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SỞ GD – ĐT QUẢNG NAM KỲ THI OLYMPIC KHU VỰC DH - ĐBBB

TRƯỜNG THPT CHUYÊN NĂM HỌC 2018 - 2019


NGUYỄN BỈNH KHIÊM ĐỀ THI MÔN: TIẾNG ANH 10

ĐỀ ĐỀ NGHỊ Thời gian: 180 phút (không kể thời gian giao đề)
(Đề thi có17 trang)
A. LISTENING. (50 points)
HƯỚNG DẪN PHẦN THI NGHE HIỂU
 Bài nghe gồm 4 phần, mỗi phần được nghe 2 lần, mỗi lần cách nhau 15 giây, mở đầu và kết
thúc mỗi phần nghe có tín hiệu
 Mở đầu và kết thúc bài nghe có tín hiệu nhạc.
 Mọi hướng dẫn cho thí sinh (bằng tiếng Anh) đã có trong bài nghe.
Part 1. Complete the form below using NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A
NUMBER for each answer. Write your answers in the space provided. (10pt)

PET PROTECT UK
PET DETAILS
Type of pet: dog
Pet’s name: (1) …………………
Pet’s D.O.B: May 19, 2013
For Dogs Only:
Is the dog a guide dog? ……..No…….
Has the dog been neutered? (2) ……………..
Type of dog: (3) ……………….
CUSTOMER DETAILS
Name: Peter (4) …………….
Address: (5) ………………………, NW8 3HD

Your answers:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

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Part 2.You will hear three people discussing a film they have just seen at the cinema
(Wendy, Mrs. Turner and Adrian). Listen carefully and choose the best answer A, B or C
for each question. Write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided. (10
points)
1. What did Wendy’s mum think of the film?
A. It was not her favourite film.
B. She loved the film.
C. She absolutely hated it.
2. Adrian mentions doing a course in order to show that ________.
A. he wants to change the subject
B. Mrs. Turner is wrong about the dinosaurs
C. he knows what he is talking about
3. Adrian feels that watching a film at home ______.
A. is always better than going to the cinema
B. is not something he wants to do again
C. has advantages and disadvantages
4. When Adrian suggests that Wendy was frightened, she _______.
A. admits that she felt scared
B. denies that she felt scared
C. complains about the length of the film
5. What do Wendy and her mum disagree about?
A. whether or not the film was frightening
B. whether or not Wendy covered her eyes
C. whether or not the film is P.G. rated
Your answers:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Part 3. You will hear an interview with a woman called Jane talking about her exciting
story of survival at sea, against all the odds, and decide whether the following sentences
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are true (T) or false (F). Write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes
provided. (10 points)
1. Jane was sailing from Panama and had completed about a thousand miles.
2. Jane's boat hit a surface obstruction.
3. Jane could have used the GPS to call for help.
4. Jane wasn't concerned about her food rations.
5. Jane didn't panic because she didn't consider herself in danger.
Your answers:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Part 4. You will hear an interview with a woman called Sophie Doyle, who organizes
adventure holidays in Australia for teenagers. Listen carefully and complete the following
sentences with NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS AND/OR A NUMBER. Write your
answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided. (20 points)
AUSTRALIAN ADVENTURE HOLIDAYS
The Australian Adventure Holiday is usually in the month of (1) ………………………….
In each group, there are (2) ……………………… teenagers plus four leaders.
The price covers everything except (3) ………………………….
When they visit the islands, they will sleep in a (4) ……………………
They will first meet the other young people at the (5) ……………………..
They will visit the largest (6) ……………………. island in the world.
They will sleep next to a (7) ………………….. when they are in the outback.
At the Great Barrier Reef, (8) …………………….. will be available for those who need
them.
From the boat on the river, you will see (9) …………………. on the banks.
Teenagers normally stay in touch with people at home by (10) ……………………
Your answers
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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B. LEXICO – GRAMMAR. (50pts)
Part 1. Choose the best option A, B, C, or D to complete the following sentences and write
your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes. (20 pts)
1. The sculpture is worth an ...........................₤ 10 million.
A. evaluated B. appreciated C. estimated D. assessed
2. At first .............................., they look like photos, but they're actually drawings.
A. glimpse B. glance C. view D. gaze
3. Our town has a real problem with youth crime, ........................ do may other British towns.
A. so B. as C. like D. nor
4. The soloist .......................... her success on a series of acclaimed concerts.
A. manufactured B. composed C. built D. assembled
5. The .......................... buildings in town are nearly a thousand years old.
A. historic B. elderly C. historical D. outdated
6. I will use this example to ................................... my point.
A. illustrate B. sketch C. depict D. portray
7. If he accepted the promotion it would involve him being ................................... to the head
offices in France.
A. transported B. transformed C. transferred D. transmitted
8. Although she had never used a word-processor before, she soon got the ..................... of it.
A. touch B. swing C. hang D. feel
9. The manager requested that all staff ............................. present at the meeting.
A. have been B. be C. being D. are being
10. There has been a lot of .............................. surrounding the government's propose scheme.
A. consequence B. controversy C. conformity D. consent
11. He worked at a car factory and usually .............................. at 7:30 every morning.
A. called the shots B. opened an account C. signed the pledge D. clocked in
12. We ............................ as well try to sell this old sofa before throwing it out.
A. should B. could C. can D. might
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13. The rent in this area are ............................. the highest in the city.
A. far from away B. far to away C. far and away D. away by far
14. The print edition of the dictionary is regularly .............................. to include new words.
A. upgraded B. renovated C. renewed D. updated
15. The police are working .......................... with the Football Association in an effort to
stamp out soccer violence.
A. hand in glove B. hand over fist C. hand in hand D. head over heals
16. In the end, the document that the tax office sent us were ............................ useless.
A. extremely B. totally C. really D. very
17. My father refused to eat meat that had been fried. He had ....................... in his bonnet
about it causing cancer.
A. a bull B. a bee C. an ant D. a bug
18. The coastguard boarded the ship and found ..................................
A. alive four men injured B. injured four men alive
C. four injured alive men D. four injured men alive
19. The traffic warden told me that he would ................................. me off with a warning this
time, but the next time I was caught driving without a license, I would have to pay a fine.
A. get B. let C. put D. see
20. News of the new pay agreement spread like ................................ through the factory.
A. the plague B. butter C. wildfire D. a flood
Your answers:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Part 2: The passage below contains 10 mistakes. Identify the mistakes and write the
corrections in the corresponded numbered boxes. (10pt)
Line
1 Desalination is the process in that excess salt and other minerals are
2 removed from water. This method is used in order for salt water to convert to fresh

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3 water so that it is suitable to both irrigation and consumption. Apart from potable
4 water, other by-products can be produced during that process, such as table salt or
5 waste of course! In recent years, a lot of research has been done in the field in
6 order to develop cost-effective ways of providing fresh water for human
7 consumption, specially in regions where it is either limited or scarce. Quite
8 recently, the United Arab Emirates had the world's largest desalination plant build,
9 which is capable of producing 300 million cubic metres of water per year.
10 However, this process cannot be characterized as particularly economic since
11 extremely large amounts of energy, special personnel and expensive infrastructure
12 are required. Furthermore, this process can affect the environment adverse. The
13 large amount of energy is consumed during the process and the greenhouse gases
14 that are emitted into the atmosphere can have a detrimental effect on the
15 environment. In addition, the plankton and the fish larvae that exist in the sea water
16 are destroying in the desalination process, and the high-temperature waste created
17 afterwards is then thrown back into the sea, leading to an increase in the
18 temperature of the sea. For this reason, waste-water treatment plants have
19 constructed as well. Apparently, whether desalination is a problem-solving or a
20 problem-causing process is still under debate.

Your answers:
Lin Mistakes Correction
e
0 1 that which
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
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10

Part 3: Complete each sentence with one suitable particle or preposition. Write your
answers in the corresponding numbered boxes provided. (10pt)
1. Everyone was taken ……………….. when the manager stood up and walked out of the
meeting.
2.We mustn’t be late tomorrow, so I expect you all to be here at 9 o’clock ……………. the
dot.
3. Antony says he felt a little dizzy when he came ……………… from the anesthetic.
4. It really got me ……………. when the doctor said I’d have to be off work for eight weeks.
5. I heard on the news that terrorists had blown a train …………….. in India.
6. Last year was the third year ………………….. succession that they had come top of the
football league.
7. I don’t know how I’m going to summon ……………. the courage to tell Dad.
8. Sales have really fallen off this year. If this goes on much longer, the company will soon
be …………… the rocks.
9. I didn’t like this CD at first, but now I’m really getting …………….. it.
10. What annoys me is that the man got ………………. with just 100 hours’ community
service.
Your answers:
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10

Part 4: Give the correct form of each bracketed word in the following passage. Write your
answers in the corresponding numbered boxes. (10pt)
Mankind’s intuition of freedom, and our (1. IDENTIFY) ………..……. of freedom
with knowledge, sets us apart from animals. The animal’s grasp of freedom is (2. SIGNIFY)
………..……. in comparison, being only the freedom to respond to external stimuli. The
nearest creature to us on the ( 3. EVOLVE) ………..……. tree of life, the chimpanzee,

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cannot retain an image for a sufficient length of time to be able to reflect on it. So animal life
is largely a matter of conditioned reflexes, performed in an (4. TERMINATE) ………..
……. present; in short, animals are more than machines with consciousness.
While the animal is carried along (5. SUBMIT) ………..……. on the stream of time,
mankind has certain capacities that (6. POWER) ………..……. us to resist the current or
look into the future. Our (7. RESOURCE) ………..……. in developing language was the
first step towards this ‘conquest of time’. Language ‘fixes’ experiences, and places the
experience of the past on an equal (8. FOOT) ………..……. with that of present.
Imagination is bound to follow, as a natural (9. PROGRESS) ………..……. from ‘labelling’
a past experience to conjuring up its (10. MIND) ………..……. image.
Your answers:
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
9 10

C. READING. (5.0pts)
Part 1. Read the following passage and decide which answer (A, B, C, or D) best fits each
gap. Write your answers in corresponding numbered boxes. (10 pt)
THE FUTURE
The environmental (1) ………………… for the future is mixed. In spite of economic
and political changes, interest in and (2) ………………….. about the environment remains
high. Problems such as acid deposition, chlorofluorocarbons and ozone (3) ………………
still require solutions and (4) ………..…… action is needed to deal with these. Until acid
depositions (5) ………….…., loss of aquatic life in northern lakes and streams will continue
and forest growth may be affected. Water pollution will remain a growing problem as an
increasing human population puts (6) ……………… stress on the environment. To reduce
environmental degradation and for humanity to save its habitat, societies (7) ………………
recognize that resources are (8) ……………… Environmentalists believe that, as
populations and their demands increase, the idea of continuous growth must (9)
……………… way to a more rational use of the environment, but that this can be only be
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brought (10) ……………… by a dramatic change in the attitude of human species.
1. A. outline B. outset C. outcome D. outlook
2. A. concern B. attention C. consideration D. responsibility
3. A. scarcity B. depletion C. lack D. decrease
4. A. concerted B. shared C. pooled D. affiliated
5. A. curtail B. wane C. diminish D. depreciate
6. A. uncounted B. undreamed C. unrelated D. untold
7. A. need B. must C. should D. may
8. A. restricted B. confined C. finite D. bounded
9. A. give B. clear C. force D. make
10. A. about B. in C. off D. on
Your answers:
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10
Part 2: Read the text below and think of the word which best fits each space. Use only
ONE word in each space. Write your answers in the corresponding numbered boxes.
(15pts)
THE FIRST NATURALISTS
There came a time, maybe 20,000 years ago, when man, instead of being merely a
hunter, started to domesticate animals. The dog helped in his hunting activities and geese and
ducks were kept and bred (1)…………….. a source of food, which was easier than (2)
…………….. to go out and hunt them. Once human had domesticated animals they (3)
…………… their attention to plants. Instead of being nomads, drifting from one place to
place following the game animals, they began to create farms and thus enter upon a more
settled way of life. Villages and towns sprang (4) …………….. in places where previously
there had been only a hamlet. Now animals and plants began to be kept (5)…………….
merely for food but also for interest’s (6)…………….. or for their beauty.
The first writers on animal life were Aristotle, in 335 BC, and Pliny, in 75 AD, but for
many hundreds of years after Pliny the subject of natural history, in (7)…………….. with

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many other areas of knowledge, hardly progressed at all. For the most part such zoos as
existed were in the hands of the dilettante nobility and were no better than second-rate
menageries, (8)…………… any scientific purpose.
However, in the seventeenth century, naturalists began to realize that they needed a
system for classifying living things (9)……………., as more plants and animals were
discovered, it was difficult to (10)……………. track of them all.
Your answers:
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
9 10

Part 3. Read the following passage and choose the best answer to each of the following
questions. Write your answers in corresponding numbered boxes. (10pt)
Almon Strowger, an American engineer, constructed the first automatic telephone
switching system, which had a horizontal, bladelike contact arm, in 1891. The first
commercial switchboard based on his invention opened in La Porte, Indiana, a year later and
was an instant success with business users. To access the system, the caller pressed buttons
to reach the desired number and turned the handle to activate the telephone ringer. During the
same year, Strowger's step-by-step call advancement technology was implemented in the
long-distance service between New York and Chicago when it proved to have the capacity of
carrying signals through cable-joint extensions.
The first actual dial telephones, patented by Lee De Forest in 1907, were installed in
Milwaukee in 1896. In 1912, their sound transmittal apparatus adapted an electronic tube to
function as an amplifier. Transatlantic radio-telephone service linked New York and London
in 1927. However, the long distance coaxial cable, which was hailed as unprecedented, came
on the scene in 1936 connecting New York and Philadelphia. The Bell Laboratories research
facility came up with the transistor to replace the cumbersome vacuum tube, thus
diminishing the size of the electronic switch system to about 10 percent of that of the

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original. Crossbar switching, installed in terminals in 1938, operated on the principle of an
electromagnetic force, which rotated horizontal and vertical bars within a rectangular frame
and brought contacts together in a split second. A technological breakthrough in the form of
undersea cables between the United States and Hawaii was implemented almost twenty years
later. An extension was connected to Japan in 1964.
1. Which of the following would be the best title for the passage?
A. A Link between Research and Technology
B. The Telephone: A Technological Fantasy
C. The Developing Sophistication of the Telephone
D. The Patent History of the Telephone
2. In line 6, the word "implemented" is closest in meaning to
A. breached B. used C. broken D. usurped
3. In line 3, the word "instant" is closest in meaning to
A. immeasurable B. impelling C. immediate D. impervious
4. It can be inferred from the passage that initially telephones
A. utilized human operators B. were limited to businesses
C. revitalized business in La Porte, Indiana D. did not have a bell
5. How did Lee De Forest improve the existing telephone?
A. He integrated the mouthpiece and the receiver.
B. He created a device to boost the reception quality.
C. He made implementation of the dial system possible.
D. He modified a pipe to transmit sound.
6. Why did Strowger's switchboard find application in long-distance lines?
A. It required the caller to activate switches.
B. It could carry connections through cable extensions.
C. It could handle a large volume of simultaneous calls.
D. It was prevalent in commercial enterprises.
7. In line 11, the word "hailed" is closest in meaning to
A. prepared B. preserved C. praised D. proposed
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8. In line 13, the word "cumbersome" is closest in meaning to
A. curious B. unyielding C. culpable D. unwieldy
9. In line 14, the phrase "that" refers to
A. the size B. the tube C. the system D. the percent
10. The author of the passage implies that telephone networks expanded because of
A. staunch public and private support B. multiple technical blunders
C. the work of a few inventions D. a series of breakthroughs
Your answers:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Part 4. Read the following extract and do the tasks that follow. (15pts)
Questions 1-6. The reading passage has seven paragraphs, A-G. Choose the most
suitable heading for paragraphs A-G from the list of headings below. Write the
appropriate numbers (i -x) in corresponding numbered boxes in boxes 1-6. (0) has been
done for you.
List of headings
i The best moment to migrate
ii The unexplained rejection of closer feeding ground
iii The influence of weather on the migration route
iv Physical characteristics that allow birds to migrate
v The main reason why birds migrate
vi The best wintering grounds for birds
vii Research findings on how birds migrate
viii Successful migration despite trouble of wind
ix Contrast between long-distance migration and short-distance migration
x Mysterious migration despite lack of teaching

0. Paragraph A ………iv……….
1. Paragraph B ………………. 2. Paragraph C ……………….
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3. Paragraph D ………………. 4. Paragraph E ……………….
5. Paragraph F ………………. 6. Paragraph G ……………..
BIRD MIGRATION
A Birds have many unique design features that enable them to perform such amazing feats
of endurance. They are equipped with lightweight, hollow bones, intricately designed
feathers providing both lift and thrust for rapid flight, navigation systems superior to any
that man has developed, and an ingenious heat conserving design that, among other
things, concentrates all blood circulation beneath layers of warm, waterproof plumage,
leaving them fit to face life in the harshest of climates. Their respiratory systems have to
perform efficiently during sustained flights at attitude, so they have a system of
extracting oxygen from their lungs that far exceeds that of any other animal. During the
later stages of the summer breeding season, when good is plentiful, their bodies are able
to accumulate considerable layers of fat, in order to provide sufficient energy for their
long migratory flights.
B The fundamental reason that birds migrate is to find adequate food during the winter
months when it is in short supply. This particularly applies to birds that breed in the
temperate and Arctic regions of the Northern Hemisphere, where food is abundant during
the short growing season. Many species can tolerate cold temperatures if food is
plentiful, but when food is not available they must migrate. However, intriguing
questions remain.
C One puzzling fact is that many birds journey much further than would be necessary just
to find food and good weather. Nobody knows, for instance, why British swallows,
which could presumably survive equally well if they spent the winter in equatorial
Africa, instead fly several thousands of miles further to their preferred winter home in
South Africa’s Cape Province. Another mystery involves the huge migrations performed
by arctic terns and mudflat-feeding shorebirds that breed close to Polar Regions. In
general, the further north a migrant species breeds, the further south it spends the winter.
For arctic terns this necessitates an annual round trip of 25,000 miles. Yet, en route to
their final destination in far-flung southern latitudes, all these individuals overfly other
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areas of seemingly suitable habitat spanning two hemispheres. While we may not fully
understand birds’ reasons for going to particular places, we can marvel at their feats.
D One of the greatest mysteries is how young birds know how to find the traditional
wintering areas without parental guidance. Very few adults migrate with juveniles in
tow, and youngsters may even have little or no inkling of their parents’ appearance. A
familiar example is that of the cuckoo, which lays its eggs in another species’ nest and
never encounters its young again. It is mind boggling to consider that, once raised by its
host species, the young cuckoo makes it own way to ancestral wintering grounds in the
tropics before returning single-handedly to northern Europe the next season to seek out a
mate among its own kind. The obvious implication is that it inherits from its parents an
inbuilt route map and direction-finding capability, as well as a mental image of what
another cuckoo looks like. Yet nobody has the slightest idea as to how this is possible.
E Mounting evidence has confirmed that birds use the positions of the sun and stars to
obtain compass directions. They seem also to be able to detect the earth’s magnetic field,
probably due to having minute crystals of magnetite in the region of their brains.
However, true navigation also requires an awareness of position and time, especially
when lost. Experiments have shown that after being taken thousands of miles over an
unfamiliar landmass, birds are still capable of returning rapidly to nest sites. Such
phenomenal powers are the product of computing a number of sophisticated cues,
including an inborn map of the night sky and the pull of the earth’s magnetic field. How
the birds use their ‘instruments’ remains unknown, but one thing is clear: they see the
world with a superior sensory perception to ours. Most small birds migrate at night and
take their direction from the position of the setting sun. However, as well as seeing the
sun go down, they also seem to see the plane of polarized light caused by it, which
calibrates their compass. Traveling at night provides other benefits. Daytime predators
are avoided and the danger of dehydration due to flying for long periods in warm, sunlit
skies is reduced. Furthermore, at night the air is generally cool and less turbulent and so
conducive to sustained, stable flight.

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F Nevertheless, all journeys involve considerable risk, and part of the skill in arriving
safely is setting off at the right time. This means accurate weather forecasting, and
utilizing favorable winds. Birds are adept at both, and, in laboratory tests, some have
been shown to detect the minute difference in barometric pressure between the floor and
ceiling of a room. Often birds react to weather changes before there is any visible sign of
them. Lapwings, which feed on grassland, flee west from the Netherlands to the British
Isles, France and Spain at the onset of a cold snap. When the ground surface freezes the
birds could starve. Yet they return to Holland ahead of a thaw, their arrival linked to a
pressure change presaging an improvement in the weather.
G In one instance a Welsh Manx shearwater carried to America and released was back in its
burrow on Skokholm Island, off the Pembrokeshire coast, one day before a letter
announcing its release! Conversely, each autumn a small number of North American birds
are blown across the Atlantic by fast-moving westerly tail winds. Not only do they arrive
safely in Europe, but, based on ringing evidence, some make it back to North America the
following spring, after probably spending the winter with European migrants in sunny
African climes.
Your answers:
0. iv 1 2 3 4 5 6

Question 7-10. Complete the sentences below using NO MORE THAN THREE
WORDS OR NUMBER from the passage. Write your answers in corresponding
numbered boxes 7-10.
7. It is a great mystery that young birds like cuckoos can find their wintering grounds
without …………………… .
8. Evidence shows birds can tell directions like a …………………… by observing the sun
and the stars.
9. One advantage for birds flying at night is that they can avoid contact with
…………………… .
10. Laboratory tests show that birds can detect weather without …………………… signs.
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Your answers:
7 8 9 10

D. WRITING (50 pts)


Part 1. Finish each of the following sentences in such a way that it means exactly the
same as the sentence printed before it. There is an example at the beginning (0). (10pt)
(0): Why don’t we have a picnic this weekend?” said Andy. HAVING
 Andy suggested having a picnic that weekend
1. I’m sure I know the answer and I’ll remember it in just a moment. TIP
 The answer is ………………………………………………………….…..
2. Sam tried extremely hard to convince her. LENGTHS
Sam ……………………………………………………………………… ...
3. The government’s policy has been strongly criticized recently. COME
 The government’s policy has ……………………………………….………
4. He wants to challenge the world champion. INTENT
 He …………………………………………………………………………...
5. I succeeded in persuading Joe not to quit her job. TALK
 I managed ……………………………………………………………….…..
Part 2. Finish each of the following sentences in such a way that it means exactly the
same as the sentence printed before it. There is an example at the beginning (0). (10
points)
0. I haven’t seen him for two years
 The last time I saw him was two years ago.
6. As soon as he opened the door, his wife rushed into his arms.
 Hardly ……………………………………………………….
7. Richard is not suitable for this job, in spite of his being very clever.
 Clever ………………………………………………………….……….….
8. It was Walter Raleigh who introduced potatoes and tobacco into England.
 The English owed …………………………………………………..………
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9. I was not surprised to hear that Harry had failed his driving test.
 It came ………………………….………………………………………..…
10. The only thing that prevented the passing of the bill was the death of the Prime Minister.
 Had …………………………………………………………………………………..…
Part 3: Write a paragraph of about 200-250 words on the following topics. (30 points)
All inventions and discoveries like the discovery of fire and electricity have impacts on our
lives so much that people can no longer live without them. To what extent do you agree or
disagree? Give reasons and specific examples to support your answer.
--------- The End ---------

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