profitability and potential of customer


relationships and allocates sales and servicing time
appropriately.

Maintains up-to-date list of target prospects.

Reviews prospect’s/customer’s business ___ times per


year to identify opportunities for establishing a
relationship.

Sets and tracks weekly activities and goals.

Uses a forecasting form to track pipeline.

Has daily back-up plans when plans change.

5.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


The Six Steps to Effective Pipeline Management

Step 1 Create a Baseline Pipeline Forecast

Step 2 Determine Variance from Your Goal

Step 3 Create Your Activity Plan

Step 4 Assessing Your Weekly Progress

Step 5 Create the Next Weekly Activity Plan

Step 6 Rework the Pipeline Forecast

Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 5.3


The Six Steps to Effective Pipeline Management
Here’s a simple, straightforward process for determining and growing your pipeline:

Step 1: “Create a Baseline Pipeline Forecast”


At the beginning of each month complete a listing of all signed contracts, any verbal
agreements, outstanding proposals, and proposals to be sent within 30 days.

The Pipeline Sales Forecast is used to guide this process. Note the suggested
probabilities of sales that can be applied based on where you are in the process.
For example, if you have given a client a $20,000 proposal and you expect approval,
multiply $20,000 by 50%, which gives you a forecasted amount of $10,000. Add up
all of the amounts for clients/prospects to get a baseline pipeline amount.

Step 2: “Determine Variance from your Goal”


For example, if your total on your Pipeline Sales Forecast indicates that the
subjective probabilities equal $200,000 after six months of the year and your goal is
$300,000. Your shortfall is $100,000.

Step 3: “Create your Activity Plan”

A. Conversion Rate
One way to determine the appropriate activity level is to estimate a “conversion
rate:” How many prospect calls does it take to make a sale? For example, you may
estimate that for every six appointments you get one sale averaging $10,000. Also,
you estimate it takes five calls to get one appointment. Thus your personal
“conversion rate” is 30 to 1 (5 calls x 6 appointments) to get one sale.

5.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


B. Calculating Activities Needed
Based on your pipeline estimate, your desired goal, and your conversion rate, you
can calculate the number of activities needed. For example assuming:

• Goal: $300,000
• Pipeline estimate: $200,000
• Shortfall: $100,000
• Conversion rate: 30 to 1
• Average sale: $10,000

You need approximately 300 prospect calls during the next six months to reach
your sales goal. $100,000 shortfall divided by $10,000 average sale or 10 sales. Ten
sales times 30 calls per sale, or about two a day.

C. Determining your Planned Activity by Week


The Planned Weekly Activity Form helps you capture and organize each of the
important activities associated with increasing your pipeline. You can track:

• Phone calls
• Face-to-face appointments
• Speeches/presentations proposals
• Training sessions

Step 4: Assessing your Weekly Progress


Exemplary performers apply rigor, discipline, and reflection to their pipeline process.
The weekly Activity Summary form allows you to plan for the upcoming week and
record what you actually accomplish. By completing the form you will create a
snapshot of your levels of accomplishment and where you need to direct attention
in subsequent weeks.

Step 5: Create the Next Weekly Activity Plan


By reviewing your weekly Activity Summary for the week past, you can create a
focused plan for the following week.

Step 6: Rework the Pipeline Forecast


Rework your Pipeline Sales Forecast at the beginning of each month. You do this by
adding any new prospects that meet the 25% to 100% criteria and changing the
other probabilities accordingly.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 5.5


9/26/03 SALES PROBABILITY SUMMARY - JEFF HARTNEY

Salesperson's Name
Month

Projected Month(s) Net


Rep Client Name Amount of Sale Revenue Expected % Probability Amount $
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
$ -
TOTAL AMOUNT $ -

Key for Profitability amounts:


100% Signed Contract
75% Verbal approval from client
50% Proposal in client's hands-approval expected
25% Proposal in client's hands-approval uncertain
Proposal to be sent in 30 days

5.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


NAME:
Weekly Activity Planning Week of:
Monthly Goals Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Actual
Total = 0 0

Annual Goals Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Actual Goal Actual
Total = 0 0

May, 2011–May, 2012


TOTAL TOTAL
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Planned Actual
Activities Planned Actual Planned Actual Planned Actual Planned Actual Planned Actual
Calling to Prospects 0 0
(Actual Connects)
Calling to Client 0 0
(Actual Connects)
Inbound calls from prospects 0 0

Inbound calls from Clients 0 0

Speeches 0 0

Face to Face Appointments 0 0

Proposals Generated 0 0

Other 0 0

TOTAL 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Instructions: E-mail to . Every Friday complete a sheet with your planned activities for the upcoming week. On the following

Pearson Sales Academy 5.7


Friday, submit your actual activities on the same sheet. Every Friday you will then submit 2 forms, one for planning for the
upcoming week, and one that shows actual totals for the current week.
Exhibit B Weekly Activity Sheet planned calls

Week of:
Name:

Phone Calls-contacts

Date Name/Organization Prospect/Client Completed


3)
(3

Face to Face Appointments

Date Name/organization Prospect/Client Completed


3)
(3

5.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Speeches/Presentations

Date Name/organization Prospect/client Completed


3)
(3

Proposals
Date Name/organization Prospect/client 3)
Completed(3

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 5.9


Training Sessions

Date Name/Organization Prospect/client 3)


Completed (3

5.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Action Plan

The two most useful ideas I gained in this session are:


1.

2.

How this applies to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 5.11


Notes

5.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Resolve Objections 6
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Identify points of agreement to lower buyer resistance


• Apply a win-win process to identify hidden objections
• Respond to the six most common objections with confidence

Overview
It is likely in any selling situation that obstacles will have to be overcome before
a buying decision is made. Often we make the mistake of “handling” objections
in such a way that the buyer is turned off. Resolving objections effectively is a
process that involves careful, sensitive listening along with positive, factual
responses to buyer concerns.

We must understand that buyer objections are not always rational. Objections
are often totally emotional. We must respond to customers’ emotional needs,
along with the obstacles preventing them from buying, if we want to build long-
term relationships.

Have you ever been in a selling situation where the buyer kept rejecting your
solutions? Do you ever find people giving you a string of objections, but you
never seem to get to the root cause? We will work with tools to uncover
hidden objections and get them expressed and resolved. The hardest
objections to answer are the ones you do not hear.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part IV, Chapter 9

“When life hands you lemons, don’t just make lemonade.


Open up a lemonade stand.”

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.1


Objections
Objection Rule: Resolve objections by finding points of agreement,
clarifying the issues, and providing compelling reasons to proceed.

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

g s from the other p


e thin ers
o
se n’s
o p
yt
Cushion
oi
tl

nt
es
on

of
h

vie
Try

w.

Uncover Category When Step Respond


Question Hopeless Now Rapport Deny
Addition Trivial Later Interest Admit
Meet Misconception Before Solution Reverse
Else Put-off Never Motive Explain
Bury Prejudiced
Amount Genuine

Trial Close
Objections

6.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Buying Objections

What is a buying objection?

Where can we get objections in the sales process?

Why do we get objections?

How do people react when they hear objections?

When a buyer voices an objection, we have to keep in mind


that there are at least four aspects of the objection: what
they say, what we hear, our interpretation, and what they
actually mean. See page 244 in The Sales Advantage for
additional insights on objections.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.3


Most Common Objections

Write your most common objections, using the words your prospects would say.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

6.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Cushion
A cushion is a statement that acknowledges that we listened to the prospect, heard
the objection, and recognized its importance. When a buyer states an objection,
our first action should be to cushion the objection. A cushion does not agree,
disagree, or answer the objection.

Examples of Cushions:

Objection: Your price is considerably higher than I expected.


Cushion: I appreciate your concern about the investment.

Objection: I am happy with my current provider.


Cushion: I’m sure your current provider has been satisfactory.

Objection: My staff is happy with the process they are using now.
Cushion: Certainly you want to keep your staff happy.

Objection: I do not think we’re ready to make a change at this time.


Cushion: I know you want to make the right decision at the right time.

Cushions for my objections:


1.

2.

3.

4.

When we cushion objections, avoid the most common trap of


saying “but.” This can be a confrontational word, and it tends
to erase whatever we say just before we use it. You’ll find
three other options to use on page 243 in The Sales Advantage.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.5


Uncover Hidden Objections
Often, the initial objection we hear from a buyer is only part of the reason he or
she is hesitating to make a buying commitment. We must uncover any other
objections before responding.

Concept Consultant Buyer


Trial Close—Opinion-asking “What do you think so far?” Objection #1: “I’m not
question to evaluate the comfortable with …”
buyer’s thinking.

Cushion—Find a point of “I appreciate your concern Buyer nods in agreement.


agreement, without about …”
agreeing, disagreeing, or
answering the objection.

Question—Ask a non- “Why is that important?” “Because …”


threatening question to
clarify the objection.

Addition—Probe for any “In addition to this concern, is “No, that’s it.”
additional objections. there anything more causing
you to hesitate?”

Meet—Test to see if “So if I could meet this “Not quite.”


meeting this objection will concern, you would go ahead
advance the sale. today, is that right?”

Else—If there are other “There must be something Objection #2: “Another
concerns, they should begin else. Would you tell me what major issue is …”
to surface now. it is?”

Bury—Try to bury the “So it sounds like this issue is “Yes, that’s right.”
initial objection to see if it really the critical factor, and
is genuine or just a smoke the other is not a concern.”
screen.
Amount—Clarify that the “What this amounts to is that “Exactly.”
second objection is genuine. if you were convinced that we
could resolve this critical factor,
you would consider this further.
Is that right?”

6.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Objection Decisions

Category
Hopeless

Trivial

Misconception

Put-off

Prejudiced

Genuine

When to Respond
Now

Later

Before

Never

Step in the Sales Process


Rapport

Interest

Solution

Motive

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.7


Respond to Objections

Deny Admit Reverse


Deny falsehoods Admit problems your Turn objections
or company has now or into reasons
misinformation had in the past. for buying

Explain
Recall information gathered in the sales process to
Primary
appeal to buyer interest areas and perspectives.
Interest Customize evidence to buyers.

Buying Other Financial Executive


Criteria Considerations Doubt

Buying
User Technical Evidence
Motive

Trial Close
Ask questions to determine if the objection has been resolved.

Evidence for my top six objections:


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

6.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Trial Close
We may think that we have done a terrific job of resolving the buyer’s objection.
However, it is what the buyer feels that is important. Before moving ahead, let’s
take a moment to evaluate whether or not the buyer is ready to move forward
toward a commitment.

Examples:
Does that make you feel more comfortable about the lease payments?

How does that sound?

Does that address your concern?

Always use a trial close to help the customer evaluate


whether you have met their objection. This helps them
recognize that you have met their concern, or helps you see
if you haven’t. An open-ended question, like the one on page
259 in The Sales Advantage, can help buyers sell themselves.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.9


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

6.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Chapters 8 and 10

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Part IV, Chapters 1–5

2. Prepare to relate a sales success based on an idea from the training.

3. Be proactive in cushioning, clarifying, and resolving objections.

4. Probe for hidden objections.

5. Develop strategies for responding to your most common objections.

6. Complete the mid-point assessment.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.11


Sales Report
Describe a recent sales call in which you applied an idea from the training.

What was the outcome?

What advice do you have for us?

How will we benefit from your advice?

6.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 6.13


Notes

6.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Appeal to Motives
Commitment
& Gain
7
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Evaluate buyer perspectives to move the sale forward


• Engage the prospect’s emotions in the buying process
• Practice six methods to ask for the sale with confidence

Overview
Throughout the sale, the buyer is constantly evaluating what is being said and
done. Buyers may respond verbally, physically, or emotionally to the concepts
and materials that are presented. These responses can be buying or warning
signals. We must possess the ability to recognize these signals, accurately
interpret them, and respond appropriately.

Often we find that people seem convinced that we can help them, but they are
reluctant to make a commitment. We often get put-offs and delays here. It is
our responsibility to create a sense of urgency and appeal to motives.

We get commitments more easily when the early phases of the sale are
conducted skillfully. An overemphasis on closing can lead to manipulative
techniques and strained buyer relationships. Successful people who compete
in today’s marketplace do not manipulate buyers into commitments they
later regret.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part I1I, Chapter 10

“The salesperson’s job is to persuade people


to want what they already need.”
—E. St. Elmo Lewis

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.1


Appeal to Motive
Overcome Procrastination

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive Value Summary


1. Remind buyers of their need
and get their agreement.
2. Remind them your solution
will satisfy that need.
3. Paint a word picture.

ings
from the other Motive
th per
e e s on
tos ’s
p
y
tl

Customer
oi
es

nt
on

Evaluation
of
h

view
Try

Positive Neutral Negative

Sales
Close Trial Close Process

Commitment

Gain Commitment
Overcome Reluctance

7.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Customer Evaluation
Sales people must be attentive to buying and warning signals. Watch for sudden
changes in body language, facial expression, and vocal inflection. Be prepared to
advance or step back in the sales process, depending on what you observe. Clarify
buyers’ signals with a trial close.

Actions May Indicate

Eye contact Attention

Arms folded Resistance

Rubbing nose Uneasiness

Deep sigh Relaxation

Rapid blinking Nervousness

Hands steepled Confidence

Leaning back with hands behind head Concentration

Drumming fingers Impatience

Sitting on edge of seat, leaning Listening


forward
Focused
Knuckles under chin
Anger
Change in rate of speech
Hesitation
Silence
Enthusiasm
Change in voice tone

There are dangers in misinterpreting buying and warning


signals. Always evaluate the buyer with a trial close to
be sure you are moving forward to a commitment.
See page 167 in The Sales Advantage for additional insights.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.3


Appealing to Motives
People buy for a variety of reasons, including rational factors and motivational
factors. Have you ever convinced a person logically that your solution would
exceed their expectations, but still did not receive a decision? We can use word
pictures to summarize the value of our solution, creating a sense of urgency, and
overcoming procrastination.

Building a Value Summary


Remind yourself of what your buyers want (primary interest) and why they
want it (dominant buying motive), and then do these three things:

1. Remind your buyers that they lack the benefit your solution will give them
and get their agreement.
2. Remind your buyers that your solution will satisfy that lack.
3. Paint a word picture of your buyers using your solution, enjoying it, and
benefitting from it.

Remember to
• Describe how your solution appeals to the dominant buying motive.

• Work with the buyer to paint a word picture illustrating how he or she will feel
once the dominant buying motive has been satisfied.

Guidelines for Value Summaries


• Be clear and concise.

• Describe in the present tense.

• Directly link to the buyer’s dominant buying motive.

• Be believable and realistic.

• Show the buyer benefitting from your solution.

• Touch the senses—sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell.

7.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Value Summary

Buyer:

Primary Interest:

Dominant Buying Motive:

1. Remind them of their lack and get their agreement.

2. Remind them that your solution satisfies that lack.

3. Paint a word picture.

Painting word pictures may feel uncomfortable and unnatural


until you use them enough. They work in radio, television,
and print advertising. You’ll find some real life examples
starting on page 180 in The Sales Advantage.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.5


Types of Commitments
We have all heard about the importance of being able to “close the sale.” People
tend to put far too much importance on this step. If we have built rapport, gained
interest, and presented compelling solutions, asking for the order should be an easy
and natural step. One way to make this comfortable is to ask for a variety of
commitments throughout the process. This is especially important when we have
long selling cycles.

Commitments:

No clever closing technique will save a sale that has been lost
through poor questioning or offering a generic solution. We
need to be asking for commitments throughout the process. If
we have been gaining incremental “yes” responses, it will be
easier to ask for the buying commitment with the
straightforward approaches like the ones starting on page 214 in
The Sales Advantage.

7.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Gain Commitment
Overcome Reluctance
Commitment Rule: Secure commitments throughout the process
by gaining agreements toward mutually beneficial decisions.

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Customer Evaluation

Trial Close

Positive Response Neutral Response Negative Response

Direct Rapport
Rapport
Alternate Trial Close Interest
Minor Point
Next Step Solution
Opportunity Motive
Weighing Trial Close

Trial Close

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.7


Methods for Gaining Commitment

Direct Question
Often the best way to gain a buyer’s commitment is to ask for it. Ask a direct
question that calls for a decision.

Are you ready to go ahead with this decision now?

Alternate Choice Method


Asks the buyer to select one of two options.

Would you like the K80 with the standard stock, or would you prefer to choose
from our speciality line?

Minor Point Method


Calls on the buyer to make a minor decision that indicates that the larger
buying decision has been made.

In whose name should this title be drawn?

Next Step Method


Assumes that the sale has been made and looks past the commitment to the
next actions that need to be taken.

When would you like for me to schedule the installation?

Opportunity Method
Presents the buyer with a brief window of opportunity when options are
available. This can be used with a buyer who is ready to buy but is putting
it off.

You know that our prices increase on September 1st. You want to get these
lower prices now, don’t you?

Weighing Method
If the buyer still has second thoughts about making the purchase, show him
or her how the return on investment outweighs the cost.

Let’s do what many people do when making a major decision. Let’s weigh the
ideas causing you to hesitate and the value you’ll realize from going ahead.

7.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Gaining Commitment

Direct Question:

Alternate Choice:

Minor Point:

Next Step:

Opportunity:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.9


Worksheet:
Weighing Method
The weighing method can be used to show logically how the value and return on
investment outweigh the costs and other options. This approach can be used in
summarizing results of a long selling cycle, in comparisons with other vendors, in
written proposals, and with multiple decision-makers.

Concerns Value

7.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Planning Sheet:
Rapport

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Buyer:

Primary Interest (2.4):

Dominant Buying Motive (2.7):

Pleasantries:

Attention-Getter (1.6):

Credibility Statement (1.11) or Agenda Statement (1.13):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.11


Planning Sheet:
Interest

As Is Questions (2.10):

Should Be Questions (2.11):

Barrier Questions (2.12):

Payout Questions (2.13):

7.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Planning Sheet:
Solution

Capability Statement (2.16):

Need Fact (3.4) Benefit (3.5) Application (3.6)

Evidence (3.8):

Trial Close (3.9):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.13


Planning Sheet:
Solution (Continued)

The objection I will resolve will be (4.4):

The response method I will use is (4.8):

Motive—Value Summary (5.5):

Commitment Question (5.9):

7.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.15


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Review Chapter 4

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Part IV, Chapters 6–9

2. Prepare to relate a sales success based on an idea from the training.

3. Watch and listen carefully to identify and respond to buying and warning signals.

4. Use value summaries to appeal to the motives of your buyers.

5. Ask for some kind of commitment on every sales call.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

7.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sales Report
Describe a recent sales call in which you applied an idea from the training.

What was the outcome?

What advice do you have for us?

How will we benefit from your advice?

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 7.17


Notes

7.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Uncover Opportunities 8
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Penetrate existing accounts and increase customer loyalty


• Identify the best prospecting methods to fill the sales pipeline
• Create a referral network of champions who bring business

Overview
It has been said many times in business that it’s all in who you know. If you
have contacts, you’ve got it made. Certainly, the names and numbers of the
right people are critical, but today, with all the database information available, it
is easy to know who to call. The real issue is not who you know, but who
wants to know you. Some people talk about how important it is to build a
large database of business contacts. What is more important is the number of
people who have you in their database.

Prospecting and networking are tools you can use to create selling success for
yourself. The best sales performers, in all industries, figure out a way to attract
more new buyers to themselves. To do this, we need to learn to go to the
right sources to find good leads, develop “champions” in the accounts we
work, build an effective personal referral network, and attend events that lead
us to potential business contacts. Selling does not have to be endless hours of
cold-canvassing and rejection.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part II, Chapter 1

“People are always blaming circumstances for what they are. I


don’t believe in circumstances. The people who get on in this world
are the people who get up and look for the circumstances they
want, and if they can’t find them, they make them.”
—George Bernard Shaw

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.1


Uncover Opportunities
Opportunity Rule: Uncover new opportunities by penetrating
existing accounts, prospecting for new clients, and
developing a network of champions.

Opportunity
Chart

Networking Pre-Approach
Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Referrals Prospecting

Champions

8.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Penetrating Your Existing Accounts
One of the most effective means of getting additional business from existing
accounts is to depict graphically the truth about your relationship with each of your
customers.

Helping customers reduce their list of suppliers is truly a service. Working with
proven suppliers, who offer quality products or services, at competitive pricing, on a
timely basis, is always desirable. If you have earned their trust with one product or
service, it is reasonable to anticipate that they would be receptive to your follow-up
with other quality offerings.

Opportunity Chart Directions:


Use this chart to identify the “Opportunity” in your relationship with your
customers.

• Begin by listing ten customers in the boxes across the bottom.

• Next, along the left side, list the best-selling solutions that you offer.

• Place an “A” in the boxes of the graph to determine the companies that are
already buying the corresponding solution from you.

• Place a “B” in the boxes to indicate where you feel there is a good opportunity
to sell to existing accounts.

• Place a “C” in the boxes where there is minimal opportunity.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.3


Opportunity Chart:
Example

Graphic
Design C A C C A B A

Typesetting B A A B C B C

Brochure
Printing C B A A A A B

Annual Report
Printing A B A C B C C

Direct Mailer
Design C C B C A C A

Web Press C B C A C C B

Newsletter
A C C C A A C
Solution

Design
Franklin Services

AMR Chemicals
ARC Products

Supermarkets
FSA Aviation

Accounting
Consulting

Sandstone
Swelling

Alco

Companies/Locations

Already buying Good selling Minimal


A from me B opportunity C opportunity

8.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Opportunity Chart:
Existing Accounts
Solution

Companies/Locations

Already buying Good selling Minimal


A from me B opportunity C opportunity

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.5


Opportunity Chart:
New Accounts
Solution

Companies/Locations

Already buying Good selling Minimal


A from others B opportunity C opportunity

8.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Opportunity Chart:
Re-entry (lost or old accounts)
Solution

Companies/Locations

Already buying Good selling Minimal


A from others B opportunity C opportunity

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.7


Worksheet:
Best Opportunities

Conduct research and identify the five best new opportunities. Identify specific
action steps you can take immediately to get more business from these
opportunities.

Existing Accounts: Action Step:


1. 1.

2. 2.

3. 3.

4. 4.

5. 5.

New Accounts: Action Step:


1. 1.

2. 2.

3. 3.

4. 4.

5. 5.

Re-entry (lost or old accounts): Action Step:


1. 1.

2. 2.

3. 3.

4. 4.

5. 5.

8.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Pre-Approach

Five reasons to conduct pre-approach research


1. Identify qualified buyers.
2. Take existing accounts to a higher level.
3. Increase likelihood of getting appointments from prospecting.
4. Save time for us and for buyers.
5. Present an image of an informed consultant rather than a salesperson.

Research Sources
Internet search by company name Search by product name
Search by people’s names Web page
Contact management system Internal records
Champions Your mentor
News sources Magazines and business publications
Annual reports Credit bureaus
Word of mouth Friends and associates

Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.9


Worksheet:
Pre-Approach

Key information about the people, company, industry, etc.:

Specific call objectives:

Issues that represent selling opportunities:

Common ground or contacts that might be helpful:

Decide what to say first:

8.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Profitable Prospecting

Account Penetration
Referrals
Networking
Targeted Prospecting Campaign
Cold Calling
Sending Mass-mailings
Relying on Advertising and Marketing

Key points about prospecting:


• Balance your time and activities.
• Use a variety of approaches.
• Keep records and analyze your results.
• Find out what works best for you.
• Master an approach before deciding whether it works.
• Be creative.


Seeing a high quantity of prospects is not enough. We also want


to qualify our prospects to make the best use of our time. See
page 42 in The Sales Advantage to learn more about the four types
of prospects: known need—willing to talk, known need—unwilling
to talk, unknown need—not willing, and no need—willing to talk.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.11


Prospecting Methods
Here is a partial listing of possible tools for prospecting. Check the ones you are
using now, and circle the ones you could try. Remember to look for ways to take
an idea and make it relevant to your business.

Current accounts Financial reports


Referrals Telemarketing
Internet searches Competition
Phone books Databases
Trade shows Billboards
Trade magazines Cold calling
Lead groups Affiliates
Media New construction sites
Social/business functions Building directories
Business directories Service organizations
Book of lists Business events
Chambers of Commerce Direct mail
Call-in leads
Government
Neighbors and friends
Charity organizations
Presentations and workshops
Advertising from buyers
Local business publications
Seminars
Mailings/response cards
Mailing lists

8.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Prospecting Activities

Activity Day/Time Objectives

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.13


Finding and Building Champions
• Well-respected within the account

• In a position of authority

• Understands what makes your solution effective

• Articulate

• Dynamic

Customer Continuum
ant

t
e

nt

tive

n
ten
stil

pio
rab
ale
sist

por
Ho

con

am
o
biv

Fav
Re

Sup
Dis

Ch
Am

How can champions help us sell more business?

Where can we find champions?

When our champions move on or up, we can see our


business drop, or we can create new opportunities. See
how Andrew Winter doubled his business with his
champion on page 26 in The Sales Advantage.

8.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Champion Analyzer

Name and Title Influence (1–10) Possible Next Steps

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.15


Organizational Chart
Champions do not always have decision-making authority, but they can influence a
buying decision and/or put us in touch with the key decision-makers.
Understanding this chart helps us understand the relationship that key decision-
makers have with our champion, along with how much probable influence our
champion will have.

Man
agers age
Man rs
r Dir
i re cto ecto
D r
rs

Man
age

Dire
ecto
Man

ager
F O
VP

C
ctor
Dir

CEO s
ctor
Dir

s
Man

ager
ect

VP
Dire
VP
or
age

Man
rs

Dire tor
ctor re c
Di
Man ers
ager ag
s Man

8.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Organizational Chart

Place the champion on the organizational chart, along with other key people critical
to the decision-making process of your target company.

Organization:

Champion’s Name:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.17


Worksheet:
Sphere of Influence

Place the champion in the center of the Sphere of Influence chart. Identify points of
contact inside and outside the organization where this person has influence.

Champion’s Name:

Champion

8.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sphere of Influence

Social Community Business Groups

Buyers Doctors/Lawyers Accountants/Bankers

Other Sources

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.19


Buyer Profile
An important skill for us is the ability to briefly describe the kind of business we
represent. One of the most effective ways to do this is by describing a buyer
profile. We should be able to give a brief, interesting, and clear description of our
typical buyer.

Describe the type of person that you, your solution, and your company can help:

List challenges this person typically faces:

Describe the typical benefits this person gets from your solution:

8.20 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Referrals

When asking for referrals:


• Think of your buyers as partners who can refer you to a steady stream of
new business.
• Don’t underestimate the power of a satisfied buyer’s good will or influence.
• Remember that people who have been referred to you are more likely to
meet with you.
• Bear in mind that people who buy are more likely to refer others.
• Ask for an introduction in writing, by phone, or in person.

When are good times to ask for referrals?

When are people likely to give us referrals?

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.21


Worksheet:
Asking for Referrals

Examples
Thank you so much for your continued business. Your initiative has really given your
company a competitive advantage. I’m happy our company has been able to help you
and your organization meet your year-end goals. Based on what we have discussed today,
who else in your company might benefit from what we do or would welcome more
information? Would you please introduce me to that person now?

I am going to describe a colleague, associate, or friend to you right now. When someone
comes to mind, please stop me and tell me about him or her. She (he) is very similar to
yourself in that: (Relate your buyer profile.) This could be someone else in your company,
another department, an acquaintance from a professional organization, service club,
chamber of commerce, church, school … Stop me when you have thought of someone.
Would you write an introduction for me on the back of your business card? Thank you
very much!

8.22 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Networking

You develop a sales network by:


• Giving value to people, even if it has little to do with your product or service.

• Sharing your unique abilities and knowledge with others.

• Being approachable.

• Following through on commitments.

• Writing personal thank-you notes.

• Introducing influential people to each other.

Why would anyone want to know you? What unique abilities or knowledge do
you have?

Networking: If you don’t already have a good organization


in which to network, create one. Baek Sook Hyun built
a reputation this way and watched her business grow
from referrals she received. See how she did it on
page 31 of The Sales Advantage.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.23


Networking Events

How to Maximize Results


• Find out beforehand who will be attending.
• Show up early.
• Look your best.
• Bring lots of business cards.
• Target your buyers.
• Have your credibility statement ready.
• Remember people’s names and use them.
• Don’t drink, smoke, or eat while mingling.
• Don’t waste time with non-buyers.
• Have fun, laugh, be energetic.
• Stand close to the entrance at the start and end of the event.
• Spend two-thirds of your time with people you do not know.
• Find out about the other person before talking about yourself.
• Write notes on the back of the person’s business card immediately.
• Establish rapport—avoid selling at the event.

Networking Interview
1. What is your name?
2. What company do you represent?
3. What is your position?
4. Tell me about your responsibilities.
5. What are some of the challenges occurring in your business?
6. What business trends are affecting you and your organization?
7. What brings you to this event?
8. Tell me a little about the people you like to do business with.
9. Let me tell you about what I do. We provide …
10. What can I do for you?

8.24 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.25


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Chapter 11

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Review Parts 1 and 2

2. Prepare to relate a sales success based on an idea from the training.

3. Complete the opportunity charts and pursue new opportunities.

4. Conduct pre-approach for key sales calls.

5. Try new methods of prospecting.

6. Analyze champions within your accounts.

7. Ask for referrals.

8. Attend a networking event.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

8.26 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sales Report
Describe a recent sales call in which you applied an idea from the training.

What was the outcome?

What advice do you have for us?

How will we benefit from your advice?

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 8.27


Notes

8.28 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Plan for Success 9
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Develop a motivating personal vision


• Establish meaningful goals to ensure higher levels of sales success
• Learn ten ways to manage time to focus on profitable action
• Create five approaches to add value for clients with effective follow-
through

Overview
The way we spend our time determines what we get out of life and, more
importantly, how we feel about ourselves and the world around us. The key to
time management is knowing what we want most out of life and ensuring that
we take consistent action toward our goals.

Activities that may have little to do with what we want most tend to get in the
way of our goals. We will learn in this session how to take control of the
direction of our lives. In addition, we will discover exciting new ways to stay
on track, minimize distractions, and eliminate time wasters.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part III, Chapter 12

“Definition of insanity: Doing the same things in the


same way and expecting different results.”

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.1


Planning and Follow-Through

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Sales
Skills Plan
Customer
Attitude Prospect

Communicate Network Our


Consultant
Company
Follow- Penetrate
Through Accounts

Planning Rule: Plan for success Follow-Through Rule: Create


by creating a motivating customer loyalty by providing
personal vision, setting exceptional value and
smart goals, and managing following through to
time to enjoy a balanced life. exceed expectations.

9.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


The Wheel of Sales

Month/Year:

Planning

Selling Skills Prospecting

Attitude Networking

Communication Penetrate
Accounts

Follow-Through

Observations:

Changes I need to make:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.3


The Wheel of Life

Month/Year:

Career

Spirituality Finance

Health Community

Personal Life Social Life

Family

Observations:

Changes I need to make:

9.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Personal Vision

Vision is a concept we hear often in the business world. It means different


things to different people. We define vision as a clear picture of our desired
future state. An effective personal vision statement gives direction to our
personal and professional lives.

Reflect on your progress during this training and establish a new vision for your
future. Describe your new self with powerful language, in the present tense, and
with positive outcomes.

Having a clear vision for our lives helps us keep a positive


attitude about selling, which can be hard. For more
ideas on keeping our attitude on track, read chapter 13
in The Sales Advantage.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.5


Worksheet: Setting Goals
Professional Specific

Using the SMART formula, determine the goals Measurable


that will help you reach your objectives.

• Specific in terms of processes and resources Attainable

• Measurable by objective data


Relevant
• Attainable in that they can be achieved
• Relevant to my vision
Time-Specific
• Time-specific with a deadline

Goal:

Deadline to accomplish:

Challenges I will face:

How I will overcome these challenges:

How I will measure my progress:

The first step I will take:

9.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet: Setting Goals
Personal Specific

Using the SMART formula, determine the goals Measurable


that will help you reach your objectives.
Attainable
• Specific in terms of processes and resources
• Measurable by objective data
Relevant
• Attainable in that they can be achieved
• Relevant to my vision Time-Specific
• Time-specific with a deadline

Goal:

Deadline to accomplish:

Challenges I will face:

How I will overcome these challenges:

How I will measure my progress:

The first step I will take:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.7


Daily Time Log

Day:

Time Activities Note

Pre 7:00 am
7:00–7:30
7:30–8:00
8:00–8:30
8:30–9:00
9:00–9:30
9:30–10:00
10:00–10:30
10:30–11:00
11:00–11:30
11:30–12:00
12:00–12:30
12:30–1:00
1:00–1:30
1:30–2:00
2:00–2:30
2:30–3:00
3:00–3:30
3:30–4:00
4:00–4:30
4:30–5:00
5:00–5:30
5:30–6:00
6:00–6:30
Post 6:30

9.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Tyranny of the Urgent

Urgent Not Urgent


Important

Crisis Networking
Deadlines Clarifying Values
Meetings Planning
Repairs Relationships
Prospecting
Not Important

Trivia
Interruptions Internet
E-Mail Games
Voice Mail “Escapes”
Reports Junk Mail
Busy Work
Original concept by Charles E. Hummel

What would be the result if you spent more time in quadrant 2?

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.9


Time Management Fundamentals

Time-Savers 1–3* Specifically how you can improve

1. Block time.

2. Group similar tasks.

3. Keep a time log.

4. Know your priorities.

5. Network with successful


business people.

6. See high-capacity buyers


frequently.

7. Keep accurate records.

8. Plan your work.

9. Work your plan.

10. Learn new skills daily.

* 1 = Doing consistently 2 = Doing occasionally 3 = Doing rarely

9.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Example: Putting Activities to Work
A key to time management is to plan your schedule so your days are filled with
profitable activity. Determine what you should be doing for an upcoming week, and
set your schedule. Start with quadrant II (Important, not urgent) so you focus on this
area first.

Selling Activities
1–3* Calendar
I Need to Do
Plan for next quarter 1 hr Monday–6:30–7:30

Prospect to set appointments 45 min Monday–7:30–8:15

Write proposal 3 hrs Tuesday–8:30–11:30

Write 10 prospecting letters 45 min Tuesday–11:30–12:15

Drop by four accounts 2 hrs Wednesday–2:30–4:30

Call for referrals 90 min Wednesday–9:00–10:30

Attend networking luncheon 2 hrs Thursday–12:00–2:00

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.11


Worksheet:
Putting Activities to Work

Selling Activities
Time Calendar
I Need to Do

9.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Time Management Tools, Tips, and Winning Shortcuts

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.13


Contact Management Systems
Contact management is a means of helping sales professionals work more
productively. Contact management includes having up-to-date buyer information at
our fingertips, organizing our schedules, and providing a dependable means of
record keeping and correspondence.

Contact Management Tools


Systems have been in place for maintaining information on buyers for as long as
there have been salespeople. The systems used have been as diverse as the people
using them. They have ranged from the 3 x 5 cards in storage boxes to today’s
remarkable electronic tools.

Regardless of the system that you use, sales effectiveness today demands a contact
management system that provides accurate, timely, dependable information. Some
of the benefits of an effective contact management system include:

• Instant information on all your contacts

• A comprehensive history log to record all of your calls, meetings, and


correspondence

• A calendar by day, week, or month

• A report generator, a word processor, and mail-merge so you can create and
address personalized correspondence

• Sending and receiving electronic mail messages from within the program

• Information that is shared interactively through a network

9.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Contact Management

What contact management system are you using now?

What does it do well?

What do you wish that it would do?

What would more effective management of your information allow you to do?

Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.15


Follow-Through
Follow-Through Rule: Create customer loyalty by providing
exceptional value and following through to exceed expectations.

Customer

Consultant Our
Company

List five ways to follow through and exceed your customers’ expectations.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

To maintain customer loyalty, we have to exceed customer


expectations, not just meet them. Use a variety of
approaches to be sure you are constantly adding value, like
the ones on page 226 in The Sales Advantage.

9.16 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Service Opportunity Chart: Example

Waste water
analysis A B A B B B

Energy
consumption C C A B A B
review

Review
management A A C B A B
system

Refer to other
suppliers A C A A A A
Health
Compliance B A B C A C
Value-Added Services

Review Clean Forever


FSA Aviation
Pure waters
Blue Bird

Spotless
Crystal
Pick’s

Companies/Locations

Value-added services Opportunity to provide No opportunity


A clients are receiving B value-added services C exists

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.17


Worksheet:
Service Opportunity Chart
Value-Added Services

Companies/Locations

Value-added services Opportunity to provide No opportunity


A clients are receiving B value-added services C exists

9.18 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Worksheet:
Follow-Through

Specific account:

1. When did you last have contact, other than a sales call?

2. What can you do to exceed their expectations?

3. Based on this evaluation, what will you do this week?

4. How will this impact your relationship with this account?

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.19


Alternative Selling Approaches
Our changing world means that we need to capitalize on different selling
approaches. Identify creative ways to be proactive with new opportunities.

Team selling: Telephone:

Proposals: New markets:

Internet sales: Formal presentations:

9.20 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Alternative Selling Approaches

Technical sales: Contracts:

Multi-national buyers: Partnerships:

Others: Others:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.21


Assessing Your Progress
To help you prepare for your final report, would you please write a letter to us
based on how you benefitted from this training? An effective testimonial might
include:
• How you have benefitted from this experience so far
• Evidence of positive business results you are getting so far
• A sales incident that illustrates a success you had based on this training
• Return on investment for you, your company, or your clients

Example:

®
ing
le C a r n egie Train e
Da Driv
N o r th Central
62 366
, MO 63
O’Fallon
ding my
ve , d if fi c u lty excee ed by
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Because this year. I say y . A s w ldo u
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nk you, sm ever
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,
Sincerely
Karla

9.22 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Summary

The two most useful ideas I gained:


1.

2.

Applications to my selling:

Specific actions I will take:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.23


Applications
1. Reading

• The Sales Advantage—Chapter 13

• How to Win Friends and Influence People—Review Parts III and IV

2. Take specific action on your goals.

3. Make a change in how you manage your time.

4. Be proactive in creating added value for current clients.

5. Create new opportunities through alternative selling approaches.

6. Assess your progress by writing a testimonial letter about this training.

Reading Recap Notes

How to Win Friends and Influence People

The Sales Advantage

9.24 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 9.25


Notes

9.26 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Master the Selling Process 10
At the completion of this session, participants will be able to:

• Tie the seven-step sales process together


• Appraise and communicate strengths to create relationships
• Build on the successes experienced in this program

Overview
The ability to apply what we are learning is the most important measure of
participation in a training program. This session will give you the opportunity
to demonstrate the sales process we have been working on. Research shows
that we learn far more from what we do than what we observe. Our
strengths grow and become visible to others when we take risks and jump
outside our comfort zones.

Suggested reading supporting this session:


How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, Part I, Chapter 2

“Keep your mind open to change all the time. Welcome it.
Court it. It is only by examining and re-examining your opinions
and ideas that you can progress.”
—Dale Carnegie

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.1


Sales Model

Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Buyer Sales Element We Sell


nt

Preoccupation Rapport Ourselves


lta

Indifference Interest Needs


Buy

nsu

Doubt Solution Value


er

Co

Procrastination Motive Urgency


Reluctance Commitment Decisions

Partnership

10.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sales Presentation Championship
It’s your turn! You will deliver a seven-minute sales presentation that covers the
steps involved in the actual interview with the buyer.

Rapport
• Pleasantries
• Attention-Getter
• Agenda Statement or
• Credibility Statement

Interest
• As Is, Should Be, Barriers, Payout Questions
• Capability Statement

Solution and Motive


• Facts, Benefits, Applications, Evidence, Trial Close
• Motive—Value Summary
• Resolve Objection

Commitment
• Ask for a Decision
• Ask for a Referral

Guidelines for Sales Presentation Championship


• Seven minutes to give demonstration
• Resolve one objection
• Requirement for graduation
• No notes allowed

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.3


Sales Presentation Championship:
Preliminary Round

Name

Score
Pleasantries 5

Attention-Getter and Agenda,


10
or Credibility Statement

Questions:As Is, Should Be,


10
Barriers, Payout

Capability Statement 5

Solution: Facts, Benefits,


10
Applications, Trial Close

Solution: Evidence
10
(DEFEATS)

Resolve Objections 10

Motive—Value Summary 5

Ask for Commitment 5

Ask for Referral 5

Credibility 5

Would You Buy? 10

Enthusiasm 10

Total 100

10.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sales Presentation Championship:
Championship Round

Name

Score
Pleasantries 5

Attention-Getter and Agenda,


10
or Credibility Statement

Questions:As Is, Should Be,


10
Barriers, Payout

Capability Statement 5

Solution: Facts, Benefits,


10
Applications, Trial Close

Solution: Evidence
10
(DEFEATS)

Resolve Objections 10

Motive—Value Summary 5

Ask for Commitment 5

Ask for Referral 5

Credibility 5

Would You Buy? 10

Enthusiasm 10

Total 100

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.5


Notes

10.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sales Presentation Championship:
Rapport

Interest

Rapport Solution
Planning Customer Follow-
Relationship Through

Commitment Motive

Buyer:

Primary Interest (2.4):

Dominant Buying Motive (2.7):

Pleasantries:

Attention-Getter (1.6):

Credibility Statement (1.11) or Agenda Statement (1.13):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.7


Sales Presentation Championship:
Interest

As Is Questions (2.10):

Should Be Questions (2.11):

Barrier Questions (2.12):

Payout Questions (2.13):

10.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Sales Presentation Championship:
Solution

Capability Statement (2.16):

Need Fact (3.4) Benefit (3.5) Application (3.6)

Evidence (3.8):

Trial Close (3.9):

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.9


Sales Presentation Championship:
Solution (Continued)

Possible objections and responses (4.2):

Motive—Value Summary (5.5):

Commitment method to use (5.9):

Ask for a referral (6.22):

10.10 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Strength Comments
The ability to recognize and communicate the strengths we see in others is a skill that
has a tremendous effect on our professional and personal lives. Dale Carnegie said
that one thing every human craves is appreciation. One goal of this program is to
enhance our ability to develop positive relationships that lead to increased sales and
repeat business.

Of course, comments that aren’t sincere will do more harm than good. People
know when we are merely flattering them, and they will resent it—and us. A
strength comment includes a positive quality or characteristic you see in the other
person and evidence to support that strength.

Name:

Strength:

Evidence:

Name:

Strength:

Evidence:

Name:

Strength:

Evidence:

Name:

Strength:

Evidence:

Name:

Strength:

Evidence:

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.11


Summarize Your Progress

My most significant benefit from this sales training program so far is:

Specific results:

How this training will impact my career:

10.12 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy 10.13


Notes

10.14 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Resources

Program Glossary

Recommended Reading

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy R.1


Program Glossary

1. Build Rapport
Sales Philosophy—Try honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view.
Sales Model—Includes the seven elements of the sales process: Planning, Rapport,
Interest, Solution, Motive, Commitment, Follow-Through

Rapport Rule—Build rapport by talking to people briefly about something in which


they are interested.

Pleasantries—Brief conversation points that precede the actual sales process.


Stronger relationships lead to deeper levels of pleasantries.

Attention Getters—Five approaches to gain favorable attention at the start of the


sales process: Compliment, Ask Questions, Referral, Educate, Startle.

Client Interview—A questioning approach to help determine the impact the


solutions have for clients to gain evidence for selling.

Credibility Statement—Four-step process to build credibility in contacts with


prospects: General benefits, results for clients, suggestion, transition.

Agenda Statement—Three-point agenda plan for follow-up sales calls: Benefit of


meeting, Agenda, Transition.

2. Generate Interest
Interest Rule—Generate interest by finding out what your solutions will do to
benefit or service your prospects.

Primary Interest—The problem or opportunity a buyer wants resolved. The


primary interest is the result of the products, not what we actually sell.

Buying Criteria—Buyer’s requirements of the sale. If we cannot meet these


criteria, the buyer cannot do business with us.

Other Considerations—Factors that influence the buyer’s decision, but are not
required. Discovering and selling to these considerations gives a competitive
advantage.

R.2 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Program Glossary (Continued)

Buying Motives—Compelling emotional reasons for a buyer, team, or organization


to make a purchasing decision.

Questioning Model—Four-part process used to uncover the interests of buyers


and widen the buyer’s gap: As Is, Should Be, Barrier, Payout.

Buyer’s Gap—The buyer’s perception of how much difference there is between


their current reality and the possibilities of what they could have.

Buying Perspectives—Four different perspectives of buyers that influence their


decision making process: Executive, Financial, Technical, User.

Capability Statement—A summary process that puts the solution together with
the buyer’s needs and wants: Solution, Primary Interest, Buying Motive.

3. Provide Solutions
Solution Rule—Give buyers enough information, and no more, about your solution
and how it will benefit them, to convince them that they are justified in buying.

Fact—A statement that is specific, true, and can be proven. Use facts rather than
claims and generalities to build trust and credibility.

Benefit—Description of how a fact relates to a typical buyer’s interests and needs.


Application—Explanation of how a specific buyer will apply or enjoy some aspect
of the solution. Applications are unique to each buyer and allow us to tailor each
solution.

Evidence—Seven approaches to help build buyer confidence in the solutions.


Effective for opening the sale and resolving objections: Demonstrations, Examples,
Facts, Exhibits, Analogies, Testimonials, Statistics.

Trial Close—Evaluative question that asks buyers to express their opinion about
some aspect of the solution or presentation.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy R.3


Program Glossary (Continued)

4. Resolve Objections
Objection Rule—Resolve objections by finding points of agreement, clarifying the
issues, and providing compelling reasons to proceed.

Objection—Any point in the mind of a prospect that is hindering the advance of


the sale.

Objection Categories—Our response method for objections will depend on the


type of objection: Hopeless, Trivial, Misconception, Put-off, Prejudiced, Genuine.

Objection Responses—Four approaches to respond to objections: Deny, Admit,


Reverse, Explain. Almost all objections will ultimately require an explanation.

5. Appeal to Motive and Gain Commitment


Value Summary—Sales approach that appeals to the motivational reasons for
buying: Remind prospects of their need. Remind them your solution satisfies that
need. Paint a word picture.

Commitment Rule—Secure commitments throughout the process by gaining


agreements toward mutually beneficial decisions.

Commitment Methods—Approaches to ask buyers to make a buying


decision: Direct question, Alternate choice, Minor point, Opportunity, Weighing.

6. Uncover Opportunities
Opportunity Rule—Uncover new opportunities by penetrating existing accounts,
prospecting for new clients, and developing a network of champions.

Opportunity Chart—Evaluation tool to assess new business opportunities for


existing clients, new prospects, and lost accounts.

Pre-Approach—Research we conduct to understand as much as possible about the


buyer before making contact.

R.4 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Program Glossary (Continued)

Prospecting—Using a variety of methods to identify possible business partners.


Find the right variety and approaches.

Champion—A person who knows our client profile and is willing and able to refer
business to us. Excellent champions are articulate, dynamic, and well respected.

Sphere of Influence—A contact analysis tool that helps people identify business
and personal relationships that can lead to new sales.

Referral—New business leads from existing relationships.


Networking—Developing acquaintances and relationships with a variety of other
professionals to add value to the business community and develop more business.

7. Plan for Success


Planning Rule—Plan for success by creating a motivating personal vision, setting
smart goals, and managing time to enjoy a balanced life.

Vision—A clear picture of our desired future condition, including personal and
professional goals. Effective vision statements include powerful language, are set in
the present tense, and have positive outcomes.

Goal—Specific measuring points toward our vision. Effective goals are specific,
measurable, attainable, relevant to our vision, and time-specific.

Tyranny of the Urgent—A time assessment tool that helps determine how and
where to spend time for maximum value.

Contact Management System—Information tools that keep up-to-date


information about clients and prospects. Most people use electronic database tools.

Follow-Through Rule—Create customer loyalty by providing exceptional value and


following-through to exceed expectations.

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy R.5


Recommended Reading
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

How to Stop Worrying and Start Living by Dale Carnegie

The Sales Advantage: How to Get It, Keep It, and Sell More than Ever by J. Oliver Crom
and Michael Crom

The Greatest Salesman in the World by Og Mandino

Think and Grow Rich by Napolean Hill

The Sales Bible by Jeffrey Gitomer

How I Raised Myself from Failure to Success in Selling by Frank Bettger

SPIN Selling by Neil Rackham

The New Strategic Account Selling by Stephen E. Heiman, Diane Sanchez with Tad Tuleja

Selling to VITO by Anthony Parinello

The Whole Brain Business Book by Ned Herrmann

Swim with the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive by Harvey Mackay

Selling Power Publisher: Gerhard Gschwandtner

Solution Selling: Creating Buyers in Difficult Selling Markets by Michael T. Bosworth

Let’s Get Real or Let’s Not Play: The Demise of 20th Century Selling & the Advent of
Helping Clients Succeed by Mahan Khalsa

Persuasive Business Proposals: Writing to Win Customers, Clients, and Contracts by Tom Sant

Key Account Selling by Mack Hanan

Advanced Selling Strategies by Brian Tracy

The Force by David Dorsey

R.6 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012


Notes

May, 2011–May, 2012 Pearson Sales Academy R.7


Notes

R.8 Pearson Sales Academy May, 2011–May, 2012