Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 297

Introduction

The European Framework Grid

Level A1
Listening
I can understand very basic sentences concerning myself and my setting.
I can understand very simple instructions.
I can understand very simple rhymes

Speaking
I can give very simple instructions related to my setting.
I can describe myself, places and objects.
I can say something I like and dislike.
I can tell a simple story.
I can talk about myself and use essential.

Reading
I can read words and short sentences related to my everyday life.
I can read and understand short instructions.
I can read and understand a short poem.

Writing
I can identify myself writing very basic sentences.
I can write words, short notes of salutation, thanks and invitation related to my personal
setting.
I can write short notes to describe the actions in a role play situation.

Level A2
Listening
I can listen and follow short dialogues in well known settings.
I can follow the plot of a short and simple story or the description of places or persons from
my personal setting.
Speaking
I can communicate in everyday life situations and known settings, and express my likes
and dislikes.
I can describe with a certain accuracy people, places and objects that are well known to
me.
I can tell a short story choosing appropriate words and structuring the discourse correctly.
I can dramatize the characters of a short story.

Reading
I can read and understand in detail short messages as letters, notes, etc.
I can read and understand in detail short descriptive and narrative texts.
I can read and understand in detail a short drama (including the script describing the role of
characters).
I can read and understand short expository texts on natural sciences (including simple forms
of experimentation).

Writing
I can write a short letter or a simple information note.
I can write short descriptive texts on persons and places I know.
I can write the plot of a short story.
I can write essential notes describing the types of performance of the characters in a short
drama.
I can answer a short questionnaire on known subjects and give reasons for the answers.

Level B1
Listening
I can follow a conversation on general topics (family, school, hobbies, etc).
I can understand a story or a description including the comments of the speaker.
I can understand the description of simple phenomena in the field of natural sciences.
I can follow the content of a poem dealing with general topics.

Speaking
I can interact with foreigners at home and abroad in everyday life situations.
I can describe with accuracy events, places, and people.
I can describe natural phenomena using the adequate scientific expository form.
I can express my point of view on general topics and give reasons for it.

Reading
I can read and understand reports on general topics.
I can read and understand personal feelings expressed in literary forms.
I can read and understand non-complex texts in prose and poetry dealing with
contemporary subjects.

Writing
I can write in detail letters, summaries, or reports on known subjects I’m interested in.
I can write a short comment on literary texts (prose or poetry) expressing my personal point
of view.

Level B2
Listening
I can understand in detail a conversation or discourse on topics related to my field of
studies, or to my personal interests.
I can understand the general gist of a conversation based on theoretical themes.

Speaking
I can discuss with some fluency on general contemporary topics, expressing my point of
view.
I can discuss in simple terms about scientific (or literary) subjects related to my field of
studies and express my point of view.

Reading
I can read and understand a paper or commentary on scientific and literary themes related
to my field of studies.
I can read and understand newspaper articles on general topics or themes related to my
fields of interest and studies.
I can read and understand in detail non-complex contemporary writers (in prose or
poetry).

Writing
I can write a text in the essay form on subjects I’m interested in.
I can write in detail a report on scientific or technical subjects related to my fields of
interests or studies.
I can write a short commentary on the various aspects of meaning that can be devised in a
literary text (in prose or poetry).

Components of the Course


Student’s Materials
Three richly illustrated student books.
Three workbooks for further practice containing:
 reinforcement exercises on grammatical structures;
 exercises on vocabulary;
 further reading passages on culture
 more than fifty extra listening activities linked to the student's audio materials;
 further practice in writing dialogues, letters, and summaries.
Six students audio CDs containing:
 all the introductory dialogues (with and without pauses);
 pronunciation exercises;
 reading passages (in modules B Plus and C Plus);
 more than fifty listening activities linked to the workbooks;
 songs.

Teacher’s materials for 1 Plus


A comprehensive and easy-to-use Teacher’s Guide.
Five series of tests complete with solutions, the first one being an Entry Test.
Three audio CDs containing:
 introductory dialogues (with and without pauses);
 pronunciation exercises;
 open dialogues;
 listening activities for each unit
 listening activities linked to the student’s workbook;
 songs;
 listening tests.
Upgraded teacher’s material on European Certifications and the European Language
Portfolio

Modules
Each module is divided min four sub-modules and each sub-module contains 3 units. The units
focus on the functional use or English and present topics and skill development techniques
relevant to young learners. Different story lines, tracing the day-to-day activities of some
teenagers living in London, run throughout the modules. The characters represent the diversity of
the English-speaking population. Their conversations, life events, and other narratives provide
abundant cultural and factual information on the United Kingdom, the United States of
America, and Australia (see page 19 of this Guide information on the main characters of the
storyline).
The five basic skills; listening, spoken production. spoken interaction, reading, and writing, are
presented in each unit. The units are built around particular themes. Each unit contains the
following sections: Recalling Vocabulary (only in Module 1 Plus), Presentation Dialogue,
Communication Practice, Grammar Practice, Pronunciation, Developing Skills (called
Developing Oral Skills only in Module 1 Plus), Vocabulary Work (only in modules 2 Plus and
3 Plus), and Unit Self-Test.

Recalling Vocabulary: This section is included only in Module 1 Plus and aims at recycling
vocabulary that the students have already learnt in primary school. The lexical items are
introduced through listening activities, games, songs, and puzzles.

Presentation: Each unit generally opens with a dialogue involving the characters of the
module. The main characters are all in their early teens but there are also some young adults.
Most of the main characters are English, but some are American, Scottish, Jamaican, and
Australian (see page 19 for information on the main characters of the storyline).
Each dialogue introduces new functions and notions in a natural context of language and
culture. The dialogue also illustrates the unit theme and presents much of the vocabulary,
expressions, and structures practised in the unit. The complete dialogues are recorded on the class
CDs and student’s CDs, with background noise and without pauses first; they are then presented
with pause to allow students to repeat at the lines of the dialogue. From time to time a listening
purpose has been introduced to maintain the student's attention. Students have to listen carefully
to complete the dialogue or understand what one of the speakers says.
Each dialogue is accompanied by one or more coloured illustrations which:
 give a general idea of the situation (action, characters, events);
 communicate the meaning of some key utterances
 illustrate various cultural aspects.
Suggestions for using the dialogue illustrations in pre-listening activities such as predicting,
forming hypotheses, and exchanging information are given in the notes to each unit contained in
this Teacher's Guide. Important elements of the dialogues are isolated and practised in the
Communication Practice section. In this way, the dialogues are the first steps in oral skill
development.

Communication Practice: In this section students practise the functions and the structures
which are the objectives of the unit. Each activity is constructed around a task involving one or
more of the five skills (understanding the spoken language, spoken production, spoken
interaction, reading, and writing). The skills are therefore practised in an integrated manner that
is they are not isolated but coordinated. In almost all cases, the activities are carried out by
students working in pairs (pair work) or in groups (group work). Most of the activities ate
constructed with an information gap between the students in the pair or group. This makes it
possible to carry out the activity in a context which is very much like that of a real situation of
communication, and students can use the language according to their own abilities.
Communicative situations are clarified by and built up with pictures, maps, timetables, charts,
and other visual devices.

Classroom atmosphere
Teachers should remember that the main aim of the section called Communication Practice is
to develop students' oral production skills. Speaking is a very complex skill and is sometimes
neglected. Students require not only knowledge of the vocabulary and the grammatical system
but, above all, confidence in themselves in order to fulfill the simplest objectives in oral
language.
To build up this confidence, students need to practise vocabulary and grammatical structures,
but they should also be encouraged to develop "interaction skills". These skills concern what
they want to say, how they say it, how they develop their speech according to what the other
people say, how they maintain relationships with other people. Therefore, the activities in this
section should be carried out in a relaxed atmosphere. Teachers should not be too concerned
about the inevitable mistakes that students make when they speak to each other at this stage.
Only if students have the chance to speak freely without the anxiety of constantly being judged
by the teacher will they take a turn in the conversation.
Of course at the beginning they will be shy, but as time goes by they will acquire confidence in
themselves and build up oral fluency.

Grammar Practice: In this section the most important grammatical structures are dealt with in
Italian in a simple manner and with limited use of technical language. Particular attention has
been paid to the rules which govern the use of the grammatical structures in daily life.
Each grammatical point is immediately followed by one to more written exercises
concentrating on the structures, vocabulary, and communicative functions presented. Teachers
may choose to assign this section as homework. These exercises may also be used for student self
evaluation.
The content of this section must never be used for testing learning. The aim of exposing
students to the rules is to provide them with a reminder when necessary. Comprehending and
learning the mechanisms of the language must follow naturally from the activities students carry
out in class. It is useful, however, that students, with the help of the teacher, reflect upon the
language at some point in the teaching unit.
Some examples of such teacher-guided inductive procedure are given in this Teacher's Guide.

Developing Skills: This section in Module 1 Plus is called Developing Oral Skills. It aims at
practising and developing oral production and comprehension so that, at the end of the module,
students will immediately be able to take exams in order to obtain European Certifications at
level A1 .
In Modules 2 Plus and 3 Plus, this section allows students to apply and consolidate their
knowledge. Activities include listening comprehension, note taking, many reading passages
(usually accompanied by pre-reading and post reading tasks), open dialogues, interviews, role
plays, problem solving activities, crosswords, word puzzles, songs and writing tasks. The
listening activities and reading passage in this section present a richer vocabulary than that of the
opening dialogue and Communication Practice section. However, exercises related to the
readings do not generally require the use of a dictionary and are well within the reach of the
students' active abilities. From the outset, the course exposes students to spoken and written
language that is a little more complex than the language they are able to produce. The use of
authentic language versus restricted language encourages students to draw upon their native
abilities and use inference and deduction to acquire overall meaning rather than learn the
language word by word.
Particular emphasis has been placed on writing personal letters and guiding students to
summary writing. From the very beginning, students arc guided in the use of the most common
connectors in written discourse, understanding a text by distinguishing the main ideas from
details, organizing discourse according to a logical or temporal sequence.

European certifications and portfolio dossiers: Every unit includes practice in the five skills.
Emphasis on reading and writing increases as students consolidate and refine their listening and
speaking skills. This will allow students to take exams in order to get European Certifications at
level A1 and A2.
The activities which are especially structured to train students to external examinations are
marked with a yellow star.

A special symbol lE~ marks all the activities which can be inserted in each student's Portfolio.
These activities also include those in the section Unit Self-Test. This way the students build up
their dossiers with evidence of the level they have reached in all the language skills. At the end
of each sub-module, a section called "Build up your Portfolio" has been included with sugge-
stions for supplementary activities which students can include in their Portfolios.

Pronunciation: This section contains pronunciation exercises which should be carried out in
class with the teacher. These exercises concentrate on areas of pronunciation, intonation, and
stress that many teachers know are difficult for Indonesian students of English. For example,
exercises on word stress and sentence stress, exercises on the difference ty- and -teen the
numerals, etc.

Vocabulary work: This section is only in Modules 2 Plus and 3 Plus. It recycles lexical items
already presented in the unit. It also aims at enriching lexical areas and at giving students insi-
ght into word formation.
Songs: Several songs appear in the modules. The songs are a mixture of traditional American
and British folk songs and pop songs. The appeal of music to teenage learners is obvious;
students use the music to practise rhythm and stress, to acquire new vocabulary and expressions,
to use known language in a new context, and to have fun. The class CDs and the student's CDs
contain two versions of the songs. The version with the singers and the musical
accompaniment is followed by a version with the musical backtrack without the voices of the
singers. This allows the students to sing and/or record their voices with a musical
accompaniment.
Many of the traditional songs are excellent starting points for research projects about the times
when the songs were popular. Some songs lend themselves to discussions and essays on feelings,
leisure-time activities, personal preferences, and the creation of new lines or verses. Most
important, let the music act as a “break” in the daily routine. Let students enjoy themselves and
learn the songs they really like. Some songs have also been included in the Workbooks.
Unit Self-Test: This section is divided into three parts.
In the first part, students have to accomplish a writing task.
In the second part, called Record your voice, the students find suggestions to make recordings
(summaries, songs, descriptions, poems, dialogues, etc). This is particularly important for
students to get more practice in speaking about a particular topic, as specifically requested by
Examining Boards authorized to issue European Certifications.
The activities in these two parts are also intended to make students aware both of what they
have learnt in the unit and of the progress they have made.
The materials produced by the students in these two parts can be included in their Portfolios.
The third part, called Active Vocabulary, contains all the new words that students have learnt in
the dialogues and the Communicative Practice Section.

Self Evaluation Tests: Self evaluation tests are provided at the end of each sub-module.

Glossary: A glossary containing all the vocabulary actively practised in the units is placed at
the end of each module. Following each word you will find the pronunciation specified
according to the International Phonetic Alphabet, the equivalent word in Italian in the same
context, and the number of the unit in which the word appears for the first time.

Irregular verbs: A list of the most common irregular verbs presented in the course appears at
the end of each module.

The Teacher's Guide contains:


• an introduction to the course;
• a language breakdown:
• teaching procedures;
• a questionnaire in Indonesian (only in Module A Plus)
• an entry test (only in Module A Plus);
• a series of tests for each sub-module complete with solutions;
• two evaluation charts for oral production;
• lesson plans for each unit.
• the tape scripts of all recorded material (including the extra listening activities an the
Workbooks);
• the keys to the exercises in the Students Books.

Language breakdown: A language breakdown for each unit is provided in this Teacher's
Guide. It contains the communicative functions with their related linguistic exponents, the
grammatical structures, the lexical items, the topics and the pronunciation and intonation
patterns presented and activated in each unit.

Teaching procedures: Suggestions on how to organize and develop the various steps of the
teaching unit are given in detail.

Questionnaire: The questionnaire aims at finding out both whether students have any previous
experience in learning English and what kind of motivation they have to study that foreign
language.

Testing: A series of tests is provided at the end of each sub-module to evaluate student’s
progress. The first is an Entry Test aiming at evaluating the level of knowledge reached by
students who have already studied English at primary school. The tests are divided into:
• Listening comprehension
• Oral production
• Reading comprehension
 Written production
• Language structures and functions
 Cultural awareness
• Examination practice.

A CD-ROM containing the tests for the Way Points language courses is provided so that teachers
can choose and change exercises as they wish, and then print their personalized tests.

Evaluation charts for oral production: Two evaluation charts to assess the oral production of
each student are provided. The teacher can use the charts to evaluate the students during an oral
interview.

Lesson plans: In the lesson plans, teachers can find suggestions on how to exploit the
possibilities offered by the course. There are ideas for warm-up activities, review, activities; for
reinforcement and improvement. There are also special notes for teachers concerning cultural or
linguistic aspects. Additional activities and exercise for the development of the various skills
are given when appropriate. Finally, there are the tape scripts for the recorded material and the
keys to the exercises.

Multimedia Material
The course includes class and students material.
CLASS MATERIAL
Class audio CDs: The voices of teenagers and adults speaking their native language provide
authentic spoken language. The CDs contain all the dialogues, pronunciation exercises, open
dialogues, listening comprehension activities, reading passages (for Module 2 Plus and 3 Plus),
songs with backing tracks for karaoke singing, extra listening materials linked to the activities
in the workbooks, and the listening comprehension tests given in the Teacher’s Guide. The CDs
are a valuable: tool for listening and speaking exercises.
All sound material has been recorded by professional British and American actors at The Sound
House Studio, in London. Producer: James Richardson.

STUDENT'S MATERIAL
Student's audio CDs including;
• all the dialogues recorded twice: once with background noises and a second time without
background noises and with pauses to allow students to repeat the lines of the dialogues;
• pronunciation exercises;
• listening material linked to that activities in the Workbooks:
• songs with backing tracks for karaoke singing.

Three CD-ROMs (one for each Module) containing:


• Build up your Portfolio
• the video of London Adventures
• three musicals from the book Sing and Act with Musicals. For further information see
page 14 of this Guide.
The Workbooks contain about 350 supplementary written exercises, and more than 61 listening
activities linked to the student's recorded material.

Supplementary material for extra practice in the classroom or at home are available.

A video: London Adventures, with a related Activity Book.

A CD-ROM containing the video London Adventures and various activities as in the CD-
ROMs for the students (see page 14 of this Guide). It is also accompanied by an Activity Book
for extra practice.

Two sets of 288 Communication Cards (Only in Modules 2 Plus and 3 Plus): these cards aim at
improving the communication abilities of students. They work in pairs carrying out
communication tasks. Each task, based on the information gap principle, is carried out with
two cards, A and B. Only part of the information needed is contained in each card so that
students have to ask question and give answers to complete the task. Two tasks have been
provided for each unit. There are 12 cards for Task I and 17 cards for Task 2, so that a whole
class of 24 students can practise in pairs at the same time.

A book with two audio CDs: Sing and Act with Musicals. A collection of six short musicals
written and produced by Guido Cataldo and Janet Shelly. The language structures and the
vocabulary of the six musicals follow the syllabus of the Way Points language courses. In
particular, the musicals Cinderella and The Jungle Book are based on the syllabus of the first
year, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and King Arthur and The Knight of Round Table are
based on the syllabus of the second year, The Taming of the Shrew and A Christmas Carol are
based on the syllabus of the Third year.
Sing and Act with Musicals is composed of a Student's Book and a Teacher's Guide.

The Student's Book is richly illustrated and contains the scripts and the scores of the six
musicals and two audio CDs. The two audio CDs contain the musicals sung and acted by a
group of teenagers.

The Teacher's Guide contains:


- an introduction on how to use the musicals
- a description of the characters
- detailed production notes and drawings for sceneries, costumes and props
- language notes, and teaching suggestions
- two audio CDs containing the backing tracks of the musicals to allow students to sing with a
musical accompaniment.

Extra activities on the Internet: students can also connect to the Zanichelli site on the Internet
and enjoy during English language activities linked to Way Points.

www.zanichelli.it/zte is a website of interactive tests with specific activities for Way Points
Plus. Students can train and lest their level of knowledge and competence of the English
language. Teachers can change and personalize test; and build up a personal test-bank.

www.zanichelli.it/happening is an information and topical issues site updated every two weeks.
It allows students to integrate their knowledge of the English speaking world and culture with
recent events and news.

Teaching procedures
Each teaching unit, which is usually completed in three or four lessons, consists of five stages:
1. Presentation (Recalling Vocabulary and Dialogue)
2. Oral Practice
(Communication Practice)
3. Grammar and Written Practice
(Grammar Practice)
4. Expansion (Developing Skills)
5. Self Evaluation and Testing (Unit Self-Test).

1. Presentation Stage
This stage is very important because it is the first time the linguistic material students must learn
is presented. For false beginners, each unit in the Module 1 Plus starts with the section Recalling
Vocabulary. In this section, students are guided in their efforts to recall and reuse the lexical
items needed for the functions and structures contained to the unit.
The vocabulary and the structures are then contextualized in a dialogue. It is imperative that
students clearly understand from the outset what is presented.
Teachers may adopt various techniques, and the expert teacher is able to select the most suitable
according to the type of material he/she is using and his/her teaching situation. The techniques
described here have been tested by the authors and many other experienced teachers over many
years of teaching. Nevertheless, the techniques we suggest may be varied and adapted to fit
various teaching situations.

a) Pre-listening activities
Since language always depends on the situation the speakers are in, before asking students to
listen to the recorded dialogue, the teacher should help them recognize and consider the various
elements of the situation of communication. Teachers may ask questions such as: Who it
speaking? Who is he or she speaking to? Where are the speakers? What do you think they are
talking about? What relationship is there between the speakers?
This can be done from the very first lesson with the help of the illustrations and using the
students' mother tongue. Precisely for this reason, some of the illustrations have been made large
enough to visualize the overall situation clearly and easily transmit cultural information. It is
obvious that English can be used more frequently as students progress in learning.
There are many levels of interpretation in “reading” a picture. Four levels of speculation are
suggested here:
 What is seen in the picture.
• What is known about the setting and the characters.
 What can be inferred.
• What can be hypothesized

What is seen in the picture


At this level of comprehension, the students' task is to identity the components of the picture.
Questions may be Who/What can you see? How many people are there? What are they
wearing? What colour.., etc. The teacher can also try to discuss cultural aspect for example the
sorts of houses shown. It is better not to provide too many explanations, although some
comparisons and contrasts can be made between the British way of life and the culture of the
students' country. By looking at the picture carefully, students can better understand not only the
foreign culture, but also their own.

What is known about the setting and characters


When proceeding to the other pictures accompanying the dialogues in the course book,
students should recognize features they have already met; people, objects, places,
relationships between people, people and places, people and objects etc.

What can be inferred


At this stage students can be guided in their attempts to infer relationships between
people, people and objects, and people and actions.

What can be hypothesized


This stage is not really very different from the above. However, it is slightly more
challenging. The teacher may ask students to make hypotheses about relationships
between elements in the picture and what can be outside of the picture.
The last two stages are very important in developing the creative ability of students.
The ability to make hypotheses is an essential thinking skill that needs to he practised in
both the foreign language and the mother tongue.
The specific aims of the four stages are:
• to present the general situation;
• to set the scene:
• to give a general idea of the story:
• to present the cultural environment;
• to recall known vocabulary and structures;
• to present new vocabulary and structures;
• to predict events;
• to encourage creativity.
These activities with pictures are most productive if they take place in friendly
atmosphere. This encourages students to speculate quite freely so that even shy students
will want to contribute. Examples of how this stage can be conducted are given in the
lesson plans.
Pre-listening can also be carried out by trying to focus the students' attention on one or
more key points in the dialogue. The teacher can, for example, write questions on the
black-board before asking students to listen to the dialogue, and ask them to answer these
after listening. Occasionally, listening purposes are given before the dialogue. Of course,
the questions will be in the students' mother tongue during the initial stage.

b) Listening
Students listen to the dialogue once or twice without pauses and then discuss the answers
to the listening purposes given in the book or by the teacher.

c) Predicting the utterances of the dialogue


The teacher may ask students to reconstruct the utterances of the dialogue asking questions
such as: Who speaks first? What does he/she say? Then, the students listen to the actual
utterance in confirm or reject their hypotheses. The teacher stops the CD player and asks
other questions like: What do you think Eddy will answer? and students provide suitable
answers. The teacher plays the CD player again. Then he/she asks other questions to elicit
all the other utterances of the dialogue. It is important that students listen to each utterance
after they have made a series of hypotheses.
This procedure is used to encourage students to predict most or the utterances contained
in the dialogue. The teacher must accept all of the students’ predictions, provided they are
appropriate to the situation of communication. This is to ensure that shy students are not
discouraged from mentioning their predictions when these are continually rejected by the
teacher.

d) Listening and repetition


Students listen to the dialogue with pauses and repeat the utterances. When students repeat the
dialogue for the first time it is advisable that they do not see the written version, in order to avoid
interference due to the discrepancies between sounds and their written symbols.
If teachers consider it useful, they can ask the class to repeat the utterances in chorus, then in
groups of students (for example whole rows) and finally individually.
When, interference from the written text is reduced to a minimum, students can repeat the
utterances by reading from their books.

e) Reading out loud


Reading out loud should be done by groups of students either at the same time or one after the
other. Each member of a group reads out loud the utterances of one character.

f ) Reconstruction of the dialogue


The reconstruction of the dialogue must obviously be carried out with books closed. The teacher
asks question; to help students reconstruct the dialogue: Who speaks first? What does he/she
say? How does Susan answer? What happens now? etc.

g) Dramatization
At this point, the dialogue will have been memorized by almost all the students, who will
therefore be able to act it out. This is always extremely interesting and fun for students, and it
would be a pity to dedicate only a short time to this activity. If the lesson is almost over, it
would be better to postpone this activity until the following lesson thus giving all students, even
the slowest enough time to memorize the entire dialogue at home.
It is advantageous to use "props”, if the students have them available where necessary (the
teacher or the students can procure them). Other students not directly involved in the activity in
question can provide background noise (a doorbell ringing, a door opening, etc.), or they can act
as "extras'". The whole activity should be carried out in a lively playful atmosphere in order to
reassure stage-shy "actors", and also encourage shy students. The teacher should coordinate the
activities, but also be able to remain in the background at the right time and, when necessary,
suggest forgotten lines. He/she should avoid correcting students. Correcting can be done after
the acting is over.

2. Oral Practice Stage (Communication Practice)


In this stage, the functions and structures presented in the dialogue are practised intensively,
usually with new lexical items. Each activity is highly visible and clearly reveals the kind of
communicative function it exercises so that students can immediately become aware of the real
use of the utterances they produce during practice. Moreover, in these activities there is always
some kind of information gap where one speaker will not know what the other speaker will
answer, and vice versa. Occasionally, participants have to communicate about their personal
experience. These activities are of fundamental importance for the success of the course. Not
only do students practise listening and speaking, but they also exercise skills such as organizing
oral and written discourse, predicting language, negotiating meaning and correcting each other
mistakes.
Almost all the activities should be aimed out in pairs on groups. Working in pairs or in groups
helps solve the problem of lack of time for individual student production and comprehension
practices. The class is divided into pairs and the teacher assigns letters A and R to the member of
each pair. All pairs work simultaneously and at the end of the activity, the two members
exchange roles so that each student can, for example, ask and answer questions. If the class has
an odd number of students, the teacher can pair up with the odd students and take part in the
activity. The seating arrangement of the class should be change frequently so that students can
change partners.
During these activities the teacher should take the role of monitor. He/she can walk around the
classroom, listen to the pairs of students, and make necessary corrections. Often, however, the
partners themselves will correct each other.
The teacher might, from time to time, follow another procedure. He/she can walk around the
classroom, listen to the pairs of students, and note down any mistakes they might be making.
After the activity has been completed, the teacher may go over the mistakes noted beforehand
with the whole class.

This type of activity has the advantage not only of setting all students involved simultaneously,
but also of amusing boredom caused by listening to the same exercise repeated over and over
again. One might object that practice is rendered less effective by the fact that all the students
are talking at the same time. However, this rarely happens. Students get used to lowering their
voices almost immediately because they realize that yelling does not help, but only causes
other students to raise their voice as well. Sometimes, when the activity is over in a few verbal
exchanges, it might be a good idea to substitute a chain exercise for pair work: student A asks a
question to student B who answers. The latter than asks the same question to student C who
answers and then asks the question to student D, and so on.
Group work is also interesting and useful; it is carried out in the same way as pair work. It is
often necessary for the group (usually a small group of 3 or 4 students) to select a group leader
who will report the results of his/her group work to the class. An important characteristic of
this kind of activity is that students are asked to collaborate actively. They themselves must
provide the necessary information thus giving the exercise a touch of the personal information
unknown to the partner. This justifies the verbal exchanges and makes them similar to those
occurring in real situations of communication.
An information gap is introduced into almost all oral activities.

3. Grammar and Written Practice (Grammar Practice)


Students should start from real linguistic experience to discover how the language they are
learning works. These experiences lead students to consciously make use of the linguistic
materials. Afterwards, with the guide of the teacher, they can make generalizations about the
basic structures they have already met. This is best done through a guided inductive method
that allows students to "discover" rule through discussion with their teacher and classmates.

The main characteristics of this procedure are:


a) Discussion must take plan after a certain amount of practice on the linguistic material dealt
with, and not before. The teacher is usually advised to conduct discussion either after work on
the dialogue has been completed or after the Communication Practice stage. Of course, teachers
are free to carry this out even later. for example at the end of the teaching unit.
b) It must be the students who "discover" the rule and not the teacher who explains it; this
procedure is based on the pedagogical principle according to which learning by discovery last
longer. Of course, the role of the teacher is more delicate than the tradition generally allows,
he/she becomes, that is a “solicitor of knowledge" and no longer the "depository of
knowledge".

In the section Grammar Practice, each grammatical note is immediately followed by some
written exercises included in order to apply the rule. The new structures are isolated and com-
pared to the corresponding mother tongue structures. The notes that follow are simple and are
limited to essential aspects. All fine distinctions not to be found in the actual use of the langua-
ge at any given stage have been artfully avoided. Grammatical terminology is limited to the
strictly necessary.

This section has several basic aims:


• to provide a series of exercises to apply the rules;
• to make it possible for students to concentrate further on the working of the language;
• to give any students, who for some reasons, were not present during the discussion on
the language, the possibility of understanding certain mechanisms of the language on their
own.

Teacher should remember that the content of this section must never be used for test learning.

4. Expansion (Developing Skills)


This section represents the transfer stage, where all the linguistic material presented earlier in
the unit is made use of again, together with the material learned in previous units. Students
carry out language activities within the scope of the main language skills, listening, spoken
production, spoken interaction, reading and writing.

a) Listening activities
There are many listening activities in all the units. At this point, listening is of an extensive
kind which is very similar, therefore, to the way we listen during a conversation or to the radio,
for example. At this stage, of course, vocabulary and structures are not strictly controlled, but it
is not necessary for the students to understand every single word of what they are listening to;
they must instead grasp the global meaning or be guided toward concentrating only on some
elements present in the text. The task of the student is therefore reduced but his/her interest in
listening is held high because what he/she is asked to do while listening. The task is never too
difficult, so the student is reassured that her/she will be able to face it, and will have the
satisfaction of being able to carry it out.

b) Speaking activities
These activities aim at developing students’ oral production through recall of linguistic
material learned previously. Productions stimulated by involving students in simulations during
which they exchange roles, or discussion to be carried out in the class.
There are open dialogues, interviews, problem solving activities, crosswords, word puzzles,
and songs.
There are also many games, some of which stress competitiveness as a means of stimulating oral
production, while others require verbal corporation reach the objective of the game.
Open dialogues are also useful. They usually focus on the functions presented in the teaching unit.
An advisable to encourage students to give “true” answers using the appropriate vocabulary and
structures. At the beginning of the course, the teacher is advised to give an example before the
activity begins. He/she will play the recording and supply the appropriate utterances during the
pauses. Then, a few students can be asked to do the same.
The songs are also very useful. First, the teacher plays the recording and students
listen to the song. Then he/she reads the text, explains the meaning, and ask students
to practise pronouncing the words line by line. The teacher then plays the song again
and asks students to sing along with the recording. The teacher should sing with the
students, encouraging the shy ones to sing in the chorus. Dedicating, from time to time,
the last five or ten minutes of the lesson to a song is an excellent way to conclude a
lesson in which students have concentrated on exercises, leaving them in a good mood,
more eager than ever to begin another lesson. Motivation and pleasure are worth a
hundred exercises!

c) Reading activities
Written texts are always accompanied by some kinds of activities. These activities
take into consideration the various kinds of reading each of us engages in during our
everyday life. In fact, the way we read is influenced essentially by our reasons for
leading and by the kind of text we are reading. If we want to know what time a
television programme will be broadcast, for example, we look through the text
rapidly, the text in this case being a TV guide, until we find the place that interests us;
this kind of reading is called "scanning-. Other kinds of text can be read in this way
too. We can also scan a text to fine, for example, a date or a name that interests us in a
newspaper article. Another technique, known as "skimming", is adopted when we are
reading a text quickly in order to find out if it is of interest to us and if it is worth
reading more carefully.
It is important that students become accustomed to using these techniques right from
the start. Therefore, various activities of this type are found in the course book,
together with other activities aimed at helping students understand the meaning of the
various texts, select the main ideas of the texts first, and then of the various
paragraphs, classify details, understand difficult words, etc.
These activities accompanying the text are often placed before the text they refer to
and students must carry them out while reading. This differs from the usual technique
of presenting a list of questions at the end of the passage. The questions at the end
only check comprehension of the passage itself, whereas the activities to be carried out
before reading or while reading help students understand the passage. It is clear,
therefore, why we have given precedence In this kind of activity. However, many
questions are also included to check comprehension.

d) Writing activities
The written activities in this section are for written discourse beginners. Students
must be trained to organize a written text which, at this level, consists of a letter, a
brief a brief report or a summary. The exercises are graded and begin with the
organization of the sentence and go on to the organization of paragraph, within a
complete text. To do this, the most common logical syntactic connectors have been
introduced quite early. Later, the activities take into account the organization of the
sentence to finally reach organization of paragraph within a complete text. Since the
beginning, students are asked to write chart short personal letters and brief reports.
Summary is also dealt with using techniques which help the student distinguish more
important ideas from details, in a written text.

e) Pronunciation
This section is dedicated to pronunciation and must be carried out in the classroom
with the teachers help. The pronunciation exercises concentrate on areas of
pronunciation, intonation and stress that Indonesian students of English find
particularly difficult. For example, particular attention has been paid to:
- [σ ] and [ζ ] sounds (voiceless and voiced) in plural nouns and third person
singular of the simple present;
pronunciation of -teen and -ty in number endings;
[Ω ] sound at the end of the word;
[δ ], [τ ], [ι δ ] sounds in past tenses;
[ ], [∂ ] sounds;
[η ] sound at the beginning of a word;
pronunciation of the sound [ρ ]
word tress and sentences;
intonation it question tags;
linking sounds;
full and reduced forms of words.

5. Self evaluation (Unit Self Test)


In this section, students should become aware of what they have learnt in the unit. There are
two kinds of activities relating to the functions, structures, and vocabulary learnt: written
activities and self recording activities during which students record their voices while
speaking in English.

a) Written activities
These activities aim at helping students recognize the functions studied and relate these to
appropriate utterances. Most of the activities consist of matching functions and utterances,
writing dialogues, following instructions and writing dialogues following descriptions of
situations.

b) Record your voice


This is an activity that each student should carry out at home with a cassette recorder. The aims
of this new activity are firstly to have the student product oral language at his/her own pace,
making mistakes, correcting the mistakes at his/her convenience, and secondly to build up a
sense of achievement and self confidence, which is essential for success. Moreover, this activity
should be of great value both for the teacher and the student, because, after a period of time,
each student will have enough of his/her own material to compare and verify the progress
he/she has made in the oral production of the language. The teacher, from time to time, can
collect the cassettes to evaluate the progress of each individual student.
Both the written materials and the recorded texts produced by the students can also be inserted
in their own Portfolios. The recorded texts represent a tangible evidence of what the students
can produce orally.

c) Active vocabulary
This is a list of the new words presented in the dialogues and in the Communication Practice
section of each unit. Words are classified as noun, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, etc.

Entry Questionnaire
This questionnaire is only in Module 1 Plus. It is in Indonesian because it is addressed to
students al the beginning of the first school year. The questionnaire is included to find out:
• whether the student studied English in primary school;
• whether the student knows about the English speaking world;
• whether the student is motivated to learn English and to appreciate the culture of English
speaking peoples.

This questionnaire is given on page 21 of the Teacher's Guide for Module 1 Plus. It may be
dictated or photocopied.

Tests
An Entry Test (only for Module 1 Plus) and four series of other tests have been provided at the
end of each Teacher's Guide.

Entry Test
This test is addressed to students who have already studied English at primary school. It aims
at evaluating the level of knowledge reached by students at the beginning of the first school
year. This entry test is given on page 86 of the Teacher Guide for Module 1 Plus. It may be
photocopied and distributed to all students.

Test 1-12
There is a series of tests for each sub-module. They aim at testing not only the linguistic
material in each sub-module, but also recycled material from previous sub-modules. Should the
teacher wish to use them, he/she is authorized to make photo-copies for the students.
Each series consists of various types of tests.

Some aim at testing oral and written receptive and productive skills. Others aim at testing the
learning of grammatical structures, functions, and vocabulary. Finally, there are tests which aim
at verifying the students' knowledge of the serious aspects of British and American culture
contained in the course.
However, teachers should always remember that they are not only testing students’ abilities but,
above all, finding out whether what was intended to be taught has in fact been learned. The
results of these tests will help teachers decide if students are ready to begin another sub-module
or if some revision is necessary. Each series of tests includes an extra session called
Examination Practice especially structured to train students to external examinations in order to
obtain European Certifications at an elementary level,

A CD-ROM containing all the tests (for Module 1 Plus, 2 Plus, 3 Plus) is provided together with
this Guide. Teachers can choose and change exercises in Microsoft Word format as they wish,
and then print their personalized tests.

a) Listening comprehension tests


There are twelve series of listening tests. These listening tests are recorded on the Class audio
CDs and precisely at the end of the following units' recordings:
Listening Test 1 (Test 2) end of Unit 1c
Listening Test 2 (Test 3) end of Unit 4
Listening Test 3 ('test 4) end of Unit 7
Listening Test 4 (Test 5) end of Unit 10
Listening Test 5 (Test 6) end of Unit 13
Listening Test 6 (Test 7) end of Unit 16
Listening Test 7 (Test 8) end of Unit 19
Listening Test 8 (Test 9) end of Unit 22
Listening Test 9 (Test 10) end of Unit 25
Listening Test 10 (Test 11) end of Unit 28
Listening Test 11 (Test 12) end of Unit 31
Listening Test 12 (Test 13) cud of Unit 34

Tape-scripts of the tests can be found in the section KEY TO TESTS and detailed notes on how
to use them are given in the lesson plans.

b) Oral production test


The tests consist of interviews, communication tasks, open dialogues, role plays, etc.
Two evaluation charts for oral production are included. They have been printed on page 20 for
teachers to photocopy. The first chart can be used for a general assessment of the student
production during the course of the oral test. The second chart is more specific and features a
points system whereby the teacher can give each student a mark according to the total number
of points he/she receives during the test.

c) Language structures and function tests


These tests aim at checking grammar, functions, and vocabulary. They can he photocopied and
distributed to students.
d) Written production tests
These tests regard composition of letters, dialogues, and summaries.

e) Reading comprehension tests


Passages and activities relating to test reading comprehension are printed in this Teachers Guide.
These passages may be photocopied and distributed to students.

f) Tests to check student’s knowledge of culture


These tests consist mainly of questionnaires in Indonesian or in English which aim at checking
student’s knowledge of the British and American ways of life.

g) Examination Practice
These tests are especially structured to prepare students for external examinations in order to
obtain (European Certifications at an elementary level.

CD-ROMs for the students


One CD-ROM comes with each of the three volumes of Way Points Plus Yellow Edition
Each CD-ROM has three interactive sections presenting, year by year, up-to-date material and
new activities. Complementing the course material presented in the book, the CD-ROM
provides a natural multimedia integration of the learning experience:
• Build up your Portfolio
• London Adventures
• Sing and Act with Musicals

BUILD UP YOUR PORTFOLIOS

An interactive tool helping students between the ages of 11 and 14 create their own language
Portfolio for English.

• A selection of specially chosen exercises lets students assess their language skills and
improve their learning strategies, after having truly understood their importance.
• All the material is graded following the skills and abilities developed throughout the course.
• All the activities can be performed interactively, with new content each year.
• An opportunity for the students to practise and measure themselves in a practical way by
completing exercises, listening to audio tracks, and watching videos.
• A way of integrating portfolio activities into a homogeneous teaching course.

STRUCTURE
This is the main part of the Portfolio where students reflect on their knowledge of the language
and become aware of their own achievement in the study of English.
It is divided into 5 sections that are easily accessed using the menu at the top.

Chi sono
A short autobiographical section where students enter personal data, the languages they know
and their favourite activities.

Cosa ho fatto
An opportunity to reflect on students' important language experiences, from intercultural
exchanges to writing to a pen-friend.

Cosa mi piaccrrbbc fare


A moment to consider what students would like to do with English and what abilities they will
need to develop.
On the basis of the preferences expressed by the students, this section automatically calculates
which are the most important skills and makes them more aware of the linguistic objectives they
can aim at.

Strategic per migliorare


On the basis of what students would like to do, the program proposes the fair skills of listening,
speaking, reading, and writing and then suggests three possible strategies that students can use to
improve each skill. To make this process more effective, students are not asked to passively fill
in a table on the strategies they use, but they are invited to complete two exercises for each
strategy before responding.
This approach, easy to accomplish with an interactive program, has several advantages:
• students are made aware of the strategies they are considering and are invited to give
answers bated on real experience, this section proposes 24 exercises, providing it further lear-
ning opportunity within the Portfolio activities
• students learn to approach exercises from the viewpoint of their usefulness within an
engaging learning experience.
Self-Evaluation
An activity suitable for the end of the school year. It presents 20 different abilities that students
have acquired during the course of study. Again this is not just filling in an arid form, but deals
with real abilities. For each ability, there are two exercises which must be completed before
students can reply.
• Through exercises and videos, students are invited to give answers that require practical work
and careful thought.
• Students perform a further 40 exercises.
While the activities and exercises change each year, progressively adapted to the level achieved,
they are always graded to match the pace of the course book and the European Common
Framework.
All the material produced by students can be printed and colleted in a ring binder.
The pages show the date when the work was printed. It is possible to return to the Biography
section throughout the years to update the material, adding new results, and experiences.

Dossier
Each CD-ROM includes an interactive project which requires reading, listening and writing
skills. The project can he performed at home or in the computer room at school. Following the
guided course, students progressively build up a document of several pages. This can then be
printed and kept in each student's personal Dossier as evidence of the work he or she has
produced.

• The activity can be carried out, step by step, over several days and printed once it has been
completed.
The course allows students to acquire new vocabulary and improve their listening, writing, and
reading skills while engaged in the creation of personal work which can be shown to the class
and parents.
The projects proposed:
• The Diamonds' Thief  CD 1 Plus
• Sports CD 2 Plus
• The Tower of London CD 3 Plus.
Passport
This part of the language Portfolio has been made as simple and intuitive as possible for students.
Thanks to the interactive program, in fact, students are guided through the levels of the Common
Framework of Reference, becoming familiar with it in an easy way without complicated tables.
Let’s look at the 4 units making up this section in more detail:

Personal Data
A short section where personal information is entered.
To save precious teaching time, the personal data already entered in the Biography section under
-
Chi sonri' is automatically carried over to this section. The page simply has to be completed.

Educational Background
In this section students keep record of their certificates and/or diplomas. To make it
easier to fill in, the more common certificates and relative levels are already shown.

Linguistic Experience
A concise table where students can enter the overall duration of their language
experiences.

Self-Evaluation
A grid where students enter the language level they have reached according to the
European Common Framework of Reference.

INTERACTION
In designing the CD-ROM we took particular care to provide students with a multimedia tool
as simple and intuitive as possible.
The interactive Portfolio reflects the metaphor of a ring binder, showing visually the aim of
collecting and saving their work.
The navigation bar at the top allows students to move from one section to another at any time
where they are at that moment.
It is not possible to reply to the questions until the interactive exercises have been completed.
In this way, students are able to understand the meaning of the descriptors and assess
themselves in a conscious manner.
You can move back and forth between successive pages within each section.
All the sections can be printed.

LONDON ADVENTURES
The London Adventures section contains various activities allowing students to interact with
the computer.

• Every time students complete an activity they are given immediate feedback and a reward.
• They can also record their voices, then listen and compare their pronunciation to that of a
native speaker.
• They can look up words in the Glossary, and check grammar rules in the Grammar section.
• The CD-ROM can be used to the classroom or at home.

The episodes are divided up into the three consecutive CD-ROMs.


Episode 1, 2  CD 1 Plus
Episode 3, 4, 5, 6  CD 2 Plus

Episode 7, 8, 9, 10  CD 3 Plus

STRUCTURE
The London Adventures section has two main parts:
Video
Here students can watch each episode of the film London Adventures and choose between
showing or hiding the subtitles. The Video section lets students access two subsections:
• Dialogues: students can listen to a selection of dialogue from the episode, one at a time.

• Dubbing: students can record their own voice and substitute one of the characters to
perform true interactive dubbing.

Activities

There are 11 Activities associated with each episode. These interactive exercises allow the
students to measure their own understanding and knowledge of the language structures
presented in the video. There are various types of Activities:
• Comprehension: exercises to test understanding of the dialogues.
• Grammar Check: grammar exercises.
• English Sounds pronunciation exercises.
• Reading comprehension exercises.
• Dictation: dictations.
For each episode there is also a Simulation where the students have to use English to
communicate in a real life situation.
Students who successfully complete the first 10 exercises of an episode of an episode earn
access to the Language game.
All the exercises involve interactive response mechanisms and the results are saved in a
medals cabinet

Three final sections complete the work:

Grammar
A collection of grammar notes, with explanations in Indonesian.
Glossary
All the vocabulary used in the dialogues of the videos are included in a glossary complete with
translation. Students can listen to the pronunciation of the words.
Help
All the functions of the program are explained in detail, in Indonesian, in the online guide -
just click on the Help button.

How to use the London Adventures section

1. After starting the program, choose the episode you want to watch from the index in the
opening screen.
2. Watch the film of the episode (Video section), first without subtitles and then again with
subtitles.
3. After watching the film, go to the two Dialogues and Dubbing and complete the activities.
Then go on to the exercises in the Activities section.
• The instructions for the exercise appear at the top left. Always read them carefully.
• When you successfully complete an exercise, you will be given a medal, and when
you finish all of them, you will be awarded a cup.
• You can look things up in the glossary and the grammar sections while you are
doing the exercises.
4. Then, move on to the next episode.
The CD-ROM can always be used freely. This may he useful to teachers who intend to use part
of the material in class, to show the videos or to present their students with only some of the
activities.

Guide to the use of buttons

The main buttons used to navigate and explore the CD-ROM are the following:

BACK to go back to the previous step.

INDEX to go to the events index.

H E L P to open the on-line guide.

EXIT to close the programme.


Three buttons appear automatically when the mouse is placed over the small bar situated at
the top left of the screen.
At any time, it is possible to consult the on-line guide by clicking on the label Help.

SING AND ACT WITH MUSICALS

This section of the CD-ROM presents a different musical each year. This can be staged by
fist class or used as the basis for further activities. For each musical, the students can:
• listen to all the audio files and read the text (provided with an interactive glossary).
• look at the score.
• see which characters are on stage.
• print all the material for use in class activities.

The musicals proposed:


• The Jungle Book  CD 1 Plus
• The Knights of the Round Table  CD 2 Plus
• The Taming of the Shrew  CD 3 Plus

INTERACTION
Again, we paid particular attention to providing students with a multimedia tool as simple and
intuitive as possible.
Using the buttons in the column on the left, the students can choose the scene they want to
view.
These buttons allow them to move on to the next page of the scene.
All the material can be printed.
For each scene, they can see:
• the text
• the score
• the characters.
They can change the volume at any moment.
With the player at the bottom, they can:
• listen to the songs
• stop playing at any point
• move quickly back and forth through the audio.

USEFUL INFORMATION ON USING THE CD-ROMs


How to use this CD-ROM for the first time
You must install the CD-ROM on your hard disk following the installation procedure.

To install the program you only have to launch the program Setup.exe present on the CD-
ROM.
The installation requires less than 1 MB of free space. You must have administrator privileges
to install under Microsoft windows 2000 or XP.
Warning
You only need to install one of the three CD-ROMs (for example the one that comes with
volume A Plus). There is no need to repeat the installation the following years. All the data
saved up to that time will be kept and you can access new material and activities simply by
inserting the new CD-ROM in the drive and starting it in the usual way.

Directory of Installation
The program presents a window where you can choose the directory where the CD-ROM will
he installed. Having chosen the installation directory, the program creates a subdirectory Way
Points Plus and the required directories and files are loaded. A link is also created in the start
menu.
Installing Quick Time
To see the videos included on the CD-ROM, you must install QuickTime (version 3.0 or
higher).
When installing, the CD-ROM will check to see whether a suitable version of QuickTime is
already present on the computer and, if necessary, propose installing it.

QuickTime is a free program which allows you to reproduce, view or interact with audio,
video, VR and graphics files. For more information visit the website:
http://www.apple.com/it/quicktime (Italian and English).

How to use the CD-ROM thereafter


After placing the CD-ROM in the appropriate drive, go to the start menu, select the group of
programs Zanichelli and click on Way Point Plus.

How to transfer your Portfolio data and completed work if you change computers
The first time you access a CD-ROM, you are asked to enter your name and surname. This
creates a directory on the computer hard disk within the data directory present in the directory
where the CD-ROM was installed. This directory, called name_surname (eg. Mario_rossi), is
where all your data and activities are saved.
To move your personal data to another computer you must copy the personal directory (eg.
Mario_rossi) from one PC to the other, again saving it in the data directory.
If several students have used the CD-ROM on the same computer, for example in the school
computer room, the data directory will contain several sub-directories with the data of the
different students.

Warning

The name of the directory with personal data corresponds to the name and surname typed in
when you accessed the CD-ROM the first time. If you later change your name or surname, the
directory on your hard disk with still be called by the name and surname you entered the first
time. The directory name can, however, be changed manually.

Further Information
Further information on how to use the three CD-ROMs and a brief guide to solving any
technical problems are found in the file Leggimi.rtf included on the CD-ROMs.
Main Characters
Module 1 Plus

Main character Father Mother Brother


Susan King Mr. King Mrs. King Mike,12
AGE: 11 architect secretary
NATIONALITY: English
ADDRESS: Gayton Square
CITY: London
PET: dog

Main character Father Mother Brother/Sister


John Morrow Mr. Morrow Mrs. Morrow Alex, 15
AGE: 11 taxi driver teacher Sarah, 18
NATIONALITY: English Martha, 14
ADDRESS: Laughlin Road
CITY: London
PET: canary

Main character Father Mother Brother/Sister


Brad Adler Mr. Adler Mrs. Adler Mark, 17
AGE: 11 detective shop assistant Sheila, 13
NATIONALITY: English Elizabeth, 15
CITY: London
PET: parrot, dog
Main character Father Mother Brother/Sister
Alison Fox Mr. Fox Mrs. Fox Peter, 11
AGE: 13 actor housewife Mary, 14
NATIONALITY: English
CITY: London
PET: cat

Eddy Adams
AGE: 11
NATIONALITY: Jamaican
ADDRESS: Worcester Street
CITY: London
PET: dog

Sandra Bradford
AGE: 12
NATIONALITY: English
ADDRESS: Park Lane
CITY: London

Mrs. Vicky Wilson and Mr. Max Carter


Teachers at the Hampstead School of Music
Evaluation charts for oral production
Chart 1
Name …………………………………………….. Class ……….

Poor Average Good Very good Excellent


Listening comprehension
Conveying meaning
Pronunciation
Grammatical accuracy
Vocabulary
Fluency

Chart 2
Name …………………………………………….. Class ……….

A. LISTENING COMPREHENSION
Total = 2 points
Partial = 1 point
Very little = 0 points

B. PRONUNCIATION
Serious errors = 0 points
Frequent errors = 1 point
Rare errors = 2 points
No errors = 3 points

C. GRAMMATICAL ACCURACY
Serious errors = 0 points
Frequent errors = 1 point
Rare errors = 2 points
No errors = 3 points

D. USE OF VOCABULARY
Variety
Considerable variety = 3 points
Fairly good variety = 2 points
Limited variety = 1 point

Appropriateness
Always appropriate = 4 points
Frequently appropriate = 2 points
Rarely appropriate = 1 point

E. FLUENCY
Very good = 3 points
Adequate = 2 points
Repetitive = 1 point
Broken = 0 points

Total points: ………./18


QUESTIONNAIRE
Name ………………………………..
Class ………………………………..
Date …………………………………

1. Have you studied English before? YES NO


2. Where?
School
Informal school
All ‘estero
3. Does your family use English? YES NO

4. If yes, lo usa per il suo lavoro? YES NO


5. Cosa conosci del mondo anglo/americano?
Canzoni? Quali? ........................................................
Filastrocche? Quali? ........................................................
Nomi de attori cantanti? Quali? ........................................................
Nomi de personaggi politici Quali? ........................................................
Nomi di citta e Stati? Quali? ........................................................
Altro? Quali? ........................................................

6. Can you count in English ? YES NO


If yes, till what number do you know?............................................................................
7. Conosci delle parole inglese che si usano nella Indonesian language?
Scrivini alcune qui............................................................................................................
8. Pensi sia utile imparare l’inglese? YES NO
Se si, indica per quali motivi sceglindoli tra seguenti:
Per il tuo lavoro futuro
Per conoscere un’altra civilta
Per fare piu facilmente del turismo
Per capire i turisti che vengono in Indonesia
Per capire le canzoni in English
Per capirei film in original language
Other.......................................................................................

Unit 1A: I’m from Kingston

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and understanding phone numbers
Picking out the missing lines in dialogue
Listening and understanding nationalities
Checking a multiple choice quiz
Linking aural and visual information
Completing identity cards
Song: “What is your name?”

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue intensive reading of the text of a song

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/ group work
Answering the telephone 8436 1651. Hello!
Hello, John.
Asking and saying phone numbers What’s your phone number?
0828 309 432.
Greeting Hello!
Introducing yourself My name’s Susan
Asking for and giving personal information What’s your name?
My name’s Eddy.
Where are you from?
I’m from Kingston.
Asking and saying nationality Are you Italian?
You’re Jamaican.
Locating cities Where’s Kingston?
It’s in Jamaica.
Montreal is in Canada.
Asking and saying where events taken place Where’s the piano lesson?
It’s in Room 5.
The piano lesson is in Room 5.
Record your voice
Song: “What’s your name?”

Written Production
Writing phone numbers
Inserting the missing lines in a dialogue
Completing an open dialogue
Writing a guided dialogue

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN

Structures
Telephone numbers
Verb be, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person singular, affirmative, interrogative
Personal pronouns you, it
Short answers
Possessive adjectives my, your

Pronunciation
Identifying stressed syllables in words

Topics and cultural items


Telephone numbers
Introductions
Nationality
Cities and countries
Musical instruments

Active vocabulary
Nouns
Australia
bass guitar
Canada
drums
England
France
guitar
Italy
lesson
name
piano
room
sax
Scotland
Spain
telephone number
trombone
trumpet
United States
violin

Verbs
am (‘m)
are (‘re)
is (‘s)

Adjectives
American
Australian
Canadian
English
Italian
Jamaican
my
Scottish
Your

Adverbs
No
not
then
where
yes

Pronouns
I
it
what
you

Articles
the

Preposition
from
in

Interjections
oh
thanks

Expressions
Bye!
Hello!
It’s time for (the piano lesson)
Wait a minute

Competences (p.1/1)
Before starting Sub-module 1, ask students to read the series of objectives in terms of
competence that they should reach at the end of the sub-module. When students finish Unit 4
they can go back to the list of objectives and check what they can do and how well they can do
it.

Activities for Portfolio (p. 1/1)


Here the students find suggestions for activities they can do to develop materials for their
Portfolios.
Recalling Vocabulary
NUMBERS (1)
Preview

Count off twelve students, having students repeat after you. Have volunteers count off twelve
students. Then, ask volunteers to go to the blackboard and write numbers 0-12 in letters. If they
make mistakes, ask other students to correct them.

Listening (p.1/2)

1. The students listen to the recording of numbers 0-12 and write the missing numbers in the
blank spaces in the book.

Speaking (p.I/2)

2 a / b . The students in pairs check if they have written the missing numbers correctly. Then,
they shut their books. Student A says the numbers aloud, first in ascending order and then in
descending order and student B listens for mistakes. Then they exchange roles.

TELEPHONE NUMBER
Listening (p.1/2)
3. The students listen to the recording of six short dialogues and write the phone numbers they
hear beside the names of the people in the notepad. Explain that English people usually say the
numbers which make up a telephone number one at a time. Provide an example by reading
John's phone number. Eight, three, four, six, one, six, five, one. Also explain that a phone
number with two equal numbers which come one after the other (8346 2257) can be read like
this: eight, three, four, six, double two, five, seven.

Tape-script
John 8346 1651. Hello.
Voice Hello, John.

Eddy 8356 1497. Hello.


Voice Hello, is that Eddy?

Cindy 7287 1220. Hello.


Voice Hello, Cindy.

Mick 131 538 4926. Hello.


Voice Hello, is that Mick speaking?

Kathy 9319 4133. Hello.

Voice Hello, Kathy.

Joe 415421 3155. Hello.


Voice Hello, is that you, Joe?

Speaking (p.1/2)

4. Game. The students work in pairs. Student A pretends he is one of the boys or the girls whose
names are written in the notepad of the previous activity and answers the phone saying his or her
phone number. Student B has to guess who he or she is, Then, student A and student B
exchange roles.

Speaking (p.1/2)
5. Group work. Students work in groups of four. They exchange their phone numbers and write
them in the notepad in the book.

Dialogue (p. 1/3)


1. Tell the students that they are going two meet two of the main characters in the book, Eddy
and Susan. They attend Hampstead School of Music, a music school in London where boys
and girls learn to play musical instruments. The kids are having a break and are sitting on a
bench in the school courtyard. Give the class a moment to look at the pictures in their book, and
ask them questions in Indonesian to elicit the content of the dialogue. For example:

• Pensive she i due prnrrnaggi si coroscano gid r>,opurr r !n prima villa eke si
incaarunu?
• Di shenacicnalird'sensate sheslams SrwrneEddy? (Explain that Eddy is from Kingston in
Jamaica, but he lives in London with his family.)
• Prostate a irahninare gnu( c to su'unnenu> the .wanno irnprrrunlo a .snnnarr.
• httpa rasa hr:ri a due a strarurr lu gems .rtnanen:o oppurr no?
• Pen dr la nttiaaina guarda Yaulagio?
• /due raga::ins faranno lenone inrirate nppral• no

2. Tell the class that they will listen to the dialogue and will have to fill in the balloons with the
words and sentences they hear. Then, play the CD. Move around the classroom and if necessary,
help the students with their task.

3. Play the CD again. Use the recorded version with pauses. Help the students predict what Susan
and Eddy will say. Help them by asking questions like Who speaks first? What does she say?,
etc. Questions will be asked and answered in Indonesian.

4. Play the first line of the dialogue. Ask Who speaks now? Then, ask students to guess what that
person says. Play the next line and do the same again with each line asking the students to
predict the whole dialogue. Encourage them to try and guess the meaning of new words from the
situation.

5. Ask the class to repeat the dialogue line by line after the rereading, with books still closed.

6. Divide the class into two groups and assign each group a role. Still keeping books closed, ask
the groups to repeat the lines after the tape. Have the groups exchange roles.

7 . Wi th student’s books open, now play one role yourself and practise the dialogue several times
with different pairs of students. Encourage them to use gestures when saying, for example, It’s
time for the piano lesson or Wait a minute!

8. Students practise the dialogue in pairs. They can practise in groups when there are more than
two characters in a dialogue. Ask the students in each pair to exchange roles. Move around the
classroom and help them.

9. After the students have practiced the dialogue enough to know it thoroughly, ask for volunteers
to do the role play.

Tape-script

Susan Hello! My name’s Susan. What's your name?

Eddy Eddy.
Susan Where are you from. Eddy?
Eddy I'm from Kingston. It’s in Jamaica.
Susan Oh, you're Jamaican, then!
Eddy Yes, I am.
Susan It's time for the piano lesson.
Eddy Are you in Room 5?
Susan Yes, I’m. Bye!
Eddy Wait a minute! What's your telephone number?
Susan 8346 50 double 2.
Eddy Thanks. Bye!

Communication Practice

Writing/speaking (p 1/4)

1a/b. Students complete the sentences in the balloons. Then, in pairs, they read the sentences
they have completed.

Key: SUSAN Hello, my name's Susan. What's your name?


EDDY Eddy.
SUSAN Where are you from, Eddy?
EDDY I'm from Kingston

Listening (p.1/4)
2a. Before listening to the recording, the students will practise pronouncing the nationalities.
Have them listen and repeat the adjectives, first Teacher-Class and then in small groups. Make
sure that they can pronounce the adjectives correctly with the right stress. Then, the students
listen to the recording and write the nationalities under the pictures.

Key: Joe - American.

Dana – Italian.
John - English.
Kathy - Australian.
Mick - Scottish.
Cindy - Canadian,

Tape-script and key:


Joe’s From San Francisco. He’s American.
Daria's from Florence. She’s Italian.
John's from London. He’s English.
Kathy's from Sydney. She's Australian.
Mick's from Edinburgh. He’s Scottish.
Cindy's from Toronto. She's Canadian.

Speaking (p. 1/5)


2b/c. Role play. The students work in pairs. They pretend to be one of the boys or the girls in the
previous activity and use the model dialogue to introduce themselves to each other. Then, they
introduce themselves to other students in the classroom. This time, they use their real names,
nationalities etc.

Listening/speaking (p. 1/5)


3a/b/c. Geography quiz. First, make sure that the students can pronounce the names of the
country correctly. Then, tell them they have to answer the quiz by choosing one of the three alter
natives. After listening to the recording, the students check their answers and do the pair work
according to the model dialogue.

Tape-script and key:


Montreal is in Canada.
Padua is in Italy.
Perth is in Australia.
Glasgow is in Scotland.
Turin is in Italy.
Madrid is in Spain.
Lyon is in France.
Los Angeles is in the United States.

Speaking (p.1/6)
4. Game. Who are you? The activity is constructed as a guessing game. The students work in
pairs. Student A choose some of the characters in the pictures and student B has to guess who he
or she is. But they can never ask a direct question like Who are you? Instead, they must try to
guess by asking Yes/No questions like Are you Italian? Are you from…..? etc.
Then the students exchange roles. The winner is the student who guesses the character by asking
fewer questions.
Listening/speaking (p. 1/6-1/7)
5a/b/c. First, the students learn to pronounce the names of the instruments correctly. Then, they
listen to a recording containing a dialogue and some sound effects. They look at the plan of
Hampstead School of Music and link the pictures of the instruments to the rooms where they are
taught. Then, the students in pairs check by asking and answering according to the model
dialogue.

Key: Room I – trumpet

Room 2 - violin

Room 3 - bass guitar


Room 4 - guitar
Room 5 - piano
Room 6 - sax
Room 7 - trombone
Room 8 – drums

Tape-script
Secretary Come on, Eddy. I'll show you round.
This is Room 5. (FX: piano)
... and this is Room 4. (FX: guitar)
The next room is Room 3. (FX: bass guitar)
Eddy Where's the drums lesson?
Secretary Wait a minute. Look, this is Room 2 (FX: violin)
... and this is Room 1 (FX: trumpet)
Room 6 is this way... Here it is (FX: sax)
Eddy Mmm, I like that number!
Secretary Room 7 is here opposite Room 6. (FX :trombone)
And this is your room. Room 8 (FX: drums)
Eddy Thank you very much.
Secretary Not at all.
Open dialogue (p. 1/7)
6. The teacher can introduce the activity by doing it himself or herself. He or she will play the
tape recorder and will give answers to Susan's questions like this.
Susan What's your name?
You My name's Mario Rossi
Susan Are you Italian?
You Yes, I am. 25

Susan Where are you from?


You I'm from Rome.
Susan Are you in Room 5?
You No, I'm not. I'm in Room 4.
Susan Well, it's time for the piano lesson. Bye.
You Bye.

Then, the teacher can choose some of the students and have them do the activity with the tape
recorder. The students can then do the open dialogue in pairs exchanging roles.

Grammar Practice

Following the "inductive method", it is important to point out that it must be the students who
"discover' and formulate the rule themselves. The main idea of the inductive procedure is the
important pedagogical principle according to which, what is the result of a discovery is kept in
our memory much longer than what is told to us. This can be done through a discussion invol-
ving the whole class. Some examples are provided here.
This is what the teacher could do to highlight the contrast between What’s your name? and
Siapa namamu?
Write on the board the word name and elicit the Indonesian equivalent from the students.
Say the sentence My name’s (Mario) and write it on the board. Discuss with the students the
difference between Nama saya (Mario) and My name’s (Mario). Students should notice that
there is to word for word correspondence between English and Idonesian.
Ask a student what his or her name is and write on the board Your name’s Giulia. Elicit the
difference between my and your.
This is how the teacher might help students understand how contractions are formed:

Teacher Vi ricordete cost rispnnde Eddy quando Susan ,yli chicle di dot Z?
Students I’m from Kingston.
Write on the board I’m from Kingston on the left side and I am from Kingston on the right
side.
Go on asking:
Teacher Cosa dice allora Swam?
Students Oh, you're Jamaican then?

Write on the board Oh, you're Jamaican! on the left side and Oh, you are Jamaican! on the
right side. Ask again:

Teacher Vi neord:de corn dice Eddy per spiegare time si from Kingston.
Students It’s in Jamaica.

Write on the board It’s in Jamaica on the left side and it is in Jamaica on the right side.

Tell the students that ‘m, ‘re, and ‘ s are the contracted forms of other words. Guide them to
guess the words am, are and is. Also tell them that contractions me very common in spoken
English.

Telephone Number (p.1/8)

Key: Write Susan’s telephone numbers with letters: oh - two - oh - eight - three - four - six -
five - oh - dootk tiro

Exercise 1 (p.1/8)

Key:

Cindy Seven-two-eight-seven-one-double two-oh

John Eight-three-four-six-one-six-five-one

Mick One-three-one-five-three-eight-four-nine-two-six

Exercise 2 (p.1/9)

Key:

Normal form Contractions form

I am I’m

You are You’re

It is It’s

C PERSONAL PRONOUN I, YOU, IT (p.1/9)


Key: Personal pronouns I, You, It mean Saya, Anda, Itu in Indonesian.

Exercise 3 (p.1/9)

Key:

1. A What’s your name?

B My name’s Joe.

2. A Where are you from, Joe?

B I’m from San Francisco.

3. A You’re American, then.

B Yes, I am.

4. A What’s your phone number?

B It’s 421 6377.

Exercise 4 (p.1/9)

Key: the verb be..............

Exercise 5 (p.1/10)

Key:

1. Is the piano lesson in Room 5?

2. Is Eddy from Kingston?

3. Are you from San Francisco?

4. Is Joe American?

5. Is Lyons in France?

6. Is Leonardo DiCaprio from Hollywood?

Exercise 6 (p.1/10)

Key:

1. No, I’m not.

2. Yes, I am.
3. Yes, I am. / No, I’m not.

4. Yes, I am. / No, I’m not.

5. No, it isn’t

6. No, it isn’t

PRONUNCIATION (p.1/10)

Stressed Syllables

2. Key: Aus tra li an

Scot tish

I tal i an

Ca na di an

Unit Self-Test (p.1/11)

Key: Possible Answers:

You Hello. My name’s Mario Rossi. What’s your name?

Eddy My name’s Eddy. Where are you from?

You I’m from Rome.

Eddy Are you Italian?

You Yes, I am. Are you English?

Eddy I’m Jamaican. From Kingston.

You It’s time for the guitar lesson. Bye.

Eddy Are you in Room 1?

You No, I’m not. I’m in Room 4.

Eddy Ok. Bye. Wait a minute. What’s your telephone number?

You 06 752 388.

Eddy Thanks. Bye.

You Bye.

RECORD YOUR VOICE (p.1/11)

These activities should be done at home. There are very important fro preparing for the oral
exams required fro the certifications at all levels. To carry out the activities of the section
Record your voice, students must have a cassette recorder and an empty cassette of their own.
As this is the first time students are asked to do this activity, examples should be given.

Tell students that they are going to made a lot of these recordings. So, they should get a cassette
recorder and have one or more cassette fro this particular activity. From time to time, collect
some of the cassettes and evaluate each student’s progress using an evaluation chart.

WORKBOOK 1 PLUS UNIT 1A

Activity 1 (p.W1/2)

Down

1. United States

2. Guitar

6. Eddy

Across

3. Violin

4. telephone

5. Trumpet

6. London

Activity 2 (p.W1/3)

Key:

1. It’s a computer.

2. It’s a trombone

3. It’s a telephone

4. It’s a saxophone

Activity 3 (p.W1/4)

Key:

1. What’s your phone number, Susan?


2. It’s 8346 502.

3. Are you in Room 8?

4. Yes, I am.

5. A What’s your name?

B Eddy.

6. A Where are you from, Robert? Are you English?

B Yes, I am.

7. I’m from Liverpool. It’s in England.

8. A Where is Montreal? Is it in the United States?

B No, it’s in Canada.

9. A Are you Italian, Giorgio?

B Yes, I am.

10. A You’re French, aren’t you, Pierre?

B Yes, I am.

Activity 4 (p.W1/4)

Key:

1. Name: Jessica

City: York

Country: England

2. Name: Mark Short

City: Los Angeles

Country: USA

3. Name: Cindy

City: Toronto

Country: Canada

4. Name: Riccardo

City: Amalfi

Country: Italy
Tape-script

Number 1

Eddy Joe, this is Jessica. Jessica Moore.

Joe Hi, Jessica.

Jessica Hello, Joe.

Tim Where are you from, Jessica?

Jessica I’m from York.

Joe York?

Jessica Yes. It’s in England.

Number 2

Teacher Boys and girls, this is our new student, Mark. Mark Short.

Boys and girls Hello, Mark.

Mark Hello.

Teacher Mark is from Los Angeles. In the USA.

Number 3

Janet Hey, Marcia. Who’s that girl over there?

Marcia Oh, that’s Cindy. She’s Canadian, from Toronto.

Number 4

Billy Susan, this is my friend, Riccardo.

Susan Nice to meet you, Riccardo. You’re Italian, aren’t you?

Boy Yes, I am. I’m from Amalfi.


Susan Oh, that’s a beautiful place.

Activity 5 (p.W1/5)

Key:

Peter
Marie

Heather

Elizabeth

George

Activity 7 (p.W1/5)

Key:

Tape-script and key:

Number 1 What’s your name?

Number 2 Hello, Susan.

Number 3 What’s your telephone number?

Number 4 Montreal is in Canada.

Number 5 8346 1148. Hello.


Number 6 Where are you from, Eddy?
UNIT 1B: HELLO EDDY!

SKILLS
Listening Comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and locating places
Listening and locating people
Listening and understanding greetings
Listening and understanding descriptions
Song: “Good morning”

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/group work:
Asking where people are Where’s Sandra?
Saying where people are She’s at the counter.
Greeting a friend Hi, John! / Hello, Eddy!
Greeting an adult Good morning, Mrs. Wilson
Asking somebody how hw/she is How are you?
Answering Fine, thanks.
Thanking somebody Thanks.
Introducing somebody This is Eddy
Greeting Hello!
Identifying people Who’s he?
That’s Mrs. Wilson.
She is my piano teacher.
Record your voice
Song: “Good morning”

Written production
Filling in the gaps
Guided writing

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
This is….
Mr, Mrs, Miss
Articles the, a, an
Preposition at
Where’s…?/He’s…/She’s…
Simple present of be: negative form

Pronunciation
Pronunciation of Mr, Mrs, Miss

Topic and cultural items


Greeting
Titles
Names of shop and places
Introducing people

Active vocabulary
nouns
actress
astronaut
bank
bar
bus stop
cinema
clown
counter
hotel
kid
Miss
Mr
Mrs
newsstand
number
pub
restaurant
singer
station
student
supermarket
teacher

verbs
is
look

pronouns
he
she
this
who

adverbs
now

preposition
at

conjunctions
and

adjectives
that

expressions
fine, thanks
good afternoon!
Good evening!
Good morning!
Good night!
Goodbye!
Hi!
How are you?

articles
a
an

Recalling Vocabulary (p.1/12)


PLACES
Writing (p.1/12)
1. Before students start writing, ask them to repeat the pronunciation of the words after
you. Make sure that they know the meaning of each word.
Then students write the names of the places under the appropriate pictures.
Listening (p.1/12)
2. Tape-script and key
NUMBER 1 is a pub
NUMBER 2 is a supermarket
NUMBER 3 is a cinema
NUMBER 4 is a bus stop
NUMBER 5 is a station
NUMBER 6 is a hotel
NUMBER 7 is a restaurant
NUMBER 8 is a bank
NUMBER 9 is a new stand
NUMBER 10 is a bar

Dialogue
1. Give the class a moment to look at the pictures in their books. Then help students
understand what is happening in the pictures. Ask them question in Indonesian (for the
first unit, then in English). Try to reconstruct the sequence of the story with the
students.
2. Play the CD. Books closed. Ask student Who’s Mr Carter?, Who’s Mrs Wilson?
3. Play the CD again. Use the recorded version with pauses. Help the students predict
what Susan, John, Edy, and Mrs Wilson will say. Help them by asking questions like
Who speaks first? What does he/she say? Then what happens? Play the first line of the
dialogue. Ask Who speaks next? Then ask students to guess what that person says.
Play the next line and do this with whole dialogue, asking the students to predict each
line of the dialogue. Encourage them to try to guess the meaning of new words from
the situation.
4. Ask the class to repeat the dialogue line by line after CD, with books still closed.
5. Divide the class into four groups and assign each group a role. Still keeping books
closed, ask the groups to repeat the lines after the CD. Change roles.
6. With student’s books open, now play one role yourself and practise the dialogue
several times with different pairs of students. Encourage them to use gestures when
saying, for example, Hello, Eddy! or Look, Eddy! That’s Mr Carter!
7. Group work. Students practice the dialogue in group of four. Ask each students in the
group to play every role once. Move around the classroom and help them.
8. After students have practiced the dialogue enough to know it thoroughly, ask for
volunteers to do role plays. Ask students to stand and greet each other. Ask several
groups of students to do the role play.

Puzzlers
1. Hello and Hi are used in informal conversation. Hello is generally used in United
Kingdom. Hi is now used both in the States and in the United Kingdom.
2. Tell student that in informal conversation either thanks or thank you can be used.
Thank you is more formal and can be used in formal situation as well.
3. Because the th sound is not found in Indonesian, it is a problem for some speakers.
Model correct placement of the tongue between the font teeth for pronouncing the th
sound. Ask students to practise these th words after you: thanks/ This is Eddy/ the/
That’s Mrs Wilson. Then ask them to repeat these phrases: Fine, thanks. / The
newsstand.
Communication Practice (p.1/14)
Preview
Here students are introduced to formal and informal greetings. Make sure the students use
the appropriate forms in their role plays as well as in their interactions with classmates
and with you. Help them use formal greetings with you and other adults, and use informal
greetings with classmates.
With books closed, say and have students repeat Hi, John (your own name). How
are you? Reply Fine, thanks. Repeat this exchange several times, Teacher-Class, Teacher-
Student. Ask student to repeat after you Fine, thanks. And you? T-C, T-S. Do the dialogue
several times with volunteers. Now ask a student to be the teacher. Another students
greets the first formally, using Mr, Mrs, Miss. Repeat, asking several students to be the
teacher. Ask two volunteers to stand up. Ask Student A to repeat after you Hello…! How
are you? Student B repeats Fine, thanks. And you? Students A repeats Fine, thanks.
Repeat the dialogue again, T-C.

Listening (p.1/14)
1. Discuss with the students the different ways of greeting people according to the
different times of the day and the degree of familiarity.

Speaking (p.1/14)
2. Make sure students use the appropriate forms during role play as well in their
interactions with classmates and with you.

Listening (p.1/14)
3. Key: 1. Mr Carter - pub
2. Miss Maple – bus stop
3. Sandra – counter
4. Mrs Smith – station
5. Mrs Abbs – cinema
6. Mr Brown – newsstand
Tape-script
Dialogue 1
Susan Look! That’s Mr Carter.
Eddy Who’s he?
Susan He’s a teacher.
Eddy Where is he now?
Susan He’s at the pub.

Dialogue 2
Eddy Look! That’s Miss Maple.
John Who’s she?
Eddy She’s an actress.
John Where is she now?
Eddy She’s at the bus stop.

Dialogue 3
Susan Look! That’s Sandra.
John Who’s she?
Susan She’s a student.
John Where is she now?

Susan She’s at the counter.

Dialogue 4
Kathy Look! That’s Mr Smith.
Eddy Who’s she?
Kathy He’s a clown.
Eddy Where is he now?
Kathy He’s at the station.

Dialogue 5
Susan Look! That’s Mrs Abbs.
Mick Who’s she?
Susan She’s a singer.
Mick Where is she now?
Susan She’s at the cinema.

Dialogue 6
John Look! That’s Mr Brown.
Kathy Who’s he?
John He’s an astronaut.
Kathy Where is he now?
John He’s at the newsstand.

Speaking (p.1/15)
4a. With books open, model and have students repeat Who’s Mr Carter? Elicit He’s a
teacher. Then, ask Where’s he now? And elicit He’s at the pub. Practise the questions,
Teacher-Class, Student-Class, Student-Student.
4b. Pair work. Students practise in pairs. Help them as necessary.

Puzzler
Students will probably find it difficult to pronounce the final sounds in the contractions.
Have students pronouncing he’s, she’s, and where’s after you, emphasizing the length of
the final z sound. Then, practise the words in short sentences with other s sounds, for
example Where’s Sandra?, Where’s Eddy?

Supplementary activity
Where? (Enrichment). On the blackboard, draw (or have students draw) simple rectangles
representing places like the station, the restaurant, the bank, the newsstand, the hotel, the
pub, the supermarket, the bar, the cinema, and a bus stop. Add familiar locations in the
students’ school or area. Label each drawing. Ask some students to come up to the
blackboard, with one or more standing in front of each drawing. Ask students who are
seated questions with where about their classmates who are standing: Where’s Marco?
After you have asked the questions a few times, the students should ask you the questions.
Then, have the students ask other students where-questions about their classmates.
Afterwards, ask different students to go to the blackboard and have other students ask the
questions.

Grammar Practice (p.1/16)


B Greetings (p.1/16)
There are further examples of the “learning by discovery” approach.
Teacher How does John greet Eddy?
Class Hello, Eddy.
Write on the board, on the left side, Hello, Eddy.
Teacher How do Susan and Eddy greet Mrs Wilson?
Class Good morning, Mrs Wilson.
Write on the board, on the right side, Good morning, Mrs Wilson.
Teacher What’s the difference between Hello and good morning? When do we use
Good morning

Exercise 1 (p.1/16)
Key:
• We use hello or hi to our friends, in informal situation
• We use good morning to our teachers, people we respect, etc, and in formal
situation
• We use good afternoon or good evening to our teachers, people we respect, and in
formal situation.
• We use good night to our parents, friends, etc, when we go to bed
• We use good bye or bye-bye when parting.

Exercise 2 (p.1/17)
Key: In English, the personal pronoun used for third person singular masculine is he,
whereas she is used for third person singular feminine.

Exercise 3 (p.1/17)
Key:
1. Mrs Wilson / at the counter
2. Mr Carter / at the cinema
3. Miss Maple / at the newsstand
4. Mr Smith / at the restaurant
5. Susan / at the bus stop
6. John / at the station
7. Mr Brown / at the bar
8. Eddy / at the hotel
Exercise 4 (p.1/18)
Key: The article a is used when the next word begins with a consonant sound. Article an
is used when the next word begins with vocal sound.

Exercise 5 (p.1/18)
Key:
1. Mr Carter / teacher / at the pub
2. Sandra / student / at the bar (at the counter)
3. Mr Brown / astronaut / at the station
4. Miss Maple / actress / at the restaurant
5. Mrs Abbs / singer / at the bus stop
6. Mr Smith / clown / at the newsstand

Writing Skills: capital letters and punctuation. When checking students’ work at the
board, make sure they use capital letters for names and at the beginning of sentences.
Write some names and sentences on the board as example, and underline all the capital
letters. Also point out the proper position of commas, apostrophes, and full stops in the
dialogue. Check these points in all written work.

Exercise 6 (p.1/19)
Key:
1. Mrs Wilson is not at the bus stop. She is at the restaurant.
2. Mr Carter is not at the counter. He is at the bus stop.
3. Mr Smith is not at the pub. He is at the station.
4. Susan is not at the hotel. She is at the cafeteria.
5. Miss Maple is not at the station. She is in the hotel.
6. John is not at the newsstand. He is at the cinema.

PRONUNCIATION (p.1/19)
Pronunciation of Mr, Mrs, Miss
2. Key: 3, 6, 4, 2, 5, 1

Tape-script
Mrs Abbs; Mr Brown; Mr Carter; Miss Maple; Mr Smith; Mrs Wilson.
Developing Oral Skills (p.1/20)
Listening (p.1/20)
1. Tape-script
Look at number 1. This is Sandra. She’s a student. She’s at the counter in the school
cafeteria.

Look at number 2. That’s Mr Brown. He’s an astronaut. He’s at the bus stop.
Look at number 3. That’s Miss Maple. She’s an actress. She’s at the newsstand.
Look at number 4. That’s Mr Smith. He’s a clown. He’s at the pub.

Listening/speaking/writing (p.1/20)
2a/b. Refer to the picture and guide students to give appropriate answers. It is an
important exercise to prepare students right from the very start of the course to face the
exams required for the European Certifications.
Tape-script and key:
Susan Look at number 3. Who’s she?
You That’s Miss Maple.
Susan Is she an astronaut?
You No, she isn’t. (She’s an actress.)
Susan Where’s she now?
You She’s at the newsstand.
Susan Is number 4 a teacher?
You No, he isn’t. (He’s a clown.)
Susan Where’s he now?
You He’s at the pub.
Susan Look at number 2. Who’s he?
You That’s Mr Brown.
Susan Where’s he now?
You He’s at the bus stop.
Susan Is number 1 Miss Maple?
You No, she isn’t. She’s Sandra.
Susan Where’s she?
You She’s at the counter.
Unit Self-Test (p.1/21)
Key: Possible answers:
Marco, this is John.
Hello, Paolo!
Good morning, Mrs Bianchi!
Good afternoon, Mrs Bianchi!
Good evening, Mr Rossi!
Good night, mum and dad!
Goodbye!
Look, Paolo! That’s M Carter.
Who is Mr Brown?
He’s an astronaut.
Where is he now?
He’s at the newsstand.

RECORD YOUR VOICE (p.1/21)


2. Song: “Good morning!”
With the student’s book closed, play the CD for the song. Students just listen or hum
along.
Then, with books open, play the CD for the song one or two more times, encouraging
students to sing along.
Now, tell the students: Let’s sing the song to Fabrizio, using one of the students’ names.
Except Fabrizio, everyone sings the first line of the song together. Fabrizio will sing the
second line: I’m fine, thanks. Good morning to you too! Do this with several other
students’ names.

Workbook 1 Plus Unit 1B


Activity 1 (p.W1/6)
Key:
1. Eddy is at the cinema
2. Susan is at the newsstand.
3. John is at the station.
4. Mrs Abbs is at the bus stop.
5. Miss Maple is at the bank.
6. Mr Brown is at the pub.

Activity 2 (p.W1/7)
Key:
1. clown
2. singer
3. astronaut
4. student
5. teacher
6. actress

Activity 3 (p.W1/ 8)
Key:
Heather Hello, Eddy!
Eddy Hello, Heather!
Heather Eddy, this is my friend, Karen.
Eddy Hello, Karen!
Karen Hi, Eddy!
Eddy Are you English?
Karen No, I’m not. I’m Scottish.
Heather Karen is from Glasgow.
Karen Look! There’s Mr Smithson over there, at the newsstand.
He is my drums teacher.
Heather Where’s Susan now?
Eddy She’s at the supermarket.

Activity 5 (p.W1/9)
Key:
1. Where’s Eddy?
2. He’s at the counter.
3. I’m not English. I’m Scottish.
4. Look! That’s Miss Maple. She’s an actress.
5. John, this is Mr Brown. He’s an astronaut.
6. What’s your name?
7. Mr Carter isn’t at the bus stop. He’s at the pub now.
8. Who’s that man?
9. You’re Italian, aren’t you? Yes, I am.
10. That’s Sheila McGinn. She’s a teacher.

Activity 6a (p.W1/9)
Key:
1. Mark
2. Mrs Wilson
3. Sandra
4. Miss Maple
5. Eddy
6. Mr Carter
Tape-script
Number 1 Look over there! That’s Mark at the hotel.
Number 2 John, isn’t that Mrs Wilson at the supermarket?
Yes, it is Mrs Wilson. Mrs Wilson?
Number 3 John, there’s Sandra. At the counter of the shop.
Oh, yes. I see her. Let’s say “Hello.”
Number 4 Look! That’s Miss Maple
Where? I don’t see her.
Number 5 Sandra, where is Eddy?
Eddy? He’s at the station.
Number 6 Isn’t that Mr Carter at the bank?
Yes, it is.

Activity 6b (p.W1/10)
Key:
1. Mark isn’t at the counter. He’s at the hotel.
2. Mrs Wilson isn’t at the bus stop. She’s at the supermarket.
3. Sandra isn’t at the bank. She’s at the counter, in the shop.
4. Eddy is at the station.
5. Miss maple isn’t at the supermarket. She’s at the bus stop.
Activity 7 (p.W1/10)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 Good morning, Mr Carter!
Number 2 Where’s Susan?
Number 3 She’s at the station.
Number 4 That’s Mr Carter. He’s a teacher.
Number 5 Eddy isn’t at the bus stop.
Number 6 Good night, mum and dad!
Number 7 John, this is Mr Smith.
Number 8 Good afternoon, Mrs Abbs.
UNIT 1C WHERE ARE THE PENS?

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Filling in a crossword with names of colours
Song: “All together now”
Picking out the missing lines in a dialogue
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and understanding the names of school objects
Carrying out orders
Matching aural and visual information
Locating objects

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Reading and colouring a picture

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/Group work:
Asking and talking about colours What colour is it?
It’s blue
What colour are the felt pens?
They’re red.
Asking and saying where things are Where are the books?
They’re under the desk.
Are the pens on the desk?
Yes, they are. / No, they aren’t.
Is there a book under the desk?
There are four exercise-books in the school
bag
Giving orders Take your exercise-book.
Put it on the desk.
Asking and saying where people are Are Mr and Mrs Wilson at school?
No, they aren’t. They’re in an underground
station.

Written production
Doing a crossword puzzle
Inserting the missing lines in a dialogue
Filling in a form with personal information
Answering questions

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Plural of nouns (-s)
There is / are
Prepositions in, on, under
Word order (adjective-noun)
We are, you are, they are
Imperative (2nd person, singular and plural)

Pronunciation
Recognizing intonation patterns
Saying sentences with raising and falling intonation

Topics and cultural items


Colours
School things
Places

Active vocabulary
Nouns
book
cafeteria
chair
class
colour
desk
exercise-book
felt pen
floor
home
media room
pen
pencil
pencil case
phone box
photo
rubber
ruler
school
school bag
Underground station

Verbs
close
give
put
take

Adjectives
black
blue
brown
green
gray
orange
pink
purple
red
white
yellow

Pronouns
me
they
we

Prepositions
of
on
under

Adverbs
here
late
there

Interjections
please

Expressions
Here you are.
Hurry up!
OK.

Recalling Vocabulary (p.1/22)


COLOURS
Preview
Game. Bring coloured chalks to the classroom. Put them on the teacher’s desk and lend them
up so that the students can see them. Then, name a colour and ask for volunteers to come and
pick up the right piece of chalk. Tell the student who picked the right chalk to go to the
blackboard and write the name of the colour. Let the other students correct the spelling or do
it yourself if necessary. Go on with the game until all the names of the colours have been
written on the blackboard.

Writing/listening (p.1/22)
1a/b. Tell the students to do the colour crossword on their own. Then, they listen to the
recording and check.
Tape-script
Across
Number 1 grey
Number 4 blue
Number 6 white
Number 7 black
Number 9 orange

Down
Number 1 green
Number 2 yellow
Number 3 purple
Number 5 pink
Number 7 brown
Number 8 red

2. Sing a song. The song contains numbers 1-10 and names of colours. It also contains some
new vocabulary and structures which the students can understand and use globally, so it is not
necessary to explain them in depth. The pictures will have the students understand the
meaning of the actions.
Before playing the song, have the students repeat the text line by line, first in chorus then in
small groups. Then, play the song and let the students listen to it a couple of times before
asking them to sing along. Don’t force the students to sing. They can join in as soon as they
feel they are ready. This part of the lesson should be a welcome and enjoyable break from the
usual pattern.

Dialogue (p.1/23)
1. Tell the students that Susan, John, and Eddy are in the Media Room at the Hampstead
School of Music. They are preparing a poster for the Spring concert held every year at
the end of the spring term. Give the class a moment to look at the pictures in their
books and ask them questions in English and Indonesian to elicit the content of the
dialogue.

Point at Eddy in the first picture and ask:


Teacher Who’s he / that?
Students He’s / that’s Eddy.

Do the same with John and Susan. Then, point at Mrs Wilson and ask:
Teacher Who’s that?
Students That’s Mrs Wilson.
Teacher Is she the drums teacher?
Students No, she isn’t. She’s the piano teacher.

Then, go on asking questions in Indonesian.


• Quali apparecchiature nella classe?
• Mata pelajaran apa yang diajarkan di Media Room?
• Cosa sta facendo Eddy?
• Perche Susan ha in mano una foto?
• Dove deve essere messa la foto che Susan ha in mano?
• Cosa vedi sui banchi o sotto i banchi?
• A cosa servono le penne e I pennarelli

2. Tell the class that they will listen to the dialogue and will have to fill in the balloons
with the words and sentences they hear. Then, play the CD. Move around the
classroom and, if necessary, help the students with their task.
3. Play the CD again. Use the recorded version with pauses. Help the students predict
what Eddy and Susan will say. Help them by asking questions like Who speaks first?
What does she say?
Questions can be asked in Indonesian.
4. Play the first line of the dialogue. Ask Who speaks next? Then, ask students to guess
what that person says. Play the next line and do the same again with each line asking
the students to predict the whole dialogue. Encourage them to try and guess the
meaning of new words from the situation.
5. Ask the class to repeat the dialogue line by line after the recording, with books still
closed.
6. Divide the class into four groups and assign each group a role. Still keeping books
closed, ask the groups to repeat the lines after the CD. Have the groups exchange
roles.
7. With student’s books open, now play one role yourself and practise the dialogue
several times with different groups of students.
8. Students practise the dialogue in groups of four. Ask the students in each group to
exchange roles. Move around the classroom and help them.
9. After the students have practised the dialogue enough to know it thoroughly, ask for
volunteers to do the role play.
Tape-script
John Where are the pens?
Susan They’re under the desk.
John Take the red pens, please.
Susan Here, you are.
Eddy Susan, put the photo here.
Susan OK.
John What is there in your pencil case?
Eddy Felt pens.
John Give me a felt pen. What colour is it?
Eddy It’s blue.
John OK.
Mrs Wilson Susan, John? Where are you?
Susan We’re here Mrs Wilson. We’re in the Media Room.
Mrs Wilson Hurry up. It’s late. We’re closing.
Susan OK.

Communication Practice (p.1/24)


Listening (p.1/24)
1a/b. Students listen to the recording first. Then, they practise the pronunciation of colours
and school things.
Tape-script and key:
A red pencil
A black pen
A grey rubber
An orange pencil case
A purple ruler
A yellow schoolbag
A brown book
A pink exercise-book

Reading/writing (p.1/24-1/25)
2a/b. The structure there are and the prepositions under, in, and on are introduced and
practised in this activity.

Speaking (p.1/25)
3a/b. Pair work. The students work in pairs according to the model dialogue. Then, go on
with a game. Student A hides some of student B’s school things. Student B tries to guess
where they are by asking YES/NO questions according to the model dialogue.

Listening/speaking (p.1/25)
4a/b. The activity is in the form of the well known game “Simon says”. The students first
listen to a recording and learn how to play the game. Then, they go on playing the game
themselves. This activity can be done in pairs or in small groups. The students can practise the
use of the imperative and the use of prepositions on, under, and in.

Tape-script
Simon says: “Take a book and put it in the school bag.”
Simon says: “Put the school bag on the floor.”
“Take the school bag and put it on the desk.”
Some of you obeyed the order. OK, now listen again:
Simon says: “Take the school bag and put it under the desk.”
“Take a pen and put it in the school bag.”
Well, it is better this time. OK. Ready?
Simon says: “Take an exercise-book from the school bag and put it on the desk.”
“Take a pen and put it under the book.”
Simon says: “Take a pen and put it under the book.”
OK. Good. Now, you go on playing.

Listening/speaking (p.1/26)
5a/b. the students listen to a recording of sound effects and associate the people with the
places where they are. Then, the students ask and answer the questions in the book. Highlight
the use of the preposition in with the words phone box and Underground Station.
Key: Mr and Mrs Wilson are in an Underground station.
Mr Carter is in a phone box.
Miss Maple and Mr Smith are in the bus stop.
Eddy and Susan are at school.
Sandra is at home.
John and Daria are at the cafeteria.

Tape-script
Where are Mr and Mrs Wilson? Listen and guess.
(FX: Underground Station.)
Where’s Mr Carter? Listen and guess.
(FX: In a phone box.)
Where are Miss Maple and Mr Smith? Listen and guess.
(FX: Bus stop.)
Where are Eddy and Susan? Listen and guess.
(FX: In a classroom.)
Where’s Sandra? Listen and guess.
(FX: At home.)
Where are John and Daria? Listen and guess.
(FX:In a cafeteria)

5c. Key:
2. A Is Mr Carter at the bus stop?
B No, he isn’t. He’s in a phone box.
3. A Are Miss Maple and Mr Smith in an Underground Station?
B No, they aren’t. They are at the bus stop.
4. A Are Eddy and Susan at the cafeteria?
B No, they aren’t. They’re at school.
5. A Is Sandra in a phone box?
B No, she isn’t. She’s at home.
6. A Are John and Daria at home?
B No, they aren’t. They’re at the cafeteria.

Grammar Practice (p.1/27)


Exercise 1 (p.1/27)
Key: To form a plural noun, simply add an –s at the end of the singular noun.

Exercise 2 (p.1/27)
Key: English expressions there is and there are in Indonesian mean di sini ada.

Exercise 3 (p.1/27)
Key: There are two books under the desk.
There are four pens on the desk.
There’s a guitar on a chair.
There are two books in the school bag.

Exercise 4 (p.1/28)
Key: 1. My pencils are in the pencil case.
2. Where’s the piano lesson?
3. Take the blue felt pens.
4. Put your books on the chair.
5. My pencil case in under the desk.
6. What is there in your school bag?
7. What colour is your rubber?
8. What’s your telephone number?

Exercise 5 (p.1/29)
Key:
1. A Where are the pens?
B They’re under the desk.
2. A What is there in your pencil case?
B There’s a brown pencil.
3. A What colour is your rubber?
B It’s red.
4. A Where are you and John?
B We’re here in Room 5.
A Hurry up, it’s late.
5. A Hi, John! How are you?
B I’m fine, thanks.
6. A That’s Mr Carter.
B Is he a teacher?
7. A Is Mrs Wilson at the bus stop?
B No, she isn’t at the bus stop. She’s at the station.
8. A Are you English?
B I am not English. I am Italian.

Exercise 6 (p.1/29)
Key:
1. There are three students in Room 5.
2. Mr Carter and Mrs Wilson are two teachers at HMS.
3. Your pens are under the desk.
4. There are two pencils in my pencil case.
5. Put the books in your school bag.
6. What colour are your felt pens?

Exercise 7 (p.1/29)
Key:
1. Put the book in the school bag.
2. Give me your pencil.
3. Take the ruler under the desk.
4. Put the ruler on the exercise-book.

PRONUNCIATION (p.1/29)
Raising and Falling Intonation
The students listen to the recording and underline the sentences which are said with a raising
intonation (all the YES/NO questions).

Key:
Give me a felt pen.
Hurry up.
It’s late.
Are the pens under the desk?
Are they in the school bag?
The felt pen is on the chair.
Is Susan in Room 5?

Developing Oral Skills (p.1/30)


Writing/speaking (p.1/30)
1a/b. First, the students fill in the words in the questions about the picture. Then, they take
turns asking and answering the same questions.
Key:
1. A What colour is the pencil case?
B The pencil case is green.
2. A Where is it?
B It’s on the desk.
3. A What is there in it?
B There are two felt pens.
4. A What colour are the felt pens?
B They are red.
5. A Is there a book on the desk?
B No, there isn’t.
6. A Where is the book?
B It’s under the desk.
7. A Are there three pencils on the desk?
B No, there are three pencils on the chair.
8. A What colour are they?
B Brown, blue, and pink.
9. A What is there under the chair?
B There’s a photograph.

Listening (p.1/30)
2. The students listen to the recording and carry out the orders they hear.
Tape-script
Put a book under the desk.
Take a pen and put it on a book.
Take a red pencil and put it on the floor.
Put a book on the chair. Then, take a black pen and put it under the book.
Take three pencils. Put them under the chair. Then, take a book and put it on the chair.

Unit Self-Test (p.1/31)


Each student will fill in the blanks in the form with information about himself or herself and
his or her school.

Culture File (p.1/32)


As students to read The Keswick House Theatre School on their own and complete the text.
Key:
Mr Richardson is American.
Miss Burton is Scottish.
Mrs Lee is English.

Now, ask students questions like these:


• What nationality is Mr Richardson?
• Where is he from?
• Is he an English teacher?
• Who is Mr Burton?
• Where is the Theatre School?

Build up your Portfolio (p.1/33)


1. How to prepare the activity
Ask students to bring their cameras to school and to take photos of the school building.
Some of them can also go around the classroom and take pictures of their teachers.
Then, ask some students to write on the blackboard the subjects they have chosen from the
ones listed in Activity C. [Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is a subject
which teaches skills, concepts, processes involved in communicating and handling,
controlling and monitoring information. The aim is to generate and develop an
Information Communication technology capability that will enable children to use modern
technology and computers to their advantage in the technological world. It is a subject in
its own right and a subject which enables a student to enhance other curriculum areas.]
Check that they have chosen the right subjects and ask students to repeat the names of the
subjects after you. This way, students can learn the right pronunciation of the lexical
items.
At this point, ask students to prepare their own posters.
In one of the next lessons, dedicate the whole time to checking what students have
prepared. Make your own comments and listen to the comments of the class. Each student
will make a note of the suggestions and correct their posters accordingly.
Finally, students can decide whether to put their work in their Portfolios.

2. Skills on which the activity is based


The skills on which the activity is based are mainly reading and writing. But other skills
are also involved. For example, taking photographs, designing a layout, and if desired,
drawing.

3. Time required to complete the activity


Part of the activity can be done during the students’ free time (taking pictures of the
school and teacher).
About an hour is required to prepare the posters. Alternatively, students can prepare their
own posters as homework and bring them to school for discussion.

4. Level required
Students can do this activity after they have completed the Introductory Sub-module.

Learning Strategies (p.1/34)


This activity should be carried out in the classroom in pairs or groups with the help of the
teacher.
Students write down the words they already knew before they started the Sub-module and
those they have learned in the Sub-module. Then, they write a few sentences containing some
of these words. At this point, the teacher can ask students to read out loud the sentences they
have written and comment on them.

Self Evaluation Test (p.1/35-1/36)


Exercise 1 (p.1/35)
Key:
1. 3
2. twelve
3. nine
4. two
5. 5
6. ten
7. one
8. 11
9. 6
10. four
11. eight
12. 7

Exercise B (p.1/35)
Key:
1. John is from London. He is English.
2. Cindy is from Toronto. She is Canadian.
3. Joe is from San Francisco. He is American.
4. Kathy is from Sydney. She is Australian.
5. Mick is from Edinburgh. He is Scottish.
6. Eddy is from Jamaica. He is Jamaican.
7. Daria is from Italy. She is Italian.
8. You are Italian.

Exercise C (p.1/35)
Key:
1. A What’s your name?
B Eddy.
2. A Who is she?
B She’s Mrs. Wilson.
3. A What colour is your school bag?
B It’s yellow.
4. A Where are you?
B We’re in the Media Room.

Exercise D (p.1/35)
Key:
1. Where’s Eddy? He’s in a phone box.
2. Where’s Miss Maple? She’s at the bus stop.
3. Where’s the pencil case? It’s under the desk.
4. Where are the pens? They’re on the book.

Exercise E (p.1/35-1/36)
Key:
1. Are Mrs Wilson and Mr Carter here?
No, they aren’t.
Mrs Wilson and Mr Carter aren’t here.
2. Are you and John American?
No, we aren’t.
John and I aren’t American.
3. Is Daria English?
No, she isn’t.
Daria isn’t English.
4. Is your school bag red?
No, it isn’t.
My school bag isn’t red.
5. Is your pen on the desk?
No, it isn’t.
My pen isn’t on the desk.
Exercise F (p.1/36)
Key:
1. Sandra is at the counter.
2. Mr Carter is a teacher.
3. That’s Mrs Wilson.
4. John and Eddy are at the bus stop.
5. Mr Brown is an astronaut.
6. Miss Maple is there.
7. That’s an exercise-book.

Exercise G (p.1/36)
Key:
1. Take the blue pencil
2. Give me your exercise-book.
3. Put that red pen on the desk.
4. What colour is that felt pen?
5. What is there in your pencil case?

COMPETENCE
Exercise H (p.1/36)
Key: Example dialogue:
You What’s your name?
Joe Joe. What’s your name?
You Mario. Are you from London?
Joe No, I’m not. I’m from San Francisco.
You Oh, you’re American, then.
Joe Yes, I am. Where are from?
You I’m from Rome.
Joe Oh, you’re Italian, then. What’s the time?
You It’s five o’clock.
Joe Well, it’s time for my music lesson. Bye.
You Bye.

Exercise I (p.1/36)
Key: Example dialogue:
You Hello, Joe!
Joe Hi, Mario! Susan, John, this is Mario. He’s Italian.
Eddy Hello, Joe! Hello, Susan!
You Who’s that?
Susan That’s Eddy. He’s a student. He’s Jamaican, from Kingston. Look, that’s Mr Carter.
He’s the drums teacher.
You Where is he?
Joe He’s at the counter.
Mr Carter Hello!
You Good morning, Mr Carter.

Workbook 1 Plus Unit 1C


Activity 1 (p.W1/11)
Key:
One exercise-book
Two felt pens
Three pencil cases
Five pencils
One book
Four rubbers
Three school bags
Ten pens

Activity 2 (p.W1/11)
Tape-script and key:
1. The felt pens are on the desk.
2. The school bags are under the chair.
3. The rubbers are in the pencil case.
4. The pencils are in the school bag.
5. The pencils cases are under the desk.
6. The pens are on the floor.
7. The book is on the chair.
8. The exercise-book is under the book.
Activity 4 (p.W1/13)
Key:
1. There are two guitars on the chair.
2. There are three books in the school bag.
3. There are three school bags on the floor.
4. There are five rubbers under the chair.
5. There are two pianos in the room.
6. There are seven pencils in the pencil case.

Activity 5 (p.W1/14)
Key:
1. There’s an exercise-book on the desk.
2. There’s a book on the counter.
3. There are three books on the chair.
4. There’s an orange ruler in my school bag.
5. There are two blue felt pens in your pencil case.
6. There’s a chair in the room.
7. There are five English books under your desk.
8. There are three pencils on the book.

Activity 6 (p.W1/14)
Key:
1. Where is the yellow ruler?
2. My English book is on the desk.
3. Richard is a Canadian student.
4. Is that your purple pencil under the desk?
5. There are three pink school bags under the table.
6. Mr Carter is a good teacher.
7. Where’s your Italian book?
8. Miss Maple is an excellent actress.

Activity 7 (p.W1/14)
Key:
1. Yes, there are. / No, there aren’t.
2. No, he isn’t.
3. No, I’m not.
4. Yes, she is.
5. Yes, there is. / No, there isn’t.
6. Yes, it is. / No, it isn’t.
7. Yes, there are. / No, there aren’t.
8. Yes, there is.

Activity 8 (p.W1/15)
Key:
Felt pens / on the desk
Four rules and two pens / under the chair
Italian book / under the school bag
English book / in the desk
Exercise-books / in the school bag
Three pencils and a rubber / in the pencil case
School bag / on the chair

Tape-script
Man Put the felt pens on the desk, please.
Boy OK, they’re on the desk now.
Woman What is there on the floor under the chair?
Girl Hum, . . . let see. There are four rulers and two pens.
Man Look! There’s an Italian book. Under the school bag!
Boy Put your English book in the desk, please.
Man OK, it’s in the desk now.
Girl Give me my exercise-book, please. They’re in my school bag.
Woman There are three pencils and a rubber in the pencil case.
Boy Where’s my school bag?
Man It’s on the chair, John.

Activity 9 (p.W1/15)
Key:
1. They’re under the chair.
2. No, it isn’t. It’s on the chair.
3. No, there isn’t.
4. It’s under the school bag.
5. Yes, there are.
6. They’re on the desk.
7. Yes, there is.
8. There are three exercise-books.

Activity 10a (p.W1/16)


Key:
1. Are the books on the desk?
2. It’s in the pencil case now.
3. Yes, they are.
4. Where are you, John and Susan?
5. Where is the pen now?
6. They’re blue and white.
7. We’re here in the Media Room.
8. What colour are the books?

Activity 10b (p.W1/16)


Key:
1. A Where is the pen now?
B It’s in the pencil case.
2. A Are the books on the desk?
B Yes, they are.
3. A What colour are the books?
4. A Where are you, John and Susan?
B We’re here in the Media Room.
UNIT 2 WHERE DO YOU LIVE?

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Picking out missing letters of the alphabet
Listening and understanding times
Understanding a dialogue
Completing personal information
Matching aural and visual information
Listening and understanding routine actions
Listening to the spelling of city names
Song: “Mickey mouse March”

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Matching written and visual information (daily routines)
Intensive reading of a text
Numbering visual cues

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/group work:
Telling the time What’s the time please?
It’s seven o’clock.
It’s a quarter past seven.
Asking for and giving information Who’s that?
about people that’s Quentin Roach.
Where do the Adamses live?
They live in Worcester Street.
Where do you live?
I live at Gayton Square.
Asking and saying how a word is spelt How do you spell it/that?
G-A-Y-T-O-N
How do you spell your first name?
Q-U-E-N-T-I-N
How do you spell your surname?
R-O-A-C-H
Asking and talking about daily routines What times does Susan get up?
She gets up at half past seven.
When does she take a bus to school?
At half past eight.
Dan and Tom get up at half past seven,
then they take a bus to school at eight o’clock
Record your voice
Song: “Mickey Mouse March”

Written production
Paragraph writing: your daily routine
Questions for interviewing a classmate
Completing speech balloons
Writing down times
Spelling of city names

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
What’s the time?
It’s seven o’clock / a quarter to seven /
A quarter past seven / half past seven.
Present simple (affirmative, interrogative)
Short answers with the present simple

Pronunciation
Recognizing vowel sounds in the letters of the alphabet
Saying the alphabet

Topics and cultural items


The alphabet
Names
Spelling
Parts of a town: boroughs, streets, roads, squares, lanes
Daily routine actions

Active vocabulary
Nouns
bed
breakfast
bus
dinner
family
first name
half
homework
lane
music
quarter
road
square
street
surname
TV

Verbs
do
does
dress
end
get up
go
have breakfast
have dinner
listen
live
spell
start
surf the Internet
wash
watch

Prepositions
after
past
to
with

Adverbs
how
then
when

Interjections
thank you
what?

Expressions
I see
o’clock
What time?
What’s the time?

Competences (p.1/37)
Before starting Sub-module 1, ask students to read the series of objectives in terms of
competence that they should reach at the end of the Sub-module. When students finish Unit 4,
they can go back to the list of objectives and check what they can do and how well they can
do it.

Activities for Portfolio (p.1/37)


Here, the students find suggestions for activities they can do to develop materials for their
Portfolios.

THE ENGLISH ALPHABET


Listening/drawing (p.1/38)
1a/b. Tell the students that they have to listen to a recording and complete the English
alphabet on their books. They can write the missing letters with a pencil in the blank spaces.
Play the CD and move around the classroom to help the students, if necessary. Tell the
students that they can make the missing letters fancy by drawing and colouring them on their
own way. Then, the students are to repeat the alphabet all together and in small groups.
Lastly, ask individual students to repeat the alphabet in front of the class. Let the other
students correct them if they make mistakes.

Tape-script and key:


A B C D E F G H I J
K L M N O P Q R S T
U V W X Y Z

THE TIME
Listening (P.1/38)
2a. The students listen, repeat the times after the CD player and number the clocks in their
books accordingly. Play the CD several times, if necessary, and check that the times have
been written in the correct sequence.
Tape-script and key:
1. 12 o’clock.
2. 4 o’clock.
3. 7 o’clock.
4. 5 o’clock.
5. 9 o’clock.
6. 11 o’clock.
7. 3 o’clock.
8. 10 o’clock.
9. 1 o’clock.
10. 2 o’clock.
11. 8 o’clock.
12. 6 o’clock.

2b. Tell the students they will listen to people telling times and will have to draw the hour
hands in the clocks in their books. Make sure that all the students can read the time on an
analogical clock. Then, play the CD. If you think that the pauses between the times are too
short for the students to draw the clock hands, stop the CD player. Then, the students write the
times in the blank spaces in their book.
Move around the classroom and check or have single students read the times out loud.
Tape-script and key:
1. 7 o’clock.
2. 5 o’clock.
3. 9 o’clock.
4. 11 o’clock.
5. 3 o’clock.
6. 10 o’clock.

Speaking (p.1/38)
3. The students work in pairs asking and telling the time according to the model dialogue.

Dialogue (p.1/39)
1. Tell the students to cover the text of the dialogue and look at the picture. Then, ask
them a few questions in English.
Teacher Who are those boys?
Students They’re Eddy and John.
Teacher Where are they?
Students They are at the bus stop.
Teacher Is there a bus in the picture?
Students Yes, there is.
Teacher What colour is it?
Students It’s red.
Go on asking questions in Indonesian.
• Apakah kamu pergi ke sekolah dengan menggunakan bus?
• Apakah bus yang ada dalam gambar sama dengan bus yang ada di kotamu?
• Apa perbedaannya?

2. Tell students to shut their books and listen to the recording of the dialogue. Play the
normal version of the dialogue. Then, ask the students a few questions in English to check
comprehension. Of course, this is only possible with false beginners. Ask the same
questions in Indonesian with real beginners.
• Do John and Eddy live in London?
• Where does John live?
• Where does Susan live?
• What’s the time?
• Is the bus late?
• What time does John have dinner?
Continue exploiting the dialogue. Use the techniques you have already used for the dialogues
in the previous units (see step 3-9, Unit 1A page 23 of this Guide).

Communication Practice (p.1/40)


Listening (p.1/40)
1. Before starting the listening activity, explain the meaning of first name and surname. Then,
tell the students they will listen to the recording and will have to write the missing first names
or surnames under the pictures. Also explain the meaning and the use of spelling. Tell the
students they will hear the spellings of the names and surnames of the people in the pictures.
This should help them write the names correctly.
Key:
1. Susan King
2. Quentin Roach
3. Dustin King
4. Sandra Bradford
5. John Morrow
6. Vicky Wilson
7. Eddy Adams
8. Max Carter

Tape-script
Voice 1 What’s the name of the girl in Picture 1?
Voice 2 Susan King.
Voice 1 Susan King. OK. What’s the first name of the man in Picture 2?
Voice 2 Quentin.
Voice 1 How do you spell it?
Voice 2 Q-U-E-N-T-I-N.
Voice 1 Quentin Roach. OK. What’s the first name of the man in Picture 3?
Voice 2 Dustin.
Voice 1 How do you spell it?
Voice 2 D-U-S-T-I-N.
Voice 1 So, Dustin King. OK. What’s the surname of the girl in Picture 4?
Voice 2 Bradford. B-R-A-D-F-O-R-D.
Voice 1 Sandra Bradford. And the surname of the boy in Picture 5?
Voice 2 Morrow. M-O-R-R-O-W.
Voice 1 John Morrow. Thank you. What’s the first name of the woman in Picture 6?
Voice 2 Vicky. V-I-C-K-Y.
Voice 1 Vicky Wilson. OK. What’s the surname of the boy in Picture 7?
Voice 2 Adams. A-D-A-M-S.
Voice 1 Eddy Adams. Right. Now, the last one.
Voice 2 The first name of the man in Picture 8? That’s Max. M-A-X.
Voice 1 Max Carter, thanks a lot.

Speaking (p.1/40)
2a/b. The students in pairs check the matching they have done in the previous activity by
asking and answering according to the model language. Then, student A and student B ask
each other the spelling of their names.

Listening (p.1/41)
3. Before starting the activity, explain that the pictures show the families of four of the main
characters of the story. Point out that we can use the plural of surname to refer to all the
members of a family, e.g. the Kings, the Morrows, the Adamses. Also ask the students to
repeat after you the names of the places where the families live and explain the different
meanings of road (usually leads to another town or to another part of a town), street (it is in a
town and has a buildings or shops on one or both sides), square (an area surrounded by
buildings in a town, usually in the form of a square), lane (a narrow road between houses or
fields). The students listen to the recording and associate the families with the places where
they live.
Key: The Adamses / Worcester Street
The Kings / Gayton Square
The Morrows / Laughlin Road
The Bradfords / Park Lane

Tape-script
Dialogue 1
John Where do the Adamses live?
Susan They live in Worcester Street.
John Worcester. How do you spell that?
Susan W-O-R-C-E-S-T-E-R.

Dialogue 2
Boy Eddy, what’s the name of that girl over there?
Eddy Who? The blonde one?
Boy Yes.
Eddy That’s Susan King.
Boy Susan King. Does she live in Hampstead?
Eddy Yes. She lives in Gayton Square.
Boy Gayton? How do you spell that?
Eddy G-A-Y-T-O-N.

Dialogue 3
Mrs King John’s a very nice boy, isn’t he?
Mr King Who? Susan’s friend?
Mrs King Yes. Where does he live?
Mr King I think the Morrows live in Highgate. In Laughlin Road.
Mrs King Laughlin? How do you spell that?
Mr King L-A-U-G-H-L-I-N.
Mrs King Oh, I see. Laughlin.

Dialogue 4
Mrs Wilson Where does Sandra Bradford live, Mr Carter?
Mr Carter Sandra Bradford? Let me see. Ah, yes. She lives in 45 Park Lane.
Mrs Wilson P-A-R-K L-A-N-E. Thanks Mr Carter. I’m updating the students’ files.

Speaking (p.1/41)
4a/b. The students check the matching they have done in the previous activity according to
the model dialogue. Then, in pairs students ask each other questions about where they live
and the spelling of the name of their streets.

Reading (p.1/42)
5. Let the students read the balloons in the picture. Then, draw a clock on the blackboard with
the hour hand on 5. Say it’s a quarter to five and ask a volunteer to come to the blackboard
and draw the minute hand.
Correct him/her if necessary. Then, ask other volunteers to come and draw the minute hands
for a quarter past five and half past five. Highlight the use of the prepositions to and past.
Then, ask other students to come and draw the hands for various times and ask them what
time it is until you are sure that everybody has understood how telling the time works with
fractions of the hours.

Listening (p.1I/42)
6. The students listen and repeat the times as indicated by the clocks. Before doing the
activity, make sure that everybody can convert the minutes into fractions (15 and 45 = a
quarter; 30 = half) and can use the prepositions to and past correctly.

Tape-script
Half past two.
A quarter to four.
A quarter past six.
Half past five.
A quarter to eleven.
A quarter past eight.

Drawing/speaking (p.1/42)
7. The students work in pairs. Student A draws hands in the clocks and ask student B the time
for each of the six clocks. Then, the students in the pairs exchange roles. Move around the
classroom and check.

Reading (p.1/42-1/43)
8. Tell the students to read the text on their own. Alternatively, you can read the text aloud
and the students can follow on their books, so that they can get a model for the pronunciation
of the new lexical items. If necessary, give the meanings of the verbs wash, dress, have
breakfast, end, do, listen, watch, and surf. Then, tell the students to number the pictures on the
next page in the same order as the actions in the text. Move around the classroom and help if
necessary.
Key: Pictures are numbered in the order: 8, 1, 7, 4, 2, 9, 6, 10, 3, 5.

Speaking (p.1/43)
9. Students work in pairs. Student A and student B take turns in asking and answering the
questions in the book. Move around the classroom and check that the students use the ending
of the 3rd person of the present simple correctly.
Key:
2. She washes and dresses.
3. She has breakfast at a quarter to eight.
4. She takes a bus to school at half past eight.
5. School starts at 9 o’clock.
6. She takes a bus home at 4 o’clock.
7. She does her homework at half past four.
8. She has dinner at 7 o’clock.
9. She watches TV, listens to music or surfs the Internet.
10. She goes to bed at 10 o’clock.

Grammar Practice (p.1/44)


Exercise 2 (p.1/44)
Key: CAPTAIN QUENTIN ROACH LIVES NEXT DOOR TO SUSAN KING.

Exercise 3 (p.1/44)
Key: In English, to ask or tell the time the personal pronoun it is used.

Exercise 4 (p.1/45)
Key:
2. It’s a quarter to one.
3. It’s a quarter past one.
4. It’s half past four.
5. It’s six o’clock.
6. It’s a quarter to eight.
7. It’s half past two.
8. It’s a quarter past eight.
9. It’s ten o’clock.
10. It’s a quarter to four.
11. It’s five o’clock.
12. It’s a quarter past eleven.

Exercise 5 (p.1/45)
Key: In present simple, the verb is added with the ending –s for the subject third person
singular. If the verb is ended with –s, -ss-, -ch, and –o, simply add an –es.

Exercise 6 (p.1/46)
Key:
1. Eddy plays the drums.
2. Susan and John live in London.
3. Eddy and Susan go to the same music school.
4. They take a bus to school.
5. She does her homework after dinner.
6. We take a bus to school.
7. She gets up at seven o’clock, then she washes and dresses.
8. Lessons end at 4 o’clock.

Exercise 7 (p.1/46)
Key: In present simple, the use of do/does depends on the subjects. The negative form of
do/does is don’t/doesn’t. We use don’t/do in negative and interrogative form if the subject is
plural. If the subject is third person singular, we use doesn’t/does.

Exercise 8 (p.1/47)
Key:
1. Does he watch TV in the evening?
Yes, he does. / No, he doesn’t.
2. Do they live in Laughlin Road?
Yes, they do. / No, they don’t.
3. Do you listen to music in the afternoon?
Yes, I do. / No, I don’t.
4. Does he come from Scotland?
Yes, he does. / No, he doesn’t.
5. Do they do their homework after school?
Yes, they do. / No, they don’t.
6. Does she take a bus to school?
Yes, she does. No, she doesn’t.

Exercise 9 (p.1/47)
Key:
1. What time do you get up?
2. What do you do then?
3. What time does school start?
4. When do you do your homework?
5. What does Susan do after dinner?
6. What time does she go to bed?

PRONUNCIATION (p.1/47)
Pronouncing the alphabet
1. Tell the students that each letter of the alphabet has a vowel sound. The letters in this
activity have been grouped according to the vowel sound they have so that it is easier to
remember their sound and to pronounce them correctly.
[ι ] [ ε ] [ ε  ] [ ϕυ ]
[ α  ] [ ] [ Ω← ]
b f a q i r o
c l h u y
d m j w
e n k
g s
p x
t z
v

Developing Oral Skills (p.1/48)


Speaking (p.1/48)
1. With this activity, the students learn how to cope with an interview. The questions concern
personal information and immediate surroundings, like home and school. Student A has the
role of the examiner and Student B the role of the candidate. Then the roles are exchanged.

Listening/speaking (p.1/48)
2. The students listen to the recording, look at the pictures and take notes of Dan and Tom’s
routine. Then they say what the twins do during the day.

Key:
1. Get up at 7:30.
2. Have breakfast at 8:00.
3. Take a bus to school at 8:30.
4. Lessons end at 4:30.
5. Do homework at 5:00.
6. Have dinner at 6:30.
7. Watch TV. Listen to music.
8. Go to bed at 9:30.

Tape-script
Dan and Tom get up half past seven. They have breakfast at eight o’clock, then they take a
bus to school at half past eight. The lessons end at half past four. At five o’clock Dan and
Tom do their homework and at half past six they have dinner with their family. Then, Dan
watch TV and Tom listen to music. At half past nine they go to bed.

Unit Self-Test (p.1/49)


2. Key:
Example questions:
1. What time do you get up?
2. What do you do then?
3. What time do you have breakfast?
4. Do you take a bus o school?
5. What time does school start?
6. What time does it end?
7. Do you take a bus home?
8. When do you do your homework?
9. What time do you have dinner?
10. What do you do after dinner?
11. What time do you go to bed?

Workbook I Plus
Activity 1 (p.W1/17)
Key:
2. It’s a quarter past three.
3. It’s a quarter to twelve.
4. It’s eight o’clock.
5. It’s a quarter past nine.
6. It’s half past seven.
7. It’s a quarter past twelve.
8. It’s a quarter past two.
9. It’s a quarter to four.

Activity 2 (p.W1/17)
Key: Example answers
1. I get up at seven o’clock.
2. No, I don’t. / Yes, I have lunch at one o’clock.
3. At half past eight.
4. Yes, I do. / No, I don’t. I go by car.
5. I do my homework after lunch.
6. My lessons start at half past eight.
7. Yes, I do. / No, I don’t. I watch TV.
8. I finish school at a quarter to two.

Activity 2 (p.W1/18)
Key:
1. How do you spell your surname, Sandra?
2. Where do Joanna and Sharon live?
3. It’s a quarter to twelve.
4. At a quarter past seven.
5. I watch TV or surf the Internet.
6. Where’s Susan now?

Activity 4 (p.WI/19)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 L-O-S A-N-G-E-L-E-S
Number 2 N-E-W Y-O-R-K
Number 3 S-A-N F-R-A-N-C-I-S-C-O
Number 4 L-O-N-D-O-N
Number 5 O-X-F-O-R-D
Number 6 T-O-R-O-N-T-O
Number 7 S-Y-D-N-E-Y
Activity 5 (p.WI/20)
Key:
Pictures are numbered in the order: 4, 2, 6, 5, 1, 3.

Activity 6 (p.WI/21)
Key:
1. Tinky, the robot gets up at one o’clock in the morning.
2. What time does Tinky take a bus to school?
3. Tinky and his family have dinner at a quarter past four in the evening.
4. Does Tinky surf the Internet?
5. What time does school start for Tinky?
6. Tinky does his homework before dinner.
7. Does Tinky go to bed at eleven o’clock?
8. Tinky listens to music after he finishes his homework.

Activity 7 (p.WI/21)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 What time do you get up?
Number 2 Q-U-E-N-T-I-N.
Number 3 How do you spell your surname?
Number 4 Where do the Kings live?
Number 5 What’s the time?
Number 6 It’s a quarter to eleven.

Activity 8 (p.WI/21)
Key:
Tinky’s friend is a dog.
UNIT 3 HOW OLD ARE YOU?

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and completing a paragraph
Listening and understanding numbers
Listening and understanding the description of a picture
Listening and understanding questions
Song: “My Family”

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Reading and completing a paragraph
Reading information about families

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Memory game
Pair/group work:
Talking about families Have you got any brothers?
Yes, I have one brother and two sisters.
Introducing people Mum, this is John.
Identifying people Who’s that?
That’s Captain Roach, our neighbour.
He’s a sailor.
Asking and saying age How old are you? / How old is he/she?
I’m eleven.
Saying where people live They live in Highgate.
We live nearby.
Answering recorded questions
Record your voice
Song: “My Family”

Written production
Paragraph completion
Family description

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Number 13-30
This is . . . .
Who’s that?
That’s . . . .
This/That
How old are you? / How old is he/she?
I’m eleven. / He/She is . . . .
Verb have got
Interrogative and negative form with have
Short answers with have

Pronunciation
Pronunciation of –teen and –ty.

Topics and cultural items


British families
Active vocabulary
Nouns
actor
architect
boy
brother
bus driver
canary
captain
cat
detective
dog
father
house
housewife
man
mother
mum
member
parrot
sailor
secretary
shop assistant
sister
taxi driver

Verbs
has (got)
have (got)
‘ve

Adjectives
nice
our
small

Adverbs
nearby

Indefinites
any

Possessive adjectives
her
our

Interjections
really?

Expressions
Hello there!
How old are you?
I’m (eleven) years old.

Recalling Vocabulary (p.I/50)


FAMILY
Writing (p.I/50)
1. After the students have completed John’s family tree, ask questions like Has John got a
brother? What’s his name? Has he got any sister? Who’s his father? etc.

NUMBERS (2)
Listening (p.I/50)
2. After the students have finished writing the numbers, have them listen and repeat.

Dialogue (p.I/51)
1. With books open, ask students to identify and talk about the people in the picture. For
example, point to John and ask Who’s this boy? eliciting the answer, John. Then, point
to Susan and ask Who’s that girl? eliciting the answer, Susan. Then, ask Is she
American? eliciting the answer No, she isn’t. She is English. Then, ask the same
questions while pointing at different students in the class. Write the two questions,
Who’s this boy? and Who’s that girl?, on the board. Then, ask volunteers to come to
the board and ask the questions to the class while pointing at different students.
2. Play the CD for the dialogue with books closed and ask students to complete the
dialogue.
3. Play the CD for the dialogue again and ask the class to repeat the dialogue line by line
after the recording with books closed. Now dividing the class into four groups, have
one group take John’s role, another group Susan’s role, a third group Mrs Kings’, and
a fourth group Captain Roach’s role. Exchange roles and do it again.
4. With books open, have volunteers take part and read the dialogue. Check and if
necessary model the correct intonation for questions and expressions.
5. To check comprehension, say the following sentences and have students correct them.
The girl is Sandra. And that boy is Susan’s brother, Mike. That woman is Mrs Wilson.
Captain Roach is a teacher.
6. Pair work: With books open, students practice the dialogue, exchanging roles. Move
around the classroom and help them.
7. Ask for volunteers to role play a dialogue.

Tape-script
Susan Mum, this is John.
Mrs King Hello, John.
John Good afternoon, Mrs King.
Mrs King How old are you, John?
John I’m eleven.
Mrs King Have you got any brothers?
John Yes, I have one brother and two sisters.
Susan Yes, they live nearby.
Mrs King Really? Where?
John We live in Highgate.
Mr Roach Hello there!
Mrs King Good afternoon, Mr Roach?
John Who’s that?
Susan That’s Captain Roach, our neighbour. He’s a sailor.

Communication Practice (p.I/52)


Listening (p.I/52)
1. Tape-script and key:
My name is Brad Adler. I am eleven years old. This is my family. My father, Tom, is a
detective. My mother, Janet, is a shop assistant. I’ve got two sisters and one brother. My
sisters are Shelia and Elizabeth. Sheila is thirteen and Elizabeth is fifteen. My brother,
Mark is seventeen. We’ve got a dog, Jimmy and a parrot, Crik. We live in London.

Speaking (p.I/52)
2a. Students work in pairs. One student in each pair asks the questions according to the
model given and the other student answers according to the passage he/she has completed.
Finally, the teacher can ask the class to read the completed passage to make sure that all
students have completed it without any mistakes.
2b. The teacher now ask some students questions about their families similar to the model
dialogue given. After a few examples, students work in pairs and ask each other the same
questions.

Reading (p.I/53)
3. The teacher gives the class some time so that students can read the data in the table
concerning for different families.

Listening (p.I/53)
Tape-script and key:
Girl Who’s that?
Boy That’s Susan King. She’s 11. Her father, Mr King, is an architect and her
mother, Mrs King, is a secretary. Susan has got a brother, Mike. Mike is
12.They have got a dog and they live in London.

Girl Who’s that?


Boy That’s Brad Adler. He’s 11. His father, Mr Adler is a detective and his mother,
Mrs Adler, is a shop assistant. Brad has got one brother, Mark, and two sisters,
Sheila and Elizabeth. Mark is 17, Sheila is 13, and Elizabeth is 15. They have
got a parrot and a dog and they live in London.

Boy Who’s that?


Girl That’s Mrs Morrow. She’s teacher, and Mr Morrow is a taxi driver. Mr and
Mrs Morrow have got four children, Sarah, Alex, Martha, and John. Sarah is
18, Alex is 15, Martha is 14, and John is 11. They have got a canary and they
live in London.

Boy Who’s that?


Girl That’s Mr Fox. He’s an actor. And Mrs Fox is a housewife. Mr and Mrs Fox
have got three children, Mary, Alison, Peter. Mary is 14, Alison is 13, and
Peter is 11. They have got a cat and they live in London.

Speaking (p.I/53)
5a. Preview. Point to M King and then Susan in the picture while holding up your book to
the class and say Mr King is her father. Write Mr King’s name on the board, and then
write Susan’s name under it, drawing a line between the names. Now, point to Susan and
to her mother, Mrs King, and ask Who is her mother? Help students answer and repeat
Mrs King. Mrs King is her mother.
Write Mrs King on the board next to Mr King. In the same way, pointing to Mike, ask
Who is his sister? Help them answer Susan. Susan is his sister. Write her name next to
Mike. Pointing to all of the names, say and ask them to repeat This is Susan’s family. Mrs
King is her mother. Mr King is her father. Mike is her brother.
Do the same with the people of the other families.
Then, ask students to do activity 5A in pairs.
5b. Preview. Draw stick figures on the board representing a baby, a four-year-old, a
teenager, and an older person. Write age under each one. Point to the baby and ask How
old is he/she? Answer He/She’s one, and have students repeat, T-C. Continue in the same
way with each picture. Now have students repeat the question. Ask a volunteer to come to
the board and ask classmates the question, pointing to different people.
At first students often have difficulty pronouncing the –teen numbers. The stress goes on
the –teen and it has a long ee sound. Be sure to give them lots of oral practice with this
numbers.
Ask a student How old are you?; help the student answer I’m . . . . Students repeat the
question and answer, T-C. Now have one student ask another the question. The second
student answers, and then asks a third student the question. Students continue asking and
answering the question in a chain around the class.

Memory game. Students practise asking and answering questions about the people in the
table. Move around the classroom and help them.

Puzzler
It is often considered impolite in English-speaking cultures to ask an older person’s age.
For example, it would not be appropriate for a student to ask a teacher’s age in an English
speaking country.

Grammar Practice (p.I/54)


Exercise 1 (p.I/54)
Key:
1. Mum, this is John.
2. Who’s that?
3. That boy is my brother.
4. This coffee is very good.
5. This parrot is very beautiful!
6. That’s my father!

Exercise 2 (p.I/55)
Key:
1. has got
2. have got
3. has got
4. have got
5. has got
6. has got
7. have got
8. have got
9. have got
10. have got
Exercise 3 (p.I/55)
Key:
In interrogative, the verb have precedes the subject.
The short answer for Yes/No question is yes/no then followed by the subject and the verb
has/have (for positive) or hasn’t/haven’t (for negative)

Exercise 4 (p.I/56)
Key:
1. Has John got any brothers or sisters?
2. Have you got a felt pen?
3. Have they got satellite television?
4. Has Eddy got a piano?
5. Has Mark got a cat?
6. Has John got a canary?
7. Have Susan and her family got a nice house?
8. Have you got a cat?

Exercise 5 (p.I/56)
Key:
1. Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.
2. Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.
3. Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.
4. Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.
5. Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.
6. No, he hasn’t got a saxophone. He has got a set of drums.
7. Yes, she has.
8. Yes, they have.

Exercise 6 (p.I/56)
Key:
To form the number 13 til 19, we simply add the ending -teen..
Exercise 7 (p.I/56)
Key:
Untuk membentuk angka 21 sampai 30 adalah dengan menyebutkan angka puluhan
terlebih dahulu kemudian angka satuan.

Exercise 8 (p.I/56)
Key:
twenty
twenty-four
twenty-six
thirteen
nineteen
twenty-seven
fifteen
five

E HOW OLD ARE YOU? (p.I/57)


Key: To ask your friend’s brother/sister’s age we say How old is your brother/sister?

Exercise 9 (p.I/57)
Key:
This is Serena. She’s twenty-two. Serena is from Rome.
This is Mike. He’s twenty-five. Mike is from Edinburgh.
This is Kathy. She’s twenty-one. Kathy is from Sydney.
This is Frank. He’s fifteen. Frank is from San Francisco.
This is Mary. She’s nineteen. Mary is from Toronto.
This is Robert. He’s twenty-eight. Robert is from Manchester.

PRONUNCIATION (p.I/57)
Pronunciation of numbers ending of –teen and –ty.
Students will hear numbers ending either –teen or –ty. Tell them to pay attention to the
endings of the numbers they hear and also to the stresses. Numbers ending in –ty have a
stress on the syllable, while numbers ending in –teen have the main stress on the last
syllable.

Tape-script and key:


13; 50; 70; 14; 17; 30; 90; 18; 16; 80; 19; 15; 40; 60.

Developing Oral Skills (p.I/58)


Listening (p.I/58)
1. While the students listen to the recorded description of the picture, they can cover the
written description with a sheet of paper and just look at the picture.

Reading (p.I/58)
2. After listening to the recorded description, some students can read the passage out loud.

Listening/speaking (p.I/58)
3. Now, students can listen to the questions and give their answers in chorus or
individually.
Tape-script and key:
John Who’s that man?
You Mr Prescot.
John Is he an actor?
You No, he isn’t. (He’s a bus driver.)
John Who’s the small boy?
You That’s Bob.
John How old is he?
You He’s eleven.
John Has he got a brother?
You Yes, he has.
John What’s his name?
You Martin.
John How old is Martin?
You He’s eighteen.
John Has Bob got any sister?
You Yes, he has. (He has got two sisters.)
John What are their names?
You Julia and Paula.
John How old are they?
You Julia is twelve and Paula is fourteen.
John Is Mrs Prescot a teacher?
You No, she isn’t. (She’s a housewife.)
John Have they got a canary and a parrot?
You No, they haven’t. (They’ve got a dog and a cat.)

Unit Self-Test (p.I/59)


Key:
2. How old are you?
3. How old is he/she?
4. I live in (Rome).
5. Thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one,
twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty-seven, twenty-
eight, twenty-nine, thirty.

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.WI/22)
Key:
Down
1. A How many brothers and sisters has Alison got?
B She’s got one brother and one sister.
2. A Do you live here in Highgate?
B Yes, we live over there next to the supermarket
4. A Look at this photo. It’s my family.
B And who’s that? Is it your father?
A Yes, that’s my father. He’s a detective.
6. A Is it your mother?
B Yes, that is my mother. She is a shop assistant.
A She is a beautiful woman.
Across
3. A Who’s that man?
B That’s Mr Roach. He’s a sailor.
5. A How old is your brother?
B He’s 12.
7. A Good afternoon, Mrs King.
B Good afternoon, Mike.
8. A Who’s that girl over there, Timmy?
B That’s Sheila, my sister.

Activity 2 (p.WI/23)
Key:
• Mum, this is my schoolmate, John.
• Good afternoon, Mrs King.
• How old is your brother?
• John has got one brother and two sisters.
• Have you got any brothers or sisters?
• I’ve got a dog and a parrot.
• I haven’t got a piano, but I’ve a guitar.
• I’m from Rome.

Activity 3 (p.WI/23)
Key:
This is Andy. He’s American and he’s 12. His father is an architect and his mother is a
math teacher. Andy has got one brother and two sisters. Andy, his brother, and his sisters
have got a dog, Spike, and a parrot, Pete. They live in Chicago, USA.

This is Lucy. She’s English and she’s 18. Her father is a bus driver and her mother is a
secretary. Lucy has got three sisters. Lucy and her sisters have got a cat, Stormy. They
live in Toronto, Canada.

This is Ellen. She’s English and she’s 10. Her father is a detective and her mother is a
housewife. Ellen has got one brother and one sister. Ellen, her brother, and her sister have
got a dog, Rocky. They live in Oxford.

This is Phillip. He’s Scottish and he’s 20. His father is an actor and his mother is a shop
assistant. Phillip has got one brother. Philip and his brother have got a canary, Tweety.
They live in Edinburgh.

Activity 4 (p.WI/24)
Key:
1. Has Mary got a pet?
Yes, she has.
2. Has Shawn got a school bag and a red felt pen?
She has got a school bag, but she hasn’t got a red felt pen.
3. Have Heather and Peter got a musical instrument?
Yes, they have.
4. Has Gary got a blue pencil case and a red felt pen?
He has got a red felt pen, but he hasn’t got a blue pencil case.
5. Has Karen a brother, a sister, and a pet?
She has got a brother and a sister, but she hasn’t got a pet.
6. Have Heather and Peter got a computer and a satellite television?
They have got a satellite television, but they haven’t got a computer.
7. Has Sam got a pet and a brother?
He has got a pet, but he hasn’t got a brother.
8. Has Mary got a computer and a musical instrument?
She has got a computer, but she hasn’t got a musical instrument.
9. Has Gary got a bicycle and a computer?
Yes, he has.
10. Has Shawn got a brother and a sister?
No, she hasn’t.
11. Has Sam got a bicycle and a satellite television?
No, he hasn’t.
12. Has Karen got a school bag and a blue pencil case?
She hasn’t got a school bag, but she has got a blue pencil case.
13. Has Gary got a musical instrument and a satellite television?
No, he hasn’t.
14. Has Mary got a brother and a sister?
She has got a brother, but she hasn’t got a sister.
Activity 6 (p.WI/26)
Key:
1. A Who’s that?
B That’s Miss Bean, our neighbour.
2. A How do you spell your surname?
B B-A-X-T-E-R.
3. A How old is your brother?
B He’s eighteen.
4. A Is Mr King an actor?
B No, he isn’t. He’s an architect.
5. A Does McDonald come from Scotland?
B Yes, he does.
6. A Where does Susan live?
B In Highgate.
7. A John, this is Sally.
B Hello, Sally. Nice to meet you!
8. A Have you got any brothers and sisters?
B Yes, I have. I’ve got two brothers and one sister.

Activity 7 (p.WI/226)
Tape-script and key:
Voice 1 Look at picture 1. Who’s that?
Voice 2 That’s Peggy Brown. Look at picture 3. How old is she?
Voice 1 She’s 20. What’s her name?
Voice 2 Wendy More. Who’s that boy in picture 2?
Voice 1 That’s Steve Black. Is he English?
Voice 2 No, he isn’t. He’s American. Look at picture 3. Has she got any brothers?
Voice 1 No, she hasn’t. How many sisters has she got?
Voice 2 She’s got two sisters. Who’s got two brothers?
Voice 1 Peggy. And how old is Steve?
Voice 2 He’s 23. Is Peggy Brown English?
Voice 1 Yes, she is. And Wendy More? Is she English too?
Voice 2 No, she isn’t. She’s Canadian. And look at picture 2. Tell me about his family.
Has he got any brothers or sisters?
Voice 1 Yes, he has. He’s got one brother and one sister.

UNIT 4 WHEN’S YOUR BIRTHDAY?

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and speaking
Listening and repeating
Listening and finding out presents and people
Listening and understanding questions

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Understanding mazes

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Repeating names of the days of the week and months of the year.
Game: following a maze and speaking
Pair/Group work:
Asking and answering about days What day is it today?
It’s Monday.
Talking about preferences Does she like chocolates?
Why?
Talking about presents Because I want to give her a present.
The box of chocolates is a present for John.
It’s his birthday tomorrow.
Talking about birthdays When’s your birthday?
It’s in . . . .
Answering recorded questions
Record your voice

Written production
Wring sentences following instructions

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Saxon genitive: Susan’s dog
My brother’s party
The plural of nouns (2)
Negative form of the present simple: I don’t (do not) know
Susan doesn’t (does not) live in Chelsea.
Possessive adjectives: his / her
Personal pronouns: him / her

Pronunciation
Pronunciation of the –s ending

Topics and cultural items


Days of the week
Months of the year

Active vocabulary
Nouns
April
August
birthday
box
CD
chocolate
day
December
February
flower
Friday
January
July
June
kite
March
May
Monday
November
October
party
present
Saturday
September
Sunday
teddy bear
Thursday
Tuesday
video game
Wednesday

Verbs
ask
buy
come
doesn’t
don’t
know
like
want

Adjectives
his

Adverbs
today
tomorrow
why
Expressions
By the way
Don’t worry!
Let me know
What day is it?

Possessive adjectives
‘s

Conjunctions
because

Interjections
well

Pronouns
him
her

Recalling Vocabulary (p.I/60)


DAYS OF THE WEEK
Writing (p.I/60)
1. Ask students to write the English names of the days of the week in the table on the right.
Listening (p.I/60)
2. Tape-script
Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.

MONTHS OF THE YEAR


Writing (p.I/60)
3. Key:
November February July January
August September April June
December October May March

Listening (p.I/60)
4. Tape-script
January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November,
December.

Dialogue (p.I/61)
1. The teacher can ask some questions about the picture and give additional vocabulary.
For example, rollerblades, safety helmets, and bench. With student books closed, hold up
your own book for the class to see. Pointing to each person in the picture, ask students
What’s his name? Where’s he from? What’s her name? Where’s she from?
2. Play the CD for the dialogue with the books closed.
3. Play the CD for the dialogue again and ask the class to repeat the dialogue line by line
after the recording, with books closed.
4. Ask the class Who speaks first? and elicit the answer, Susan. Point to Susan and ask
What does Susan say at the beginning of the dialogue? Model and ask students to repeat
Do you want to come to my brother’s party?
5. Play the CD for the first utterance and ask students to listen carefully to what Susan
says. Then, continue with the same way with all the other utterances. First, ask the class to
make hypotheses about what the different characters may say and then play the CD to
listen to what they actually say.
6. Play the version with pauses, this time having students repeat each line.
7. Divide the class into two groups and have each group repeat one role after you. Then,
the groups exchange roles.
8. With student books open, ask individual student to read the dialogue.
9. Group work: Students work in pairs, practicing the dialogue. Walk around the
classroom and help students with pronunciation and intonation.
10. Have several groups of students act out the dialogue in front of the class. Encourage
students to try to speak without reading directly from the book. They can refer to the text,
but should look at their partner when speaking.

Communication Practice (p.I./62)


Listening/speaking (p.I./62)
1. Tape-script
presents – a box of chocolates – two boxes of chocolates – some flowers – two CDs – a teddy
bear – a video game – a kite.

Speaking (p.I./62)
2a. The teacher asks the class to try to identify the first six characters in the puzzle. Refer to
page 19 of this Teacher’s Guide. The characters are John, Susan, Eddy, Sandra, Brad, and
Mark. The last character is a new boy. His name is Martin.
The teacher writes the names of the seven characters on the board. Then, he/she asks the class
to try to find out, individually, the days of the characters’ birthdays.
Finally, the students work in pairs to check what they have found out. They follow the model
dialogue.
Key:
Susan’s birthday is on Monday.
John’s birthday is on Sunday.
Eddy’s birthday is on Tuesday.
Sandra’s birthday is on Wednesday.
Martin’s birthday is on Thursday.
Brad’s birthday is on Friday.
Mark’s birthday is on Saturday.

Speaking (p.I/63)
2b. Key: Captain Roach’s birthday is in February.
Mrs Wilson’s birthday is in August.
Mr Carter’s birthday is in January.
Mrs King’s birthday is in September.
Mr Smith’s birthday is in April.

Grammar Practice (p.I/64)


Exercise 1 (p.I/64)
Key:
1. Mrs King is Susan’s mother.
2. John’s birthday is in June.
3. Mark is Brad’s brother.
4. Mr Carter is Susan’s teacher.
5. Crik is Brad’s parrot.
6. Martha is John’s sister.
7. Brad’s father is a detective.
8. Susan’s neighbour is Captain Roach.
9. John’s house is in Highgate.
10. Mrs Wilson is John’s piano teacher.

Exercise 2 (p.I/65)
Key: There are sandwiches, five matches, four glasses, three dishes, and two box in the
picture.

Exercise 3 (p.I/66)
Key:
1. Don’t
2. Doesn’t
3. Don’t
4. Don’t
5. Doesn’t
6. Doesn’t
7. Doesn’t
8. Don’t
9. Doesn’t
10. Don’t
Exercise 4 (p.I/66)
Key:
1. Eddy doesn’t play the piano.
2. John and Susan don’t live in Oxford.
3. Mark and Eddy don’t go to the same school.
4. They don’t take a bath to school.
5. She doesn’t get up at seven o’clock.
6. She doesn’t do her homework after dinner.
7. Lessons don’t end at 3 o’clock.
8. John doesn’t go to bed late.
9. We don’t watch TV in the afternoon.
10. They don’t live in Sussex Road.

Exercise 5 (p.I/66)
Key:
1. His
2. her
3. his
4. His
5. Her
6. his
7. his
8. her
9. her
10. his

Exercise 7 (p.I/67)
Key:
A How old are you?
B I’m eleven.
A Have you got any brothers and sisters?
B Yes, I have one brother and two sisters.
A Where do you live?
B I live in London.
A Who’s that?
B That’s Captain Roach, our neighbour.
A What does he do?
B He’s a sailor.
A How old is Alison?
B She’s thirteen.
A Has Brad got a dog?
B Yes, he has.
A What day is it tomorrow?
B It’s Saturday.
A What time is the party?
B It’s at five o’clock.
A Does your brother like chocolates?
B Yes, he does.

PRONUNCIATION (p.I/67)
Pronunciation of the plural ending –s
The pronunciation of the plural endings –s and –es is very difficult to acquire. Ask for a
couple of volunteers, play the cassette and ask a volunteer at a time to repeat the three
examples. Then, ask the class to repeat. Play the cassette for the other words and ask the class
to repeat. Move around the classroom and help single student.
Puzzlers
Remember that the plural forms –s and –es are pronounced in three different ways.
1. If you add –s to a word ending in one of the voiceless sounds, / π /, / τ /, / κ /,
φ /, the –s is pronounced s. For example: maps, restaurants, forks, laughs.
2. If you add –es to a word ending
in / σ /, /ζ /, /♣ / , / τ ♣ / , / δ  / , –es is pronounced /iz/. For
example: glasses, dishes, sandwiches, edges.
3. If you add –s to a word ending in a voiced sound or a vowel, the –s ending is
pronounced /z/. For example: bottles, chairs, trolleys, tables.
Key:
boxes (iz) sandwiches (iz) parrots (s)
pianos (z) reasons (s) chocolates (s)
brothers (s) boys (z) tables (s)

Developing Oral Skills (p.I/68)


Listening (p.I/68)
1. Key: a box of chocolates / John;
flowers / Sheila;
CD of rock music / Eddy;
teddy bear / Sandra;
kite / Mary;
video game / Mike.
Tape-script
Boy It’s John’s birthday tomorrow.
Girl Really? Does he like chocolates?
Boy Yes. Why?
Girl Because I want to give him a box of chocolates as a present.

Girl It’s Sheila’s birthday tomorrow.


Boy Does she like flowers?
Girl Yes. Why?
Boy Because I want to give her some flowers as a present.

Girl It’s Eddy’s birthday tomorrow.


Boy Does he like music?
Girl Oh, yes. Why?
Boy Because I want to give him a CD as a present.

Boy It’s Sandra’s birthday tomorrow.


Girl Really? Does she like teddy bears?
Boy Yes, why?
Girl Because I want to give her a teddy bear as a present.

Girl It’s Mary’s birthday today.


Boy Really? Does she like kites?
Girl Yes. Why?
Boy Because I want to give her a kite as a present.

Girl It’s Mike’s birthday today.


Boy Really? Does he like video game?
Girl Yes. Why?
Boy Because I want to give him a video game as a present.

Listening/speaking (p.I/68)
2. The teacher can ask one or two students to answer the recorded questions. Then, the class
can work in pairs and check whether each student remembers what present each of the six
characters gets.
Tape-script and key:
Mrs King What’s John’s birthday present?
You A box of chocolates.
Mrs King And what about Sheila? What’s her present?
You Some flowers.
Mrs King What’s Eddy’s birthday present?
You A CD.
Mrs King And what about Sandra? What’s her present?
You A teddy bear.
Mrs King What’s Mary’s birthday present?
You A kite.
Mrs King And what’s Mike’s birthday present?
You A video game.

Unit Self-Test (p.I/69)


Key: Example questions:
My birthday is in (June).
My mother’s birthday is in (January).
When is your birthday?
What day is it today?
It’s Tuesday.
It’s my brother’s birthday today.
Does he like video game?
Yes. Why?
I want to give him a video game as a present.
I don’t live in London.
Susan and John don’t live in Chelsea.

Culture File (p.I/70)


Ask students to read A British Family on their own and complete the table. Tell students that
it will not be possible to fill in all the columns in the table. In fact, only partial information is
given for each person mentioned in the passage.
Key:
Name Brad Diana Barbara
Simon
Age / / 6
8
Nationality Scottish English /
/
Address 22, Station Road, London / /
/
Job computer programmer shop assistant /
/
Place of Work Software Company in London Harrods, London /
/
Means of Transport / Underground /
/

Build up your Portfolio (p.I/71)


1. How to prepare the activity
Ask students to write the questions required in activity A.
Key:
1. What time do you get up?
2. What do you have for breakfast?
3. How do you go to school?
4. What time do you do homework?
5. What do you do after dinner?
6. What time do you go to bed?

Check that students write their questions correctly. Then tell them to move around the
classroom and ask the questions above to their classmates. They should also write down their
classmate’s answers.
Ask a student to write a table on the blackboard which will collect all the information
concerning the students’ routines. Here is an example. Of course, you can add as many items
as you like according to the students’ answers. In place of the dots, write how many students
usually get up at 7, how many have milk and coffee at breakfast, etc.

Time they get up Breakfast Transport


7.00 Milk and coffee Bus
7.15 Biscuits Car
7.30 Cereal Walk
etc. etc. etc.

Homework After dinner Go to bed


4 pm. Watch TV 9.30 pm
4.30 pm Play 10 pm
5.00 pm Go out 10.30 pm
etc. etc. etc.

Then ask students to prepare a poster with the result of their research. At home they should
illustrate the poster with photos or drawings.
In one of the next lessons, dedicate the whole time to checking what students have prepared.
Make your own comments and listen to the comments of the class. Each students will make a
note of the suggestions and correct their work accordingly. Finally students can decide
whether to put their work in their portfolios.

2. Skills on which the activity is based


This activity is based mainly on verbal interaction. But other skills are also involved, for
example, drawing, collecting appropriate photograph, and designing a layout.
3. Time required to complete the activity
About an hour is required to complete Activities A and B. Activity C can be done at home as
homework.

4. Level required
This activity aims to prepare students for level A1 speaking skills.

Learning Strategies (p.I/72)


This activity should be carried out in the classroom. Students can do Activity A on their own.
Then, in pairs or groups, they can compare what they have written down and discuss the
different ways of learning English words.

Self Evaluation Test (p.I/73-I/74)


Knowledge
Exercise A (p.I/73)
Key:
1. Susan gets up at half past seven.
2. At half past eight she takes a bus and goes to school.
3. In the evening I like to surf the Internet.
4. Susan has dinner at seven. The she watches TV or listens to some music.
5. Susan goes to bed at ten o’clock.
6. John and his family live in Laughlin Road.
7. He wants to buy Mike a present.

Exercise B (p.I/73)
Key:
1. Do you know what time the party is?
2. Where does he live?
3. How do you spell the name of the road?
4. What does she do at 4.00?
5. What time does John get up?
6. Does he have breakfast at 7.30?
7. What time does school start?
8. What does Mr Morrow do after dinner?

Exercise C (p.I/73)
Key:
1. There are two buses at the bus stop.
2. I have got three canaries and a dog.
3. John has got one brother and two sisters.
4. I want to give my mother some flowers for her birthday.
5. The matches are on the chair.
6. Today I want two sandwiches for lunch.

Exercise D (p.I/73)
Key:
1. John has got two sisters and one brother.
2. I have got one brother and one sister.
3. Alison has got a cat.
4. Mike has got one sister, Susan.
5. They have got a dog.
6. Mark and Brad have got a parrot.
7. Eddy hasn’t got a piano. He has got a set of drums.
8. Susan and her family have got a nice house.
9. Mr and Mrs Morrow have got four children.
10. Mr Morrow has got an old Taxi.

Exercise E (p.I/74)
Key:
1. Mr Morrow is Martha’s father.
2. Mrs Morrow is Alex’s mother.
3. John is Alex’s brother.
4. Sarah is Martha’s sister.
5. Sarah is Alex’s sister.
6. Mrs Morrow is John’s mother.

Exercise F (p.I/74)
Key:
6:15 It’s a quarter past six.
8:00 It’s eight o’clock.
2:45 It’s a quarter to three.
5:30 It’s half past five.
10:00 It’s ten o’clock.
12:15 It’s a quarter past twelve.
11:15 It’s a quarter past eleven.
3:45 It’s a quarter to four.

COMPETENCE
Exercise G (p.I/74)
Key:
Martha Do you want to come to my sister’s party? It’s her birthday tomorrow.
Elizabeth Oh thanks. What day is it tomorrow?
Martha It’s Thursday.
Elizabeth Ok then. Where do you live?
Martha I live in Laughlin Road.
Elizabeth What? How do you spell it?
Martha L-A-U-G-H-L-I-N.
Elizabeth Does your sister like flowers?
Martha Yes. Why?
Elizabeth I want to buy her some flowers.
Martha Don’t worry.
Elizabeth What time is the party?
Martha It’s at half past five.
Elizabeth OK. Bye.
Martha Bye-bye!

Exercise H (p.I/74)
Key:
Example dialogue:
John Where do you live?
You I live in Via Mazzini.
John How do you spell that?
You M-A-Z-Z-I-N-I.
John Mum, this is (Roberta).
You Good afternoon, Mrs Morrow.
Mrs Morrow Hello, Roberta. How old are you?
You I’m eleven.
Mrs Morrow Have you got any brothers and sisters?
You Yes, I have. I have one brother.
Mrs Morrow Where are you from, Roberta?
You I’m from Naples.
John Do you want to come to my brother’s birthday party, Roberta? It’s on Sunday.
You Does your brother like Aerosmith?
John Yes. Why?
You I want to buy him one of their CDs. What time is the party?
John It’s at half past six. When is your birthday?
You It’s in July. Bye!
John Bye-bye!

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1a (p.WI/27)
Key:
a. Max’s birthday party is on Thursday afternoon.
b. Brad’s father is a detective.
c. Look at those beautiful dresses.
d. John’s birthday is in June.
e. There are two boxes of chocolates under the chair.
f. Martha doesn’t take the bus to school.

Activity 1b (p.WI/27)
Key:
1. Look at those beautiful dresses.
2. John’s birthday is in June.
3. There are two boxes of chocolates under the chair.
4. Max’s birthday party is on Thursday afternoon.
5. Martha doesn’t take the bus to school.
6. Brad’s father is a detective.

Activity 2a (p.WI/28)
Key: matches, dogs, glasses, photos, boxes, kites, buses, parrots, presents, video games,
flowers, dresses.

Activity 2b (p.WI/28)
Key: Kathy’s beautiful pet is her dog, Spot.

Activity 3 (p.WI/29)
Key:
1. don’t
2. don’t
3. does
4. doesn’t
5. do
6. do
7. doesn’t
8. does

Activity 4(p.WI/29)
Key:
1. Virginia and Sam don’t go to school on Saturday.
2. I don’t live in England. I live in Italy.
3. Mark’s brother doesn’t study on Sunday morning. He studies on Saturday afternoon.
4. We don’t take a bus to school.
5. You and your partner don’t get up early in the morning.
6. I don’t surf the Internet before dinner.
7. Eddy doesn’t have breakfast at seven o’clock on Sunday morning. He gets up at nine.
8. Our friends don’t listen to music after dinner. They watch TV.
Activity 5 (p.WI/29)
Key:
1. Tim’s kite is under his bed.
2. I like Susan’s teddy bear.
3. Where is John’s pencil case?
4. These are Peter’s felt pens.
5. Where are Eddy’s drums?
6. Put Martha school bag on her bed, please.
7. John’s family is big.
8. Alison’s cat is on the chair.

Activity 6a (p.WI/30)
Tape-script and key:
The teddy bear is Susan’s. Colour it brown and yellow.
Colour the school bag purple and green. It’s Eddy’s school bag.
That’s John’s kite. Colour it red and blue.
The football is Mark’s. Colour it black and green.
Colour the pencil case pink. It’s Sarah’s.
That’s Martha’s ruler. Colour it orange and green.

Activity 6b (p.WI/30)
Key: teddy bear / Susan;
school bag / Eddy;
kite / John;
football / Mark
pencil case / Sarah
ruler / Martha

Activity 6c (p.WI/30)
Key:
Susan’s teddy bear is brown and yellow.
Eddy’s school bag is purple and green.
John’s kite is red and blue.
Mark’s football is black and green.
Sarah’s pencil case is pink.
Martha’s ruler is orange and green.

Activity 7 (p.WI/31)
Key:
Heather Hello, Brad!
Brad Hello, Heather!
Heather Brad, do you want to come to my sister’s birthday party?
Brad When’s her birthday?
Heather It’s tomorrow.
Brad What day of the week is it today?
Heather It’s Saturday.
Brad OK. I can come tomorrow. Thank you. I want to buy your sister a present.
How old is she?
Heather She’s ten.
Brad Has she got a kite?
Heather No, she hasn’t.
Brad Good! I want to buy her a kite. What time is the party?
Heather It’s at five o’clock in the afternoon. Bye, Brad! See you!
Brad Bye-bye, Heather!

Activity 8 (p.WI/31)
Key:
1. him
2. her, her
3. his
4. him
5. him
6. her
7. her
8. A him
9. B his
10. C her
Activity 9(p.WI/32)
Key:
Susan King is English. She’s eleven years old and she lives with her family in London. They
don’t live in the centre of the city; they live in Highgate, a very beautiful area. Susan’s mother
is a secretary and her father is an architect. She’s got one brother, Mike. He’s twelve. Susan
and her brother have got a dog. They like the dog a lot. Susan goes to school. She gets at 7:30
and then she washes and dresses.
After breakfast she takes a bus to school. Susan’s lessons start at nine o’clock and end at four
in the afternoon.
Then, she goes home, does her homework, and has dinner with her family. After dinner, she
watches TV or listens to music. She likes to surf on the Internet, too. At ten o’clock she goes
to bed.

Activity 11 (p.WI/32)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 When’s your birthday?
Number 2 Sarah’s birthday party is at half past four.
Number 3 I want to buy her a present.
Number 4 What day is it today?
Number 5 It’s Thursday.
Number 6 Eddy and his family don’t live in Laughlin Road.
Number 7 Does your brother like teddy bears?
Number 8 No, he doesn’t.
UNIT 5 ISN’T THAT OUR NEIGHBOUR?

LESSON PLANS

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Listening and colouring
Understanding a dialogue
Listening to a description and recognizing people
Completing a rhyme

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Reading the description of a shop window and drawing

Oral production
Asking and talking about presence / absence Is that a green blouse in the window
Yes, there is. / No, there isn’t.
There is a pink blouse.
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/Group Work:
Identifying Who’s that woman?
That’s Mrs Roach.
Look, isn’t that Susan?
Describing people’s clothing She’s got an orange blouse and black
trousers.
Asking for an agreement Isn’t Mrs Roach thin?
Agreeing Yes, she is. She’s very thin.

Written production
Completing a dialogue
Re-ordering a dialogue

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Negative-interrogative form of be
Possessive adjectives our, their
Here, there, over there

Pronunciation
Recognizing the stress in compound words
Pronouncing compound words (1)

Topics and cultural items


Clothing
Descriptions
Active vocabulary
Nouns
blouse
boat
cap
dress
girl
jacket
jeans
pair
shirt
shoe
skirt
sweater
T-shirt
trousers
wife
window
woman

Adjectives
fat
funny
short
tall
their
thin

Adverbs
over there
very

Interjections
ah!
hey!
yeah

Prepositions
near

Expressions
old wreck

Competences (p.I/75)
Before starting Sub-module 2, ask students to read the series of objectives in terms of
competence that they should reach at the end of the Sub-module. When students finish Unit 7,
they can go back to the list of objectives and check what they can do and how well they can
do it.

Activities for Portfolios (p.I/75)


Here the students find suggestions for activities they can do to develop materials for their
Portfolios.

Recalling Vocabulary (p.I/76)


CLOTHES
Preview
Elicit the names of the clothes the students should probably know: jeans, T-shirt, shirt. Then,
go on with the activity indicating and naming clothes students are wearing. Ask a student to
stand in front of the class and ask what he/she wearing. For example: Is he/she wearing a T-
shirt? What is he/she wearing? Make sure that most of the class participate in the activity and
practice identifying and pronouncing the names of the clothes.

Writing (p.I/76)
The students write the names of the clothes in the spaces in the picture. Move around the
classroom and check.
Listening/colouring/speaking (p.I/76)
2a/b/c. Tell the students they have to listen to the recording of a dialogue between a shop
owner and her shop assistant. They are preparing the window of the shop and while talking
they will say names and colours of the clothes they are putting in the window. The students
should have coloured pencils at hand and should draw coloured dots in the appropriate articles
of clothing in the picture in their books.
Then, the students will check in pairs using the model dialogue. Move around the classroom
and help.
Finally, tell the students they can colour all the clothes in the window.
Key:
jeans / black; cap / red; T-shirt / white; shirt / blue; trousers / grey; jacket / blue; shoes /
brown; skirt / green; blouse / pink; dress / yellow; sweater / orange.

Tape-script
Shop owner Jim, let’s prepare the window for tomorrow.
Shop assistant OK.
Shop owner Take that pair of black jeans and put it in the window.
Shop assistant OK. Here are the black jeans.
Shop owner Good. Now, take that red cap. I like it.
Shop assistant The red cap, OK. Then?
Shop owner Put this white T-shirt next to the cap, right. Now . . . er . . . What about
the blue shirt?
Shop assistant The blue shirt? OK. Here it is.
Shop owner Put that pair of grey trousers beside the blue shirt.
Shop assistant OK. The grey trousers and the blue shirt.
Shop owner Good. Now, the blue jacket. Put the blue jacket in the window, please.
Shop assistant OK. Here is the blue jacket.
Shop owner Hum. A pair of shoes now. What about those brown shoes?
Shop assistant The brown shoes? OK.
Shop owner Good. Now, some women’s clothing. Take that green skirt.
Shop assistant The green skirt?
Shop owner Yes. And that pink blouse too.
Shop assistant OK. A green skirt and a pink blouse. What else?
Shop owner Er . . . I like that yellow dress. Take the yellow dress, please.
Shop assistant Shall I put it here?
Shop owner Yes. And put this orange sweater next to it.
Shop assistant The orange sweater . . . OK.
Shop owner That’s all. Let me see. . . Hum, I don’t like it. It’s a mishmash of
colours. Let’s start all over again.
Shop assistant Oh, no!

Dialogue (p.I/77)
Use the techniques discussed in the previous notes to the units to present and exploit the
dialogue.

Communication Practice (p.I/78)


Writing (p.I/78)
1a. Introduce the adjectives fat, thin, tall, and short using the pictures in the book. Then, tell
the students to write the adjectives under the appropriate pictures.
Key: a thin boy
a fat girl
a tall woman
a short man
1b. Tell the students they have to identify the characters shown in the pictures and write their
names under the pictures. Move around the classroom and help them.
Key: The characters are (starting from the left): Mrs Roach, Mike, Mrs Fox, Mr Adler, Mr
Fox, Mrs Morrow, Sheila, Eddy.

Speaking (p.I/78)
2. Students check in pairs the matching they have done in the previous activity.
Key:
A Who’s that boy?
B That’s Mike. Isn’t he fat?
A Yes, he is. He’s very fat.

A Who’s that woman?


B That’s Mrs Fox. Isn’t she fat?
A Yes, she is. She’s very fat.
A Who’s that man?
B That’s Mr Adler. Isn’t he tall?
A Yes, he is. He’s very tall.

A Who’s that man?


B That’s Mr Fox. Isn’t he thin?
A Yes, he is. He’s very thin.

A Who's that woman?


B That's Mrs Morrow. Isn't she tall?
A Yes, she is. She's very tall

A Who’s that girl?


B That's Sheila. Isn't she fat?
A Yes, she is. She’s very fat.

A Who's that boy?


B That's Eddy. Isn't he short?
A Yes, he is. He's very short.

Speaking (p.I/79)
3. Students work in pairs. They take turns pointing at one of the characters in the picture and
asking and answering according to the model dialogue.

Key:
A Look, isn't that John?
B Where?
A Over there. He’s got blue jeans and a white T-shirt..

A Look , isn't that Mr Carter.?


B Where?
A Over there. He's got purple trousers and a green sweater.
A Look, isn't that Mrs Wilson?
B Where?
A Over there. She’s got a pink dress.

A Look, isn't that Mike?


B Where?
A Over there. He’s got blue jeans, a white shirt and a red and orange cap.

A Look, isn't that Mr Morrow?


B Where?
A Over there. He's got a blue jacket and grey trousers.

A Look, isn't that Mrs Morrow?


B Where?
A Over there. She's got a yellow blouse and a brown skirt.

A Look, isn't that Sandra?


B Where?
A Over there. She's got a green T-shirt and a blue skirt.

Grammar Practice (p.I/80)


Exercise 1 (p.I/80)
Key:
1. Isn't Mr Roach a sailor?
2. Isn't Mrs Morrow very tall?
3. Aren't you Italian, Daria?
4. Isn't Mr Adler a detective?
5. Aren't Mr Carter and Mrs Wilson teachers?
6. Isn't Kathy Australian?
7. Isn't your father a doctor?
8. Aren't your parents at home?

Exercise 2 (p.I/80)
Key:
Possessive Adjectives
my milik saya
your milikmu
his miliknya (laki-laki)
her miliknya (perempuan)
its miliknya (benda)
our milik kita
your milik kalian
their milik meeka

Exercise 3 (p. I/81)


Key:
1. My name's Kathy. I'm Australian. What's your name?
2. This is my brother. His name's Tim.
3. Sarah is my sister. Our parents are Mr and Mrs Morrow.
4. Those girls are John's sisters. What are their names?
5. John and I are in the same class. Our teacher is Mr Carter.
6. That's Susan and that woman is Mrs Wilson, her teacher.
7. That's Mr and Mr' Roach's boat. Their boat is a wreck.
8. That girl's very nice. What's her name?

Exercise 4 (p. I/81)


Key:
1. It’s there on the desk.
2. Who's that man over there?
3. It’s here under this book.
4. The bus stop is over there near John’s house.
5. Susan, put the photo here, on the poster.
6. Does Captain Roach live there/ over there?

PRONUNCIATION (p. I/81)

Pronouncing compound words (1)


Before starting the activity, tell the students that they will listen to some compound words. They
will have to listen carefully and notice how the first syllable of each word is usually stressed
(words like supermarket carry two stresses, one more marked than the other).

Tape-script
Ladies and gentlemen, we interrupt our programme to read to announcement from the police.
Three men and a woman robbed a bank in Oxford Street a few minutes ago. This is a
description of the men. One of them is wearing a pair of black jeans and a blue T-shirt. Another
one is wearing a brown jacket and grey trousers and the third one is wearing a pink shirt and
blue jeans. The woman is wearing a green blouse and a blown skirt. If you see any of these
people, please immediately call the nearest police station...

Speaking (p. I/82)


The students point at the people in the picture and take turns describing the four robbers.

Key:
This man has got a blue T-shirt and black jeans.
This man has got a blown jacket and grey trousers.
This man has got a pink shirt and blue jeans.
This woman has got a green blouse and a brown skirt.

3. Game. Students play the game in pairs Student A describes one of his or her classmates and
Student B must guess who he or she is. Student B must only look at Student A's face. He or she
can't turn around and look at his or her classmates during the game. Then, A and B exchange
roles.

Unit Self-Test (p.I/83)


Key:
John Hey! Isn’t that Mr Fox?
You Mr Fox, where?
John Over there. He’s got a purple jacket and grey trousers. He's a famous actor.
You Ah, yes. And who's that woman with hin?
John That's his wife. She’s very fat.
You Yes. And she's very short, too.
Are those their children?
John Yes, the tall boy is Peter. And those are his sisters Alison and Mary. Aren't they
nice?
You Yes, they're very nice.
John But look at their car. Isn't it funny?

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.WI/33)
Crossword

Activity 2 (p.WI/34)
Key:
1. A Look at that boy in jeans and a T-shirt. Isn't he thin?
B Yes, he is.
2. A Look at that girl in a skirt and a blouse. Isn’t she short?
B Yes, she is.
3. A Look at that boy in jeans and a sweater. Isn't he very tall?
B Yes, he is.
4. A Look at that girl in a skirt and a blouse. Isn't she very tall?
B Yes, she is.
5. A Look at that woman in a dress. Isn't she short?
B Yes, she is.

Activity 3 (p.WI/34)

Tape-script and key:


The fat man has a yellow sweater and brown trousers. Colour the thin girl's skirt green. Then,
colour her blouse pink. Look at the short woman with a dress. Colour her dress blue and red.
The thin man has a black T-shirt and blue jeans. There’s a short woman, too. Colour her skirt
purple and her blouse yellow. Finally, the tall boy has a pair of green jeans and a brown
sweater.
Activity 4 (p.WI/35)
Key:
Susan Hey, look eddy! Isn’t that Rod Bingham, the famous actor?
Eddy Where?
Susan Over there near the newsstand.
Eddy Hmm . . . Isn’t Rod Bingham tall? That man is short.
Susan No, not that short man, Eddy! The tall man in black trousers and white shirt.
Eddy Oh, yes, I see him now. Yes, that is Rod Bingham! Super! A famous actor!
Susan Eddy, go and ask him for his autograph!
Eddy OK, Susan.

Activity 5 (p.WI/36)
Key:
Susan and Eddy are in the street near a bookshop window. There are two men near a newsstand.
One of the men is short, with grey trousers and a white shirt. The other man is tall with black
trousers and a white shirt. The tall man is Rod Bingham, a famous actor. Susan wants his
autograph.

Activity 6 (p.WI/36)
Key:
1. That's Captain Roach with his wife over there.
2. A Mum, this is my friend, Jason.
B Nice to meet you, Mrs Morrow.
C Hello, Jason.
3. Look! Mr and Mrs Fox. They're with their three children, Alison, Mary, and Peter
4. That's Janet. She's with her brother Richard.
5. John and I go to the same school, and our houses are on the same street.
6. A Mary and Sue, where are your rulers?
B Here they are, in our school bags!
7. Look! The dog is i n i t s new house in the garden!
8. Where are Mark and Eddy? Aren’t those their posters on the desk?

Activity 7 (p.WI/36)
Key:
1. Captain and Mrs Roach have got a boat. It's an old wreck.
2. Aren’t those girls thin? Yes, they are.
3. John and Eddy don’t live in Edinburgh. They live in London.
4. Isn’t there a pair of black trousers under the desk?
5. Where are your felt pens, Susan?
6. Isn’t Mr Morrow Australian? No, he isn’t. He’s English.
7. That's Mr and Mrs Adler's house, isn't it nice?
8. John, aren't you and Heather in the same class? Yes, we are. Our teacher is Mrs Brown.
9. There are that boys at the newsstand right now.
10. Does Captain Roach live in this street?

Activity 8 (p.WI/37)
Key:
1. There are two photos in the school bag.
2. Jason is near the boat.
3. Isn't that Sharon under the desk?
4. Martha and Jennifer aren't at home; they're at the bus stop.
5. Where’s the cat? Oh no! It's on the table!
6. The jacket and the dress are in the window.

Activity 10 (p.WI/38)
Tape-script and key:
Man Is there a red sweater in the window?
Woman No, there isn’t.

Man Is there a pair of grey trousers?


Woman Yes, there is.

Man Are the shoes black?


Woman Yes, they are.

Man Is there a man in the window?


Woman No, there isn’t.
Man Is there a woman?
Woman Yes, there is.

Man Is her skirt orange?


Woman Yes, it is.

Activity 11 (p.WI/38)
Tape-script and key:
A rhyme
One, two, three, four
Come in, please, and shut the door.
Five, six, seven, eight,
It’s time for school. You’re very late.
Nine, ten, nine, ten,
Don’t be late for school again.

UNIT 6 I LOVE CLOWNS


LESSON PLANS

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and guessing
Listening and identifying people
Listening and filling in balloons

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Reading descriptions of people

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Describing a puppet
Talking about people
Pair/Group Work:
Describing people He’s got big ears. His eyes are brown. Etc.
Mary is young, tall, and thin.
Identifying people by asking questions Who’s got a big head?
Who’s got blonde hair?
Record your voice

Written production
Filling in balloons
Writing descriptions of a person
Writing orders

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
What’s the English word capelli?
Who’s got a big head?
What colour is Tom’s hair?
Imperative (2): play. .
show me . . .
touch . . .
stand up.
sit down.
point to . . .
Personal pronouns objects (1): me, you, him, her, it

Pronunciation
Pronunciation of the letter h

Topics and cultural items


Environments
Active vocabulary
Nouns
arm
beard
ear
eye
foot
gentleman
hair
hand
head
lady
leg
moustache
mouth
neck
nose
puppet

Verbs
call
‘ll
love
play
point
say
show
sit down
stand up
tell
touch

Adjectives
big
blonde
large
left
long
other
right

Pronouns
everybody
it
one
you

Interjections
ssh!

Conjunctions
but

Prepositions
for

Expressions
oh, boy!
that’s right

Recalling Vocabulary (p.I/84)


THE HUMAN BODY
Listening (p.I/84)
1a.Tape-script
hair, head, eye, ea, nose, mouth, neck, arm, hand, leg, foot.

Speaking (p.I/84)
2. Pair work. Before starting, give examples. Show a pen to the class and ask What’s the
English for “pensil”? Students should answer pen. Then, go on asking other questions such as
What’s the English for “buku”? etc. Then, with books open, students practice asking
questions on what the part of the body are called in English. Move around the class and help
them.

Dialogue (p.I/85)
1. With books open, ask students to identify and talk about the people in the picture. For
example, point to Mike and ask Who is this boy? eliciting the answer, Mike. Then, point to
Susan and ask Who’s that girl? eliciting the answer, Susan. Then, ask the same questions
while pointing at Sandra, Mrs King, and Mr Smith.
2. Play the CD for the dialogue with books closed.
3. Play the CD for the dialogue again and ask the class to repeat the dialogue line by line
after the recording, with books closed. Now, dividing the class into seven groups, have
each group take the part of one of the characters. Exchange roles and do it again.
4. With books open, have volunteers take part and read the dialogue. Check and if
necessary, model the correct intonation for questions and expressions.
5. Pair work. With books open, students practice the dialogue, exchanging roles. Move
around the classroom and help them.
6. Ask for volunteers to role play the dialogue.

Communication Practice (p.I/86)


Listening (p.I/86)
1. Ask students to look at the pictures of the three puppets. Point to Big Guy and ask Look at
Big Guy. Is he young or old? Then, point to Red Hat and ask the same question. Point to Mr
Bear and ask Is Mr Bear tall or short? Raise your hand high when you say tall and lower it
when you say short. Then, ask Is he fat or thin? and spread your hands wide when you say fat
and move your hands closer together when you say thin. Write the three questions on the
board. Then, ask some students to come to the board. Point to one of them and ask the class
the three questions. Obviously, avoid calling a student short or fat, they may be offended.
After students have practiced young, old, fat, thin, short, tall with you, they proceed with
Activity 1.
Key:
The puppet in the first description is Red Hat.
The puppet in the second description is Mr Bear.
The puppet in the third description is Big Guy.

Speaking (p.I/86-I/87)
2a/b/c. Students are guided through activities 2a and 2b to describe people and ask questions.
Activity is guessing game where students can use all their competence in trying to identify the
four characters.

Listening (p.I/88)
3. Key:
Stand up!
Touch your nose!
Show me John’s leg!
Point to eddy’s nose!
Play your trumpet!
Sit down!

Grammar Practice (p.I/89)


Exercise 1 (p.I/89)
Key: pergi = go; mendengarkan = listen; berhenti = stop; datang = come; mengambil =
take; membuka = open; meletakkan = put; belajar = study; kehilangan = lose.

Exercise 2 (p.I/89/-I/90)
Key:
Picture 1 Close the door, please!
Picture 2 Come to my house!
Picture 3 Listen to your father!
Picture 4 Go to school!
Picture 5 Put your book on the table!
Picture 6 Stop!
Picture 7 Take your pen!
Picture 8 Open your mouth!

Exercise 3 (p.I/90)
Key:
Subjects pronoun Objects pronoun
I me
you you
he him
she her
it it

Exercise 4 (p.I/90)
Key:
1. her
2. him
3. him
4. it
5. it
6. me
7. him
8. you

Exercise 5 (p.I/91)
Key:
1. Mr Smith doesn’t live far from our house.
2. Joe has got a small head and big ears.
3. Say “Hello” to everybody.
4. Point to Jim’s nose.
5. Take a felt pen and put it on the desk.
6. That man is short and fat.
7. This woman is tall and thin.
8. That puppet has got a large mouth.
9. Big Guy has got green eyes and a long nose.
10. Stand up and play your trumpet!

Exercise 6 (p.I/91)
Key:
Down
1. FOOT
2. LEG
3. ARM
5. HEAD
7. HAND
Across
4. NOSE
5. HAIR
6. MOUTH
8. EAR
9. EYE
10. NECK

PRONUNCIATION (p.I/91)
Pronunciation of letter h
Ask students to listen carefully and pronounce the h the way English people do. Repeat the
activity many times until students have understood the difficulty and try to imitate the actors.

Developing Oral Skills (p.I/92)


Reading (p.I/92)
2. The puppet on the left is Mr Chips and the one on the right is Mr Strike.

Listening/speaking (p.I/92)
3. Tape-script and key:
Mrs King Is Mr Chips short?
You No, he isn’t.
Mrs King He’s got big ears or small ears?
You He’s got big ears.
Mrs King Has he got a beard or a moustache?
You He’s got a moustache.
Mrs King Is his moustache long or short?
You It’s long.
Mrs King What about his mouth? Is it big or small?
You It’s small.
Mrs King What colour is his hair?
You It’s blonde.
Mrs King Is it long or short?
You It’s long.
Mrs King He’s got a long or short neck?
You He’s got a long neck.
Mrs King And what colour are Mr Strike’s eyes?
You They are blue.
Mrs King Has he got short legs or long legs?
You He’s got short legs.
Mrs King What colour is Mr Strike’s hat?
You It’s black.

Unit Self-Test (p.I/93)


2. Key: Stand up!
Touch your ears!
Show me your hands!
Take a pencil and put it on the table!
Point to M Strike’s nose!
Sit down!

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.WI/39)
Key:
1. ear
2. head
3. hair
4. neck
5. arm
6. hand
7. nose
8. eye
9. mouth
10. foot
11. leg

Activity 2 (p.WI/39)
Key: That ear is big. That nose is long.
That head is big. That eye is small.
That hair is long. That mouth is large.
That neck is long. That foot is small.
That arm is thin. That leg is thin.
That hand is small.

Activity 4 (p.WI/41)
Key:
1. True.
2. False: his mouth is very big.
3. False: he’s got very large hands.
4. False; Benny has got a dog, Sport and Slicker has got a cat, Trudy.
5. True.

Activity 5 (p.WI/41)
Key: Pictures are numbered: 4, 2, 6, 1, 5, 3.
Tape-script
Number 1 Show me your leg!
Number 2 Sit down!
Number 3 Touch your hair!
Number 4 Touch your feet!
Number 5 Stand up!
Number 6 Touch your head!

Activity 6 (p.WI/41)
Key:
1. Touch your feet!
2. Sit down!
3. Touch your head!
4. Show me your leg!
5. Stand up!
6. Touch your hair!

Activity 7 (p.WI/42)
Key:
1. There’s John over there. But who’s the boy near him?
2. Tell her what to do.
3. Close it, please!
4. Mr and Mrs Roach are in their car. Look at it.
5. Eddy plays it.
6. Marry likes him very much.
7. Mark wants to give her a present for her birthday.
8. The boy with him is my brother, Alex.

Activity 9 (p.WI/42)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 Look at the clown!
Number 2 That clown has a big mouth.
Number 3 Susan, put the photo on the table.
Number 4 Mrs Roach is tall and thin.
Number 5 Red Hat is short and fat. He’s got big ears and a small mouth.
Number 6 Who’s got long neck and short arms?

Activity 10a (p.WI/43)


Example answer:
I’ve got a pet. It’s a dog. Its name is Rags. He’s a beautiful animal. He’s got a small nose. It’s
red. He likes to go to the restaurant with me. He sits at his table in the restaurant and has
dinner. When it’s time to go home, I say “Stand up!” and Rags puts his dishes in the box and
goes to the bus stop with me. We go home. But Rags doesn’t live in my house with me. He
lives in the boat near my house because he loves wrecks.
UNIT 7 DO YOU PREFER CATS OR DOGS?

LESSON PLANS

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Matching written and aural information
Comparing a listening and a reading text
Answering comprehension questions
Identifying pets by listening to descriptions

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Matching visual and written information

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/Group Work:
Asking and talking about likes and dislikes What are your favorite pets?
I like dogs.
I like them too. / I don’t like them.
I don’t like hamsters.
I don’t like them either. / No, I like them.
Asking and talking about animals Is it big or small?
It’s big.
Has it got a mane?
Yes, it has.
Does it live in Africa?
Yes, it does.
Is it a lion?
Yes, it is.
Describing pet qualities Pets born under this sign are very intelligent.
Dogs or cats under this signs don’t like to go out
for walks.
These pets have a placid nature.
Asking and talking about a picture

Written production
Matching description with pictures
Completing a letter

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Verb like
Personal pronoun objects (2): us, you, them
These, those
Too / either

Pronunciation
Listening for word stresses
Pronouncing word with different stresses

Topics and cultural items


Animals
Pets
Astrology

Active vocabulary
Nouns
Africa mice
Alsatian mouse
Arctic panda
Asia pet
bird polar bear
cage pouch
children puppy
China shop owner
country stable
elephant stripe
garden tail
goldfish bowl thief
hamster thieves
horse tiger
kangaroo tortoise
kitten trick
lion word
mane
master

Verbs
keep watch
learn
prefer
protect
quarrel
stop
talk

Adjectives
active
adventurous
asleep
beautiful
bright
clean
conscientious
extrovert
favourite
independent
intelligent
lively
loyal
placid
sensitive
stupid
sweet
these
those
useful

Pronouns
either
them
us

Adverbs
away

Prepositions
about
behind
over

Interjections
hum

Expressions
What about . . . ?

Recalling Vocabulary (p.I/94)


PETS
Writing (p.I/94)
la/b. Let the students try to match the names of pets with the pictures. Move around the
classroom and help. Then the students choose their favourite pets and write their names in
their exercise-books.

Key: The pictures illustrate in the order: goldfish, tortoises, parrots, cats, hamsters, canaries,
dogs.

Speaking (p.I/94)
2a/b. Before starting the activity make sure that all the students know how to pronounce the
new vocabulary. If necessary, have the students repeat the names after you, first Teacher-Class,
then Teacher-Student.
The students in pairs work according to the model dialogue. Students A make a note of the pets
Students B like and vice-versa . Then each student reports to the class what his or her partner
likes.

Enquiry (p.I/94)
3. Write on the board the names of the pets which appear in the pictures. For example, dogs,
cats, canaries, etc. Then ask: How many of you have a dog? Put your hands up. Then write
the number of dogs in the appropriate column. Go on with the enquiry until you get the results
for all the pets. When you have completed the unit, you can publish the enquiry on the web, of
course if your school has access to the Internet. Students can bring photos of their pets and can
write short paragraphs describing their characters or short interesting or amusing stories about
them.

Dialogue (p.I/95)
Use the techniques discussed in the previous notes to the units to present and exploit the
dialogue.

Communication Practice (p.I/96)


Reading/writing (p.I/96)
1. Let the students read the short descriptions of the animals and help them with the meaning
and pronunciation of the new vocabulary items. Then, the students write captions for the
pictures.
Key:
Mouse. It is grey. It is small. It lives in houses or in the country.
Horse. It is big. It has long legs and a mane. It lives in stables.
Lion. It is a big cat. It has a mane. It lives in Africa.
Tiger. It is a big cat. It has black and brown stripes. It lives in Asia.
Elephant. It is grey. It is big. It has a long nose. It lives in Africa or in Asia.
Polar bear. It is white. It is big. It lives in the Arctic.
Kangaroo. It has a pouch and a long tail. It lives in Australia.
Panda. It is black and brown. It lives in China.

Speaking (p.I/96)
2. Guessing game. Students work in pairs. Student A thinks of an animal and Student B has
to guess what it is. Of course, he or she can’t ask a direct question, like What animal is it? He
or she can only ask questions like the ones in the model dialogue.

Reading (p.I/97)
3. Students read Pet Qualities on their own. As usual, move around the classroom and help
the students with the meaning and pronunciation of the new vocabulary items. Then, have the
students number the qualities giving number one to what they think is the most important
quality and so on and so forth.

Listening/reading (p.I/97)
4. Students listen and match the Signs of the Zodiac to the pet qualities.

Key: Aries: 12; Taurus: 6; Gemini: 2; Cancer 4; Leo: 5; Virgo: 1 ; Libra: 10; Scorpio
9; Sagittarius: 3; Capricorn: 7; Aquarius: 8; Pisces: 11.
Tape-script
Speaker Welcome to the 'Pet corner'. This afternoon we’ll talk about pet astrology. Do you
know which sign your pet was born under? Well, listen to our astrologer and
discover your pet’s qualities.
Astrologer Aries. Pets born under this sign are adventurous.
Taurus. These pets have a placid nature.
Gemini. Pets born under this sign are very intelligent.
Cancer. These pets are very sensitive and like gentle and sweet masters.
Leo. Pets born under this sign are extrovert.
Virgo. Dogs or cats born under this sign conscientious and clean.
Libra. These pets are lazy. They are not active or lively.
Scorpio. Pets born under this sign are loyal.
Sagittarius. Dogs or cats under this sign aren't very active and don't like to go out
for walks.
Capricorn. These pets like to learn tricks.
Aquarius. Pets born under this sign are lively and bright.
Pisces. These pets don't love children.

Grammar Practice (p.I/98)


Exercise 1 (p.I/98)
Key: George likes / I like /They like

Exercise 2 (p.I/98)
Key:
1. He likes chocolates.
2. It doesn't like cats.
3. She doesn't like hamsters.
4. They like canaries.
5. She likes presents.
6. It doesn't like to go out for walks.

Exercise 3 (p.I/99)
Key: Personal pronouns (object)
us kita
you kamu (kalian)
them mereka

Exercise 4 (p.I/99)
Key:
1. Where are John and Eddy? I want to tell them a joke.
2. Brad’s parrot is nice. I like it.
3. I’m here. Do you want to talk to me?
4. Susan and I want to go to cinema. Do you want to come with us?
5. Susan is a nice girl. Eddy likes her.
6. John and Sandra, come here. I want to give you a chocolate.
7. Where are Alex and Sarah? Tell them their father is here.
8. Show us your video game, please. We want to play with it.

Exercise 5 (p.I/99)
Key:
1. Can you phone her?
2. I like it.
3. Put it on the chair.
4. I want to go to the cinema with him.
5. Please, tell us the time.
6. I want to talk to you.
7. Write a letter to them.
8. I want to tell them a joke.

Exercise 6 (p.I/100)
Key:
1. Those girls over there are Susan and Sandra.
2. Are these your jeans, Eddy?
3. Are these boys your children?
4. Are those your parents, Susan?
5. These are my new shoes.
6. Look at those lions. Aren't they beautiful?

Exercise 7 (p.I/100)
Key: Example answers:
1. I like them too.
2. I do.
3. I do,
4. I don't.
5. I don't.
6. I don't like them either

PRONUNCIATION (p.I/101)
1. Tell the students to underline the stressed syllable in each word. Then, have them listen to
the recording and check. Finally, the students repeat the words after the tape.
Key:
ad ven tur ous
loy al
sen si tive
in tel li gent
con sci en tious

Developing Oral Skills (p.I/102)


Listening (p.I/102)
1. Students listen to the recording and look at the picture on their books.

Reading (p.I/102)
2. The students read the transcription of the listening activity on the book.

Listening/speaking (p.I/102)
Tape-script and key:
1. Who is the man in the counter?
He’s Mr Anderson, the shop owner.
2. Is he nice?
Yes, he’s very nice.
3. Has he got long brown hair and green eyes?
No, he hasn’t. He has got short brown hair.
4. Has he got a beard?
No, he hasn’t. He has got a moustache.
5. Has he got many pets in his shop?
Yes, he has.
6. How many puppies are there?
There are three puppies.
7. Are they on the floor?
No, they’re in a cage.
8. What colour are they?
One is black, one is brown, and one is black and white.
9. Have they got long tails?
Yes, they have long tails.

Speaking (p.I/102)
4. Memory game. The students work in pair. they cover the picture and ask each other
questions about the pets in the shop.

Unit Self-Test (p.I/103)


Dear Pen friend,
I’m writing to tell you that I’ve got great news. I’ve got a pet! It is a dog. His name is Frizzy.
He’s a Basset Hound, so he’s a small dog. He’s one year old and it’s black and white. He’s
very active and lively. He likes to go out for walks and he loves children. Have you got a pet?
Write me soon,
Yours sincerely,

Paolo

Culture File (p.I/104)


Ask students to read The Circus and give written answers to the questions.
Key:
1. Five
2. They come from all over the world.
3. A team of talent scouts.
4. The best Latin dancers are from Brazil, the best skiers are from Canada and Colorado, and
the best riders and acrobats are from Mongolia, Russia, Bulgaria, and Rumania.
5. The Indonesian word for skier is “atlet ski/ pe-ski” and the one for rider is “pengendara”.
6. He is a clown.
7. He likes to see three generations of the same family laughing at his jokes.
8. Seven.
9. “Fisarmonica”.
10. Traveling around the USA.
Make sure that students understand the meaning of unfamiliar words either by context or by
giving them the Indonesian equivalents as a last resort.

Build up your Portfolio (p.I/105)


1. How to prepare the activity
Make sure that all students understand the dialogue in Activity A. Then ask students to make
a list of the rules that people should follow if they want to keep a pet.
Here is an example:
• Keep a big dog in a large house. A big dog can’t live in a small city flat.
• Give your pet the exercise he/she needs.
• Give your pets the right kind of food and make sure he/she always has fresh water.
• Take him/her to a vet when he/she is ill.
• Make sure that he/she gets all the necessary vaccinations.
• Always talk to him/her in a soft voice.
• Never hit him/her even when he/she behaves badly.
• But, first of all, love your pet.
Move around the classroom and make sure that students write the rules correctly.
At this point, divide the class into groups of three or four. Each group will discuss the rules.
Then each student will prepare a poster describing the rules for keeping a pet and illustrating
them with drawings.
Check what students have prepared. Make your own comments and listen to the comments of
the class. Each student will make a note of the suggestions and correct their work accordingly.
Finally students can decide whether to put their work in their Portfolios.

2. Skills on which the activity is based


The skills on which this activity is based are mainly reading and writing. But other skills are
also involved. For example, transforming one kind of text into another, in this case, for
example, tram oral language to written rules. Drawing and designing a layout are also
required.

3. Time required to complete the activity


About fifteen minutes are required to complete Activity 1.
Activity 2 will require about half an hour in the classroom to prepare and discuss the rules.
The making of the poster can be carried out at home by individual students.

4. Level required
This activity aims to prepare students for Level A1 reading and writing skills.

Learning Strategies
Has activity should he carried out in the classroom. Students can do Activity 1 on their own.
Then, in pairs or groups, they can compare the items they have ticked  and discuss the
different skills involved in understanding the meaning of a dialogue.

Self-Evaluation Test (p.I/107/108)


COMPETENCE
Exercise 1 (p.1/107)
Key:
1. Isn't the piano lesson at 4 o'clock?
2. Isn't John's birthday in June?
3. Aren't Susan and Sandra at the cinema?
4. Aren’t Mr and Mrs Morrow at home?
5. Isn't it 11 o'clock?
6. Aren't you American, Joe?
7. Aren't we late?
8. Aren’t your teachers English?
9. Isn't Susan's father an architect?
10. Aren't those boys Italian?

Exercise 2 (p.I/107)
Key:
1. John, are these your jeans?
2. We live in Hampstead. That's our house, over there.
3. I like your teachers, Susan. They're very nice.
4. That’s Captain Roach over there. And that's his wife.
5. This is Brad's parrot. Its name is Crik.
6. This is Susan. And this is her brother Mike.
7. The house over there is my house. I live there.
8. Those boy's are very nice. What are their names?
9. We know a clown. His name's Mr Smith and he lives near our house.
10. Hey, Joe! Show me your leg.

Exercise 3(p. I/107)


Key:
1. I want to see it. It's a beautiful Walt Disney film.
2. I like them. They are my favourite actors.
3. Please, give us your felt pens.
4. We want to go to the cinema with you.
5. I like her. She's very nice.
6. Tell him I want to see his parrots.
7. Buy them an ice cream.
8. Close it, please.

Exercise 4 (p.I/107-I/108)
Key:
1. Those sandwiches over there are big.
2. Your exercise-books aren’t on that desk. They are on this desk.
3. These jeans here on the bed are Nick’s jeans.
4. Look at that girl over there. She’s Mike’s sister.
5. That pink dress in the window is beautiful.
6. Look at those dishes over there. They’re beautiful.
7. Put your jacket on this chair not on that chair.
8. These T-shirts here are John’s T-shirts.
9. That boy over there is Mike, Susan’s brother.
10. Shh! I like this song. I want to listen to it.

Exercise 5 (p. I/108)


Key:
1. I like than too. / I don't.
2. I don't like them either. / I do.
3. I don't. / I like it too.
4. I do. / I don't like it either.
5. I like them too. / I don't.
6. I like it too. / I don't.

Exercise 6 (p.1/108)
Key:
1. He loves children.
2. I like presents.
3. They don't like tortoises.
4. They like cats.
5. He likes to go out for walks.
6. Mrs Wilson likes cheese.

COMPETENCE
Exercise 7 (p.1/108)
Example answer:
Dear Bill,
I’ve got a new English friend. His name’s Brad Adler. He’s very nice and his family is very
nice too. He’s 11. He’s blond and has got blue eyes. His father, Mr Adler, is a detective. He’s
tall and thin. Brad’s mother, Mrs Adler is a shop assistant. She has got brown hair. Brad has
got one brother, Mark, and two sisters, Sheila and Elizabeth. mark is 17, Sheila is 13, and
Elizabeth is 15. They have got a parrot and a dog and they live in London.
Write soon,
Yours sincerely,
Luca

Exercise 8 (p.1/108)
Example dialogue:
You Do you like dogs, Brad?
Brad Oh, yes. I’ve got a nice dog.
You I don’t like dogs. I like cats. They’re independent and intelligent.
Brad Yes, but I prefer dogs, and I like parrots. They are lively and they talk.
You I don’t like birds.
Brad I do.
Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.W1/44)
Key:
Down
1. GOLDFISH
2. PARROT
3. CANARIES

Across
4. CAT
5. DOG
6. TORTOISE
7. HAMSTER

Activity 2 (p.W1/44)
Key:
1. Martha and her brother like cats. They don’t like dogs.
2. Jennifer doesn’t like tigers. She likes pandas.
3. Mr and Mrs Wilson like elephants. They don’t like lions.
4. My partner and I like English. We don’t like Math.
5. Susan doesn’t like hamster. She likes horses.

Activity 3 (p.W1/45)
Key:
Brad Susan, look at that beautiful parrot over there!
Susan Yes, it is beautiful. Its colours are wonderful.
Brad Do you like birds, Susan?
Susan Yes, I do. But I prefer dogs. And I like cats, too. They’re independent and they love
their house. Er. . . you’ve got a parrot, haven’t you, Brad?
Brad Yes, that’s right. He’s beautiful. Red, blue, and green. And he’s intelligent.
Susan Intelligent? Then your parrot’s a Gemini. Pets born under that sign are very
intelligent.
Brad Yes! He is a Gemini! Incredible! What about your dog? What sign is he?
Susan He’s an Aquarius. He’s lively and bright.
Brad Yes, he is. And I like him.

Activity 4 (p.W1/45)
Key:
1. I do. / I don't like them either.
2. I don't. / I love them too.
3. I like them too. / I don't.
4. I don't like them either. / I do.
5. I don't. / I like them too.
6. I like them too. / I don't.
7. I don't. / I love them too.
8. I do. / I don’t like them either.

Activity 5 (p.W1/46)
Key: George / canary;
Rachel / Dalmatian;
Ann / horse.
Tape-script
GeorgeMy name's George and I've got a nice pet. It's a canary. It's small. It's green and
yellow and I like it a lot. My canary is very intelligent and talks to me, too!
Rachel I'm Rachel. I live in Highgate. 1've got a beautiful pet. It's a Dalmatian. He’s big and he's
black and white. His name is Sam My dog Sam live in my garden.
Ann Hello. My name's Ann. I love my pet. It’s a lovely horse. Her name is Pretty Girl. She is
white and brown and she lives in a stable on my grandfather's farm.

Activity 6 (p.W1/46)
Key:
1. It’s a canary.
2. It’s small.
3. No, it isn't. It's green and yellow.
4. Rachel's dog's black and white.
5. His name’s Sam.
6. It’s big.
7. It lives in the garden.
8. Pretty Girl's a horse.
9. It's white and brown.
10. It has got a long mane.
Activity 7 (p.W1/47)
Key:
1. Look at those beautiful flowers over there.
2. These small dogs are Mr Black's.
3. Those big white animals are polar bears.
4. Isn’t that a tiger over there in the cage?
5. This is my hamster, Harry.
6. These boys and girls here are Miss Short's students.
7. Hey! Look over there near the newsstand! That’s John, isn't it?
8. Who are those girls over there?

Activity 8 (p.W1/48)
Key:
Subject Pronouns Object Pronouns
I me
you you
he him
she her
it it
we us
they them

Activity 9 (p.W1/48)
Key:
1. I like horses. What about you? Do you like them, too?
2. When’s Janet’s birthday? I want to give her a present.
3. Is that your new video game, John? I want to see it. Show it to me, please.
4. Jason and I want to play. Do you want to play with us?
5. Mark is in the garage. Tell him his mother is on the telephone.
6. Here’s the photo. Look at it.
7. Jennifer, this is a present for you.
8. This is Joe, the clown. We call him Small Head.

Activity 10 (p.W1/48)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 Eddy likes dogs.
Number 2 Susan, do you like parrots?
Number 3 John, what’s your favourite pet?
Number 4 The clown has got long legs and short arms.
Number 5 Eddy, does Susan like teddy bears?
Number 6 Show me your hands!
UNIT 8 WHAT’S SHE DOING?

LESSON PLANS
SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Identifying food and drinks
Listening and writing captions
Understanding questions about a picture
Song: “My House”

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Reading a letter
Reading a paragraph

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/Group work:
Offering food and drink Do you want some jam for breakfast?
Accepting Yes, please.
Refusing No, thanks.
Asking what people are doing What’s Eddy doing?
Answering He’s playing the drums.
Answering questions about a picture
Record your voice
Song: “My House”

Written production
Completing a letter
Writing a caption
Completing a paragraph
Writing a description of your house

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Present progressive

Pronunciation
Pronouncing compound words (2)

Topics and cultural items


Food and drinks
Houses

Active vocabulary
Nouns
bathroom glass omelette
bedroom hall orange juice
bottle ham poster
cheese jam sandwich
coffee kitchen table
computer letter tea
corner living room television
dining room lunch toast
fish marmalade toilet
flat meat TV set
fridge milk vegetable
friend newspaper wall
garage noise water

Verbs
close
cook
drink
eat
read
write

Adverbs
downstairs
How many?
upstairs

Indefinite adjectives
some

Expressions
Come in!
Get out!
Have a look
No, thanks
Yes, please

Competences (p.I/109)
Before starting Sub-module 3, ask students to read the series of objectives in terms of
competence that they should reach at the end of the sub-module. When students finish Unit 10,
they can go back to list of objectives and check what they can do and how well they can do it.

Activities for portfolio (p.1/109)


Here, the students find suggestions for activities they can do to develop materials for their
Portfolios.
Recalling Vocabulary (p.1/110)
Writing (p.1/110)
1. Key:
1. bedroom
2. bedroom
3. toilet
4. bathroom
5. kitchen
6. dining room
7. living room
8. hall
9. garage
10. garden

Listening (p.1/110)
2. Tape-script
Alison’s house is not a big house. Upstairs there are two bedrooms, number 1 and number 2, a
toilet with number 3, a bathroom, number 4. Downstairs at number 5, there is a kitchen,
number 6 is a dining room, number 7 is a living room, and number 8 is the hall. There is also a
large garage, number 9, and number 10 is a beautiful garden with many flowers.

Speaking (p.1/110)
3. Pair work. Students ask and answer questions in the examples. Move around the classroom
and help them as needed.

Dialogue (p.1/111)
1. Ask the students to look at the pictures before playing the CD and ask them questions
abut the characters who appear in the pictures. For example, Where are Alison and
Sandra? Do they go to Sandra’s house? Is the cat eating an omelette? Where’s the cat?
2. Play the CD for the dialogue. Then, you may follow the same steps as in previous
units.

Communication Practice (p.1/112)


Speaking (p.1/112)
1. Game. Hide-and-Seek. Repeat the names of the different rooms in a house. Also repeat
garden and garage. Give some examples of the game. You can pretend to hide somewhere in a
house and the students ask you questions to find out where you are. For example, they can ask
Are you in the bedroom? Are you at the garage? You answer accordingly, until they find out
where you are. Then, ask students to play the game in pairs or in small groups.

Listening (p.1/112)
2. Tape-script
Number 1 is jam
Number 2 is (a piece of) cheese
Number 3 is fish
Number 4 is (a cup of) coffee
Number 5 is (a bottle of) water
Number 6 is marmalade
Number 7 are vegetables (carrots, potatoes, and peas)
Number 8 is ham
Number 9 is (a bottle of) milk
Number 10 is meat
Number 11 is toast
Number 12 is a sandwich
Number 13 is (a cup of) tea

With books open, give students a few moments to look at the pictures. Then, practice the
pronunciation of the various names. Point at one item in one of the three lists and ask What’s
this?

Listening (p.1/113)
4. Tape-script and key:
1. Eddy is playing the drums.
2. Mrs Wilson is writing a letter.
3. Pussy is eating Alison’s omelette.
4. Mr Carter is reading a newspaper.
5. John and his brother are having breakfast.
6. Susan is drinking a glass of water.

Once students have completed the activity, hold up your book for the class to see and ask a
student: What’s Mr Carter doing? eliciting the correct answer.

Speaking (p.1/113)
5. Pair work. Students ask and answer questions as in the examples. Move around the
classroom and help them as needed.

Grammar Practice (p.1/114)


Exercise 1 (p.1/114)
Key:

1. is drinking
2. is writing
3. is reading
4. are listening
5. is eating
6. is going
7. is speaking
8. is closing

Exercise 2 (p.1/115)
Key:

1. Joe is playing the trumpet.


2. Mrs King is putting the book on the table.
3. Jim is showing Joe’s leg.
4. Captain Roach is touching his nose.
5. Sandra is taking a book.
6. Brad is pointing to his parrot, Crick.

Exercise 3 (p.1/115)
Key:

Hello, Cheryl!
How are you? What are you doing? Are you still studying for your exams?
I am writing this letter to you because I want to invite you to come here next weekend and
stay with me. We can relax a little.
My family is OK. My father is not at home, he is an architect, and he is working at his
office right now. My mother is reading a book in the living room and my brother, Mike, is
eating a sandwich in the kitchen. Mike is 12 now and he eats a lot. Our dog, Brown, is playing
in the garden.
That's all for now.
Write me soon and give my best wishes to your family.
Love,
Susan
P.S. Here’s a recent photo of me and my family.

Exercise 4 (p.1/116)
Key:
1. A Is Eddy listening to some music?
B No, he isn’t. He’s playing tennis.
2. A Is Susan touching her nose?
B No, she isn’t. She’s touching her mouth.
3. A Is John eating an ice cream?
B No, he isn’t. He’s eating a sandwich.
4. A Is Mrs King writing a letter?
B No, she isn’t. She’s reading a book.
5. A Is Jim showing Joe’s leg?
B No, he isn’t. He’s showing Joe’s arm.
6. A Is Joe playing the drums?
B No, he isn’t. He’s playing the trumpet.

Exercise 5 (p.1/116)
Example answer:
Brad’s house has got a garden. There are three bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs.
Downstairs there is a kitchen, a dining room, a living room, and a toilet. There is also a
garage.
PRONUNCIATION (p.1/117)
Pronouncing compound words (2)
Tell students to listen carefully and try to repeat the sounds after the actors. Underline that in
compound words, there are generally two main accents. The first is generally on the first
syllable.

Developing Oral Skills (p.1/118)


Listening (p.1/118)
1. Tape-script and key:
This is John’s house. Right now, John is in his room and he is using the computer. The
computer is on a table and next to the computer there are five books. There are also three CDs
on a chair and two posters on the wall. John’s brother, Alex, is in the living room. He’s
watching television. The TV set is in the corner of the room. On the TV, there are some
flowers. Mrs Morrow, John’s mother is in the kitchen. She’s cooking dinner. Pete, the canary,
is in his cage. The cage is on the fridge. Next to the fridge there is a table. On the table there
are three glasses and behind the glasses there is a bottle of orange juice.

Listening/speaking (p.1/118)
2. Tape-script and key:
Eddy Where’s John right now?
You He’s in his room.
Eddy What’s he doing?
You He’s using the computer.
Eddy Where’s the computer?
You It’s on a table.
Eddy Where are the books?
You They are next to the computer.
Eddy How many books are there?
You There are five books.
Eddy Where are the CDs?
You They are on a chair.
Eddy How many posters are there on the wall?
You There are two posters.
Eddy Where’s Alex now?
You He’s in the living room.
Eddy What’s he doing?
You He’s watching television.
Eddy Where are the flowers?
You They are on the TV set.
Eddy Where’s Mrs Morrow?
You She’s in the kitchen.
Eddy What’s she doing?
You She’s cooking dinner.
Eddy Where’s Pete, the canary?
You He’s in his cage.
Eddy Where’s the cage?
You It’s on the fridge.
Eddy Where’s the table?
You It’s next to the fridge.
Eddy How many glasses are there on the table?
You There are three glasses.
Eddy Where’s the bottle of orange juice?
You It’s behind the glasses.

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.W1/49)
Key:
Down
2. HOUSE
3. BATHROOM
6. DINING ROOM
7. GARDEN

Across
1. KITCHEN
4. HALL
5. BEDROOM
8. LIVING OOM
9. GARAGE
10. TOILET

Activity 2 (p.W1/49)
Key:
Possible answers:
1. I have breakfast in the dining room.
2. I watch TV with my family in the living room.
3. There are a lot of flowers in the garden of Alison’s house.
4. I generally study in my bedroom.
5. My mother cooks in the kitchen.
6. Upstairs in an English house there are usually two or three bedrooms, a bathroom, and a
toilet.

Activity 4 (p.W1/50)
Key:
Mark is in the kitchen. He’s having breakfast.
Alison is in her bedroom. She’s writing a letter.
Jennifer and her cat are in the garden. They’re playing hide-and-seek.
Mr Carter is in the living room. He’s reading a book.
Jason is in the dining room. He’s eating a sandwich.
Tim and Sheila are in the living room. They’re watching TV.

Activity 5 (p.W1/51)
Key:
1. Eddy is listening to music.
2. Susan is studying in her room.
3. Sandra is watching TV.
4. Alison and her cat, Pussy, are playing in the garden.
5. Mr Carter is reading a book.
6. Joe, the clown, is drinking milk.

Tape-script
John What are you doing now, Eddy?
Eddy I’m listening to music.

Sheila Hello, Mrs King. Is Susan at home?


Mrs King Yes, she is. She’s studying in her room.

Alison Sandra, what are you doing? Are you studying?


Sandra No, I’m not. I’m watching TV.

Mrs Fox Where’s Alison?


Mr Fox She’s playing with Pussy in the garden.

Eddy Look! That’s Mr Carter over there. He’s reding a book.

Sandra Hey, isn’t that Joe, the clown?


Alison Yes, it is. What’s he doing? Is he drinking milk?
Sandra Yes, he is.

Activity 6 (p.W1/51)
Tape-script and key:
Man What’s Eddy doing now?
Woman He’s listening to music.

Man And what about Susan? Is she listening to music, too?


Woman No, she isn’t.
Man What is she doing?
Woman She’s studying.

Man Is Sandra listening to music or watching TV?


Woman She is watching TV.

Man What are Alison and her cat, Pussy, doing in the garden?
Woman They’re playing.

Man Is Mr Carter listening to music?


Woman No, he isn’t.
Man What is he doing?
Woman He’s reading a book.

Man What’s Joe the clown doing?


Woman He’s dinking milk.

Activity 7 (p.W1/52)
Key:
1. Do you want some milk for dinner?
Yes, please.
2. How many rooms are there downstairs?
Four.
3. What’s Jennifer doing?
She’s playing hide-and-seek.
4. Where’s Jason?
He’s in the bathroom.
5. Is Mrs Wilson cooking?
yes, she is.
6. Where’s Mrs King?
She’s in the living room.

Activity 8 (p.W1/53)
Key: Picture 2

Activity 9 (p.W1/53)
Key:
1. It’s in London, in Highgate.
2. There are three bedrooms, a bathroom, and a toilet.
3. It’s downstairs.
4. No, there is only one bathroom.
5. Yes, there is one.
6. There are three bedrooms, and they are upstairs.
7. Yes, she has got a dog and a cat.
8. The cat lives in the garage and the dog has a little house in the garden.

Activity 10 (p.W1/54)
Key:
1. Is Jason having toast for breakfast?
2. Cheryl is staying at Susan’s house for the weekend.
3. Mike is eating a big sandwich in the kitchen.
4. Where’s Cheryl right now?
5. Mr King is working in his office right now.
6. There are three sandwiches and some cheese on the table.
7. The milk, fish, and cheese are in the fridge.
8. How many omelettes are there on the table?

Activity 11 (p.W1/54)
Key:
1. A What are you doing?
B I’m watching TV right now.
2. A Do you want some meat?
B Meat? No, thanks.
3. A What’s Heather doing right now?
B Heather? She’s playing in the garden with her cat.
4. A How many floors are there in your house?
B There are two floors in my house.
5. A Is there a bathroom downstairs?
B A bathroom downstairs? No, there isn’t, but there’s a bathroom upstairs.
6. A Where’s Alison house?
B Alison house? It’s in Sussex Road.
7. A Do you live in a house?
B I live in a flat, not a house.
8. A Is Sandra drinking a glass of milk?
B Sandra? No, she isn’t drinking a glass of milk. She’s drinking a glass of water.
UNIT 9 CAN YOU PLAY A SOLO?

LESSON PLANS
SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Matching aural and visual information
Understanding a dialogue
Listening and locating buildings
Listening and matching aural and visual information

Reading comprehension
Reading a message
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Understanding and answering a questionnaire

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/Group work:
Asking for and giving directions Where’s the pub?
It’s in Hampstead Street, opposite the arcade.
Locating places Is there a bookshop in this street?
Yes, there is.
Where is it?
It’s opposite the hotel.
Asking and talking about ability Can you use a computer?
Yes, I can. / No, I can’t.
He / she can surf the Internet, but he can’t play a video
game.
Describing a picture

Written production
Making an enquiry

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Want + infinitive
Modal verb can (permission and ability)
Prepositions in front of and opposite

Pronunciation
Pronunciation of the weak and the strong forms of can

Topics and cultural items


Shops
Places
Free time activities

Active vocabulary
Nouns
arcade
aspirin
bookshop
car park
chemist’s
drummer
English
evening
film
football
French
gym
instrument
keyboard
library
post office
rock band
roll
solo
stamp
Verbs
borrow
can
can’t
cannot
dance
do keep-fit exercises
get
meet
phone
play
practise
ride a bike
sing
speak
swim
tell jokes
use

Adjectives
ready

Prepositions
in front of
next to
opposite

Adverbs
exactly
later on

Interjections
brilliant!
er. . .
fantastic!

Expressions
Hold on
My place
Of course
You can’t miss it

Recalling Vocabulary (p.1/120)


PLACES (2)
Listening (p.1/120)

1. Students listen and match the actions to the pictures of the shops. Introduce meanings and
pronunciation of the new vocabulary.

Key:
buy a book  bookshop
borrow a book  library
buy some aspirins  chemist's
buy a roll of film  chemist's
buy a stamp  post office
do keep-fit exercises  gym
play a video game  arcade

Tape-script
Dialogue 1
Susan Where are you going, John?
John I’m going to the bookshop. I want to buy a book.
Susan A book?
John Yes. A book about photography. I got a camera for my
birthday and I want to learn how to . . .
Dialogue 2
Mrs Adams What’s the matter Eddy?
Eddy I have to do a project about ancient Egypt and I don’t know
anything about it.
Mrs Adams Well, go to the library and borrow a book about Egypt.
Eddy Borrow a book from the library? That’s a great idea. Thanks
a lot, Mum.

Dialogue 3
Mr Morrow (Sneezes and coughs)
Mrs Morrow I am afraid you’ve got a cold, dear.
Mr Morrow Yes, I think so.
Mrs Morrow Don’t worry. I am going shopping just now. I’ll go to the
chemist’s and buy some aspirins for you.
Mr Morrow Aspirins? Thanks a lot. Ah, by the way, if you go to the
chemist, can you buy a roll of film? John wants some more
film for his new camera.
Mrs Morrow OK. Aspirins for you and a roll of film for John.

Dialogue 4
Italian tourist Excuse me.
Police officer Yes, good morning, sir.
Italian tourist I want to buy a stamp for this post card. Is there tobacconist
near here?
Police officer No, sir. Tobacconists don’t sell stamps in England. You
want a post office.
Italian tourist A post office?
Police officer Yes, look. There’s a post office over there. You can buy
your stamps there.

Dialogue 5
Mike Phew, what a drag! I am tired of playing the same video
game all the time.
Susan You’re right. Dad should buy you a new one. Why don’t
you go to the arcade in Clifton Street?
Mike The new arcade?
Susan Yeah. You can find dozens of video games there . . . and I
can do my homework in peace.

Dialogue 6
Doctor OK, Mr Adler. You are in good health. Your heart is fine,
your lungs are perfect. Only one thing, you don’t do any
spots, do you?
Mr Adler No, I don’t. I haven’t got much time for sport.
Doctor Well, I think you are a bit too thin. You should do some
keep-fit exercises.
Mr Adler Keep-fit exercises?
Doctor Yes. Why don’t you go to the gym once or twice a week? You would feel better and it
would help release the stress . . .

Dialogue (p.1/121-1/122)
Let the students read and understand the message on their own. Explain that Eddy found it
pinned on a board at the Hampstead School of Music. Then, ask questions to check
comprehension.

Which of the characters plays the drums?


How old is he?
Do you think he wants to answer the message?
Is Nick the leader of a rock band?
Does he want a drummer for his band?
What is his phone number?
Does he live in London?

Use the techniques discussed in the previous notes to the units to present and exploit the
dialogue.
Then, tell the students to cover the text of the dialogue on the next page and ask them to find
out whether Eddy is accepted as the drummer of the rock band. Then, let the students listen to
the dialogue and elicit the answer. Go on asking questions like the ones below and using all
the techniques for exploitation of the dialogue.

What are the names of the members of the rock band?


What instruments do they play?
What’s the name of the rock band?

Communication Practice (p.1/123)


Reading/listening (p.1/123)
1a/b. Before doing the activities, have students look at the plan, identify the places, and learn
to pronounce their names. Tell them that some of the buildings on the plan do not have names.
Let students find the bus stop and the pub and elicit from them the meaning of the prepositions
in front of and opposite. Make sure that everybody understands the difference between them.
The students will then listen to the recording and find out the missing names of the buildings.
Tape-script
There’s also a bookshop in Hampstead Street. It’s opposite the library. And there’s a car park,
too. It’s in front of the supermarket. In Park Road, there’s a bank. It is in front of the park, next
to the cinema. If you need a chemist’s, there’s one opposite the cinema. If you are looking for
a good restaurant, there’s a small Italian restaurant in the park, behind the hotel. And if you
don’t feel like walking there, there’s a bus stop nearby. It’s just in front of the hotel.

Reading (p.1/124)
3. Let the students try and guess the meanings of the new lexical items with the help of the
pictures. Move around the classroom and help.
Explain that each student will answer the quiz by writing Yes or No in the column “You”.

Speaking (p.1/124)
4. Then, the students will work in pairs asking and answering the questions in turns and
writing their answer in the column “Your partner”.

Spoken production (p.1/124)


5. Finally, ask single student to report what their partners can or can’t do according to the
model.

Enquiry (p.1/124)
6. Help the students to make an enquiry to show what they can do. Ask questions Teacher-
Class or have single student ask the questions in turns: How many of you can play a video
game? etc. Students will put their hands up. Have students write the results on the board.
Grammar Practice (p.1/125)
Exercise 1 (p.1/125)
Key:
2. She wants to red a book.
3. They want to eat the cheese.
4. She wants to drink a glass of water.
5. He wants to know his name.
6. He wants to dance with her.

Exercise 2 (p.1/126
Key:
Possible dialogues:
1. A Dad, can I go to the cinema with (Mario)?
B Sorry, you can’t.
2. A Can I watch TV, Mrs Bradford?
B Of course you can.
3. A Can I ride your bike, John?
B OK.
4. A Can I talk to Susan, please?
B Yes. Hold on a moment.
5. A Can I use your telephone, Nick?
B Please, do.
6. A Can you show me the garage, Nick?
B OK.

Exercise 3 (p.1/126)
Key:
1. Yes, he can.
2. Yes, I can. / No, I can’t.
3. Yes, we can. / No, we can’t.
4. Yes, he/she can. No, he/she can’t.
5. Yes, they can.
6. Yes, she can. / No, she can’t.
7. Yes, I can. / No, I can’t.
8. Yes, he can. / No, he can’t.

Exercise 5 (p.1/127)
Key:
Can for asking permission
Can I close the window?
Can we play in the garage?
Cat I use your computer?
Can we watch TV at 11 o'clock in the evening?

Can for expressing ability


Eddy can play the drums, but he can't sing.
Dad can speak Italian and English.
Mrs Adam can't drive a car.
Can Nick play the keyboard? Yes, he's fantastic.
Can John use a computer? Of course, he can.
Can you tell jokes?

Exercise 6 (p.1/127)
Key:
The preposition in front of has the same meaning with “di depan” in Indonesian.
The preposition opposite has the same meaning with “di seberang” in Indonesian.

Exercise 7 (p.1/127)
Key:
Possible answer:
There's a car park in Hampstead Street. It is in front of the supermarket. There's a bookshop,
too. It's opposite the library. In Park Road, there's a bank. It is in front of the park, next to the
cinema. There's also a chemist’s. It's opposite the cinema. And there's a restaurant in the park,
behind the hotel. The bus stop is in front of the hotel.

PRONUNCIATION (p.1/127)
Different pronunciation of can
1. Tell the students that they will have to listen for the different pronunciation between the
weak and the strong form of can. When can is stressed, as in short answers or in questions
starting with can, it is pronounced [κ  ν ]. When can is not stressed it is pronounced
2. The students listen and repeat the two ways of pronouncing can.

Developing Oral Skills (p.1/128)


Listening/speaking (p.1/128)
1a/b. Students listen to the recording and answer the questions. Then, they work in pairs
asking and answering the same questions.
Tape-script and key:
1. Is there a pub next to the hotel?
Yes, there is.
2. What is there in front of the hotel?
There’s a bus stop.
3. Is there a bookshop in this street?
Yes, there is.
4. Where’s it?
It’s opposite the hotel.
5. What is there behind the supermarket?
There’s a car park.
6. Is there a café?
Yes, there is.
7. Where is it?
It’s next to the hotel.
8. How many people are there at the bus stop?
There are two people, a man and a woman.
9. Can you describe the man?
He’s tall and thin with a red shirt and black trousers.
10. What about the woman?
She’s short and fat and she’s wearing a green skirt and a pink T-shirt.
11. How many people are there sitting in font of the café?
Two, a boy and a girl.
12. What are they doing?
The boy is eating a sandwich and the girl is drinking a cola.

Unit Self-Test (p.1/129)


Key:
Nick Sit down, Eddy. Do you want a sandwich?
Eddy No, thanks.
Nick Do you want a glass of milk?
Eddy Yes, please.
Nick How old are you?
Eddy I'm eleven.
Nick Where do you live, Eddy?
Eddy I live in Worcester Street.
Nick What? Can you spell that?
Eddy W-O-R-C-E-S-T-E-R.
Nick Where's your house exactly?
Eddy Do you know where the supermarket is?
Nick Yes.
Eddy Well, my house is opposite the supermarket.
Nick I see. What's your telephone number?
Eddy 020 – 8356 1497.
Nick Well, we practise on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
Eddy What time do you practise?
Nick At six o'clock. Is that OK?
Eddy Yes, it is.
Nick Well, what's your favourite band?
Eddy I like" Boyzone". Do you like them?
Nick Oh, yes. Do you like dance music?
Eddy Yes.
Nick I don't like it. I like house music and rap. Well, the break is over. Can you play
Bumble Bee, Eddy?
Eddy Of course.
Nick OK. And one, and two, and one, two, three, four.

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.W1/55)
Key:
1. The bus stop is in front of the restaurant.
2. Look in the fridge. The meat is under the fish.
3. Eddy is going to the cinema with Susan.
4. There's a beautiful park behind the bookshop.
5. The milk is on the table, next to the cheese.
6. There's a library opposite the supermarket.

Activity 2 (p.W1/55)
Key:
1. When I want to borrow a book, I go to the library.
2. When I want to buy some food and drinks, I go to a supermarket.
3. When I want to eat something I can go to a restaurant.
4. When I want to play a video game, I go to an arcade.
5. When I want to have some coffee, I go to a café.
6. When I want to take a bus, I go to the bus stop.
7. When I want to exercise, I go to the gym.

Activity 3 (p.W1/56)
Key:
1. Chemist’s.
2. Car park
3. Restaurant
4. Bank
5. Gym
6. Library
7. Bus stops
8. Supermarket
9. Arcade
10. Parks

Activity 4 (p.W1/57)
Key:
1. Yes, I can. / No. I can't.
2. Yes he/she can./ No, he/she can't.
3. Yes, they can. / No, they can’t.
4. Yes, I can. / No, I can't.
5. Yes, I can. / No, I can't.
6. Yes, I can. / No. I can't.
7. Yes, there is. / No, there isn't.
8. Yes, there is. / No, there isn't.
9. I go to a chemist’s.
10. Yes, there is, It's . . . / No, there isn't.

Activity 5 (p.W1/57)
Key: Ricky can swim, Click can't.
Ricky can dance, Click can't.
Ricky can't use a computer, Click can.
Ricky can play football, Click can't.
Ricky can ride a bike, Click can't

Tape-script
Ricky Hi, Click!
Click Hello, Ricky. What are you doing?
Ricky I’m swimming. Come and swim with me!
Click But I can’t swim, Ricky.
Ricky You can’t swim! Well, can you dance? I can dance!
Click No, I can’t dance, but I can use a computer. I love to do that!
Ricky Well, I can’t use a computer.
And look over there. Those boys are playing football. Can you play football?
Click Of course I can! What about you, Ricky?
Ricky Yes, I can play a little. Well, let’s go home, click.
I have my bicycle. Here’s a bicycle for you!
Click Ricky, ooooooh. Help! I can’t ride a bicycle!
Ricky Oh Click!

Activity 6 (p.W1/58)
Key:
1. False: Jeremy doesn’t live in London. He lives in a small town near New York.
2. False: Jeremy likes music a lot.
3. False: He doesn’t get up early to go to school because his school is next to his house.
4. True.
5. False: There are two boys and two girls.
6. False: Only Heather can sing.

Activity 8 (p.W1/58)
Tape-script and key:
Number 1 Can you sing?
Number 2 I can speak English.
Number 3 Are Eddy and John studying now?
Number 4 Where do you go when you want to buy a book?
Number 5 Where’s the arcade?
Number 6 The arcade is opposite the bank.

UNIT 10 IT’S HOT HERE!

LESSON PLANS

SKILLS
Listening comprehension
Understanding a dialogue
Identifying numbers
Playing Bingo and identifying numbers
Identifying and writing down times
Listening and matching pictures and sentences
Listening and completing a paragraph
Song: “Tic Tac Toc!”

Reading comprehension
Intensive reading of a dialogue
Reading a paragraph

Oral production
Dramatizing a dialogue
Pair/Group work:
Asking the time What’s the time?
Saying the time It’s ten to nine.
Asking and saying where objects are Where’s the cheese?
It’s between the ham and the coffee.
Asking when things happen What time is the match?
Saying when things happen At ten thirty.
Playing Bingo
Listening and answering questions
Record your voice
Song: “Tic Tac Toc!”

Written production
Completing a paragraph
Writing down times

LANGUAGE BREAKDOWN
Structures
Numbers: 30-100
Time: It’s + minutes + past/to + hour
Preposition at with time expressions
Prepositions: under, on, next to, between, in, behind
Expressions with be: be hot, cold, hungry, thirsty

Pronunciation
Intonation in questions

Topics and cultural items


Playing Bingo
Holidays
Telling the time

Active vocabulary
Nouns
ball
beach
clock
corn flakes
food
key
match
parent
pizza
umbrella
volleyball

Verbs
act
sit
stand
stay
walk

Adjectives
cold
glad
hot
hungry
thirsty
Adverbs
together

Expressions
In ten minutes
Listen!
On holiday
See you!

Recalling Vocabulary (p.1/130)


NUMBERS (3)
Listening (p.1/130)
1. Students listen and repeat numbers. After that, with books closed, have students quickly count
from one to thirty assisting them as necessary.
Say thirty and have students repeat, T-C. Continue with the numbers up to thirty-nine, T-C. Now
say the following numbers as you write them on the board, with students repeating T-C: forty,
fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety. Starting with twenty, hive students individually count to a
hundred, helping them as necessary.

Class game (p.1/130)


2. Bingo. To play Bingo, you need a "Tombola" set: a scorecard and wooden or plastic tokens
numbered 1-99. If you don't have a set, you can ask your students to write the numbers on small
pieces of paper.
Then, you collect the numbers, check them, fold them, and put them into a paper bag. Read the
instructions together with the students and make sure everybody understands the rules of the
game. You can also arrange to give a prize to the winners if you ask the students to bring sweets
or chocolates to school.
Give some examples before starting the game. Then, ask a student to take the number from the box
and read them.
Dialogue (p.1/131)
1. With student’s books open, give students a few minutes to look at the picture. Have
students ask and answer questions about the people pictured. For example, How many
boys are there? How many girls? Who are they? Where are they?
2. Tell students to listen to the dialogue.
3. Play the CD for the dialogue. Then, you may follow the same steps as in the previous units.
4. Group work. Students work in groups of four practicing the dialogue. Move around the
classroom and help them.
5. Have groups of volunteers act out the dialogue for the class. Encourage them
to do it without their books.

Communication Practice (p.1/132)


Listening/speaking (p.1/132)
1a. Preview. Quickly review the following times by drawing clocks on the board and having
students ask and answer questions: 10:45, 11:30, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 3:30, etc. Now, draw a
clock on the board showing 4:05. Have a student ask you What’s the time? Answer It’s five
past four. Draw clocks showing the following times: 4:10, 4:20, 4:25. Say the times, students
repeating, T-C. Have students ask and answer the questions S-S.
introduce the following times in the same way, practicing to: 5:35, 5:40, 5:50, 5:55.
Then, students listen to the recording and repeat.

1b. Pair work. Students ask and answer questions about the time. Move around the classroom
and help them.

Speaking (p.1/132)
2. Pair work. First, students draw hands in the clocks, then they ask and ask questions about
the clocks. Help them as needed.

Supplementary activity
School Activity Timetable. (Enrichment). Have students wok in small groups and write up a
schedule of their own school activities. Before beginning the group work, help students think
of the names of different activities at their school and write these on the board. An alternative
activity is to have students write out their class timetable. Supply English names for the
subjects.
The timetables can be used for oral practice, and then posted on a notice board.

Listening (p.1/133)
3. Students listen and write the captions under appropriate pictures.
Key:
1. The key is next to the newspaper.
2. The ball is in the box.
3. The letter is on the table.
4. The chair is behind the table.
5. The box is under the table.
6. The pen is between the newspaper and the book.
Then, have volunteers correct what has been written by asking and answering questions about
the pictures.

For example:
A Picture number 1. Where’s the key?
B It’s next to the newspaper.
Help students with the pronunciation of the items.

Speaking (p.1/133)
4. Pair work. Students ask and answer questions in order to locate the various kinds of food
and drink in the picture. Move around the classroom and help them.

Grammar Practice (p.1/134)


Exercise 1 (p.1/134)
Key: twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, eighty.

Exercise 2 (p.1/134)
Key: 23; 86; 75; 42; 39;
97; 61; 58; 33.

Exercise 3 (p.1/134)
Key:
1. fifty-four
2. eighty-eight
3. eighty-nine
4. eighty-five
5. thirty-two
6. eighty-seven
7. a/one hundred
8. a/one hundred

Exercise 4 (p.1/135)
Key:
1. It’s twenty to five.
2. It’s half past three.
3. It’s five past ten.
4. It’s ten past eleven.
5. It’s nine o’clock.
6. It’s ten to seven.
7. It’s a quarter to six.
8. It’s twenty past two.
9. It’s twenty-five to five.
10. It’s five to eight.
11. It’s five past twelve.
12. It’s ten past one.

Exercise 6 (p.1/136)
Key:
1. is hungry
2. is thirsty
3. It’s cold
4. am thirsty
5. am hot
6. is hot
7. are hungry
8. are cold
9. are hungry
10. is thirsty

Exercise 7 (p.1/137)
Key:
1. box
2. piano
3. books
4. key
5. teddy bear
6. telephone
7. book
8. CDs
9. pencil
10. trumpet

PRONUNCIATION (p.1/137)
Intonation in questions
Preview. Before playing the CD, explain that there are two main types of intonation – falling
and raising. Intonation is usually falling in statements and can be rising or falling in questions.
We generally have rising intonation when a question can be answered simple with a yes or a
no; we generally have falling intonation when the questions begin with a wh- word like what,
who, where, when, etc.
You can also use your voice to model rising and falling intonation. Try to say a question with
a rising or falling intonation very slowly; so that the students can hear the sound patterns more
clearly.
1. Students listen to the CD and imitate the two types of intonation. Play the CD several times, if
necessary.
2. Students listen and mark with a rising or falling arrow the intonation of a few sentences.
3. Then, the students repeat the sentences after the recording.
Key:
Are you here on holiday?

Why don’t you come with us?

Is it a quarter to five?
How are you?

What time is the match?

Is he Jamaican?

What’s colour your pen?

What’s your telephone number?

Where’s Room 5?

Developing Oral Skills (p.1/138)


Listening/writing (p.1/138)
1. Key:
Today, it is hot. It is ten to one and Eddy, John, and Susan are on the beach. John is next to
Eddy. Eddy is between John and Susan. Eddy is eating a pizza, John is drinking some orange
juice and Susan is eating a sandwich. Brad, Mark, and Sandra are there too. Brad and Mark are
playing with a ball in the water and Sandra is swimming. There is a table with the food.
Behind the table, there is an umbrella. On the table, there are some sandwiches and pizzas.
Some bottles of water and orange juice are under the table.

Listening/speaking (p.1/139)
2. Tape-script and key:
Mrs Wilson Who’s this?
You That’s Eddy.
Mrs Wilson What’s he doing?
You He’s eating a pizza.
Mrs Wilson Is John next to Susan?
You No, he isn’t. He’s next to Eddy.
Mrs Wilson Where are they?
You They’re on a beach.
Mrs Wilson Is John eating a pizza?
You No, he isn’t. He’s drinking some orange juice.
Mrs Wilson What is Susan doing?
You She’s eating a sandwich.
Mrs Wilson Are they standing or sitting?
You They’re sitting.
Mrs Wilson Is it hot or cold?
You It’s hot.
Mrs Wilson What’s the time?
You It’s ten to one.
Mrs Wilson What are Brad and Mark doing?
You They are playing with a ball.
Mrs Wilson Are they on they beach or in the water?
You They are in the water.
Mrs Wilson Is Sandra swimming or walking?
You She’s swimming.
Mrs Wilson Where’s the umbrella?
You It’s behind the table, on the right.
Mrs Wilson What’s on the table?
You There are some sandwiches and pizzas.
Mrs Wilson Are there bottles on the table?
You No, they’re under the table.

Culture File (p.1/141)


Ask students to read English Houses and decide if the statements at the end of the passage are
true or false.
Key:
1. False
2. False
3. False
4. True
5. True
6. True
7. True
8. False
Make sure that students understand the whole passage. Check that students understand the
meaning of unfamiliar words either from the context or by giving them the Indonesian
equivalents as a last resort.

Build up your Portfolio (p.1/142)


1. How to prepare the activity
Ask students to complete the definitions under the pictures.
Key:
Terraced houses are single family houses that joined together side by side.
A detached house is separated from other houses. Only one family lives there. These families
are usually rich.
Semi-detached houses are joined together in pairs and two families live in each of them.
A block of flats has many flats. All the rooms of each flat are on the same floor.

Then, ask students to write a description of their own house. Move around the classroom and
help students with the task. Make sure that they write their description correctly and suggest
any new words students might need. At home, students can add pictures to their descriptions
and they can decide whether to put their work in Portfolios.

2. Skills on which the activity is based


Writing is the main skill on which this activity is based. But other skills are also involved. For
example, making pictures and designing a layout.

3. Time required to complete the activity


About fifteen minutes are required to complete Activity A, considering that students have to
refer to the relevant passage in the Culture File.
Activity B can be carried out in the classroom in half an hour. Of course students will work at
home in their own time to complement their work with pictures and an appropriate layout.
Then, they can decide whether to put it in their Portfolio.

4. Level required
Level A1 is the minimum required for this activity.

Learning Strategies (p.1/143)


This activity should be carried out in the classroom. Students can do Activity A on their own.
Then, in pairs or groups, they can compare the items they have ticked.
After that, students can do Activity C on their own and, finally, they can discuss the different
situations they have faced when acting a role in a dialogue.

Self-Evaluation Test (p.1/144-1/145)


Exercise A (p.1/144)
Key:
Is Brad pointing to his dog?
No, he is pointing to his parrot.
Is Sandra touching her leg?
No, she is touching her nose.
Is Mr Morrow driving his taxi?
No, he is reading his newspaper.
Is Eddy studying?
No, he is playing the drums.
Is John having breakfast?
No, he is reading a book.
Is Mr Roach showing a book?
No, he is showing a picture.
Is Mike putting a book on the chair?
No, he is putting a book on the table.

Exercise B (p.1/144)
Key:
Mike can ride a bike but he can't swim.
Sheila can play a video game, but she can't surf' the Internet.
Brad can sing, but he can't dance.
John can tell jokes but he can’t play an instrument.
Eddy can play the drums, but he can't play the guitar.
Pam can play the sax, but she can't play the piano.
Alison can speak French, but she can't speak Italian.
Sandra can dance, but she can't play an instrument.
Mark can play football, but he can't play tennis.
Alex can play tennis, but he can't play football.

Exercise C (p.1/144-1/145)
Key: 8:35 It's twenty-five to nine.
11:55 It's five to twelve.
12:15 It's 3 quarter past twelve.
1:40 It's twenty to two.
5:25 It twenty-five past five.
9:50 It's ten to ten.
2:05 It's five past two.
6:30 It’s half past six.
7:10 It’s ten past seven.
3:00 It's three o'clock.
4:45 It’s a quarter to five.

Exercise D (p.1/145)
Key:
1. There is a volleyball match on the beach.
2. We are staying in this hotel.
3. Why don't you come to the cinema with us?
4. The match is at half past ten.
5. The cat is on the floor, under the table.
6. We are here in Brighton with our parents.

Exercise E (p.1/145)
Key:
1. Mike is behind Susan.
2. Sheila is between Susan and Brad.
3. Brad is sitting in front of Eddy.
4. John is next to Mike.
5. Susan is sitting next to Sheila.
6. Eddy is sitting behind Brad.
COMPETENCE
Exercise F (p.1/145)
Key: Possible answers:
You Hello, 2543 532.
Eddy Hello, this is Eddy.
You Hello, Eddy! How are you?
Eddy Fine, thanks. What are you doing?
You I’m watching TV.
Eddy Do you want to go to the cinema this afternoon?
You What’s on?
Eddy “Tempest on the Sea”. It’s a nice film. It’s about a sailor and his ship.
You What time is the film?
Eddy It starts at 5.
You OK. Where do you live?
Eddy I live in Worcester Street. Can you come to my place?
You OK. Where’s your house exactly?
Eddy My house is number 48. Next to the supermarket.
You OK.
Eddy Have you got my phone number?
You No, I haven’t.
Eddy It’s 8356 1497.
You OK, thanks.
Eddy All right. See you at a quarter to five, then.
You Bye!
Eddy Bye!

Exercise G (p.1/145)
Key: Example letter:
Dear Jason,
I live in a nice flat in Perugia. There are three bedrooms, a kitchen, a living room,, and a
bathroom. My brother, Luca, is in the living room right now. He’s watching TV. My mum is
in the kitchen and she’s cooking dinner. I’m in my room and writing this letter. Where do you
live? In a house or in a flat?
Write soon,
Paolo

Exercise H (p.1/145)
Key: Example dialogue
You Hello, my name’s Anna. What’s your name?
Liz My name is Liz.
You Where are you from. Liz?
Liz I’m from England.
You Where do you live in England?
Liz I live in Manchester.
You How old are you?
Liz I’m twelve.
You Have you got any brothers and sisters?
Liz Yes, I’ve got one brother. He’s fifteen.
etc.

Workbook 1 Plus
Activity 1 (p.W1/59)
Key:
1. The letters are under the newspaper.
2. The hamburgers are between the cheese and the meat.
3. Brad and Mark are in the water.
4. The gym is opposite the arcade.
5. The video games are on the computer.
6. The television is next to the window.
7. The bus stop is in front of the library.
8. The keys are behind the box.

Activity 2 (p.W1/60)
Key:
1. I'm cold. Give me my sweater, please.
2. We are thirsty. We want to drink some orange juice.
3. It’s hot here. Open the window, please.
4. I'm thirsty. Can I have a glass of water, please?
5. John is hungry. He wants to eat a hamburger.
6. Jennifer is hot. She wants to go to the beach.

Activity 3 (p.W1/60)
Key:
1. a hundred
2. ninety-five
3. fifty-one
4. sixty-six
5. thirty-four
6. forty-three
7. seventy-two
8. fifty-nine
9. twenty-six
10. eighty-seven
11. sixty-eight
12. eighty-three

Activity 5 (p.W1/61)
Tape-script and key:
Sam's house is number 38.
Mr Smith lives at number 89.
That’s Jennifer's house over there. Number 47.
Miss Mason lives at number 65. It's right there.

Activity 7 (p.W1/63)
Key:
Cartoons 4:35
The Tuesday Night Show 12:15
The Lion King 8.20
Chelsea-Manchester United football match 7:05
The Morning News 9.50

Tape-script
Boy Dad, what time does the film start?
Man The Lion King? It starts at twenty past eight.
TV announcer The Chelsea-Manchester United football match begins at five past
seven this evening.

Eddy What time are the Cartoons on television this afternoon, Mum?
Woman They’re on at twenty-five to five, Eddy.

Woman I want to see the Morning News. What time is it on TV?


Man The Morning News? It’s on at ten to ten.

Man There’s an interesting show tonight, The Tuesday Night Show. What
time is it on?
Woman It’s on late. It starts at a quarter past twelve tonight.

Activity 8 (p.W1/63)
Key:
1. Yes, there is “The Lion King".
2. There is the Chelsea Manchester United football match.
3. It’s at five past seven.
4. No, they are on at twenty-the to five.
5. The Tuesday Night Show.

Activity 9 (p.W1/64)
Key:
Possible dialogue
John Hello, Susan!
Susan Hello, John! What are you doing?
John I’m surfing the internet.
But it’s time to go home now. Where’s my sweater?
Susan Isn’t that your sweater, over there, behind the box?
John Yes, it is my sweater. Thanks Susan.
Susan John, what’s the time, please?
John it’s ten past four. Why?
Susan Well, there’s a programme on TV at half past four. I want to see it.
John What is it?
Susan Cartoons. I love cartoons.
John I love cartoons too. I want to watch them too.
Susan Come to my house, then. You can see cartoons with me.
John OK. Great.
Susan Well, come with me now, then!
John Thanks Susan.

CD-ROM 1 Plus
Dossier - The Diamond's Thief
1. Tape-script 1 and key:

Today inspector Casey is very busy at the police station, in Warren Street, London. Detective
Peter Thomson is in inspector Casey's office.
Casey Peter! Go to Gatwick Airport. We think that a famous thief arrives in London with the
10.30 flight from New York.
Peter What air line?
Casey British Airways. Flight number BA754.. We know for certain that the thief is on
that flight.
Peter What’s his name?
Casey Barry Clyde. C - L - Y-D-E.
Parr Barry Clyde. How old is he?
Casey He's 64. And he’s got a very long career in his field.
Peter What's his specialty?
Casey Jewels. We suspect he's got a set of stolen diamonds with him.
Peter Diamonds?
Casey Yes. Follow him, and see where he goes. We suspect he wants to sell the
diamonds here in London.
Peter OK. But. have you got a photo of him?
Casey No, unfortunately we haven't. Go to the identikit department and ask for a copy of the
identikit of the thief.
Peter OK. Bye!

Tape-script 2 and key:


Drawer So, inspector, is the man tall or short?
Casey He's tall and thin.
Drawer What about his hair?
Casey He has short grey hair.
Drawer Short grey hair. OK! And what about his eyes?
Casey His eyes? I think they're blue. And the nose. Yes, I remember he's got a long nose.
Drawer Good. Blue eyes and a long nose. And do you remember his ears? Are they big or
small?
Casey Er . . . they’re small. I think. I don't remember well.
Drawer Small, OK. And what about his mouth?
Casey Oh. l remember that. He’s got a very large mouth. And a big black moustache.
Drawer A big back moustache. Good! Beard?
Casey No, no beard.
Drawer Well, I think that's enough. Thanks a lot inspector Casey.
Casey That's OK.

Correct order of the caption


1. Detective Thomson is now at the North Terminal at Gatwick. He has got a identikit of
Barry Clyde with him.
2. Barry Clyde is at the Customs and his suitcase is open but there are no jewels in it.
3. When Barry Clyde reaches the Custom exit, detective Thomson recognizes him. Barry
Clyde is tall and he’s got a yellow suitcase in his right hand. His shoes have thick and big
heels.
4. Barry goes to a car park and gets into his car.
5. Peter Thomson gets into a taxi and says to the taxi driver: “Follow that car”.
The taxi driver says: “Follow that car! Really? It’s a dream comes true!”
6. In Dean Street Barry gets off his car and goes into “Joe’s”. Joe is a shoe repairer.
7. In the shop Barry take his right shoe off and gives it to Joe.
8. Detective Thomson runs into the shop and shouts: “Hands up!”
9. He open the shoe heel and says: “Good place to hide the diamonds, Barry. You and your
friend, Joe, are under arrest!”
TEST 1 Name: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Class: . . . . . . . .
(English test) Date: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LISTENING TEST
A. Choose the correct answer based on the information you hear.

1. My name is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ Pamela Smith □ Elizabeth Jones □ Janet


Brown

2. I am . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . years old. □ 11 □ 12 □ 13
3. I am . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ English □ American □
Canadian

4. I live in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ London □ New York □


Toronto

5. My father’s name is . . . . . . . . . . . □ Robert □ William □ Frank


6. My father is a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ photographer □ doctor □ taxi-
driver

7. My mother’s name is . . . . . . . . . . □ Mary □ Pamela □ Pauline


8. May mother is a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ waitress □ housewife □ teacher
9. My hobby is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ football □ tennis □
watching TV

10. I have two pets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . □ two cats □ two dogs □ a cat


and a dog

B. What time is it? Draw the correct clock hands according to what you hear.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
C. Choose the correct instruction based on what you hear.
1. Faccio rumore Dico il mio nome Keep silent
2. Pulisco la lavagna Come to the blackboard Write on the
blackboard
3. Mi alzo Mi siedo Rimango seduto
4. Mi siedo Non mi muovo Mi alzo
5. Exit Enter the class Rimango al mio
posto

ORAL PRODUCTION
Give a suitable response to the dialogue you hear.

WRITTEN PRODUTION
A. Match the name of the things in classroom with the correct picture.
blackboard desk pen book chair door window teacher’s desk
school bag pencil

B. Write a short composition about yourself by answering these questions.


• What’s your name?
• Where are you from?
• How old are you?
• When is your birthday?
• What’s your favourite colour?
…………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………………………………………

READING COMPREHENSION
Answer these questions based on the information given in the post card below.
1. Who writes the postcard?
2. To whom the postcard is addressed to?
3. In what city is the postcard sender?
4. What date is the postcard written?
5. Is Peter is on his vacation in London?
6. With whom Peter goes to London?
7. Where does he stay when he is in London?
8. How is the weather in London?
9. What is Peter’s opinion about London?
10. Where does Robert’s live?

TEST 1
FOGLIO PER L’INSEGNANTE

A. Ascolta I'insegnante e scegli hi payola o it disegno giusto.

Hello, my name’s Elizabeth Jones. I'm 11 years old and I'm


English. I'm a student. I live in London with my family. My
father's name is William. He's a photographer. My mother’s name
is Mary. She's a teacher.
I have many hobbies, but my favourite hobby is playing tennis. I have two pets: a cat and a
dog.

B. Ascolta I'insegnante the dice the ora e e disegna le lancette negli orologi quii sotto.
It's 8 o’clock
It’s 5 o'clock
It's 11 o'clock
It's 3 o'clock
It's 7 o'clock
C. Listen to the instructions and do them.
Be quiet please!
Come to the blackboard!
Sit down!
Stand up!
Go out!

ORAL PRODUCTION
Complete the dialogue below.
Teacher Hello!
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher What’s your name?
Pupil …………………………….
Teacher Are you Italian?
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher How old are you?
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher Have you got a brother or a sister?
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher What’s his/her name?
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher Now, draw your favourite pet.
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher What colour is it?
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher Have you got a pet?
Pupil ……………………………..
Teacher What is it?
Pupil ……………………………..

LISTENING TEST
Exercise A 10 points
Exercise B 5 points
Exercise C 5 points
TOTAL = 20 Points
20 = excellent
18 – 19 = very good
15 – 17 = good
12 – 14 = satisfactory
≤ 11 = not satisfactory

ORAL PRODUCTION
Exercise A maximum point = 10 points
TOTAL = 20 points
10 = excellent
9 = very good
7 – 8 = good
6 = satisfactory
≤5 = not satisfactory

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
Exercise A 5 points
Exercise B 5 points
TOTAL = 10 points

10 = excellent
9 = very good
7 – 8 = good
6 = satisfactory
≤5 = not satisfactory

READING COMPREHENSION
Exercise A 10 points
TOTAL = 10 points
10 = excellent
9 = very good
7 – 8 = good
6 = satisfactory
≤5 = not satisfactory

ASSESSMENT
45 – 50 EXCELLENT
39 – 44 VERY GOOD
32 – 38 GOOD
23 – 31 SATISFACTORY
≤ 22 NOT SATISFACTORY

TEST 2
Introductory Sub-module
LISTENING TEST 1
A. Listen to the dialogue happens at the Hampstead School Music and complete the
information about these figures.

NAME ………………………..
SURNAME ………………………..
NATIONALITY ………………………..
CITY ………………………..
NAME ………………………..
SURNAME ………………………..
NATIONALITY ………………………..
CITY ………………………..

B. Listen to the next part of the dialogue and choose the correct answer.
1. What’s the name of the man? Mrs Green.
Mr Green.
Mr Brown.
2. Where is he? In Room 5.
In the Media Room.
In the cafeteria.
3. What is he? A teacher.
An actor.
A student.
4. Where’s the sax? On the floor.
Under the desk.
On the chair.
5. What’s Angela’s telephone number? 020 – 8347 5586.
020 – 8347 9986.
020 – 2345 9876.
ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Make a dialogue that includes this information:
• Greetings
• Asking names
• Asking where people are from
• Asking nationality
• Asking telephone numbers

B. Make a dialogue based on this information. Use the guideline example and names
given in the box.
A: identifying a person: “Look! That’s (Paul Hullock)!”
B: asking people’s job
A: mentioning the profession (singer)
B: asking place of origin
A: mentioning a city (Bristol)
B: asking nationality
A: mentioning a country & nationality (England & English)
B: asking people’s location
A: mentioning a place (bus stop)

Paul Hullock Sandra Morris Mark Davidson Helen Mackenzie Johny and
David Stark
Bristol Toronto Sydney Glasgow San
Francisco
England Canada Australia Scotland USA
singer actress astronaut teacher students

C. Make a dialogue and introduce a friend and give his/her personal information such as
names, profession, nationality, etc.

D. Make a dialogue that includes some expressions of locating objects and you can
include plural forms.

E. Translate these instructions into English and practice them. You can add some other
instructions on your own.
• Letakkan pena-pena itu di atas meja tulis.
• Letakkan karet penghapus itu di bawah kursi.
• Ambillah dua buku.
• Berikan buku-buku itu kepada saya.
• Ambillah pena berwarna mearh dan letakkan di bawah buku itu.

TEST 2
Introductory Sub-module
READING COMPREHENSION
A. Look at the picture and decide whether the statement is true or false.
1. This is a piano lesson.
2. A trumpet is on the floor.
3. A boy is at the drums.
4. A boy is at the sax.
5. There is a guitar, a sax, and a piano.
6. There are two books on a chair.
7. A school bag is on the table.
8. There are two girls in the room.
9. There are five boys in the room.

B. Choose the correct response.


1. A: Where is Mrs Wilson now?
B: Yes, he is.
She’s in Room 6.
He’s at the pub.
2. A: Is Susan at home?
B: No, he’s at home.
No, she isn’t. She’s at the piano lesson.
Yes, she is at school.
3. A: Where are they?
B: I’m in Room1.
Yes, they are.
They’re in Room 1.
4. A: Where are you from?
B: It’s in Kingston.
I’m Susan.
We’re Canadian.
5. A: Is Glasgow in Scotland?
B: It isn’t in Scotland.
It’s in England.
Yes, it is.
6. A: Hello, David!
B: Good morning, Wilson1
Good morning, Mrs Wilson!
Good morning Mrs Vicky!

C. Cross the odd one out.


1. Ruler, felt pen, school bag, newsstand, book, blackboard
The odd one out is …………………………… because it is not a ………………….
2. School, bus station, film, home, pub, cinema
The odd one out is …………………………… because it is not a ………………….
3. Blue, bus, green, pink, brown, red
The odd one out is …………………………… because it is not a ………………….
4. Eight, five, six, four, twelve, sax
The odd one out is …………………………… because it is not a ………………….

D. Match the telephone numbers with the letters.


1. Eight three four oh double five six seven six a. 83055767
2. Eight three double oh five six seven six b. 83005676
3. Eight three oh double five seven six seven c. 83405576

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. Make a dialogue based on the given situation below
Your brother (answer a call)………………………………………………..
You (give greeting, ask the location)………………………………
Your brother (give answer: at the pub with Kathy)…………………………
You (ask who’s Kathy)……………………………………………
Your brother (give answer: my friend)…………………………………….
You (ask: where Kathy is from)………………………………….
Your brother (give answer: Sydney, Australia)……………………………
You (ask: whether the guitar is at home)…………………………
Your brother (give answer: no)……………………………………………
You (ask: where)…………………………………………………
Your brother (answer: at school, Room 8)…………………………………
You (ask: where John and Eddy are)…………………………….
Your brother (give answer: at the cinema)………………………………
You (give salutation)…………………………………………..
Your brother (give salutation)………………………………………….

B. Make a dialogue based on the information given below about George Clooney.
NAME George
SURNAME Clooney
CITY Hollywood
NATIONALITY American
PHONE 001 662 472 7599
OCCUPATION Actor

C. Complete your personal information in the diary below.


This diary belongs to:
NAME …………………………………………..
SURNAME …………………………………………..
CITY …………………………………………..
NATIONALITY …………………………………………..
PHONE …………………………………………..
OCCUPATION …………………………………………..
SCHOOL NAME …………………………………………..
ENGLISH TEACHER …………………………………………..
BEST FRIEND …………………………………………..

D. Write a short description of your classroom.


TEST 2 (UNITS 1A-1C)
INTRODUCTORY SUB-MODULE
LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS

A. Fill in the blanks with the suitable form of verb be.


1. John and Susan …………..English. They …………….American.
2. David and I are from London. We……………….English.
3. A:…………..you American?
B: No, I’m Canadian.
4. A: ………your telephone number 663882?
B: No, it…………
5. A: Who is he?
B: He…………….my piano teacher.
6. A: Where …………my felt pens?
B: On the floor.

B. Fill in the blanks with the correct personal pronoun.


1. Look at Mr Carter! …………….’s my teacher.
2. Mrs Wilkins is English. ………….’s an actress.
3. Where’s the Central Park?..............’s in New York.
4. Mr and Mrs Johnson are Scottish. ………..’re from Edinburgh.
5. A: Are ……..English?
B: No, we’re Scottish.
6. A: Susan, Mark! Where are you?
B: ……….’re here Mum, in the garden.
7. A: Where are ………?
B: I’m at school.

C. Choose the correct answer.


1. A: ……….’s she?
B: She’s my friend.
Where
Who
What
2. A: ……..is Mr Robinson.
B: Hello!
This
He
Who
3. A: Where are …….books?
B: Your books? They’re on the chair.
your
a
my
4. A: …………is David from?
B: He’s from Scotland.
What
Where
Who
5. There are ………..under the book.
three blue pen
three pens blue
three blue pens
6. What ……….in your school bag?
There is
It is
Is there
7. ……………me your pen, please.
Put
Take
Give
8. Miss Maple is ………….actress.
a
an
the

D. Write the appropriate questions based on the answers below.


1. …. …………………………………………… I’m from Italy.
2. ……………………………………………….. She’s my teacher.
3. ……………………………………………….. Yes, I’m American.
4. ……………………………………………….. It’s 0335 772 199.
5. ……………………………………………….. It’s in England.
6. ……………………………………………….. He’s from Canada.
7. ……………………………………………….. They are on my desk.
8. ……………………………………………….. It’s on the desk.
9. ……………………………………………….. Yes, there is.
10. ……………………………………………….Yes, she is. She’s from Edinburgh.

E. Do the crossword puzzle below.

CULTURAL AWARENESS
Answer the following questions.
1. How do we greet our friends? What are some English expressions used?
2. Are there any difference between answering a phone call in Indonesian and English? If yes,
what are they?
3. How do we answer a phone call in English? What expressions do we use?
4. How do we greet people on the phone in a formal situation?
EXAMINATION PRACTICE
Make a role play dialogue between an examiner and a candidate.

A. Introduction. Make a dialogue between an examiner asking a candidate about his/ her
personal information. Include the information below:
• Greeting
• Asking name
• Asking where he/she is from
• Asking the nationality
• Asking the telephone numbers

B. Instruction. Translate these instructions delivered by the examiner and you can add
some other instructions on your own.
• Ambillah dua buah pena.
• Letakkan pena itu di bawah buku itu.
• Berikan buku itu kepada saya.

C. Description. The candidate is asked to look at the picture below and describe the
people in the picture and the classroom. Make a dialogue between the examiner and the
candidate in the given situation above. Use the information below.
• Picture number 1: ask his name, where he is from, profession.
• Picture number 2 and 3: ask names, where they are from.
• Identifying objects in the classroom: computer, chair, ruler, pencil case, poster.
LISTENING TEST 2
You will hear a dialogue takes place at a music course in Hampstead School of Music.
Listen to the dialogue and choose the correct answer.
1. What instrument does the boy want to study?
the guitar
the piano
the saxophone
2. What’s the boy’s name?
John
Kevin
Mark
3. What’s the boy’s surname?
Miles
Meles
Myles
4. How old is the boy?
12
11
13
5. When is his birthday?
in October
in December
in July
6. What’s his address?
22, Spinton Street
21, Spinton Street
21, Swinton Street
7. What’s his telephone numbers?
7543 8704
7543 8904
7553 8904
8. When are the lessons?
Monday, Thursday, and Friday
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday
Monday, Tuesday, and Friday
9. What time are the lessons?
at half past four
at half past five
at a quarter past four
10. What time do the lessons end?
at five o’clock
at a quarter past five
at half past five

ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Make a dialogue that includes this information below and practice it with your
partner in front of the class.
• Asking names
• Asking how people’s name is spelt
• Asking people’s age
• Asking birthday
• Asking people’s address
• Asking how name of a place is spelt.

B. Make a dialogue based on the given situation below on how we identify people. This
time, identify one of your family members.
• Asking who the person is
• Asking his/ her age
• Asking where he/she lives
• Asking his/ her birthday
TEST 3 (UNITS 2-4)
Sub-module 1
C. Look at the picture about Linda’s daily activities. Make a dialogue based on the
picture and you can use the in the guideline example given.
A: Asking what time Linda gets up
B: Answering
A: Asking Linda’s activity at 8:15
B: Confirming Linda’s activity in 4:15

D. Make a dialogue about your daily routines and practice it with your partner.

E. Write a short composition contrasting Linda’s daily activity and yours? Are there any
differences? What are they? You can use negative forms. For example, “I don’t get up at
7:30. I get up at 7.”

READING COMPREHENSION
A. Look at the three pictures below. Read the text and decide which one is Julian’s
family.
My name’s Julian Starr. This is a photo of my family. We are from Canada but we live in
England now. I live in Oxford Road, in the centre of London, with my father Donald, my
mother Rachel, and my twin sisters Jenny and Joan. I’m 12 and they are 8 years old. I haven’t
got any brothers.
My father gets up earl, at five o’clock in the morning, because he works in an airport. He is a
fight controller – he works with computers. When my father gets up, my sisters and I are still
in bed. Unfortunately, we haven’t got pets because my father doesn’t like cats or dogs.
My mother, my sisters, and I go to the same school, the Thames Valley comprehensive
School. My mother teaches English there. We get up 7, have breakfast at half past seven and
then we go to school by car. I take a bus home when my lessons end at a quarter past three.
Today, it’s my mother’s birthday and I want to give her a present – a CD. She plays the piano
and she likes classical music. My birthday is in September. I want satellite television for my
birthday.

B. Decide whether these statements are true or false. If the statements are not mentioned
in the text, you can choose DOESN’T SAY.
TRUE FALSE
DOESN’T SAY
1. Julian hasn’t got any brothers.
2. His father is a teacher of computer science.
3. His father gets up late.
4. His mother takes a bus to work.
5. Mrs Starr is Julian's teacher.
6. Julian comes home at 3:15.
7. Julian's father likes music.
8. Today it's Julian's birthday.
9. Julian hasn't got satellite television.
10. His sisters like chocolate.
TEST 3 (UNITS 2-4)
Sub-module 1

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. Look at the pictures below about Paul’s daily routines. Answer the question and then
write about Paul’s daily routine.
1. What is Paul?
2. Describe Paul’s daily routine. You can start with: “Paul gets up at . . . “

B. Look at the two pictures, Mark’s room and Bob’s room. Can you compare them and
see the differences? Write a short composition contrasting Mark’s room and Bob’s.

C. Write a short composition about your own family.

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS


A. Complete the dialogue below with the correct form of the bracketed verbs.
This is an interview with the famous actress Miss Lane:
Interviewer Miss Lane, what time (1)………… (get up) in the morning?
Miss Lane Oh, I get up very late, at about eleven o’clock.
Interviewer (2)……………… (have) breakfast, then?
Miss Lane Oh, yes, I love breakfast. I usually have cake, fruit, and a glass of champagne!
Interviewer Champagne for breakfast?
Miss Lane Oh, yes, it’s fantastic! I (3)……………. (like) coffee in the morning. It’s
horrible.
Interviewer And what time (4)………………. (go) to work?
Miss Lane At three o’clock in the afternoon a taxi (5)……………….. (take) me to the
Studio.
Interviewer (6)………………… (have got) any pets?
Miss Lane Oh, yes, I have a cat, Ingrid, and a dog, Humphrey.
Interviewer How old (7) ……….. (be) they?
Miss Lane Ingrid (8)…………… (be) two and Humphrey (9)…………….. (be) four. And
today it’s his birthday! (10)……………….. (take) a glass of champagne,
please.

B. Look at the pictures and write this or that.


1. ……………. cat is white.
2. …………….. cat is black.
3. Look at …………… boy! He’s eddy.
4. Look at ……………girl! She’s Susan.

C. Look at the pictures and write the names with quantity. Do it as the example given.
1. four dogs
2. …………………….
3. …………………….
4. …………………….
5. …………………….
6. …………………….

D. What day is it today? Write the name of the day according to the letter encircled.

E. What time is it? Write the times below in letters.


1. 8:30
2. 3:45
3. 6:15
4. 7:00
5. 9:00

F. Make some dialogues based on the situations given below.


1. Asking your partner’s age.
2. Asking what time the tennis lesson starts.
3. Asking the time.
4. Asking what kind of transportation you use to school (bus).
5. Asking whether your partner has brothers/sisters.

G. Do the crossword puzzle below. They are the names of the months of a year.

CULTURAL AWARENESS
1. How many alphabets does English language have? What about Indonesian language?
2. Are there some English alphabets that Indonesian language doesn’t have?
3. How do we say 21 in English? In Indonesian?
4. In English there is a verb “be”. What word/s in Indonesian that has/have the same meaning as
the verb “be”?

Make a dialogue between an examiner and a candidate based on the given situation.
A. Introduction. The examiner greets the candidate and asks several personal questions.
Make the dialogue and practice it with your partner.
• Give greeting
• Asking names
• Asking how people’s name is spelt
• Asking people’s age
• Asking birthday
• Asking people’s address
• Asking about brothers/ sisters
• Asking about kind of transportation used to school
• Asking about lessons’ time
• Asking about lunch, dinner
• Asking about homework and watching TV
• Asking about pets
• Asking about day

B. Description. The candidate is asked to look at the pictures and the examiner asks the
candidate about the information based on the pictures. Make the dialogue by using the
guideline example.
• Who the people in the pictures are
• Where they live
• Picture 1: Does Alice go to school by bus?
• The lessons’ time
• Alice’s activities
• Brothers/sisters
• Pets (cat)

C. Closing. Make a short dialogue when the examiner and the candidate are parting. Use
the guideline example below.
• Asking about time
• Giving salutation

TEST 4 (UNITS 5-7) Name:


…………………………………… Class: ………….
Sub-module 2 Date:
……………………………………..
LISTENING TEST 3

Listen to the recording that gives a description about one of the robbers who robbed a
bank in Oxford. Choose the correct characteristics based on the recording you hear.
BUILD tall short fat
thin
HAIR blond brown black
EYES grey blue green
brown black
EARS big small
NOSE big small
MOUTH large small
DISTINGUISHING MARKS beard moustache
TYPE OF CLOTHING
…………………………………………………………………….

ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Give a description yourself about your physical appearance and your clothes you are
wearing.

B. Look at the picture below. These people are having a party. Make a dialogue
identifying people in the picture using their physical appearances and their clothes. Use
the guideline example below.
• Locating people
• Identifying people

C. Look at the table below. Describe what pets do Rachel and Simon like by looking at
the table and the symbols given. What pets they have got in their house?
Then, make a dialogue about pets and which pets you and your partner like. Practice the
dialogue with your partner in front of the class.

D. Play a role pay. Work in pairs. Pretend that one of you is a robot and you are giving
him/her various instructions. Translate these instructions below into English and you
can add some other instructions.
• Berdiri!
• Duduk!
• Pegang hidungmu!
• Pegang kaki kananmu!
• Tunjuk ke arah guru!
• Bunyikan terompet!
• Pergi ke pintu!
• Buka pintu! Tutup pintu!
• Letakkan tanganmu di atas kepalamu!
• Katakan ”Bye-bye”!

READING COMPREHENSION
A. This is a letter from Nick to his pen friend Marco. Nick also sends Marco a
photograph of him and his friends. Read the letter which gives the physical descriptions
of the people in the picture. Help Marco to identify the people in the picture by filling in
the boxes with the correct names.

B. In the photograph, there are three pets mentioned. What are they?

C. Read the description below. Try to give a guess.

D. What is the one odd out? Give the reason.


1. Hair, neck, eye, ear, hand, cap
The odd one out is ……………… because it is not a ……………..
2. Parrot, elephant, cat, dog, goldfish, hamster.
The odd one out is ……………… because it is not a ……………..

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. Look at the picture below. Write a description in the spaces provided.

B. Write a description of your best friend. You can mention his/her physical
appearances, his/her address, his/her family, his/her hobbies, pets, etc.

C. Make a dialogue between you and your mother in which your mother gives you some
instructions about your school things.

D. Look at the pictures below about a pet dog that is so “unusual”. Write some sentences
about it and you can start with: “My dog………..

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS


A. Fill in the blanks with the correct possessive adjective.
1. She is Indian. ………..name is Susheela.
2. We are brothers and this is ………………dog.
3. They are Italians but ……………..parents live in America.
4. I’m Jack Brown. Paul brown is………………father.
5. He is a musician and this is …………………guitar.
6. Simon and Roger, go and sit on …………chairs!
7. Your name is Tim, but what’s ……………..surname?
8. Bill’s cat is very friendly. ………………name’s Spock.

B. Fill in the blanks with this, that, these, those, here, or there.
1. Is that your cat,………………..?
2. …………………….is my dog, here.
3. Who are …………..two girls, there?
4. What colour are ……………..trousers, here?
5. Put these shoes in this box, ………………
6. Open……………….. door over there, please.

C. Below is a dialogue where the people in the dialogue are looking for Bob. Complete
the dialogue below with the suitable personal pronoun.
You Sally, where’s Bob? (1)……………….’s late!
Sally I don’t know. He is not with…………… Look, that’s Judith over there.
Ask (3)…………
You (calling Judith) Judith, is Bob with (4) ………………..?
Judith No, (5)…………..isn’t. Why?
You It’s time for the piano lesson and we are late. (6)……………..four
o’clock now.
Judith Look, those are tom and Jeremy, at the bar. (7)……………..play football with Bob.
Perhaps he’s with (8)……….
You (calling Tom and Jeremy) Hey, Tom! Hey, Jeremy! Is Bob with (9)
……….?
Tom & Jeremy Yes, he is with (10)……………… Don’t worry, it’s not late! (11)
…………want another sandwich!

D. Look at the pictures below. With a partner, make a dialogue talking about likes and
dislikes. Use some expressions like too and either.
Example: A: I like cats A: I don’t like cats
B: I like cats, too. B: I don’t like them, either.

E. Do the crossword puzzle below by looking at the pictures.

CULTURAL AWARENESS
1. In English language, the verb like is used to express our likes/dislikes towards what?
2. What is the difference between a pet and an animal?
EXAMINATION PRACTICE
Sub-module 2
Play a role play between an examiner and a candidate. Make the dialogue based on the
given situations below.
A. Introduction. The examiner greets the candidate and asks several personal questions.
Make the dialogue and practice it with your partner.
• Give greeting
• Asking names and surnames
• Asking age
• Asking likes and dislikes of dogs
• Asking about pets
• Asking about the candidate’s best friend
• Asking the candidate to describe his/her best friend

B. Instruction. The examiner gives some instructions to the candidate to do. Translate
these instructions and some other instructions on your own.
• Berdiri!
• Pergi ke jendela!
• Buka dan tutup jendela itu!
• Pegang kaki kananmu!
• Pegang telinga kirimu!

C. Description. The examiner asks some questions about the description of Sam’s room.
Make the dialogue and use -WH questions such as what, where, etc and YES/NO
questions. You can use the guideline example below.
• Asking about Sam’s clothing
• Asking about the objects in Sam’s room
• Asking about Sam’s likes and dislikes
• Asking about music

D. Closing. This is the end of the dialogue where the examiner and the candidate are
parting. Make the closing of the dialogue. The examiner gives salutation and the
candidate gives response.

LISTENING TEST 4
Listen to the recording and decide whether these statements are true or false. If the
statement is false, give the correction.
TRUE FALSE
CORRECTION
1. Kathy lives at 97, Charles Road.
………………………
2. Her house is opposite Mick’s house.
………………………
3. Bus number 74 stops here.
………………………
4. There are three bedrooms in Kathy’s house.
………………………
5. There are four rooms downstairs.
………………………
6. The piano is in the living room.
………………………
7. Kathy can play the piano.
………………………
8. In Kathy’s bedroom there is a guitar.
………………………
9. They have got a small garage.
………………………
10. Now, it’s ten past seven at Kathy’s house.
………………………
11. Kathy is having dinner.
………………………
12. She is having lunch with her mother and her brother.
………………………
13. She is having meat with some vegetables.
………………………

ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Look at the picture below. This is Mr and Mrs Green’s house. They live with their
children, Mark and Susan. Give a description of the picture about:
• The rooms in the house
• The people and their activities
• The pets and what they are doing
• Etc.

B. Look at the picture again. Make a telephone dialogue between a person and one of the
family members. You can look at the information below as an example.
Mark Answer the phone
You Give greeting, ask where Mark is now
Mark Answer by mentioning the place
You Ask what Mark is doing
Mark Give answer

C. Look at the pictures below. Where can you buy the things written in the notes? Make
a dialogue based on the pictures.

D. Look at the pictures below. With a partner, make a dialogue describing the clown.
You can look at the information in the example given.
A: Identifying the clown and what he’s doing.
B: Giving a response.

READING COMPREHENSION
A. Look at the picture and fill in the blanks with the correct word.
Here we are in Fantasyland Park! It is the hometown of Peter Pan, Cinderella, and other
famous Disney characters. Look at the picture! There is a big (1)…………………., called
Disney Sq. Around it there are many shops. You haven’t got a (2)……………..for your
camera? There is a chemist’s (3)……………..the bank and the hotel.
If you are thirsty, there is a pink bar, “The 7 Dwarfs”, (4)……………..the bank. But if you are
(5)……………… and you want a big sandwich or a complete meal, just cross Castle Road
and go to the restaurant (6)……………….. the hotel.
(7)………………it there’s a multi-screen cinema, where you can see six different Disney
cartoons here. There is a phone box (8)…………..the cinema. Can you see Peter Pan’s house?
Actually, it isn’t Peter Pan’s real house, it is a museum. It is (9) the Sleeping Beauty Castle
which is a beautiful arcade, where you can play with your friends. And it’s not difficult to
reach Fantasyland: the station is just (10)……………Peter Pan’s museum.

B. Look at the picture again. Decide whether these statements are true or false based on
the text. If the statement is false, give the correction.
TRUE FALSE
CORRECTION
1. Peter Pan’s house is a restaurant.
…………………….......
2. You can have a sandwich at the restaurant.
…………………….......
3. In the Sleeping Beauty Castle there is a museum
…………………….......
4. You can’t buy a roll of film in Fantasyland.
…………………….......
5. The restaurant is in Disney Square.
…………………….......

C. Choose the correct response.


1. What are you doing?
You are drinking a glass of milk.
I drink milk.
I’m drinking a glass of milk.
2. Do you want a sandwich?
Yes, please, I’m thirsty
Yes, please. I’m hungry.
Yes, thank you. I want a sandwich.
3. Isn’t it cold here?
Yes, can I close the window?
Yes, can I open the window?
Yes, do you open the window?
4. What time is it?
They’re four o’clock.
It is four o’clock.
It is at four.
5. I want to buy a newspaper.
Look, there’s a library over there.
Look, there’s a newsstand over there.
Look, there’s a post office over there.

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. Look at picture A and complete the telephone conversation between John and his
mother.
John Hello.
John’s mother Hello, John, what are you doing?
John (1)………………………… my homework.
John’s mother Where is Alex?
John He is (2)……………………
John’s mother What is he doing?
John He (3)…………. the dishes. the chairs are (4)…………………………… and the milk
is (5)………………………..
John’s mother Listen, I can’t find my bag. Where is it?
John It’s here, (6)………………small table, (7)………………… the TV
and the flowers.
John’s mother What are the cat and the dog doing? Where are they?
John They are (8)……………………… The dog (9) ………………under (10)
……………. and the cat (11) …………………TV.
John’s mother Is the door closed?
John (12)……………., ………………………. .
John’s mother Is the window open?
John (13)……………., ………………………. .
John’s mother Ok, John, see you later, then.

B. Look at picture B. Write a description of the messy situation of the house.

C. Write a short description of your dream house.

D. Fill in the blanks with the suitable request based on the information given.
1. I am hungry. Can I ………………………………..
2. I am thirsty. Can I …………………………………
3. I am hot. Can I …………………………………….
4. I am cold. Can I ……………………………………

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS


A. Supply the correct form of the bracketed verbs. Pay attention to the negative form.
1. What is Bob ………………. (do)? He ……………… watch) TV.
2. Is Bob ……………….. (do) his homework? No, he …………(be). He ………….. (play)
with the computer.
3. How many rooms ………………….. (be) there in your house? There ………….. (be)
four.
4. ………………. (can) you play the piano? No, I …………….. (can), but I ……………
(can) play the guitar.
5. Do you want ……………….. (buy) a roll of film?
6. …………….. (open) the window, please. It’s hot here.

B. Supply the correct preposition.


1. Germany is …………….. to French.
2. Berlin is ……………… Germany.
3. The teacher is …………….. the classroom.
4. Where are you ……………..?
5. There’s hotel ……………….. the station.
6. The film is ……………… 6:20.
7. Albert’s birthday is …………… January.
8. It’s late now. The sun is ………….. the mountains.
9. I can’t watch TV. You’re ……………….. it.
10. Look at David! He’s …………….. Claire and Simon.

C. What time is it?


1. 8:30
2. 5:45
3. 6:10
4. 12:50
5. 3:20

D. Where can you buy these things or do these activities?


1. Borrow a book ………………………………
2. Buy a roll of film ………………………………
3. Buy some aspirins ………………………………
4. Learn ………………………………
5. Buy a video game ………………………………
6. Take a train ………………………………
7. Buy a stamp ………………………………
8. Buy a newspaper ………………………………
9. Do keep-fit exercises ………………………………
10. Buy a book ………………………………

E. Do the crossword puzzle below. How do you say these numbers?

CULTURAL AWARENESS
What is a “chemist”?
How do we accept or refuse an offer?

EXAMINATION PRACTICE
Play a role play between an examiner and a candidate. Make the dialogue based on the
given situations below.
A. Introduction. The examiner greets the candidate and asks several personal questions.
Make the dialogue and practice it with your partner.
• Give greeting
• Asking names and surnames
• Asking age
• Asking address
• Asking about the candidate’s place of stay
• Asking about the objects in the candidate’s place of stay
• Asking the activities of the candidate’s family

C. Description. Look at the picture. The examiner asks some questions about the
situation in the picture. Make the dialogue and use -WH questions such as what, where,
etc and YES/NO questions. You can use the guideline example below.
• Asking what the people in the picture are doing
• Asking about the candidate’s ability in playing musical instruments

C. Closing. This is the end of the dialogue between the examiner and the candidate
where they are parting. Make the closing of the dialogue. Before that, mention about the
situation concerning senses such as hot, cold, etc and the requests relevant to the
situation.
• The examiner gives salutation
• The candidate gives the response.
KEY TO TESTS
TEST 1
LISTENING TEST
A. 1. Elizabeth Jones
2. 11
3. English
4. London
5. William
6. photographer
7. Mary
8. teacher
9. tennis
10. a cat and a dog

B. 1. It’s 8 o’clock
2. It’s 5 o’clock
3. It’s 11 o’clock
4. It’s 3 o’clock
5. It’s 7 o’clock
ORAL PRODUCTION
Open answer.

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
B. Example answer
My name is Paola. I’m from Genoa. I’m eleven years old. My birthday is in April. My
favourite colour is blue.

READING COMPREHENSION
1. Peter
2. Robert Smith
3. London
4. July 12, 2001
5. Yes, he is
6. With his friend, John
7. In a hotel in Grovel Street
8. The weather is good
9. He thinks that London is beautiful
10. In Oxford

TEST 2 (UNITS 1A-1C)


LISTENING TEST
A 1. Robert Nixon / Canadian / Toronto
2. Angela Mills / Australian / Sydney
B. 1. B. Mr Green
2. B. In the Media Room
3. A. A teacher
4. C. On the chair
5. A. 020-8347- 5586

Tape-script
Dialogue 1
Angela Hello, my name’s Angela. What’s your name?
Robert Robert.
Angela Where are you from, Robert?
Robert I’m from Toronto.
Angela Oh, you’re Canadian.
Robert Yes, I am. Where are you from, Angela?
Angela I’m from Sydney. I’m Australian.

Dialogue 2
Robert Who’s that man, Angela?
Angela Who? The man in the Media Room?
Robert Yes.
Angela Oh, that’s Mr Green. He’s the drums teacher.
Robert Oh, I see.
Angela Well, I have to go now.
Robert Don’t forget your sax.
Angela Oh, thanks. Where is it?
Robert It’s on the chair. Angela!
Angela Yes?
Robert What’s your telephone number in London?
Angela 020 – 8347 5586.
Robert Thanks.

ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Example dialogue:
A: Hello!
B: Hi!
A: What’s your name?
B: My name’s (Sam). And what’s your name?
A: I’m (Linda).
B: Where are you from, (Linda)?
A: I’m from (Rome). And you? Are you (Spanish)?
B: No, I’m not. I’m (Germany). What’s your telephone number?
A: It’s (0335 77292). What’s your telephone number?
B: It’s (88129837).
B. Example dialogue:
A: Look! That’s (Paul Hullock)!
B: Who’s he?
A: He’s a (singer).
B: Where is he from?
A: He’s from (Bristol).
B: Where’s (Bristol)?
A: It’s in (England). (Paul) is (English).
B: Where is (Paul) now?
A: He’s (at the bus stop).

C. Example dialogue
A: Hello, (Marco)!
B: Hi! This is Sandra.
C: Hello!
A: Hello! My name’s (Paulo). Are you from (London)?
C: No, I’m from Toronto. I’m Canadian. Are you (English)?
A: No, I’m not. I’m (Italian). Are you a (teacher)?
C: No, I’m an (actress). Are you a (student)?
A: Yes, I am.

D. Example dialogue:
A: Where are the books?
B: They are in the school bag.
A: Where’s the ruler?
B: It’s on the desk.
A: Where’ the blue pen?
B: It’s under the exercise-book.

E. Put the pens on the desk.


Put the rubber under the chair.
Take two books.
Give me the books.
Take a red pen and put it under the book.

READING COMPREHENSION
A. 1. False
2. True
3. False
4. True
5. False
6. False
7. False
8. False
9. True

B. 1. She’s in Room 6.
2. No, she isn’t.
3. She’s at the piano lesson.
4. They’re in Room 1.
5. We’re Canadian.
6. Yes, it is.
7. Good morning, Mrs Wilson!

C. 1. The odd one out is newsstand because it is not a school thing;


2. The odd one out is film because it is not a place;
3. The odd one out is bus because it is not a colour;
4. The odd one out is sax because it is not a number.

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. Possible dialogue
Your brother Hello.
You Hello, (Mark). This is (Simon). Where are you?
Your brother I’m at the pub with Kathy.
You Who’s Kathy?
Your brother She’s a friend.
You Where’s she from.
Your brother She’s from Sydney. She’s Australian.
You Is my guitar at home?
Your brother No, it isn’t.
You Where is it?
Your brother It’s at school, in Room 8.
You Where are John and Eddy?
Your brother They’re at the cinema.
You OK, bye.
Your brother Bye, Simon.

B. Example dialogue
You Hello! Are you George Clooney?
George Clooney Yes, I am. Hi!
You Where are you from?
George Clooney I’m from Hollywood. I’m American.
You Are you an actor?
George Clooney Yes, I am.
You What’s your phone number?
George Clooney It’s 001 662 472 7599

C. Example
NAME Giulia
SURNAME Bergomi
CITY Milan
NATIONALITY Italian
PHONE 02 2887345
OCCUPATION Student
SCHOOL NAME Leopardi
ENGLISH TEACHER Mrs Rossi
BEST FRIEND Alice

D. Example
In my class there are twenty desks and one blackboard. There is a teacher, Mrs Giusti. There
are twelve girls and eight boys. The school bags are under the desks and the books are in the
school bags. There are three windows but there isn’t a computer.

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS


A. 1. aren’t / are
2. are
3. Are / ‘m
4. Is / isn’t
5. ‘s
6. are

B. 1. He;
2. She;
3. It;
4. They;
5. you;
6. We;
7. you.

C. 1. B. Who
2. A. This
3. C. my
4. B. Where
5. C. three blue pens
6. C. is there
7. C. Give
8. B. an

D. Possible questions:
1. Where are you from?
2. Who’s he?
3. Are you American? / Are you from New York?
4. What’s your telephone number?
5. Where’s (Bristol)?
6. Where’s (John) from?
7. Where are (my books)?
8. Where’s my (pen)?
9. Is there a computer in your classroom?
10. Is (Linda) Scottish?

E. Crossword Puzzle

CULTURAL AWARENESS
Possible answers
1. Hello! Hi!
2. In English we say “Hello” while in Indonesia we say “Halo”. Sometimes in Indonesia in
formal situation, the person who answers the phone says the telephone number.
3. We give greetings like “Good morning” or “Good evening” to people to show courtesy
and respect. For example, “Good morning, Ms Jones”.

EXAMINATION PRACTICE
A. Example dialogue
Examiner Hello.
Candidate Good morning (Mr Brown).
Examiner How are you?
Candidate Very well, thank you.
Examiner What’s you name?
Candidate My name’s (Riccardo Bernardini).
Examiner Where are you from?
Candidate I’m from (Perugia). I’m (Italian).
Examiner What’s your telephone number?
Candidate It’s (0349 557 332).

B. Examiner Take two pens.


Put the pens under the book.
Give me the book.

C. Example dialogue
Examiner Look at number 1. What’s his name? Who’s he?
Candidate He’s Mr Rogers.
Examiner Is he (English)?
Candidate No, he isn’t.
Examiner Where is he from?
Candidate He’s from New York. He’s American.
Examiner Is Mr Rogers a teacher?
Candidate Yes, he is.
Examiner Look at number 2 and 3. Whoa re they? What are their names?
Candidate They are Sarra and Matteo.
Examiner Where are they from?
Candidate They’re from Italy.
Examiner Is Sarra from rome?
Candidate Yes, she is.
Examiner Is Matteo from Rome?
Candidate No, he isn’t.
Examiner Is there a computer?
Candidate Yes, there is.
Examiner Are there five chairs?
Candidate No, there aren’t. There are four chairs.
Examiner Where is the ruler?
Candidate It’s on the desk.
Examiner Where is the pencil case?
Candidate It’s on the chair.
Examiner Is there a poster?
Candidate Yes, there is.
Examiner What is there on the poster?
Candidate There is a map of Great Britain.

D. Examiner Thank you, (Riccardo). Good bye.


Candidate Good bye, (Mr Brown).

TEST 3 (UNITS 2-4)


LISTENING TEST 2
1. A. the guitar
2. B. Kevin
3. C. Myles
4. B. 11
5. A. in October
6. C. Swinton Street
7. B. 7543 8904
8. C. Monday, Tuesday, and Friday
9. A. at half past four
10. C. at half past five

Tape-script
Kevin Good morning. I’m here for the guitar course.
Woman Oh, yes. What’s your name, please?
Kevin Kevin Myles.
Woman How do you spell your surname, Kevin?
Kevin M-Y-L-E-S. Myles with (y).
Woman OK. Myles. And how old are you?
Kevin I’m eleven. Today it’s my birthday.
Woman really? Happy birthday! So your birthday is in October.
Kevin Yes.
Woman Where do you live, Kevin? I mean, what’s your address?
Kevin I live here, in London, at 21 Swinton Street.
Woman How do you spell Swinton? S-W-I-N-T-O-N?
Kevin Yes. S-W-I-N-T-O-N.
Woman And your telephone number, please.
Kevin My phone number? It’s 7543 8904.
Woman 7543 8904. Right! Now Kevin, the lessons are on Monday, Tuesday, and
Friday at half past four in the afternoon.
Kevin Ok Monday, Tuesday, and Friday at half past four. Excuse me, what time do
lessons end?
Woman At five thirty. Lessons last one hour. OK?
Kevin Yes. Thank you. Bye-bye!
Woman Bye, Kevin!
ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Example dialogue
A: What’s your name? What’s your surname?
B: My name’s Alessandra and my surname’s Nazzari.
A: How do you spell Nazzari?
B: N-A-Z-Z-A-R-I.
A: How old are you?
B: I’m 11.
A: When’s your birthday?
B: It’s in April.
A: Where do you live?
B: I live in Via Buonarroti 14.
A: How do you spell “Buonarroti”?
B: B-U-O-N-A-R-R-O-T-I.
A: OK, fine.

B. Example dialogue
A: Who’s (he)?
B: He’s my (brother)?
A: How old is (he)?
B: He’s (18).
A: Where does (he) live?
B: (He) lives in (England).
A: When is (his) birthday?
B: It’s in (November).

C. Example dialogue
A: What time does Linda get up?
B: She gets up at seven thirty.
A: What does she do at a quarter past eight?
B: She goes to school.
A: Does she do her homework at a quarter past four?
B: Yes, she does.
D. Example dialogue
A: What time do you get up?
B: I get up at seven o’clock.
A: Do you go to school by car?
B: No, I don’t. I go to school by bus.

E. Example:
Linda gets up at half past seven. I get up at seven. I don’t go to school by bus. I go by car. she
does her homework at three o’clock. Linda and I have dinner at eight o’clock, etc.

READING COMPREHENSION
A. Picture C
B. 1. True
2. False
3. False
4. False
5. Doesn’t say
6. True
7. Doesn’t say
8. False
9. True
10. Doesn’t say

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. 1. He’s a clown.
2. Paul gets up at 4 o’clock. Then, he washes. At five he dresses and at a quarter past
five he has breakfast. At six he takes a bus to work. He’s a clown.

B. Example:
In Mark’s room there is a guitar but there isn’t a sax. In Bob’s room there are two boxes, in
Mark’s room there is one box. They both have a cat, but Bob’s cat is black, Mark’s cat is
white. They have a computer. They have two books. Bob has got three glasses, Mark has got
four glasses. In Bob’s room there is one poster, in Mark’s room there are two posters. It’s their
birthday today, they have a present. It is half past three in picture A but it is three o’clock in
picture B.

C. Example:
This is my family: my father Giovanni, my mother Anna, my sister Silvia and my brother
Federico.
We live in Venice. My father is 39 years old, his birthday is in July. He gets up at seven and
goes to work by bus, etc.

LANGUAGE STUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS


A. 1. do you get up
2. Do you have
3. don’t like
4. do you go
5. takes
6. Have you got
7. are
8. is
9. is
10. Take

B. 1. This
2. That
3. That
4. This

C. 2. two buses
3. five flowers
4. two photos
5. three boxes
6. six glasses

D. 2. Monday
3. Tuesday
3. Wednesday
4. Thursday
5. Friday
6. Saturday

E. 1. Half past eight


2. A quarter to four
3. A quarter past six
4. Seven o’clock
5. Nine o’clock

F. Possible answers:
1. A: How old are you?
B: I’m twelve.
2. A: What time is the tennis lesson?
B: It’s a quarter to five.
3. A: Excuse me, what time is it?
B: It’s a quarter past nine.
4. A: Do you go to school by bus?
B: Yes, I do. / No, I don’t.
5. A: Have you got any brothers or sisters?
B: Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.

G. Crossword Puzzle

CULTURAL AWARENESS
1. English language has 26 alphabets and Indonesian has 26 too.
2. English and Indonesian language have the same alphabets.
3. We say twenty-one in English. In Indonesian we say dua puluh satu or sometimes just dua
satu in informal situation.
4. The verb “be” is similar in meaning with Indonesian words adalah, ialah, yaitu.

EXAMINATION PRACTICE
A. Example dialogue
Examiner Hello!
Candidate Hello, (Mrs Jones).
Examiner How are you?
Candidate Fine, thank you. And you?
Examiner Very well, thanks. What’s your surname? And your first name?
Candidate My name’s (Luca) and my surname is (Conti).
Examiner How do you spell your surname?
Candidate C-O-N-T-I.
Examiner How old are you?
Candidate I’m (eleven).
Examiner Where do you live?
Candidate I live (in Via Roma 15).
Examiner Have you got any brothers or sister?
Candidate (Yes, I have one brother).
Examiner What’s (his) name? How old is (he)?
Candidate My brother’s name is (Stefano). He is (seventeen).
Examiner Do you go to school by bus?
Candidate Yes, I do.
Examiner What times do lessons start? And what time do they end?
Candidate Lessons start at (half past eight) and they end at (a quarter past one).
Examiner What time do you have lunch?
Candidate I have lunch at (a quarter to two).
Examiner Do you watch TV or do your homework in the afternoon?
Candidate I do my homework and then I watch TV.
Examiner What time do you have dinner?
Candidate I have dinner at (half past eight).
Examiner Have you got a pet?
Candidate Yes, I have (a cat).
Examiner What’s its name? How old is it?
Candidate Its name is (Felix) and it’s (three).
Examiner When’s your birthday?
Candidate It’s in (August).
Examiner What day is tomorrow?
Candidate It’s (Tuesday).
B. Example dialogue
Examiner Who are the people in the pictures?
Candidate They are the greens.
Examiner Where do they live?
Candidate They live at 27 Notting Hill Road, in London.
Examiner Look at picture 1. Does Alice go to school by bus?
Candidate No, she doesn’t. She goes to school by car.
Examiner What time do lessons start?
Candidate Lessons start at eight o’clock.
Examiner Look at picture 2. What time Alice does Alice do her homework?
Candidate She does her homework at four o’clock.
Examiner has she got a cat?
Candidate Yes, she has.
Examiner What time does she have dinner?
Candidate She has dinner at eight o’clock with her family.
Examiner Has she got any brothers or sisters?
Candidate No, she hasn’t.

C. Example dialogue
Examiner What time is it?
Candidate it’s (half past ten).
Examiner Oh, it’s late. Good bye, (Luca).
Candidate Good bye, (Mrs Jones).

TEST 4 (UNITS 5-7)


LISTENING TEST 3
Build: tall / thin
Hair: blond
Eyes: green
Ears: big
Nose: small
Mouth: large
Distinguishing marks: moustache
Type of clothing: brown jacket and dark green trousers

Tape-script
To all the police stations and police cars in London. This is a description of one of the robbers
who robbed a bank in Oxford Street yesterday. He’s a man in his twenties, tall and thin with
blond hair and green eyes. He’s got big ears, a small nose, and a large mouth. He’s got a big
moustache, apparently false, and is wearing a brown jacket and dark green trousers. Anybody
who sees him repot immediately to the nearest police station…..

ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Example
I am tall and thin, I have got brown eyes and dark hair, my ears are big and my nose is small. I
have got a pair of blue jeans and a white T-shirt.

B. Possible dialogue
A: Who’s that (girl)?
B: Where’s (she)?
A: She’s over there. She has (a white T-shirt and black trousers).
B: She’s (Kate).
A: Isn’t she (fat)?
B: Yes, she is. Look that (girl)! Isn’t she (Sarah)?
A: Where’s (she)?
B: She’s (near Kate). She’s short and fat.
A: Oh, yes, that’s (Sarah)! She has (white trousers and a black T-shirt).

C. Simon likes cats, dogs and tortoises, but he doesn’t like parrots, goldfish, canaries and
hamsters. Rachel likes cats, dogs, goldfish, canaries, and hamsters, but she doesn’t like parrots
and tortoises. Simon has got a cat and a tortoise. Rachel has got a dog, a goldfish, and a
hamster.

Example dialogue
A: Do you like hamsters?
B: Yes, I do. / No, I don’t.
A: Have you got a hamster?
B: Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.

D. Stand up!
Sit down!
Touch your nose!
Touch your right leg!
point to teacher!
Play the trumpet!
Go to the door!
Open it! Close it!
Put your hands on your head!
Say “Bye-bye”!

READING COMPREHENSION
A. 1. Nick
2. Eric
3. Speedy
4. Sarah
5. Lucky
6. Fatty
7. Margaret

B. 1. Hamster
2. Cat
3. Tortoise

C. Open answer
D. 1. The odd one out is cap because it is not a part of the body.
2. The odd one out is elephant because it is not a pet (it’s an animal).

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. Example
This is me at a fancy dress party. I have a big nose and a big mouth, big ears, and long hair. I
have big hands. I have got a small cap and a trumpet, a large black jacket and black and white
trousers. And . . . I am a clown.

B. Example
My best friend is Paolo. He is twelve years old. He lives in Naples with his mother, father and
his sister. his telephone number is 081 6388242. His address is Piazza Repubblica 14. He is
short and thin. He has brown hair and blue eyes. He has got three dogs and five cats. He likes
pets. He plays the drums in the afternoon but he doesn’t like school!

C. Possible dialogue
Your mother Where is your blue T-shirt?
You It’s in the school bag.
Your mother Take it and put it on the chair.
You OK, the T-shirt is on the blue chair now.
Your mother Have you got your black shoes?
You No, I haven’t. They’re under the table.
Your mother Take the shoes and put them in the box.
You OK.
Your mother Show me your hands. Go and wash them!

D. Possible description
My dog doesn’t eat dog food. He eats my breakfast.
My dog doesn’t listen to me. He listens to music.

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTION


A. 1. Her
2. our
3. their
4. my
5. his
6. your
7. your
8. Its
B. 1. there
2. This
3. those
4. these
5. here
6. that
C. 1. He
2. me
3. her
4. you
5. he
6. It
7. They
8. them
9. you
10. us
11. We

D. Possible dialogues:
A: I like cats / school / tennis.
B: I like them / it too.
A: I don’t like football / video games.
B: I don’t like it / them, either.

E. Crossword Puzzle

CULTURAL AWARENESS
1. Verb “like” in English can be used to express our likes/dislikes towards objects, animal, and
people.
2. Animal means animal in general, are not domesticated and not kept by people (as pets are).

EXAMINATION PRACTICE
A. Example dialogue
Examiner Hello!
Candidate Good afternoon, (Mrs Jackson)!
Examiner How are you?
Candidate Very well, thank you? How are you?
Examiner Fine, thank you. What’s your name?
Candidate My name’s (Michelle).
Examiner What’s your surname?
Candidate It’s (Silvestrini).
Examiner How old are you?
Candidate I’m twelve.
Examiner Do you like (dogs)?
Candidate (Yes, I do).
Examiner Have you got any pets?
Candidate Yes, I have a (parrot).
Examiner What colour is it?
Candidate It’s (blue, green, and yellow).
Examiner What’s his name?
Candidate His name’s (Lillo).
Examiner Who’s your best friend?
Candidate My best friend is (Andrea).
Examiner Describe (him).
Candidate (He is tall and fat. He has blond long hair and green eyes. He lives in Padua but
he is from Termoli. He plays the sax. he likes music, etc.).

B. Example
Examiner Stand up!; Go to the window!; Open and close it!; Touch your right leg!;
Touch your left ear!

C. Example dialogue
Examiner Look at the picture! Who’s that boy?
Candidate He’s Sam.
Examiner Has he got a white T-shirt?
Candidate No, he hasn’t. He has a black T-shirt.
Examiner What is there in his room?
Candidate There is a computer and two posters, a guitar and a school bag. etc.
Examiner Where is the guitar?
Candidate It’s on the bed.
Examiner Is Sam tall and thin?
Candidate No, he isn’t. He’s short and fat.
Examiner Does he like music?
Candidate Yes, he does.
Examiner What sport does he like?
Candidate He likes tennis.
Examiner Has he got a guitar?
Candidate Yes, he has.
Examiner And what about you have you got a guitar?
Candidate Yes, I have. / No, I haven’t.
Examiner Do you play it? / What do you play? / What music do you like?
Candidate Yes, I do. / I play rock music. / I like pop and rock music.

D. Example dialogue
Examiner Ok, bye, (Michele).
Candidate Good bye, (Mrs Jackson).

TEST 5
LISTENING TEST 4
1. False: Kathy lives at 99, Charles Road.
2. False: Her house is next to Mick’s house.
3. True.
4. False: Bus number 85 stops here.
5. True.
6. False: There are three rooms downstairs.
7. True.
8. False: Kathy can’t play the piano.
9. False: In Kathy’s bedroom there is a computer.
10. True.
11. False: It’s ten to seven.
12. True.
13. False: She is having dinner in the kitchen.
14. False: She is having dinner with her mother and with her father.
15. False: She is having fish with some vegetables.

Tape-script
Kathy lives at 99, Charles Road. Her house is next to Mick’s house. Just opposite her house
there is a bus stop. Bus number 85 stops there. Her house is quite large. She has got three
bedrooms, a toilet and a bathroom upstairs and three rooms downstairs: the kitchen, the living
room, and the dining room. In the living room there is a piano. Kathy's mother can play it
but Kathy can't. Kathy can't play any instrument but she can use a computer. There is a
computer in her bedroom. There is also a garden on the back of the house and a small
garage.
Now, it's ten to seven in the afternoon and Kathy is having dinner. She is in the kitchen with
her mother and father. They are having some fish with vegetables. Kathy is drinking water.

ORAL PRODUCTION
A. Example
This is Mr and Mrs Green’s house. Downstairs there is the hall and two rooms: the kitchen
and the living room. Upstairs there are three rooms: two bedrooms and the bathroom. Mr
Green is in the kitchen and he is washing the dishes. Mrs Green is in the living room and she
is reading the newspaper. Mark is in his bedroom and he is playing the drums. Susan is in the
bathroom and she is washing her hair. A cat is drinking milk in the kitchen.

B. Example
(Mark) Hello.
You Hello, (Mark). This is (Luca). Where are you?
(Mark) I’m in (my bedroom).
You What are you doing?
(Mark) I’m (playing the drum).

C. Example
A: I want (to buy a stamp). Where can I buy a stamp?
B: You can buy it in a (post office).
A: Where’s a (post office)?
B: It’s (opposite the chemist’s / next to the bookshop).
D. Example
A: Look at the clown in picture 1. He’s dancing. Can you dance?
B: Yes, I can. / No, I can’t. Can you?
A: Yes, I can. / No, I can’t.

READING COMPREHENSION
A. 1. square
2. a roll of film
3. between
4. near
5. hungry
6. opposite
7. Next to
8. in front of
9. next to
10. behind

B. 1. False. It’s a museum.


2. True.
3. False. There is an arcade.
4. False. You can buy it at the chemist’s in Disney Square.
5. False. It’s in Castle Road.

C. 1. C. I’m drinking a glass of milk.


2. B. Yes, please. I’m hungry.
3. A. Yes. Can I close the window?
4. B. It’s four o’clock.
5. B. Look, there’s a newsstand over there.

WRITTEN PRODUCTION
A. 1. I’m doing.
2. in the kitchen
3. is washing
4. on the table
5. on the fridge
6. on the
7. between
8. sleeping
9. is / is sleeping
10. the table
11. Is / is sleeping on the
12. Yes, it is
13. Yes, it is

B. Example
John isn’t doing his homework, he’s watching TV. Alex isn’t washing the dishes, he is eating
a big sandwich. The milk is not on the fridge, it’s on the floor, and the cat is drinking it. The
dog isn’t sleeping under the table, it’s eating a chicken. The chairs aren’t on the table, the door
is open and the window is closed. The bag isn’t on the small table, it’s under the table.
C. Example
The house of my dreams has got two floors. Downstairs there is a hall, a big kitchen, a living
room, and a dining room. There is a toilet next to the living room. Upstairs there are six
bedrooms, a playroom, and three bathrooms. My house has got a big garden with trees and
flowers and a garage. There is also a swimming pool.

D. Possible answers:
1. I’m hungry. Can I have (a sandwich)?
2. I’m thirsty. Can I have (a glass of water)?
3. I’m hot. Can I open the window? / Can you open the window?
4. I’m cold. Can I close the window? / Can you close the window?

LANGUAGE STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS


A. 1. doing; is watching
2. doing; isn’t; is playing
3. are; are
4. Can; can’t; can
5. to buy
6. Open

B. 1. next
2. in
3. in
4. from
5. near / opposite
6. at
7. in
8. behind
9. in front of
10. between / with

C. 1. Library
2. Chemist’s
3. Chemist’s
4. School
5. Arcade
6. Station
7. Post office
8. Newsstand
9. Gym
10. Bookshop

E. Crossword puzzle

CULTURAL AWARENESS
1. Shop
2. If we accept an offer, we say “yes, please”. If we refuse an offer, we say “no, thank you”.

EXAMINATION PRACTICE
A. Example dialogue
Examiner Hello.
Candidate Good morning (Mr Kenny).
Examiner How are you?
Candidate Very well, thank you. And you?
Examiner I’m very well too, thank you. What’s your name and surname?
Candidate My name’s (Matteo) and my surname is (Rossi).
Examiner How old are you?
Candidate I’m twelve.
Examiner Where do you live? What’s your address?
Candidate I live in (Salerno) in Viale della Liberta 14.
Examiner Do you live in a flat?
Candidate Yes, I do.
Examiner how many rooms are there?
Candidate There are (four rooms - a kitchen, a living room, and two bedrooms – and a
toilet).
Examiner How many televisions have you got?
Candidate I have got three televisions.
Examiner Where are they?
Candidate One is in the (kitchen), one is in the (living room) and one in (my parents
bedroom).
Examiner What colour is the bathroom?
Candidate It’s (blue and green).
Examiner Is there a table in the kitchen?
Candidate Yes, there is. / No, there isn’t
Examiner Where are your mother and your brother now?
Candidate My mother is (at home) and my brother is (at school).
Examiner What’s your mother doing?
Candidate My mother is (cooking).
Examiner Where do you go to buy (a stamp / a newspaper / a shampoo, etc)?
Candidate I go to a (post office / newsstand / chemist’s).

B. Example dialogue
Examiner Look at the picture! Where are the people?
Candidate They are in the street.
Examiner What are they doing?
Candidate Two people are dancing, two are playing basketball, one is speaking Spanish
and two are listening. A boy is playing the trumpet.
Examiner Can you dance? / play the trumpet? / speak Spanish? / play basketball?
Candidate Yes, I can. / No, I can’t.

C. Example dialogue
Candidate I’m cold. Can I close the window?
Examiner Yes, you can.
Candidate Thank you.
Examiner OK, Matteo. The exam is over.
Candidate Good bye, Mr Kenny.